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By Zeus! (Greeks return to paganism)
Guardian ^ | February 1, 2007

Posted on 02/07/2007 8:11:30 AM PST by NYer

It was high noon when Doreta Peppa, a woman with long, dark locks and owlish eyes, entered the Sanctuary of Olympian Zeus. At first, tourists visiting the Athenian temple thought they had stumbled on to a film set. It wasn't just that Peppa cut a dramatic figure with her flowing robes and garlanded hair. Or that she seemed to be in a state of near euphoria. Or even that the group of men and women accompanying her - dressed as warriors and nymphets in kitsch ancient garb - appeared to have stepped straight out of the city's Golden Age.

To the astonishment of onlookers, Peppa also began babbling Orphic hymns, before thrusting her arms upwards into the Attic skies and proceeding, somewhat deliriously, to warble her love for the gods of Mount Olympus. But, then, for the motley group of modern pagans coalesced around the temple's giant Corinthian columns, this was a special moment. Not since the late fourth century AD, when the newly Christian Roman state outlawed all forms of pagan worship, had a high priestess officiated on the sacred site.

Armed with white doves, Peppa, a former advertising executive, was not going to hold back - even if it meant defying the furious Greek officials and riot police gathered at the second-century temple's gates, unwilling to stop the ceremony for fear of provoking a violent confrontation. "Sixteen and a half centuries is a very long time to wait," she said. "After so many years of Christian persecution we were finally able to call on Zeus, our king-god, to bring peace to the world ahead of the [2008] Olympics. For us, it was a very, very big thing."

(Excerpt) Read more at guardian.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Current Events; Religion & Culture; Worship
KEYWORDS: faithandphilosophy; godsgravesglyphs; greek; hindu; india; orthodox; paganism; worship; zeus

1 posted on 02/07/2007 8:11:33 AM PST by NYer
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To: NYer

Another attention-seeker gets her wish...


2 posted on 02/07/2007 8:14:36 AM PST by snarks_when_bored
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To: Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...
Ninety-eight per cent of the population may officially be Orthodox Christian, but in many ways Greeks remain bonded to their pagan past. "OK, the ancients had hubris, but the concept of sin was totally unknown to them, as indeed it is in modern Greece," Dimou says. "Greeks today don't observe many of the 10 commandments. Their outlook on life and values are much nearer to pagan ideas than those of the austere Judaeo-Christian faith."

This trend of returning to paganism is spreading. Several months ago, there was a thread on Scandinavians worshiping their ancient gods. All of this is simply feeding the growth of Islam.

3 posted on 02/07/2007 8:15:42 AM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

Don't Hindus worship various gods? So why can't Greeks? Just curious; no flames please.


4 posted on 02/07/2007 8:15:43 AM PST by sarasota
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To: Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...
Ninety-eight per cent of the population may officially be Orthodox Christian, but in many ways Greeks remain bonded to their pagan past. "OK, the ancients had hubris, but the concept of sin was totally unknown to them, as indeed it is in modern Greece," Dimou says. "Greeks today don't observe many of the 10 commandments. Their outlook on life and values are much nearer to pagan ideas than those of the austere Judaeo-Christian faith."

This trend of returning to paganism is spreading. Several months ago, there was a thread on Scandinavians worshiping their ancient gods. All of this is simply feeding the growth of Islam.

5 posted on 02/07/2007 8:15:48 AM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...
Ninety-eight per cent of the population may officially be Orthodox Christian, but in many ways Greeks remain bonded to their pagan past. "OK, the ancients had hubris, but the concept of sin was totally unknown to them, as indeed it is in modern Greece," Dimou says. "Greeks today don't observe many of the 10 commandments. Their outlook on life and values are much nearer to pagan ideas than those of the austere Judaeo-Christian faith."

This trend of returning to paganism is spreading. Several months ago, there was a thread on Scandinavians worshiping their ancient gods. All of this is simply feeding the growth of Islam.

6 posted on 02/07/2007 8:16:06 AM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

How does this "feed the growth of Islam". Seems that this is a totally different form of worship in that it's for multiple gods, not "Allah".


7 posted on 02/07/2007 8:16:56 AM PST by sarasota
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To: sarasota
Don't Hindus worship various gods?

