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Christians Who Don't Celebrate Easter: What Do They Know?
Good News Magazine ^ | Spring 2007 | Jerold Aust

Posted on 04/03/2007 6:31:28 AM PDT by DouglasKC

Christians Who Don't Celebrate Easter: What Do They Know?

Easter is the most important holiday for hundreds of millions of believers around the world. Yet thousands of Christians don't observe it. Do they know something that others don't?

by Jerold Aust

Every spring, the anticipation and excitement of Easter is electrifying for many people. Churches prepare elaborate Easter programs that illustrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Parents take time to color Easter eggs and hide them so their children can hunt for them.

It's typical for TV movies this time of year to depict Easter as an enjoyable occasion of renewed happiness. Television advertisements and commercial businesses also get very involved with Easter as they offer colorful Easter baskets, Easter costumes and chocolate rabbits to celebrate this great religious event.

Many churches advertise outdoor Easter sunrise services, with any and all invited. Weather permitting, the Easter celebration is visually reinforced by watching the sun rise in the east.

But what do bunnies and colored eggs have to do with Jesus' resurrection?

And if this celebration is so important, why didn't Jesus teach His apostles and the early Church to observe it? The books of the New Testament were written over a span of decades after Jesus Christ's death and resurrection, yet nowhere do we see so much as a hint of any kind of Easter celebration.

So where exactly did Easter and its customs come from? Why do hundreds of millions of people celebrate the holiday today?

Can we find Easter in the Bible?

Easter is considered the most important religious festival in today's Christianity. "The Easter feast has been and still is regarded as the greatest in the Christian church, since it commemorates the most important event in the life of its Founder" (The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1986, Vol. 2, "Easter"). Given its popularity, one would think that surely this observance is found in God's Word.

Some cite Acts 12:4 as authority for celebrating Easter. But there's a problem in that Easter isn't really mentioned there at all. The King James Bible translators substituted "Easter" for the Greek word Pascha, which means "Passover." "The word [Easter] does not properly occur in Scripture, although [the King James Version] has it in Acts 12:4 where it stands for Passover, as it is rightly rendered in RV" (ibid.).

The vast majority of Bible translations recognize this error in the King James Version and rightly translate the word as "Passover" in Acts 12:4. The truth is, "there is no trace of Easter celebration in the [New Testament]" (ibid.)

Where did Easter come from?

If Easter isn't found in the Bible, where exactly did it come from? And just exactly what does the name Easter mean?

It's important to review credible historical sources to understand the celebration's true history. For example, The Encyclopaedia Britannica tells us: "At Easter, popular customs reflect many ancient pagan survivals—in this instance, connected with spring fertility rites, such as the symbols of the Easter egg and the Easter hare or rabbit" (15th edition, Macropaedia, Vol. 4, p. 605, "Church Year").

In the ancient world of the Middle East, people were far more connected to the land and cycles of nature than we are today. They depended on the land's fertility and crops to survive. Spring, when fertility returned to the land after the long desolation of winter, was a much-anticipated and welcomed time for them.

Many peoples celebrated the coming of spring with celebrations and worship of their gods and goddesses, particularly those associated with fertility. Among such deities were Baal and Astarte or Ashtoreth, mentioned and condemned frequently in the Bible, whose worship typically included ritual sex to promote fertility throughout the land.

It was only natural to the peoples of the ancient Middle East to incorporate symbols of fertility—such as eggs and rabbits, which reproduce in great numbers—into those pagan celebrations for their gods. As The Encyclopaedia Britannica notes above, Easter eggs and the Easter rabbit are simply a continuation of these ancient spring fertility rites.

Nineteenth-century Scottish Protestant clergyman Alexander Hislop's work The Two Babylons is still considered a definitive work on pagan customs that survive in today's religious practices.

On Easter, he wrote: "What means the term Easter itself? It is not a Christian name. It bears its Chaldean origin on its very forehead. Easter is nothing else than Astarte, one of the titles of Beltis, the queen of heaven, whose name, as pronounced by the people of Nineveh, was evidently identical with that now in common use in this country. That name, as found by [early archaeologist Sir Austen Henry] Layard on the Assyrian monuments, is Ishtar" (1959, p. 103).

