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To: Teˇfilo

I think one of the reasons for the Latino-Charismatic connection is that during the early 70s (the foundation of many “Hispanic ministries” and parishes in the US), Charismatic Catholics were actually considerably more orthodox than many other Catholics. The Spanish language charismatic movement (which gave us such things as the song, De Colores) was part of this, and Hispanics were attracted to it because it was orthodox and most of them had come from countries that may have been a little dysfunctional politically, but were orthodox in religion. (This was before lefty politics had swept the Church in Latin America.)

The Spanish (in Spain) are very solemn and do not like informality in the mass. They are quite exuberant the rest of the time. When I went to a Papal audience in Rome, the Spaniards were literally jumping up and down, dancing sevillanas, and screaming, “Te amamos, Benedicto!” But now that the Spanish, particularly under the influence of the Cardinal Archbishop of Madrid, have started to return to formality and dignity in the mass, as well as to the traditional devotions that are the heart of Spain, church attendance has begun to climb.

Also, by the way, it was lay people who kept Spanish devotions alive during the worst period after Vatican II. I build belenes (Spanish Nativity scenes) and the belenista movement was purely lay people; the processions at Holy Week were also lay activities, organized by the Cofradías, and the clergy actually tried to stop them in the 1970s and 80s. But fortunately, the Spanish are so faithful they just kept on doing them anyway, and now all of a sudden, the clergy thinks it was their own idea all along...


20 posted on 06/21/2007 10:03:15 AM PDT by livius
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To: livius

It finally dawned on me that what happened after Vatican II was one of those periodic revolts among the lower clergy that cause great disruption. That is how the Reformation began, that’s how the Enlightenment began. Although some of the laity, mostly upper crust, and some of the hierarchy were involved, their reforms went ahead with very little respect for the opinions of those who they called “the people of God.”


22 posted on 06/21/2007 10:20:12 AM PDT by RobbyS ( CHIRHOa)
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To: livius; Teˇfilo
When my daughter was in Spain, she thought that the Mass at Santiago de Compostela was unbelievably gorgeous. The Spanish DO know how to celebrate a solemn High Mass!

The archdiocese here featured a Latin Mass last Friday as part of a Two Hearts society devotional evening. The priest (from the local FSSP Indult parish) brought his deacons, six altar boys, smells, bells, and his entire Schola Cantorum plus 3 ringer sopranos. The Schola did Schubert's "Mass in G" in its entirety during the Mass. It took 1 1/2 hours . . . but it was worth it. They had a Eucharistic Benediction, Procession, and Adoration afterwards until midnight, with 8 priests hearing Confessions throughout. (My daughter took the opportunity to get in the slowest line, she said the priest was a Jamaican and 'very sweet'.)

25 posted on 06/21/2007 10:58:13 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: livius
I agree pretty much with everything you said except for one thing: De Colores came from the Cursillo Movement, not from the Charismatics, although at times the members of both movements overlap.

Been there. Done that. :-)

-Theo

35 posted on 06/21/2007 4:03:20 PM PDT by Teˇfilo (Visit Vivificat! - http://www.vivificat.org - A Catholic Blog of News, Commentary and Opinion)
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