Not just various, but the same, related Indo-European gods. In India, it never died away.

Zeus

Zeus, poetically referred to by the vocative Zeu pater ("O, father Zeus"), is a continuation of *Dyaēus, the Proto-Indo-European god of the daytime sky, also called *Dyeus phaetēr ("Sky Father"). The god is known under this name in Sanskrit (cf. Dyaus/Dyaus Pita), Latin (cf. Jupiter, from Iuppiter, deriving from the PIE vocative dyeu-phetēr), deriving from the basic form *dyeu- ("to shine", and in its many derivatives, "sky, heaven, god"). And in Germanic and Norse mythology (cf. *Tīwaz > OHG Ziu, ON Týr), together with Latin deus, dīvus and Dis(a variation of dīves), from the related noun *deiwos.

To the Greeks and Romans, the god of the sky was also the supreme god, whereas this function was filled out by Odin among the Germanic tribes. Accordingly, they did not identify Zeus/Jupiter with either Tyr or Odin, but with Thor (Þórr). Zeus is the only deity in the Olympic pantheon whose name has such a transparent Indo-European etymology.

In addition to his Indo-European inheritance, the classical Zeus also derives certain iconographic traits from the cultures of the ancient Near East, such as the scepter. Zeus is envisaged by Greek artists especially in two poses: standing, striding forward a thunderbolt levelled in his raised right hand and seated in majesty.

Aside from forced transformation, Zeus is known to punish those who veered out of his pleasure with lightning bolts.

8 posted on 02/07/2007 8:21:49 AM PST by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: NYer

This is sort of like the fake wicca "religion" that masquerades as an ancient religion.

Its all made up - there is no link to any past celts or druids or whatever they think they are keeping alive.

They have created wicca ex nihilo and pretend it is an ancient tradition.

Given the absence of any Greek pagans for over a thousand years, this too is new-age claptrap. Then again, it was claptrap back in the day, too, but now they can't even claim a real link to the ancient pagan past; that link was lost centuries ago.


9 posted on 02/07/2007 8:28:24 AM PST by Notwithstanding (Post-9/11 Volunteer Active Duty OEF Vet Lawyer (who is too dumb to understand Kerry's apology))
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To: Notwithstanding
They have created wicca ex nihilo and pretend it is an ancient tradition. Given the absence of any Greek pagans for over a thousand years, this too is new-age claptrap. Then again, it was claptrap back in the day, too, but now they can't even claim a real link to the ancient pagan past; that link was lost centuries ago.

Exactly. When these people start sacrificing bulls, then I'll believe that they're real pagans. Until then, they're just delusional individuals who are so out of touch with reality that they prefer to live in an escapist fantasy world.
10 posted on 02/07/2007 8:41:10 AM PST by Antoninus ( Who is Duncan Hunter? Find out....www.gohunter08.com)
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To: NYer
Armed with white doves, Peppa, a former advertising executive, was not going to hold back - even if it meant defying the furious Greek officials and riot police gathered at the second-century temple's gates, unwilling to stop the ceremony for fear of provoking a violent confrontation. "Sixteen and a half centuries is a very long time to wait," she said. "After so many years of Christian persecution we were finally able to call on Zeus, our king-god, to bring peace to the world ahead of the [2008] Olympics. For us, it was a very, very big thing."

Unless she killed those doves as an offering, Zeus was probably pretty mad at her for profaning his temple.
11 posted on 02/07/2007 8:42:23 AM PST by Antoninus ( Who is Duncan Hunter? Find out....www.gohunter08.com)
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To: NYer
Temple prostitution.

Somehow modern feminist Asherah cults never get around to that. What do yo bet these guys will?

12 posted on 02/07/2007 9:14:38 AM PST by Lee N. Field
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To: NYer

"All of this is simply feeding the growth of Islam."

"Paganism" is not Islam. And Islam is not "Paganism". By the way "Paganism" is good for feeding the growth of Hinduism ;)


13 posted on 02/07/2007 9:45:07 AM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: little jeremiah

Ping!


14 posted on 02/07/2007 9:47:47 AM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: sarasota
What they're saying is that

That's the hypothesis. I guess we'll see, won't we?