The name Easter, then, comes not from the Bible. Instead its roots go far back to the ancient pre-Christian Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar, known in the Bible as Astarte or Ashtoreth.

Ancient resurrection celebrations

What did worship of this goddess Ishtar involve? "Temples to Ishtar had many priestesses, or sacred prostitutes, who symbolically acted out the fertility rites of the cycle of nature. Ishtar has been identified with the Phoenician Astarte, the Semitic Ashtoreth, and the Sumerian Inanna. Strong similarities also exist between Ishtar and the Egyptian Isis, the Greek Aphrodite, and the Roman Venus.

"Associated with Ishtar was the young god Tammuz [mentioned in Ezekiel 8:14], considered both divine and mortal . . . In Babylonian mythology Tammuz died annually and was reborn year after year, representing the yearly cycle of the seasons and the crops. This pagan belief later was identified with the pagan gods Baal and Anat in Canaan " (Nelson's Illustrated Bible Dictionary, 1995, "Gods, Pagan," p. 509).

Alan Watts, expert in comparative religion, wrote: "It would be tedious to describe in detail all that has been handed down to us about the various rites of Tammuz . . . and many others . . . But their universal theme—the drama of death and resurrection—makes them the forerunners of the Christian Easter, and thus the first 'Easter services.' As we go on to describe the Christian observance of Easter we shall see how many of its customs and ceremonies resemble these former rites" (Easter: Its Story and Meaning, 1950, p. 58).

He goes on to explain how such practices as fasting during Lent, erecting an image of the deity in the temple sanctuary, singing hymns of mourning, lighting candles and nighttime services before Easter morning originated with ancient idolatrous practices (pp. 59-62).

Another author, Sir James Frazer (1854-1941), knighted for his contributions to our understanding of ancient religions, describes the culmination of the ancient idolatrous worship this way: "The sorrow of the worshippers was turned to joy . . . The tomb was opened: the god had risen from the dead; and as the priest touched the lips of the weeping mourners with balm, he softly whispered in their ears the glad tidings of salvation.

"The resurrection of the god was hailed by his disciples as a promise that they too would issue triumphant from the corruption of the grave. On the morrow . . . the divine resurrection was celebrated with a wild outburst of glee. At Rome, and probably elsewhere, the celebration took the form of a carnival" (The Golden Bough, 1993, p. 350).

A new celebration with ancient idolatrous roots

In various forms, worship of this god under the names Tammuz, Adonis and Attis, among others, spread from the outer reaches of the Roman Empire to Rome itself. There a truly remarkable development took place: Early Catholic Church leaders merged customs and practices associated with this earlier "resurrected" god and spring fertility celebrations and applied them to the resurrected Son of God.

The customs of the ancient fertility and resurrection celebrations weren't the only ones morphed into a new "Christian" celebration, but they are among the most obvious. After all, many historians readily admit the origin of the name Easter and the ancient fertility symbolism of rabbits and decorated eggs (which you can verify yourself in almost any encyclopedia).

Frazer observes: "When we reflect how often the Church has skilfully contrived to plant the seeds of the new faith on the old stock of paganism, we may surmise that the Easter celebration of the dead and risen Christ was grafted upon a similar celebration of the dead and risen Adonis" (p. 345).

He goes on to note that the desire to bring heathens into the Catholic Church without forcing them to surrender their idolatrous celebrations "may have led the ecclesiastical authorities to assimilate the Easter festival of the death and resurrection of their Lord to the festival of the death and resurrection of another Asiatic god which fell at the same season . . . the Church may have consciously adapted the new festival [of Easter] to its heathen predecessor for the sake of winning souls to Christ" (p. 359).

Surprisingly, the celebration of Easter didn't finally win out until A.D. 325, nearly 300 years after Jesus Christ's death and resurrection!

As the Catechism of the Catholic Church explains in the section titled "The Liturgical Year," "At the Council of Nicaea in 325, all the Churches agreed that Easter . . . should be celebrated on the Sunday following the first full moon . . . after the vernal equinox" (1995, p. 332).

