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Muskrat love: A Lenten Friday delight for some Michiganders
CNS News ^ | Mar-8-2007 | Kristin Lukowski

Posted on 03/08/2007 1:58:26 PM PST by presidio9

There's an alternative to fish for some Michigan Catholics abstaining from meat on Fridays in Lent -- muskrat.

The custom of eating muskrat on Ash Wednesday and Fridays in Lent apparently goes back to the early 1800s, the time of Father Gabriel Richard, an early missionary in Michigan whose flock included French-Canadian trappers. Legend has it that because trappers and their families were going hungry not eating flesh during Lent, he allowed them to eat muskrat, with the reasoning that the mammal lives in the water.

The story varies on just where in Michigan the dispensation extends. Among areas mentioned are along the Raisin River, along the Rouge River, both of which flow into Lake Erie south of Detroit, Monroe County in the southeast corner of Michigan, or all of southeast Michigan.

The Detroit archdiocesan communications department said there is a standing dispensation for Catholics downriver -- in Detroit's southern suburbs and below -- to eat muskrat on Fridays, although no documentation of the original dispensation could be found.

A 2002 archdiocesan document on Lenten observances, in addition to outlining the general laws of fast and abstinence, says, "There is a long-standing permission -- dating back to our missionary origins in the 1700s -- to permit the consumption of muskrat on days of abstinence, including Fridays of Lent."

The prospect of eating muskrat, a foot-long rodent, might be less than appetizing to some, but to many people downriver it's part of Lenten life.

St. Charles Borromeo Parish in Newport holds a muskrat dinner every year to raise funds for the parish's youth sports teams. The early February dinner includes sides of creamed corn and mashed potatoes. It features prizes donated by local merchants and serves up to several hundred dinners.

Bill "Pip" Chinavare was president of the sports club for 29 years and still heads up the muskrat fundraiser. His wife, Candy, said not many women participate in the annual dinner.

"This is a men's thing," she said. "They pack the men in."

"The majority of women can't get past the 'rat' thing," she said.

Father Russ Kohler, pastor at Most Holy Trinity Parish in Detroit and a downriver native, is a regular at the St. Charles Borromeo muskrat dinners. He said the trick to making the muskrat edible is in the marinade, a secret recipe based on a French liqueur.

He said he never ate muskrat before he attended the dinner while filling in at St. Charles as a priest. He's tried to make the dinner every year since then.

"I didn't fall in love with the product until I could drink beer," he joked.

He said muskrat has the consistency of chicken, but with a "unique" taste.

Johnny Kolakowski, owner of Riverview's Kola's Food Factory, has been eating muskrat since he was a kid. When he opened up his restaurant years ago, he put muskrat on the menu.

He can sell several dozen muskrat dinners on a Friday, but they were more popular back in the 1980s, when he would sell 150 a night. The tradition's less popular with the younger crowd, but it's not uncommon for young men to come in -- with their cameras -- and order a muskrat dinner.

Kolakowski, 59, a member of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish in Wyandotte, said muskrat tastes the same as duck. Both animals live in the water and have the same diet -- the only difference is one walks and one flies, he said.

His muskrats come from a trapper in Canada and they're served with sides of sauerkraut and mashed potatoes and gravy. The best part of a muskrat is the hind legs, he said.

The late Bishop Kenneth Povish of Lansing wrote in a 1987 column in The Michigan Catholic, Detroit archdiocesan newspaper, that "no (formal) dispensation was ever given to allow Catholics to eat muskrat on Fridays."

He referred to what he called the "Great Interdiocesan Doctrinal Debate" of 1956, during which he determined that although muskrat is a warm-blooded mammal and technically flesh, the custom had been so long held along Michigan's rivers and marshes that it was "immemorial custom," thus allowed under church law.

For the record, Bishop Povish didn't much care for muskrat as a meal. He wrote that "anyone who could eat muskrat was doing penance worthy of the greatest of the saints."


TOPICS: Catholic; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: ick; lent; muskrat
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1 posted on 03/08/2007 1:58:30 PM PST by presidio9
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To: presidio9
If it was good enough for Father Pierre Marquette, ...
2 posted on 03/08/2007 2:04:28 PM PST by Yo-Yo (USAF, TAC, 12th AF, 366 TFW, 366 MG, 366 CRS, Mtn Home AFB, 1978-81)
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To: NYer; Coleus; wideawake; Salvation; Aquinasfan; Froufrou; Slings and Arrows

ping


3 posted on 03/08/2007 2:08:21 PM PST by presidio9 (Islam is as Islam does.)
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To: ShadowDancer

Ingredients:
4 Muskrats (all fat and glands removed)
1/2 pound Bacon
1/2 Celery bunch, chopped
4 Onions, chopped
1/2 pound Oleo
1/2 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
Salt
Pepper
21 ounces Tomato soup


Directions:

Saute bacon, celery, onions, oleo and cayenne pepper together for 10 minutes.

