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MORTAL SIN and HOLY CONFESSION - The Antidote of Death
Boston Catholic Journal ^

Posted on 10/23/2007 4:05:27 PM PDT by NYer

First, Mortal Sin ...


Our excuses are numberless. In fact, they are as numberless as our sins, none of which are now deemed by us (and, for sorrow, by many priests) grievous enough to preclude our receiving the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ in Holy Communion. Most often they are reducible simply to this: "I have not committed any mortal sin".

Indeed.

For Catholics who have never been taught the difference between Mortal and Venial sin --- which is to say, the entire last generation of Catholics --- we must be clear about the notion of sin, especially the distinction between two kinds of sin, before we can proceed to even understand the necessity, as well as the inestimable value of Holy Confession.

Only one analogy suffices to make this distinction clear in a way that is particularly accessible to Western society (I do not say "civilization", for that has ceased). Let us look at the matter somatically, that is to say, through our bodies, or more likely than not, the bodies of others upon which we are, in one way or another, sexually fixated. Perhaps this will provide a visual cue, some imaginative element, to an otherwise immaterial reality:

The distinction between a Mortal Sin and a Venial Sin is akin to the difference between a minor wound ... and death. Is that succinct enough? Are you still unclear about the difference?

In other words, you may accumulate many minor wounds and still live, although each is an impediment to your health and, while small, if left unattended, may yet contribute to something more serious, something more debilitating. It is a small laceration ... awaiting infection.

Mortal wounds, on the other hand, may be many, but any one of them alone will bring you to death. It is not the case that, inflicted with a mortal wound, you may die ---the wound is called "mortal" precisely because, as a consequence of it, you in fact will die. In fact, we most often understand it in a posthumous context, in the past tense. The person is already dead, and that is why his injury was called "mortal".

It is of the nature of wounds that they are either the one or the other, although the non-mortal wound may be sufficiently grievous to cause lasting deformity or mutilation even if it does not culminate in death.



PHYSICS, BODIES, AND BULLETS



Clearly, we wish to avoid both, but failing this we immediately tend the wound, see a physician, and apply the recommended remedy. The medicine may be bitter, or the therapy arduous, but we do not curse the doctor for that, still less the laws of physics brought to bear upon human anatomy, in the way, say, of projectiles and the like. Bullets do those things. We do not like it, and we would that bullets behaved otherwise, but the reality is that, however regrettable the result, we cannot, for that reason, alter the path of the bullet nor make it less fatal to the body. The consequences of this concatenation of events are not within our will to change. I believe that we will all agree on this. We may argue that the bullet ought not have been shot, but having been shot we understand the inevitability of the result given laws inherent in physics, bodies and bullets.

That the trajectory of a projectile corresponds to a given amount of energy expended over a given distance --- and intersected by the human tegument through which it subsequently passes causing death, is a terrible occurrence to be sure, but not one, in and of itself, that we are likely to imprecate. We do not rage against the laws of physics. Indeed, we would find such indignation ... odd, to say nothing of futile.

The laws inherent in physics and the constitution of the human body, are simply not amenable to our will, and we recognize this. We do not despair over it, but become terribly practical given this recognition: we avoid bullets. However great our outrage, we will not find a sane individual standing long in disputation against it ...

The reality we wish to avoid, the reality avoided at all costs at the pulpit, is that Mortal Sin is deadly. You die as a result of it. Oh, not to yourself, and certainly not to the world. You will breathe and move and the world will applaud your posthumous existence. But you die to God --- your life in God ceases. The fact as little pleases us as it pleases our preachers --- sin has real, most often empirical and always inevitable consequences. The ability of sin to harm, and yes, even kill, is as real and as indifferent to our wishes as the laws of physics that impinge on our bodies.

In our post-enlightened, post-modern pretension to sophistication, we frankly find such a notion abhorrent to our effete sensitivities, social sensitivities that we have so delicately honed upon the touchstone of correctitude.

On the one hand, we concede the notion of crime and punishment but somehow never quite attain to any correspondence between sin and condemnation on the other. We attenuate our clemency in the courts of men, given the gravity of the crime, but do not attain to that same rigor in the tribunal of sin ... given the gravity of the sin. There are, apparently, no capital offenses in the city of God, even as they abound in the City of Man. A mortal life is held to be forfeit for a crime, but life immortal is not held forfeit for a sin.