Up until this time, many believers had continued to commemorate Jesus' death through the biblical Passover as Jesus and the apostles had instructed (Luke 22:19-20; 1 Corinthians 11:23-26). Now, however, with the power of the Roman Empire behind it, the Catholic Church enforced its preference for Easter. Those who wished to continue to observe the biblical Passover had to go underground to avoid persecution.

Would Jesus Christ celebrate Easter?

The record of the New Testament is clear: The faithful members of the early Church continued to observe all that the apostles taught them, as they were taught by Jesus Christ. The record of history is equally clear: In later centuries new customs, practices and doctrines were introduced that were quite foreign to the original Christians, forming a new "Christianity" they would scarcely recognize.

So a key question is, should a Christian follow what Jesus taught or what later religious teachers taught?

It's always a good idea to ask the question, what would Jesus do?

If Jesus were in the flesh today, would He celebrate Easter? The simple answer is No. He does not change. "Jesus Christ is the same, yesterday, today, and forever," as Hebrews 13:8 tells us (emphasis added throughout). Jesus never observed Easter, never sanctioned it and never taught His disciples to celebrate it. Nor did the apostles teach the Church to do so.

Today, Jesus would observe the biblical Passover and Days of Unleavened Bread as Scripture teaches and as He practiced and taught (John 13:15-17; 1 Corinthians 5:7-8). In fact, He specifically said that He anticipated observing the Passover with His true followers "in My Father's kingdom" after His return (Matthew 26:26-29).

The feasts of Passover and Unleavened Bread have deep meaning to Christ's true disciples. They reveal aspects of God's plan for the salvation of humanity—commemorating the fact that Jesus died for us and lives in us and for us (1 Corinthians 11:26; Galatians 2:20; Colossians 3:3-4).

Should you observe Easter?

If you want to be a true disciple of Christ Jesus, you need to carefully examine whether your beliefs agree with the Bible. It is not acceptable to God to merely assume that He approves of or accepts non-biblical celebrations, regardless of whether they are done for proper motives.

The fact is that God says, "Learn not the way of the heathen"—those who don't know God's truth (Jeremiah 10:2, King James Version).

His Word gives us explicit instructions regarding worshipping Him with practices adopted from pagan idolatry: "Do not inquire after their gods, saying, 'How did these nations serve their gods? I also will do likewise.' You shall not worship the Lord your God in that way; for every abomination to the Lord which He hates they have done to their gods . . . Whatever I command you, be careful to observe it; you shall not add to it nor take away from it" (Deuteronomy 12:30-32).

Jesus Christ now commands everyone to repent of following all man-made religious traditions: "Truly, these times of ignorance God overlooked, but now commands all men everywhere to repent" (Acts 17:30; compare Matthew 15:3).

Will you honor Christ's lifesaving instructions so that God can bless you? He said: "If anyone serves Me, let him follow Me; and where I am, there My servant will be also. If anyone serves Me, him My Father will honor" (John 12:26).

God wants you and me to obey His life-giving Word. When we do, we can serve Christ as His ambassadors on earth. There is no greater calling on earth and throughout time. For your ongoing happiness and security, turn to God now and seek His complete and perfect way. GN



TOPICS: General Discusssion; History; Religion & Culture; Theology
KEYWORDS: easter; feasts; lord; passover
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Man made holidays or the Lord's Holy Days?
1 posted on 04/03/2007 6:31:31 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: DouglasKC

Here, have some Niceness Nodules. Chocolate is helpful, too.

Happy Tuesday, and don’t forget the libations to Tiw, or you’re toast!


2 posted on 04/03/2007 6:34:39 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("His mother said to the servants, 'Do whatever He tells you.' ")
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To: DouglasKC

Maybe it’s just me, but this year the journalists seem to be working over-time to come up with stories that make Easter or Passover look bad.


3 posted on 04/03/2007 6:36:36 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (Enoch Powell was right.)
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To: Tax-chick

Thanks for the bump on this Tuesday that marks the beginning of one of Christ’s spring festivals, the days of unleavened bread!


4 posted on 04/03/2007 6:36:36 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: ClearCase_guy
From the article:

The feasts of Passover and Unleavened Bread have deep meaning to Christ's true disciples. They reveal aspects of God's plan for the salvation of humanity—commemorating the fact that Jesus died for us and lives in us and for us (1 Corinthians 11:26; Galatians 2:20; Colossians 3:3-4).