Put rats in bottom of a pan you can cover tightly (my mother makes a double batch and uses the roaster she cooks turkey in). Pour sauteed mixture over the rats, and then cover with tomato soup (Don't add water to the soup).

Bake, covered, for 2 1/2 hours at 350 degrees F or until done.

This recipe for Fred's Muskrat serves/makes 4


4 posted on 03/08/2007 2:12:23 PM PST by Cagey
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To: 2ndMostConservativeBrdMember; afraidfortherepublic; Alas; al_c; american colleen; annalex; ...
Bon Appétit

Image:Common Muskrat FWS.jpg

btw, it sure looks like a rat to me.   Let's see, long whiskers, a long tail, no gills and has fur and looks like a rat.  I'd say that most would agree that it's meat and can't be eaten on Fridays.

Muskrat Love

5 posted on 03/08/2007 2:22:10 PM PST by Coleus (God gave us the right to life & self preservation & a right to defend ourselves, family & property)
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To: Coleus


FWIW, I was under the impression that the Church is also cool with people eating whale meat during Lent.


6 posted on 03/08/2007 2:26:00 PM PST by presidio9 (Islam is as Islam does.)
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To: Coleus

It can't be eaten, period. >:-Q


7 posted on 03/08/2007 2:52:35 PM PST by Campion ("I am so tired of you, liberal church in America" -- Mother Angelica, 1993)
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To: presidio9

"Kolakowski, 59, a member of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish in Wyandotte, said muskrat tastes the same as duck."

I don't eat duck, either. I heard it's very greasy!


8 posted on 03/08/2007 3:15:41 PM PST by Froufrou
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To: Froufrou; presidio9

I know. You boys can warm up to it by eating squirrel...


9 posted on 03/08/2007 3:17:22 PM PST by Froufrou
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To: Froufrou

Mmmmm.... Muskrat...

10 posted on 03/08/2007 3:35:16 PM PST by presidio9 (Islam is as Islam does.)
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To: presidio9

I agree with Bishop Povish. Eating muskrat has to be a penance worthy of the saints. It would be back to the family tradition -- meatless spaghetti. Or scrambled eggs.


11 posted on 03/08/2007 3:35:55 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: presidio9
How about the Nutria Rat?

The beaver? Castor canadensis the rodent thank you very much!

The capybara?

All of these live in water.

Is a seal or walrus OK during lent?

PENGUIN! CORMORANT!

LibKill collapses in drooling incoherence.

12 posted on 03/08/2007 3:40:28 PM PST by LibKill (Rudy is willing to lie his way to power. Do not trust him, look at his record.)
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To: presidio9

You're so bad!


13 posted on 03/08/2007 3:41:28 PM PST by Froufrou
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To: LibKill; presidio9

Just guessing, but I doubt muskat is very much like beaver...


<:-)


14 posted on 03/08/2007 3:44:38 PM PST by Froufrou
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To: Froufrou
I don't eat duck, either. I heard it's very greasy!

Not so greasy as all that. It's very nice. If you don't like fat you should leave that on the plate and concentrate on the white meat.

The local chinese buffet used to have roast duck on the line. No longer. I cry myself to sleep now.

15 posted on 03/08/2007 3:44:45 PM PST by LibKill (Rudy is willing to lie his way to power. Do not trust him, look at his record.)
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To: LibKill

Yeah, thanks for the advice. I have nothing against dark meat [per se] but fried food and sweet sauce are a major turnoff. I guess my taste is pretty healthy. Salad every day. Boring.

But, I'm a Texan and you DON'T take my steak away. Or my BBQ!


16 posted on 03/08/2007 3:54:13 PM PST by Froufrou
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To: Froufrou

I hate Chinese food.


17 posted on 03/08/2007 4:27:48 PM PST by presidio9 (Islam is as Islam does.)
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To: presidio9; Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; ...

18 posted on 03/08/2007 5:21:08 PM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: Froufrou
I have salad every day too.

But there are a couple of secrets to cooking duck. One is to briefly parboil it before you roast it, it opens all the pores (some people go so far as to stand it up on end and blow a hairdryer set on "HIGH" all over the duck to keep the pores open). The other secret is to use a large roasting pan and a rack that keeps the duck up fairly high. That way the grease drains into the bottom of the pan where it can be bailed out from time to time as the cooking proceeds. I usually roast it with the breast down.