It is an odd state of affairs that few of us believe that we can abolish crime, while most of us appear to believe that we have virtually abolished sin.

Crime, of course can in fact be abolished.

"How?", you ask.

It is simplicity itself. Legitimize what is criminal. Account nothing a crime and you abolish the notion of crime itself --- even as you leave the consequences intact.

"But that is absurd!", you exclaim.

In very deed ...

A cursory review of civil legislation over the past 30 years reveals that, not only is it not absurd, but attains to policy:

  • Abortion

  • Sexual Deviance (homosexuality, lesbianism, transsexualism, transgenderism)

  • Homosexual "marriage"

  • Cohabitation

  • Pornography

  • Prostitution (England, Scotland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, Philippines, offhand)

Few of us, I assume, would seek recourse to such a solution and for good reason. Legitimizing crime does not indemnify us against it --- however much we hold ourselves to have abolished it. Yes?

We can say as much of sin.

In fact, we have said as much. Unlike the immediate consequences of crime, the consequences of sin --- even temporally --- are often deferred, less immediate ... and because we apprehend them as remote, as distant, as impending only, we dismiss them for we fail to immediately see the terrible consequences they entail, consequences so terrible, so far-reaching, so much beyond our ken, that they have become effectively mythical, brooding like demons on some distant bourne that we obscurely perceive and never quite forget, an escarpment lost in light and shade where life quite suddenly drops off that abrupt precipice to death. We know it ... because we know that we dance on the dead.



And Now, Holy Confession ...


I am about to state something with which you are likely to disagree, and for good reason: my Parish Church is the holiest in all of Christendom; not just in the Archdiocese of Boston, but in all Massachusetts; very likely all New England --- perhaps even the entire world.

You will disagree.

In fact, you know your own Catholic Parish to be holiest, perhaps the most sinless parish in the world, and we will both appeal to the same reasons for making this remarkable statement: during Holy Communion the pews are literally emptied.

There is not a sinner among us; at least no sinner guilty of Mortal Sin which prevents our going to Holy Communion, since --- as all Catholics know --- we add the tremendous sin of sacrilege to whatever mortal sin we carry if we receive Holy Communion while not in a state of grace --- which is to say, free of mortal sin.

But as I ponder the empty pews, the stigma of being the sole sinner in the parish heavily upon me as many look askance at my kneeling while all others scramble to make their way to communion --- I at least wonder. Do Catholics, do all Catholics, do most Catholics, do some Catholics, even know what a mortal sin is any more? Do they know the difference between a mortal sin that sunders the soul from God, and a venial sin that merely impedes its union with God?

Since the entire congregation have had at least 8 years of Catechism, or Religious Education --- 8 to 10 years --- surely so simple, so basic, so fundamental a concept as the difference between serious sin and sins far less grievous in nature, is clearly apprehended.

A very clear analogy may be to the point: in the civic world, all of us know (probably because the penalty is clearly comprehended, immediate and forthcoming) the difference between grievously unlawful, or capital offenses such as murder and grand larceny, and misdemeanors, like receiving a speeding ticket or maliciously destroying a neighbor’s property. It is a no-brainer. We do not think twice, or rather, we do think twice in a given situation about the sanctions and penalties involved. It is, we are told, the means by which we maintain a "civil", a mutually responsible society. We acknowledge the concept of justice and understand very clearly why it is maintained and what penalties are incurred if it is violated. We have no problem with that. After all, the law is not some gratuitous abstraction, and you are a fool if you think that you can trifle with it and walk away. If the breach is serious enough you are clapped in irons, removed from the community, and deprived of your liberty until justice has exacted its tribute, until you have "paid your debt to society". By and large we are grateful for the severity of the law, even as its rigors make us uneasy. "There, but for the grace of God, go I ..."

We all recognize that our own behavior has not always been unimpeachable ... if not clearly actionable. We do not personally legislate parallel laws that contravene the laws of the state and hold, at any point of divergence, the private to abrogate the public law. It is the opposite which is true. We may find the laws of the state repugnant to us, unamenable to our own inclinations, even contrary to our own convictions --- in which case we are confronted with three clearly distinguishable alternatives: we can absent ourselves from the polity and choose to live elsewhere, under a constitution that more closely corresponds with our desiderations and convictions, if such exists; we can continue to enjoy the collateral benefits in the present state that constrains us to abide by the laws through which it is defined and by which it is governed --- or, we can seek to amend the law through the venues afforded us by the state.