15 posted on 02/07/2007 10:18:12 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Allah FUBAR : f * * * ed up beyond all recognition.)
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To: Gengis Khan
You're quite right that Islam is not paganism. But I don't think that's what was meant. See #15 --- if I'm not mistaken.
16 posted on 02/07/2007 10:20:18 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Allah FUBAR : f * * * ed up beyond all recognition.)
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To: Mrs. Don-o

Being against Islam does not mean I should also be against Paganism.


17 posted on 02/07/2007 11:07:54 AM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o
"this indicates the spiritual vacuum afflicting Greece (and much of Europe) "

Believing in a polytheistic religion is "spiritual vacuum". So Hinduism in India is "spiritual vacuum" and only Christianity is true spiritualism?

"If you think the Muslims are antagonistic to Christians and Jews, it looks like a love-fest compared to their historic aggressive campaign to wipe out polytheists. Thus this Apollo-stuff will feed their militancy. "

Or maybe the "Apollo-stuff" is what it takes to fight evil. Christians cant fight Muslims.
18 posted on 02/07/2007 11:17:14 AM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o

Appreciate your knowledgeable feedback. Now I get it and yes, we will see.


19 posted on 02/07/2007 11:27:26 AM PST by sarasota
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To: Gengis Khan
"Being against Islam does not mean I should also be against Paganism."

Depends on how or why you're "against."

You could say I'm "against" Mormonism, because I am convinced it is based upon erroneous religious texts and teachings; nevertheless, I can honestly say I have never met a Mormon I didn't like; much in the everyday practice of the LDS faith is true, valuable and sincerely admirable; and Mormons are not an aggressive earthly threat to me in any way whatsoever.

I can't think of any Pagans offhand that are a threat, except for the ones I've met that staff abortion clinics (and they could just as well have been apostate Christians or secular Jews.)

Islam, however, is a explosive, bloody-handed, socio-political menace; not that there are not peaceable Muslims, but that their religious texts and their putative prophet (unlike, say, Christ or Gaia) explicitly incite religious violence.

20 posted on 02/07/2007 11:47:52 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Allah FUBAR : f * * * ed up beyond all recognition.)
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To: Gengis Khan
"this indicates the spiritual vacuum afflicting Greece (and much of Europe) "
Believing in a polytheistic religion is "spiritual vacuum". So Hinduism in India is "spiritual vacuum" and only Christianity is true spiritualism [?]

Actually, that's not what I said. I said that reversion to this Apollo-stuff--- which really is intellectually threadbare, morally vacuous, and spiritually feeble in the extreme--- indicates the presence of an aspirant (in the sense of "sucking") vacuum.

Hinduism, by way of contrast, has far more intellectual and moral content than this ginned-up neo-apollo-puppy trend. But I'm sure you knew that.

21 posted on 02/07/2007 11:59:50 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Allah FUBAR : f * * * ed up beyond all recognition.)
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To: Mrs. Don-o
"Hinduism, by way of contrast, has far more intellectual and moral content than this ginned-up neo-apollo-puppy trend. But I'm sure you knew that."

Hinduism has far more intellectual and moral content than even Christianity but thats no basis for me to oppose Christianity.
22 posted on 02/07/2007 12:19:38 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Gengis Khan
Except perhaps Islam, I am not against any religion (that includes Mormons, Pagans, Seculars, Agnostics and Atheists) doesn't matter how or why. I am only against perverts that promote proselytization or holy war. I believe THOSE ideas are based upon erroneous religious beliefs and teachings.

To me it seems that these "ginned-up neo-apollo-puppy" are choosing/practicing their faith out of their own volition. I see no reason why I should oppose them based on the reasons you have stated. Doesn't this in your book go against the tenet of "freedom of religion" or for you is it only "freedom of the Christian religion" that you are concerned about?

I don't quite understand the logic that religion X should be given no space because its morally or spiritually incapable of resisting religion Y.
23 posted on 02/07/2007 1:03:26 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Gengis Khan
You're a gentleman, Gengis.

BTW, it's good to see you back on the forum.