You don't need to use a sicky-sweet sauce. I use a black bean or hoisin sauce that is tangy and spicy, or I go American with apples and onions and sage.

You'll have to count on cleaning your oven afterwards though -- the fat spits all over everywhere. Self-cleaning ovens are nice things to have.

19 posted on 03/08/2007 5:28:32 PM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: afraidfortherepublic
I would have to be pretty darned hungry before I would eat a muskrat. I don't think I've EVER been that hungry.

Cheese omelets are standard Lenten fare around here. That and shrimp in an East Indian brown sauce (onions, garlic, cardamoms, pepper, turmeric, and yoghurt) over basmati rice.

20 posted on 03/08/2007 5:31:01 PM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Coleus

Lots of muskrats in NJ. I've mostly seen them in the Penns Grove or Vineland areas, but have seen them as far north as Flemington as well.


21 posted on 03/08/2007 5:41:28 PM PST by Clemenza (NO to Rudy in 2008! New York's Values are NOT America's Values!)
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To: Clemenza

did ya cook any?


22 posted on 03/08/2007 6:16:11 PM PST by Coleus (God gave us the right to life & self preservation & a right to defend ourselves, family & property)
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Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

To: presidio9; Frank Sheed

This could reconcile my family to vegetarian meals ...

"Do you want Muskrat Stew, or the That Chickpea Dish With Noodles?"


24 posted on 03/08/2007 6:31:33 PM PST by Tax-chick (Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione.)
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To: Tax-chick
This could reconcile my family to vegetarian meals ...

"Do you want Muskrat Stew, or the That Chickpea Dish With Noodles?"

And if they all say with one voice, 'Muskrat!'

What will you do then? What will you do? :)

25 posted on 03/08/2007 6:35:04 PM PST by LibKill (RudycRAT is lying his way to power. Look at his record. He's 100% DemocRat.)
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To: LibKill

I assume the cost of ordering Muskrat over the Internet (canned? frozen? fresh-on-ice?) would be prohibitive, and my husband would decide we like chickpeas after all!


26 posted on 03/08/2007 6:36:13 PM PST by Tax-chick (Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione.)
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To: Tax-chick

Hehe, at least the adults are in charge at your house!


27 posted on 03/08/2007 6:37:30 PM PST by LibKill (RudycRAT is lying his way to power. Look at his record. He's 100% DemocRat.)
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To: LibKill

That is true. We have many meals of "that food you'll eat or come back tomorrow."


28 posted on 03/08/2007 6:39:23 PM PST by Tax-chick (Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione.)
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To: Tax-chick
I thought it was . . . gasp . . . LENTILS!

Wrt ordering Muskrat over the internet . . . you can get Possum . . . maybe you could substitute?

$5.95 plus S&H

29 posted on 03/08/2007 6:40:18 PM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

Dinty Moore Beef Stew is under $2 for the 28 oz. can.


30 posted on 03/08/2007 6:41:31 PM PST by Tax-chick (Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione.)
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To: Tax-chick
Much easier to catch a steer than a possum.

Besides, there's a lot more meat on a steer.

31 posted on 03/08/2007 6:42:26 PM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

Absolutely.

Tomorrow is black-bean-taco salad, a perennial favorite. The family will consume anything with enough corn chips and cheese!


32 posted on 03/08/2007 6:50:49 PM PST by Tax-chick (Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione.)
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To: AnAmericanMother

Your shrimp sounds great, except I'm allergic to the darned things. I think I'll do some sauteed tilapia with some special seasoning I bought at Sam's Club tonight.


33 posted on 03/09/2007 12:44:53 AM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Froufrou; All
"But, I'm a Texan and you DON'T take my steak away. Or my BBQ!" Damn straight! Ducks are for taking your kids down to the pond to throw chunks of Mrs. Baird's bread at. :P
34 posted on 03/09/2007 2:37:37 AM PST by neb52
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To: presidio9; sit-rep; ShadowDancer

Um, thanks but no thanks.


35 posted on 03/09/2007 2:55:20 AM PST by Larry Lucido (Duncan Hunter 2008)
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To: Cagey; Mr. Brightside; MotleyGirl70

I bet it tastes like nutria. Or sable.


36 posted on 03/09/2007 2:56:16 AM PST by Larry Lucido (Duncan Hunter 2008)
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To: neb52

Bwahahahaha, but don't let 'em chase the kids!


37 posted on 03/09/2007 4:23:32 AM PST by Froufrou
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To: AnAmericanMother

Thank goodness my new gas range is self-cleaning. I keep telling myself I'll study to be a better cook, but I spend so little time eating and it's so much easier to run out for Chinese on the corner - I live in a densely populated area of town.