5 posted on 04/03/2007 6:37:28 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: DouglasKC

You are very welcome. A very blessed festival to you and your loved ones.


6 posted on 04/03/2007 6:39:08 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("His mother said to the servants, 'Do whatever He tells you.' ")
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To: DouglasKC

Actually, Christians celebrate Easter every Sunday. (”The Lords Day”). We just make it extra special once a year. In my book we can’t worship the Savior enough much less too often.


7 posted on 04/03/2007 6:44:20 AM PDT by joebuck
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read later


8 posted on 04/03/2007 6:44:21 AM PDT by prairiebreeze (Iran needs a good swift kick in the teeth. Or ten.)
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To: ClearCase_guy
Easter is the most important holiday for hundreds of millions of believers around the world. Yet thousands of Christians don't observe it. Do they know something that others don't?

These supposed thousands know more than the rest of Christianity...the early Fathers and Doctors of the Church and all of the many hundreds of millions of Christians who have ever lived and celebrated Easter! They have some special knowledge the rest of us don't have. I thought the Church stamped out that Gnostic Heresy a long time ago. Well...theeeeey're back.

9 posted on 04/03/2007 6:47:08 AM PDT by pgkdan (Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions - G.K. Chesterton)
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To: joebuck
Actually, Christians celebrate Easter every Sunday. (”The Lords Day”). We just make it extra special once a year. In my book we can’t worship the Savior enough much less too often.

I too believe you can and should worship Christ all the time. However, he was very specific in his instructions to his followers that he has created certain periods of time as being holy. And that his followers should observe these days. These holy days are listed in Leviticus, chapter 23.

"The Lord's Day" is the weekly sabbath which begins at sundown Friday and ends at sundown on Saturday:

Mar 2:28 Therefore the Son of man is Lord also of the sabbath.

10 posted on 04/03/2007 6:51:11 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: pgkdan
These supposed thousands know more than the rest of Christianity...the early Fathers and Doctors of the Church and all of the many hundreds of millions of Christians who have ever lived and celebrated Easter! They have some special knowledge the rest of us don't have. I thought the Church stamped out that Gnostic Heresy a long time ago. Well...theeeeey're back.

If it's a "Gnostic Heresy" to follow the Lord's instructions in the bible then chalk me up as a Gnostic Heretic.

11 posted on 04/03/2007 6:53:37 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: DouglasKC; P-Marlowe; jude24; Kolokotronis; Gamecock; Buggman

This is simply an example of lousy research.

Easter is called by that name ONLY in nations with a Germanic language tradition. In the other European countries it is called “Passover.” This along indicates that it wasn’t some plot to foist some unproved ancient religion on top of Christianity.

In both German and English, the word for the compass direction “east” is either “oest or east.” In both German and English, the word for Sun is either Sonne or Sun. In both German and English, the word for Son is “Sohn or Son.”

The dawn sun rises in the east.

The dawn of new life through the SON rises at EASTer.

Otherwise, the celebration happens at Passover, as other European countries acknowledge. There is no biblical problem with recognizing the passover time of year as the time of Jesus, the Lamb of God, being sacrificed. It is entirely biblical that that is when it occurred.

The germanic languages recognize the same about passover, but have made a play on words about the “Sun(Son) RISING (resurrection) in the EASTERly direction.”

A “SonRise” Service, if you will.

Thoroughly biblical, and I’m a bit amused at some of the claptrap scholarship that purports to demonstrate otherwise. I’m sure that if I looked hard enough I could find some ancient god from some culture or other to naysay anything that anyone does.


12 posted on 04/03/2007 7:02:34 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who support the troops will pray for them to WIN!)
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To: DouglasKC
Man made holidays or the Lord's Holy Days?

Does it matter?

I doubt that the ancient Christians celebrated Presidents' Day, Independence Day, or Thanksgiving the way we do, but those holidays seem harmless enough.

13 posted on 04/03/2007 7:05:58 AM PDT by Logophile
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To: xzins
Easter is called by that name ONLY in nations with a Germanic language tradition. In the other European countries it is called “Passover.” This along indicates that it wasn’t some plot to foist some unproved ancient religion on top of Christianity.