24 posted on 02/07/2007 2:01:41 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Allah FUBAR : f * * * ed up beyond all recognition.)
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To: NYer

This is such modern media garbage. For the past 150 years at least various kook groups, usually made up of artists and acedemics start this stuff up in Greece. It not not new, not a result of today's society and it never goes anywhere. Its just kooks.


25 posted on 02/07/2007 2:08:45 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: Gengis Khan
My point, my dear, is that most religions don't present a aggressive threat to me; I acknowledge the elements of truth and value in them, although I do not agree with their total view. The Apostle Paul expressed a certain appreciation for the religious sentiments of the pagan Athenians at their Areopagus (Mars Hill) shrine, and even quoted one of their poets with approval (Acts 17:22-24.)

However, if anyone, secularist, atheist, Islamist or whatever, wishes to threaten my liberty and my nation, I will certainly oppose them, forcefully if necessary.

"I don't quite understand the logic that religion X should be given no space because its morally or spiritually incapable of resisting religion Y."

I'm not quite sure what you mean by this. Amongst those who are non-aggressors, all "opposition" or "resisrance" is a far friendlier thing, and takes the form of dialog, banter, love, blessing, humor, example, and reason. Against this form of "opposition" --- which is actually friendly persuasion, or even rivalry in doing good --- there can be, I think, no objection.

26 posted on 02/07/2007 2:17:04 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Allah FUBAR : f * * * ed up beyond all recognition.)
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To: Mrs. Don-o
"Against this form of "opposition" --- which is actually friendly persuasion, or even rivalry in doing good --- there can be, I think, no objection."

Hmmmm I could you some "friendly persuasion" against Christian proselytization in my own country. I don't think you would object :)
27 posted on 02/07/2007 3:32:21 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o
BTW this is from the article:

"Last year, Peppa's group, Ellinais, succeeded in gaining legal recognition as a cultural association in a country where all non-Christian religions, bar Islam and Judaism, are prohibited. "

What the above article means is that only Hinduism is banned there. It is the case in many places in Europe.

Christians themselves need to get certain things corrected before they can lecture others on morality and freedom. For a lot of us the Church little more than a symbol of hypocrisy and religious intolerance.
28 posted on 02/07/2007 3:53:11 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Gengis Khan

Church little more than = Church is hardly anything more than


29 posted on 02/07/2007 5:49:23 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Gengis Khan

Friendly is as friendly does. Surprisingly, reason and goodwill sometimes work.


30 posted on 02/07/2007 5:56:54 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o (What does the LORD require of you, but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God)
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To: Gengis Khan
According to the CIA World factbook online, the religious distribution in Greece is as follows:

Greek Orthodox 98%, Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%

I hardly think the Pope or any other (non-Orthodox) leader would have much influence on Greek state policy. But it's hardly a case, I think, of Hindus being singled out. They've had little to no contact with ANY non-monotheistic religious group: Buddhists, Shintoists, Buddhists, Sikhs, Santeria, Makumba, Rastafarianism, or anybody else.

They (Greeks) have had no historic conflicts with Hindus or India as far as I know; so the Hindu question may never have come up. I don't suppose there has ever been any Indian influx into Greece. Do you know?