What we cannot do is to enjoy the prerogatives of the state while either acting in defiance of it, or while subverting it. We understand this, and in fact underwrite it through maintaining our citizenship within it. We understand this broadly as a "Pledge of Allegiance".

In any event, we cannot construct a private and parallel universe of statutes and anticipate that the public universe of affairs will honor our privately legislated laws. If we choose to abide only by those laws of the state that we do not find disagreeable to us we have not attained to personal freedom, but to arbitrary license; not to civility, but to anarchy. We become both legislator and law. In such a solipsistic "society" the legislature and the corpus of law are as numerous as the individuals legislating them.

Well and good.

But what of God's Law?

Why, we must ask ourselves, is God's Law somehow less important, less pertinent to our behavior, why does it have less bearing upon our responsibilities and our choices --- and, most especially --- within Church? Is the Divine Law, are the laws of the Church, no more than pious and ultimately indolent sentiments --- rather than clearly articulated precepts with very real corresponding sanctions and responsibilities --- in other words, coherent laws?

Do we give tribute to Caesar but withhold it from God? Is the Fasces mightier than the Cross?

We are indeed a generation which had been nurtured on defiance to authority --- only seeing now, in our own children, the fruit of that unbridled defiance which we nurtured in them even as we pretended to "deplore it". Our children were ... "independent" ... not defiant, and we were proud --- until we began to detoxify them, to rehabilitate their behavior, to trade notes with our neighbors on "good analysts". Our kids still get the keys to the car, no matter how grievous their transgression ... their money for the mall --- just as we still get Holy Communion, no matter how grievous our offenses against God. We are as blind to our sins as we have made our children blind to their own. After all, a "good parent" "spares the rod" and does not descend to "atavistic behavior" such as punishing the child. And if we are such "good" parents --- how much "better" God? Surely, there is no sin, no offense so grievous, or so trite, as to offend Him ... nothing we can ever do or say such that we would ever forfeit our "right", not to the keys of the car but to the Kingdom, through the Bread of Angels ... Holy Communion --- that you as arrogantly insist is as much your right as the keys to the car ...,

Still pondering the empty pews, it would seem so. Perhaps it is the case that all the parishioners are in fact guiltless of civil crime, however petty (for these, too, are the stuff of Holy Confession) --- as well as sin.

The truly defining question appears to be this: to whom, we must genuinely ask ourselves, do we owe more --- to God or man? To the City of God or to the city of man?

On your blithe way to Holy Communion, ponder this ---- especially given the ultimate sanction placed before us by no less than Saint Paul:

"Whosoever shall eat this bread or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the Body and of
the Blood of the Lord.
"  (I Cor. 11:27)

...are you prepared to add sacrilege to your your sins?

Or has the notion of sacrilege itself gone the way of mortal sin ... also?

Go to Confession. You must go. It is the only antidote of Mortal Sin, and thus the antidote of death.


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Theology
KEYWORDS: confession; sin

1 posted on 10/23/2007 4:05:30 PM PDT by NYer
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To: Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...
There is much ignorance amongst the laity, concerning sin. To cite an example, I am gradually introducing this topic with my students, in our study of Church history, in preparation for Advent. One of the students said he had committed a sin too bad to bring to confession. That was my cue to recognizing just how poorly catechized some young people are, which is also a reflection on their family.

For many years, I too avoided confession thinking I could simply speak my sins to our Lord in private. How wrong I was! The priest is like a curtain between us and Jesus. We confess to God through the priest. There are no words more beautiful than those we hear at the end of Confession:

"I absolve you of your sins, in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen"

2 posted on 10/23/2007 4:13:19 PM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

While not a Catholic, I feel sorry for this student who feels he has sinned so bad that he can’t bring it to confession. I do hope he has repented to God by himself. Do you know? Thanks.


3 posted on 10/23/2007 5:29:17 PM PDT by ladyinred
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To: NYer

**Go to Confession. You must go. It is the only antidote of Mortal Sin, and thus the antidote of death.**

Go to Confession! Go to Confession! Be forgiven!