Calling the celebration "Easter" or "Passover" matters little. I could call it "PassEaster" and it still wouldn't be one of the days that the Lord commanded us to observe or the days he observed himself.

The germanic languages recognize the same about passover, but have made a play on words about the “Sun(Son) RISING (resurrection) in the EASTERly direction.”

That's a pretty good justification, but again not biblical.

Eze 8:16 And he brought me into the inner court of the LORD's house, and, behold, at the door of the temple of the LORD, between the porch and the altar, were about five and twenty men, with their backs toward the temple of the LORD, and their faces toward the east; and they worshiped the sun toward the east.
Eze 8:17 Then he said unto me, Hast thou seen this, O son of man? Is it a light thing to the house of Judah that they commit the abominations which they commit here? for they have filled the land with violence, and have returned to provoke me to anger: and, lo, they put the branch to their nose.

I find it interesting that in verses above, the 25 have turned their back to the temple and are worshipping the rising sun. Interesting parallel to today, don't you think?

14 posted on 04/03/2007 7:11:09 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: Logophile
Does it matter?
I doubt that the ancient Christians celebrated Presidents' Day, Independence Day, or Thanksgiving the way we do, but those holidays seem harmless enough.

Apparently it does matter. Christ deemed it important enough that he created holy days for us to worship on. When he incarnated, he observed these same days he created.

15 posted on 04/03/2007 7:12:31 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: DouglasKC
Who are you to judge someone else's servant? To his own master he stands or falls. And he will stand, for the Lord is able to make him stand.

One man considers one day more sacred than another; another man considers every day alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind. He who regards one day as special, does so to the Lord. He who eats meat, eats to the Lord, for he gives thanks to God; and he who abstains, does so to the Lord and gives thanks to God. For none of us lives to himself alone and none of us dies to himself alone. If we live, we live to the Lord; and if we die, we die to the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord. - Romans 14:4-8

16 posted on 04/03/2007 7:20:24 AM PDT by Between the Lines (I am very cognizant of my fallibility, sinfulness, and other limitations. So should you.)
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To: Between the Lines
One man considers one day more sacred than another; another man considers every day alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind. He who regards one day as special, does so to the Lord. He who eats meat, eats to the Lord, for he gives thanks to God; and he who abstains, does so to the Lord and gives thanks to God. For none of us lives to himself alone and none of us dies to himself alone. If we live, we live to the Lord; and if we die, we die to the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord. - Romans 14:4-8

If you read all of Romans 14 in context there are a number of things that should leap out at you.

1. The focus of the chapter is eating and drinking practices. Approximately 75% of the verses directly mention eating or drinking and the rest of the verses are support for this central theme. Therefore the "days" mentioned somehow pertain to eating and drinking.

2. There is no mention of the Lord's Holy days (greek heorte). Therefore Paul or other early Christians never took this to mean that they are free to ignore the days that the Lord created holy for ones of their own choosing.

17 posted on 04/03/2007 7:26:48 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: xzins; DouglasKC; P-Marlowe; jude24; Kolokotronis; Gamecock; Buggman

This is simply an example of lousy research.

.............

Otherwise, the celebration happens at Passover, as other European countries acknowledge. There is no biblical problem with recognizing the passover time of year as the time of Jesus, the Lamb of God, being sacrificed. It is entirely biblical that that is when it occurred.

.................

Thoroughly biblical, and I’m a bit amused at some of the claptrap scholarship that purports to demonstrate otherwise. I’m sure that if I looked hard enough I could find some ancient god from some culture or other to naysay anything that anyone does.

12 posted on 04/03/2007 8:02:34 AM MDT by xzins

Name calling does not make it false.

Yah'shua ( Yah is become my Salvation ) commanded us to celebrate Pesach in His memory.

Sunday worship was mandated by Emperor Constantine the Pagan, Pontiff of the Roman church.

b'shem Yah'shua
18 posted on 04/03/2007 7:36:28 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (you shall know that I, YHvH, your Savior, and your Redeemer, am the Elohim of Ya'aqob. Isaiah 60:16)
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To: joebuck; DouglasKC

Actually, Christians celebrate Easter every Sunday. (”The Lords Day”). We just make it extra special once a year. In my book we can’t worship the Savior enough much less too often.

