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To: All
Wednesday – First Week of Lent

Jesus said in reply, “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me is the one who will betray me. The Son of Man indeed goes, as it is written of him, but woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed. It would be better for that man if he had never been born.” Then Judas, his betrayer, said in reply, “Surely it is not I, Rabbi?” He answered, “You have said so.” (Mt 26:23-25)

One gets the impression that Judas stayed quiet when the other disciples asked one after the other. “Surely it is not I, Lord?” It was only after Jesus responded to them that Judas asks if he is the one.

Jesus phrases his response in a way that is ambiguous. Though betrayed by Judas, Jesus doesn’t betray Judas in front of the others. This is just between the two of them. Jesus knows what Judas is up to. Still, he loves him.

Some people think worse of me than I am, others better. But Jesus knows what I’m up to – good and bad. And he loves me.

If maligned for doing right, I can take courage. The Lord knows the truth.

If I get credit for things I don’t deserve, I must take heed. The Lord knows the truth.

Either way, I’m safest with the Lord. He knows me better than anyone, and I know he knows. No need to fake it. And he loves me more than anyone.

Spend some quiet time with the Lord.

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31 posted on 03/01/2007 9:05:46 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
March 1, 2007

The Bread and the Cup

In the Gospel accounts of the Last Supper, Jesus calls (not simply invites) those at the table to take and eat the bread, and take and drink the cup. These same words are part of all the Eucharistic prayers at every Mass.

The laity took Communion under both forms in the Western Church for about the first 12 centuries. The Eastern Catholic Church continued this tradition without interruption, but in the Western Church, the cup was gradually withdrawn from the laity so that by the 16th century only the priest received the consecrated wine.

Various concerns contributed to this change of practice. For one thing, there was fear of spilling the precious blood once wine. More importantly, some heretical teachings claimed that the whole Christ was not fully present in the bread and the wine separately, but only if taken together. To counteract this heresy, the laity was given only the consecrated bread, and Eucharistic piety came to center on the host which alone was kept in the tabernacle after Mass.

The Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) restored the earlier tradition of Communion under both forms, and the Church now recognizes it as the ideal: “Holy Communion has a more complete form as a sign when it is received under both kinds.”

32 posted on 03/02/2007 9:51:01 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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