Don’t receive the Holy Eucharist unworthily!


4 posted on 10/23/2007 5:44:09 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: ladyinred; NYer
It is GOD that forgives our sins in Confession/Sacrament of Reconciliation.

Read the words that priest says!!!!!

 
enter the Table of Contents of the Catechism of the Catholic Church here
1449 The formula of absolution used in the Latin Church expresses the essential elements of this sacrament: the Father of mercies is the source of all forgiveness. He effects the reconciliation of sinners through the Passover of his Son and the gift of his Spirit, through the prayer and ministry of the Church:
God, the Father of mercies,
through the death and the resurrection of his Son
has reconciled the world to himself
and sent the Holy Spirit among us
for the forgiveness of sins;
through the ministry of the Church
may God give you pardon and peace,
and I absolve you from your sins in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.


5 posted on 10/23/2007 5:47:25 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: NYer

” “I absolve you of your sins, in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen” “

Are the Maronite rubrics for Confession the same as the Latin Church ones?


6 posted on 10/23/2007 5:48:32 PM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: All
Examination of Conscience

A Guide for Confession

How To Make a Good Confession (especially if you haven't gone in years)

Why Go to Confession? (Part 1) - Pastoral Letter of Archbishop Bruno Forte

Why Go to Confession? (Part 2) - Pastoral Letter of Archbishop Bruno Forte

Why Go to Confession? (Part 3) - Pastoral Letter of Archbishop Bruno Forte

Pulling Sin up by the Roots: The Need for Mortification

Reasons for Confession [Sacrament of Reconciliation]

Cardinal Stafford's Homily at Penitential Liturgy With an Examination of Conscience

How to Go to Confession

Fr. Z’s 20 Tips For Making A Good Confession

Learning to Confess

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Sacrament of]Confession

What happened to confession – Changing mores reflective of use

Confession Comeback

Repentance and Confession - Introduction [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

The Spiritual and Psychological Value of Frequent Confession

Pick a sin, any sin (Confession gone awry)

The Early Church Fathers on Confession / Reconciliation - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus

Catholics called from the idiot box to confession

Salvation: Just click and confess

Get Thee To A Confessional! (beautiful insight for those who dread going to Confession)

Emerging Trends: The Return to the Confessional

Confessing to 'sins' is booming in America (Evangelicals and Protestants take up practice)

A Comeback for Confession

MORTAL SIN and HOLY CONFESSION - The Antidote of Death

7 posted on 10/23/2007 5:50:30 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: NYer
My problem is that Confession can be so hard to get to. Our little parish offers the opportunity to confess only on Saturday afternoons beginning at 6:15 p.m. Anyone with a baby (as we have) knows how busy a Saturday afternoon can be! Of course, I make time to go when I can, but often there simply is no time; going to Confession would mean failing to do my duty toward my wife or child, and surely God would not want that. Too, we are often out of town on business over the weekend (please mark that: business, not vacation) and are unable to confess. What's a poor sinner to do?

Going to Hell is my greatest fear. I'm terrified that one of these days I'm going to unexpectedly find myself on the last page of my all-too-sinful life and die with unconfessed mortal sin upon my conscience. But what can I do? I would love to dash to Confession on the same day I sin, but the world is simply not arranged that way. If only we could confess by e-mail, or by means of a Web-based Java app...

8 posted on 10/23/2007 6:23:44 PM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: B-Chan

Can’t you make an appointment for Confession? or just show up at the rectory and ask the priest to hear your confession?


9 posted on 10/23/2007 9:13:32 PM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: ELS
Can’t you make an appointment for Confession? or just show up at the rectory and ask the priest to hear your confession?

I suppose I could, but our parish priest is already cruelly overworked, and I just can't bring myself to impose upon him further — though he would surely oblige me if I were to make such a request. I wish we had another priest in the parish to help him with his workload — including hearing Confessions.

10 posted on 10/23/2007 9:47:48 PM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: NYer
For many years, I too avoided confession thinking I could simply speak my sins to our Lord in private. How wrong I was! The priest is like a curtain between us and Jesus. We confess to God through the priest. There are no words more beautiful than those we hear at the end of Confession:

Where would you get an ideal like this??? It is completely unbiblical...