7 posted on 04/03/2007 7:44:20 AM MDT by joebuck

The only day called out be the "L-rd's Day" by the Elohim is Shabbat.

Sunday worship has for millennia been the worship of the Evil One.

b'shem Yah'shua
19 posted on 04/03/2007 7:45:51 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (you shall know that I, YHvH, your Savior, and your Redeemer, am the Elohim of Ya'aqob. Isaiah 60:16)
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To: xzins
It's Easter, which is always prime judiazing season. The legal(ist) eagles will be swarming in abundance. You would think that Paul had never written Galatians!

Chapter 4 (which I just finished teaching through last night) pretty much shoots all this stuff in the head forever. We are children of the free woman, the Heavenly Jerusalem. Let us rejoice with her in freedom!

20 posted on 04/03/2007 7:46:29 AM PDT by jboot (If I can't get a Josiah, I'll settle for a Jehu)
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To: DouglasKC

..there is no Christianity without Resurrection Sunday...


21 posted on 04/03/2007 7:46:50 AM PDT by WalterSkinner ( ..when there is any conflict between God and Caesar -- guess who loses?)
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To: WalterSkinner
..there is no Christianity without Resurrection Sunday...

**************

It certainly wouldn't be as uplifting.

22 posted on 04/03/2007 7:50:46 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: jboot
It's Easter, which is always prime judiazing season. The legal(ist) eagles will be swarming in abundance. You would think that Paul had never written Galatians!
Chapter 4 (which I just finished teaching through last night) pretty much shoots all this stuff in the head forever. We are children of the free woman, the Heavenly Jerusalem. Let us rejoice with her in freedom!

You're mixing up the religion of Judaism with biblical commandments of Jesus Christ. When you reject biblical holy days, you are rejecting the instructions of Christ himself to his followers.

23 posted on 04/03/2007 7:50:58 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: DouglasKC

You fail to recognize that Christ lived under the old covenant, and that we now live under a new covenant.


24 posted on 04/03/2007 7:53:41 AM PDT by jkl1122
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To: WalterSkinner
..there is no Christianity without Resurrection Sunday...

Sure there is. The Roman church didn't adopt Easter/Resurrection Sunday as an official church practice until 325 AD....almost three hundred years after the death of Christ. Christianity can, does and will exist without man created holidays. Christ insured this when he created holy days.

25 posted on 04/03/2007 7:54:48 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: trisham
It certainly wouldn't be as uplifting.

..let me clarify

No Resurrection--No Christianity...

26 posted on 04/03/2007 7:55:24 AM PDT by WalterSkinner ( ..when there is any conflict between God and Caesar -- guess who loses?)
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To: WalterSkinner

I was making a joke. Uplifting? Get it?


27 posted on 04/03/2007 7:57:33 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: WalterSkinner
Let me clarify No Resurrection--No Christianity...

No atoning death (at Passover), no Christianity. Many people were resurrected. Lazarus and the saints in Matthew 27 for example. The resurrection would have been meaningless without his perfect sinless life and his atoning death.

28 posted on 04/03/2007 8:02:10 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: All; Diego1618; kerryusama04; XeniaSt

No replies for a while, I’ve got to go for a while to a formal service honoring the Lord on this day. Perhaps diego, Chuck and kerryusama04 can answer any pressing questions.


29 posted on 04/03/2007 8:05:13 AM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: jkl1122
You fail to recognize that Christ lived under the old covenant, and that we now live under a new covenant.

24 posted on 04/03/2007 8:53:41 AM MDT by jkl1122

The New covenant of Jeremiah 31:31 ?
Je. 31:31 “The time is coming,” declares YHvH,
“when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house. of Judah.
b'shem Yah'shua
30 posted on 04/03/2007 8:19:52 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (you shall know that I, YHvH, your Savior, and your Redeemer, am the Elohim of Ya'aqob. Isaiah 60:16)
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To: DouglasKC
No mixup here.

Galatians 4:9-11
But now, after that ye have known God, or rather are known of God, how turn ye again to the weak and beggarly elements, whereunto ye desire again to be in bondage?
Ye observe days, and months, and times, and years.
I am afraid of you, lest I have bestowed upon you labour in vain.