31 posted on 02/07/2007 6:09:46 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o (What does the LORD require of you, but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God)
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To: Gengis Khan
What that article obviously fails to mention is that getting this recognition as a "cultural association", which basically only means its part of Greek culture, and no one has ever denied that ancient Greek religion was not part of the Greek culture, differs from it being an official religion recognized by the state. Notice that statement makes absolute no mention that it gained legal recognition as a OFFICIAL religion in Greece. Big difference. The article is also wrong in stating that its only "non-Christian" religions not recognized by the sate but I will talk more about that below, it failed to mention that aside from Orthodox Christianity, the only other two religions that are officially recognized by the state are the faiths of Islam and Judaism. Which makes you, Gengis Khan, somewhat correct in you analysis regarding Hindu or any other religion for that matter but that does not mean you can't practice Hinduism or Buddhism or Confucianism or Jehovah Witnesses(I have an uncle who is a JW converted when he married his wife, aunt by marriage) or worshipping snakes in a cave if you want as long as you get the proper license by the state. So yes the freedom in practicing whatever religion you want is there BUT they can't have a "House of Prayers" without permits from the state. What this means is that Orthodox Christianity, Judaism and Islam are the only officially recognized by the state as faiths considered to be "legal persons of public law." Other religions are considered "legal persons of private law." which means in practice, the primary distinction is that the Civil Code's provisions pertaining to corporations regulate the establishment of "houses of prayer" for every non state recognized religions. Oh and you are wrong in believing that its only non-Christian religions that are not recognized by the Greek state, religions like Evangelists and Mormons and basically every other Christian religion that is not Orthodox Christianity are not recognized by the state either and fall under the "legal persons of private law" but that does not mean they can't be practiced freely with the proper permits...except for Scientology, called a "psycho-sect" by the Greek state that not only is it NOT recognized by the Greek sate but it is also prohibited from practicing in Greece based on legal criminal actions. As Kolokotronis stated kookie "cults" who try to associate themselves with ancient Greek religion have been popping up forever now, including quite a few who are not even native Greeks but claim "association" thru ancient Greek religion, this is nothing new and nothing amazing, just the same 'ol again. In a country where 89% of the people are Orthodox Christian and were this religion plays a big part on every Greek person's life, I have to disagree with Mrs. Don-o view that "this indicates the spiritual vacuum afflicting Greece", quite the opposite is actually true for those of us familiar with the country, the culture, history and her people. I don't know about other countries, except for the States since I've gone to school here where church and state are separated therefore religion is not allowed into public schools, but religion, that is Greek Orthodox religion ofcourse, is mandatory in their educational system and you can't learn about the Greek revolution or the Byzantine Empire without learning about the influence Greek Orthodoxy played in the creation of the modern state or about its influence from Byzantine times thru which it claims a continuation through the Eastern Roman(Byzantine) Empire to ancient Greece. In other words Greek Orthodoxy is intertwined very tightly with Greek history and identity unlike any other European countries that I know of at least, with maybe the exception of Italy. Also lets not forget that quite a bit of ancient Greek thought and philosophy had entered into Christianity and many of those ancient Greek customs and symbolic meanings are still practiced today by modern Greeks, even though the names might have changed, such as in ancient times panspermia (also known as polysporia) were offered to the Demeter and Dionysus for fertility and in honor of the dead, in modern times those ancient symbolic meanings for panspermia/polysporia have been taken on by Jesus Chris and the Virgin Mary. ;-)
32 posted on 02/07/2007 6:39:24 PM PST by apro
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To: apro

So they need to get "permits" from the State to practice their faith? Wont really call that "freedom".


33 posted on 02/07/2007 8:39:14 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o

"Greek Orthodox 98%, Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7% "

Dont have much time. For now I would only say that you are switching cause for effect. The insignificant numbers from other faiths is because those religions aren't given the breathing space. Its the same in Italy and a few other Christian countries.


34 posted on 02/07/2007 8:45:37 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: indcons

Ping!


35 posted on 02/07/2007 8:46:03 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Gengis Khan

Interesting discussion. Are Hindus interested, then in emigrating to Greece, but stopped by law? I must say it seems...odd.


36 posted on 02/07/2007 8:51:28 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o (What does the LORD require of you, but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God)
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To: Mrs. Don-o

Who's talking about emigration. Are organisations like the ISKCON allowed to preach there? (I am considering ISKCON only for example).


37 posted on 02/07/2007 9:07:13 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o

BTW the majority Muslims in US are not immigrants from middle east or South Asia. They are mostly Afro-Americans converts.


38 posted on 02/07/2007 9:10:03 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: NYer
http://www.istillworshipzeus.com
39 posted on 02/08/2007 2:41:11 AM PST by Dajjal (See my FR homepage for an essay about Ahmadinejad.)
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To: Gengis Khan
I was suprised to see how many Hindu missionary centers the Krishna Consciousness folks have in the USA: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas, Gainesville, Houston, New York, and several others. They also have missionary headquarters all over Europe. I have no idea if they are active in Greece. Why don't you go the (very attractive) ISKCON website and ask them?
40 posted on 02/08/2007 7:58:11 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (What does the LORD require of you, but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God)
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To: Gengis Khan
"BTW the majority Muslims in US are not immigrants from middle east or South Asia. They are mostly Afro-Americans converts."