I realize that duck is available, frozen, year 'round. And I've been curious about hoison sauce since Martha whatsername mentioned it. But I think your American version sounds best, for me. Thanks for the tips!!!


38 posted on 03/09/2007 4:32:46 AM PST by Froufrou
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To: AnAmericanMother

Mercy! Is that for real?


39 posted on 03/09/2007 4:40:14 AM PST by Froufrou
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To: Tax-chick
Don't forget the sour cream and salsa!

My poor husband is allergic to legumes, so we alternate between eggs/cheese and fish!

40 posted on 03/09/2007 5:18:01 AM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Froufrou

No . . . it isn't real. Just something to have fun with the Yankees . . . you can also get "Armadillo on the Half Shell".


41 posted on 03/09/2007 5:18:46 AM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

I think we have sour cream. I'm not fond of salsa, but the others will use it.

It must be difficult being allergic to legumes. Beans are so cheap compared to eggs, cheese, and fish!


42 posted on 03/09/2007 5:43:59 AM PST by Tax-chick (Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione.)
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To: Yo-Yo

Bump for later.


43 posted on 03/09/2007 6:16:39 AM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: presidio9
FWIW, I was under the impression that the Church is also cool with people eating whale meat during Lent.

Whale, dolphin, and whatever else can be found in a can of tuna back in the good old days :)

44 posted on 03/09/2007 6:20:25 AM PST by NeoCaveman (Hillary Hugo Chavez wants to "take those profits" away from you, for the common good)
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To: Cagey

The recipe sounds delicious, but a Catholic could not eat it on a Friday during Lent, not even Downriver, since the half a pound of bacon is unambiguously "meat."


45 posted on 03/09/2007 6:46:44 AM PST by AuH2ORepublican (http://auh2orepublican.blogspot.com/)
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To: AnAmericanMother

Yes, and rattlesnake, although I think some of that may be real...at least the ones that don't rattle when ya pick 'em up!


46 posted on 03/09/2007 6:57:35 AM PST by Froufrou
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To: LibKill

Believe it or not, Catholics in South America are allowed to eat capybara (which is basically a rat the size of a large dog) on Fridays during Lent. I read an article last year about all of the water-dwelling mammals (and reptiles) that Catholics traditionally eat during Lent in many parts of the world. Here, I found the article: http://www.opinionjournal.com/taste/?id=110008041

An excerpt:

The season of Lent, which began on Wednesday, brings to mind an odd request the Vatican received from South America in the 17th century. The faithful sought permission to eat capybaras on Fridays during the six weeks before Easter, when Catholics are supposed to avoid the meat of birds and mammals.

The priests who puzzled over this petition certainly had no inkling of capybaras. Even today, most non-zookeepers outside South America have never heard of them. But these critters spend lots of time in water, they swim and dive well, and their feet are slightly webbed. Kind of like fish, right?

Close enough for the Vatican, apparently, because Rome sent out the word that it was acceptable to consume capybaras during Lent. Today they are considered a delicacy in many parts of South America, especially Venezuela. Eating capybaras there during Lent is about as traditional as eating turkeys at Thanksgiving here in the U.S. Technically, though, capybaras are mammals--the largest members of the rodent family, with adults weighing more than 100 pounds. The food they provide is meat.

Capybaras are hardly the only creatures that have been subjected to cafeteria-style Catholicism: At various times and places, Lenten exceptions have reportedly been made for beavers, geese, puffins and other marine animals. There's a persistent rumor in Michigan, for example, that muskrats are an approved dish. When a bishop was asked about it, he supposedly replied that anybody bold enough to eat muskrat already is "doing penance worthy of the greatest saints."


47 posted on 03/09/2007 6:59:58 AM PST by AuH2ORepublican (http://auh2orepublican.blogspot.com/)
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To: AnAmericanMother

"Garnished in Coon Fat Gravy"? That's a selling point? Even the guy from the Whizzo Chocolate Factory knew that if he prominently disclosed that his candy was "garnished in lark's vomit" that his "sales would plummet." (If you don't know of what I speak, I recommend you listen to the Monty Python recording called "Crunchy Frog.")


48 posted on 03/09/2007 7:05:45 AM PST by AuH2ORepublican (http://auh2orepublican.blogspot.com/)
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To: AuH2ORepublican
"Well, if they didn't have bones, they wouldn't be crunchy, now, would they?"

Coon fat gravy is considered a delicacy in certain quarters . . . but not around here.

49 posted on 03/09/2007 7:14:55 AM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Tax-chick
Tell me about it!

And he's 6'6", so it takes a lot to fill him up!

50 posted on 03/09/2007 7:16:08 AM PST by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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