Or, if you'd rather...

Galatians 4:21-26
Tell me, ye that desire to be under the law, do ye not hear the law? For it is written, that Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman.
But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh; but he of the freewoman was by promise.
Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar. For this Agar is mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, and is in bondage with her children.
But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all.

Christ did not give us a Spirit of bondage (to days, and months, and times, and years), but a Spirit of freedom.

31 posted on 04/03/2007 8:22:59 AM PDT by jboot (If I can't get a Josiah, I'll settle for a Jehu)
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To: XeniaSt
Sunday worship has for millennia been the worship of the Evil One.

The Christians I know, who worship on Sunday, worship God. The only way for your statement to be true is if God is the Evil One. Is that what you are saying?

32 posted on 04/03/2007 8:30:48 AM PDT by Titanites
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To: DouglasKC

The resurection is the crux of Christianity.

It’s been ripped off by a few other religions, and there’s been a whole lot of spinning other religious traditions to make them look similar but neither of those changes the fact.


33 posted on 04/03/2007 8:33:38 AM PDT by kawaii (Orthodox Christianity -- Proclaiming the Truth Since 33 A.D.)
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To: XeniaSt

Exactly.

Hebrews 8:7-13
(7) For if that first covenant had been faultless, then should no place have been sought for the second.
(8) For finding fault with them, he saith, Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah:
(9) Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt; because they continued not in my covenant, and I regarded them not, saith the Lord.
(10) For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people:
(11) And they shall not teach every man his neighbor, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest.
(12) For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their iniquities will I remember no more.
(13) In that he saith, A new covenant, he hath made the first old. Now that which decayeth and waxeth old is ready to vanish away.


34 posted on 04/03/2007 8:46:17 AM PDT by jkl1122
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To: DouglasKC
1. The focus of the chapter is eating and drinking practices.

I disagree, the focus is on not putting a stumbling block in front of weaker members using legalism, but instead to build them up and accept them.

If you read all of Romans 14 in context there are a number of things that should leap out at you.

If you want to see it in context you will have to include the first half of chapter 15 as well. Even though it is marked as a different chapter you can see how easily it flows from the previous chapter and is the concluding remarks on the same subject.


35 posted on 04/03/2007 8:51:28 AM PDT by Between the Lines (I am very cognizant of my fallibility, sinfulness, and other limitations. So should you.)
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To: XeniaSt

And some president of the US, Lincoln(?), mandated that Thanksgiving Day be celebrated.

His mandate had absolutely nothing to do with what was being done prior to that. Thanksgiving was already being celebrated all over the place.

Similarly, Sunday worship was already taking place, even from New Testament times.


36 posted on 04/03/2007 8:58:37 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who support the troops will pray for them to WIN!)
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To: pgkdan; ClearCase_guy
These supposed thousands know more than the rest of Christianity...the early Fathers and Doctors of the Church and all of the many hundreds of millions of Christians who have ever lived and celebrated Easter! They have some special knowledge the rest of us don't have. I thought the Church stamped out that Gnostic Heresy a long time ago. Well...theeeeey're back.

9 posted on 04/03/2007 7:47:08 AM MDT by pgkdan

Pagan Sunday worship did not begin until hundreds of years
after Yah'shua's resurrection on the 17th of Nissan,
as a New Beginning for mankind. see Genesis 8:4 for a forshadowing
b'shem Yah'shua
37 posted on 04/03/2007 9:05:50 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (you shall know that I, YHvH, your Savior, and your Redeemer, am the Elohim of Ya'aqob. Isaiah 60:16)
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To: DouglasKC

It’s not about the bunny. Come to Second Baptist. Tell your Peeps.


38 posted on 04/03/2007 9:08:27 AM PDT by ichabod1 ("Liberals read Karl Marx. Conservatives UNDERSTAND Karl Marx." Ronald Reagan)
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To: XeniaSt

What are you trying to say? In plain English please.


39 posted on 04/03/2007 9:09:43 AM PDT by pgkdan (Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions - G.K. Chesterton)
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To: DouglasKC

Yeah, I believe Passover is the only Holy day the Israelites were COMMANDED to celebrate. Since Christ is our Passover lamb, we are commanded to celebrate it too. If we don’t, we jolly well better be celebrating that other one.