Do you have a source for that? According to "American Islam: The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion," by Paul Barrett,:

"People of South Asian descent — those with roots in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and Afghanistan — make up 34 percent of American Muslims ... Arab-Americans constitute 26 percent, while another 20 percent are native-born American blacks, most of whom are converts. The remaining 20 percent come from Africa, Iran, Turkey and elsewhere."

Thus 80% of US Muslims are immigrants or children of immigrants; and 20% are African-American.

41 posted on 02/08/2007 8:05:24 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (What does the LORD require of you, but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God)
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To: Mrs. Don-o
As I said "I am considering ISKCON only for example." ISKCON isnt really mainstream Hinduism. ISKCON is more of a re-packaging of Hinduism for the western world and was founded by a person called Sri Prabhupada in the US in the 70's. It quickly turned into a fad in the 70's and thats how it gained instant popularity (it wasn't always about understanding or acceptance of Hinduism but for many it was more of a fashion trend).
Just like Rajaneesh's "Osho", ISKCON came to India from the US not the other way round. And except for its association with Hinduism it has little to do with India. I was considering the case of ISKCON because outside of India its among the only few most visible Hindu organizations.
42 posted on 02/08/2007 1:02:24 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o

"They also have missionary headquarters all over Europe."

I am not sure they are "headquarters". Outside the United Kingdom most of those are actually listed as "rural communities", "restaurants" or just some obscure contact details. BTW I dont belong to ISKCON.


43 posted on 02/08/2007 1:11:42 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Gengis Khan
Thanks for the background on ISKCON.

What are the major "really Hindu" missionary organizations, then?

44 posted on 02/08/2007 1:13:21 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o
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To: Mrs. Don-o; BullDog108

BullDog108 can actually tell us more about ISKCON.

Pinging you BullDog108.


45 posted on 02/08/2007 1:13:38 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o
"What are the major "really Hindu" missionary organizations, then?"

ISKCON is very much Hindu. Just that it wasn't born in India. And there is no such thing as real Hinduism except that which most Hindus practice and there are a billion contradiction even in that. ISKCON isn't what most people in India follow but it is still "Hindu".

If you are asking what are the most prominent Hindu missionary organizations then...........ISKCON would be one and Ram Krishna Mission would be the other (Ram Krishna Mission is actually from India). And you would also have the World Hindu Council started by Swami Chinmayananda which is actually more of political nature.
46 posted on 02/08/2007 1:50:15 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Gengis Khan

Thank you.


47 posted on 02/08/2007 1:52:59 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o
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To: Mrs. Don-o
""People of South Asian descent — those with roots in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and Afghanistan — make up 34 percent of American Muslims ... Arab-Americans constitute 26 percent, while another 20 percent are native-born American blacks, most of whom are converts. The remaining 20 percent come from Africa, Iran, Turkey and elsewhere." "

I am not sure how accurate that observation is. The author may have included emigrants from South Asia and middle east who come here as visitors, student or on work permits....... in which case they are still foreigners, not Americans. In that case, yes, their number maybe larger.

I had read a different article (probably written by Fareed Zakharia cant remember) which said the largest group of American Muslims in the US are Afro-Americans (which also includes people following Nation of Islam). In fact Islam is the fastest growing religion in US because of conversions inside prisons where you have a large population of Afro Americans.
48 posted on 02/08/2007 2:22:27 PM PST by Gengis Khan
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To: Mrs. Don-o; Gengis Khan
Yes, ISKCON has a center in Greece. ISKCON has also branched off into many different sects, there is much disagreement since the Founder/Acharya Srila Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada died in 1976. There are also many other Gaudiya Vaisnava (the actual formal name of the Hare Krishna religion) temples thruout the Western world.

I'm travelling to Kolkata next week for their annual festival.

FRegards, BullDog


49 posted on 02/09/2007 12:53:05 AM PST by BullDog108 ("Conservatives believe in God; Liberals think they ARE God " -- Ann Coulter)
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50 posted on 01/25/2009 5:31:21 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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