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To: livius
Ooops, “here,” meaning the US, where I live. One of the reasons that I have never been too sure what had to do with the Spanish translation and what was connected with the peculiarities of the priest is that there is a heavy charismatic influence in a lot of the Spanish language masses celebrated in the US.

And being of that background I really don't mind it, nevertheless, in my time I served full-fledged Pontifical Mass in the Novus Ordo celebrated by a very strict bishop and let me tell ya', it never made me pine for the Tridentine Mass -- that I never came to know until my late 30's.

Sure, we Latinos can be a tad more exhuberant in our Liturgy but for some reason, the current Mass in English has invited excesses of a different kind.

-Theo

16 posted on 06/21/2007 9:02:20 AM PDT by Teˇfilo (Visit Vivificat! - http://www.vivificat.org - A Catholic Blog of News, Commentary and Opinion)
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To: Teˇfilo

I think one of the reasons for the Latino-Charismatic connection is that during the early 70s (the foundation of many “Hispanic ministries” and parishes in the US), Charismatic Catholics were actually considerably more orthodox than many other Catholics. The Spanish language charismatic movement (which gave us such things as the song, De Colores) was part of this, and Hispanics were attracted to it because it was orthodox and most of them had come from countries that may have been a little dysfunctional politically, but were orthodox in religion. (This was before lefty politics had swept the Church in Latin America.)

The Spanish (in Spain) are very solemn and do not like informality in the mass. They are quite exuberant the rest of the time. When I went to a Papal audience in Rome, the Spaniards were literally jumping up and down, dancing sevillanas, and screaming, “Te amamos, Benedicto!” But now that the Spanish, particularly under the influence of the Cardinal Archbishop of Madrid, have started to return to formality and dignity in the mass, as well as to the traditional devotions that are the heart of Spain, church attendance has begun to climb.

Also, by the way, it was lay people who kept Spanish devotions alive during the worst period after Vatican II. I build belenes (Spanish Nativity scenes) and the belenista movement was purely lay people; the processions at Holy Week were also lay activities, organized by the Cofradías, and the clergy actually tried to stop them in the 1970s and 80s. But fortunately, the Spanish are so faithful they just kept on doing them anyway, and now all of a sudden, the clergy thinks it was their own idea all along...


20 posted on 06/21/2007 10:03:15 AM PDT by livius
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