40 posted on 04/03/2007 9:12:16 AM PDT by ichabod1 ("Liberals read Karl Marx. Conservatives UNDERSTAND Karl Marx." Ronald Reagan)
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To: jboot; P-Marlowe

I love it.

It is FOR FREEDOM that Christ has set you free.

Both Colossians and Romans clearly indicate we are not bound by others’ special celebrations or lack thereof.


41 posted on 04/03/2007 9:12:58 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who support the troops will pray for them to WIN!)
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To: kawaii

Well, there was Mithra... some say we ripped off Christ from that.


42 posted on 04/03/2007 9:14:53 AM PDT by ichabod1 ("Liberals read Karl Marx. Conservatives UNDERSTAND Karl Marx." Ronald Reagan)
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To: DouglasKC; Diego1618; XeniaSt
Hi Brethren,

We are on the second day of honoring our Savior and will be leaving soon for a holy conocation as well. This is the most blessed time of the year for the Christian. It is so wonderful to finally honor Christ as he actually commanded. I only hope more can come to the truth.

Luke 22:

15 And He said to them, With desire I have desired to eat this passover with you before I suffer.
16 For I say to you, I will not any more eat of it until it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God.
17 And He took the cup and gave thanks and said, Take this and divide it among yourselves.
18 For I say to you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine until the kingdom of God shall come.
19 And He took bread and gave thanks, and He broke it and gave it to them, saying, This is My body which is given for you, this do in remembrance of Me.

43 posted on 04/03/2007 9:20:56 AM PDT by kerryusama04 (Isa 8:20, Eze 22:26)
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To: XeniaSt

I think a clergyman told me that in the early Christian times, the Followers of The Way would participate in usual Sabbaoth worship on Saturday, and then participate in Christian worship on Sunday.


44 posted on 04/03/2007 9:22:47 AM PDT by ichabod1 ("Liberals read Karl Marx. Conservatives UNDERSTAND Karl Marx." Ronald Reagan)
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To: xzins
Easter is called by that name ONLY in nations with a Germanic language tradition. In the other European countries it is called “Passover.”

I renamed my Suburban a Lexus. I wonder if I can get a free loaner car next time it is in the shop?

45 posted on 04/03/2007 9:25:16 AM PDT by kerryusama04 (Isa 8:20, Eze 22:26)
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To: ichabod1

1. there’s precious little actual evidence as to what the cult of mithras beleived.

2. there’s zero proof as to which influenced which. (but a ton more actual evidence as to when christianity was founded, and what it beleived and when)

3. st paul traveled to antioch (i’m fairly sure it was antioch) where the cult of mithras was prevelent, this is used to suggest he copied parts of the mithran ideas; hint: it’s just as likely that the Christianity St Paul preached had an influence on the cult of mithras!

4. 90% of the similarities ascribed to the cult of mithras and Christianity are laughably untrue. For instance Mithras was aledged to be born of a virgin in a cave. this is true in as much as mithras was born out of a rock which presumably left a cave in its wake and presumably had never had sexual relations with any other rocks.


46 posted on 04/03/2007 9:34:00 AM PDT by kawaii (Orthodox Christianity -- Proclaiming the Truth Since 33 A.D.)
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To: xzins; jboot; P-Marlowe

How do you guys define sin? Are we free to sin in the New Covenant? Can we sin so that Grace may abound? How do you define harlotry in reference to prophesy and historical Israel?


47 posted on 04/03/2007 9:34:09 AM PDT by kerryusama04 (Isa 8:20, Eze 22:26)
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To: kerryusama04

The lexus comment makes no sense.


48 posted on 04/03/2007 9:39:48 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who support the troops will pray for them to WIN!)
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To: xzins

Renaming Easter “Passover” doesn’t make any sense, either.


49 posted on 04/03/2007 9:41:04 AM PDT by kerryusama04 (Isa 8:20, Eze 22:26)
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To: DouglasKC
The early Church had a Pascal celebration from the Apostolic Age. While the calculation of it caused a lot of controversy, it was celebrated.

The term “Easter” is not a common one, and is limited to English and German.

50 posted on 04/03/2007 9:41:36 AM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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