11 posted on 10/24/2007 6:10:23 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: ladyinred

“I feel sorry for this student who feels he has sinned so bad that he can’t bring it to confession.”

A lot of people have personal abuse, i.e., masturbation, pornography, things of that nature that are very difficult to confess.

It is easier to simply confess out loud to God in private, and then continue to perform the act. Once it is spoken and confessed to a priest, it becomes quite real and the inclination to continue the sin usually stops. The absolution actually does cleanse.


12 posted on 10/24/2007 7:26:41 AM PDT by OpusatFR
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To: B-Chan
Going to Hell is my greatest fear. I'm terrified that one of these days I'm going to unexpectedly find myself on the last page of my all-too-sinful life and die with unconfessed mortal sin upon my conscience. But what can I do? I would love to dash to Confession on the same day I sin, but the world is simply not arranged that way. If only we could confess by e-mail, or by means of a Web-based Java app...

As we all agree, absolution comes from God...Have you all been convinced the scripture is NOT the word of God???

When Jesus died, the veil of the Temple was wrent and is open...We can all pass thru...We do not need a priest to access God...

NO MAN stands between us and God, only Jesus Christ...

There are millions upon millions of Christians who do not fear Hell...It's not even an issue...

There is peace in our souls when it comes to the issue of Hell...That peace is available to all...

13 posted on 10/24/2007 9:08:58 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: ELS
Can’t you make an appointment for Confession? or just show up at the rectory and ask the priest to hear your confession?

C'mon you guys...You have to make an appointment with a man to get access to God??? What kind of God is that???

14 posted on 10/24/2007 9:12:32 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: Iscool

No, you can pray to God whenever. The Sacraments, however, are instituted by Christ Himself, and are ministered by His priests.


15 posted on 10/24/2007 9:15:35 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
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To: Iscool; B-Chan
You have to make an appointment with a man to get access to God?

No. B-Chan wrote that the regularly scheduled confession time was not convenient for him. I was suggesting other ways he could go to confession. Receiving the Sacrament of Penance is not the same thing as getting "access to God."

16 posted on 10/24/2007 9:21:31 AM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: Pyro7480
No, you can pray to God whenever. The Sacraments, however, are instituted by Christ Himself, and are ministered by His priests.

No, if a man (a priest) can determine who gets access to God and to when, he is not a minister, he's an administer...

God has no administers...He only has ministers...

17 posted on 10/24/2007 9:26:51 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: Iscool
Two of us on here have refuted what you've been saying, and you just carry on like nothing was ever said.

There are necessary steps before a Catholic should even GO to Confession. One is the Act of Contrition, when the pentitent CONFESSES TO GOD his/her fault.

You recall the story of the ten lepers. Jesus Himself said, "Go, show yourself to the priest." Sin is a spiritual leprosy.

18 posted on 10/24/2007 9:31:56 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
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To: ELS
No. B-Chan wrote that the regularly scheduled confession time was not convenient for him. I was suggesting other ways he could go to confession. Receiving the Sacrament of Penance is not the same thing as getting "access to God."

I realize that's what yuor church teaches, but the scripture teaches that absolution comes directly from God to the sinner, any time, 24/7...No mediator...No priest...

You want to pray to God, get your sins forgiven, walk thru that vail right up to the Throne and petition God directly...It's a done deal...We all have access...

19 posted on 10/24/2007 9:32:01 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: Iscool

I appreciate your sincere concern for my well-being. Thank you.


20 posted on 10/24/2007 9:36:43 AM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: Pyro7480
There are necessary steps before a Catholic should even GO to Confession. One is the Act of Contrition, when the pentitent CONFESSES TO GOD his/her fault.

Well of course...It's no different for a non-Catholic...

You recall the story of the ten lepers. Jesus Himself said, "Go, show yourself to the priest." Sin is a spiritual leprosy.

Yes I certainly do...And I believe every word of it...

But the veil had not been wrent at that time...Not until Jesus died on the cross...

21 posted on 10/24/2007 9:37:25 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: Iscool

vail=veil


22 posted on 10/24/2007 9:38:21 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: B-Chan
I appreciate your sincere concern for my well-being. Thank you.

And thank you because I am sincere...

23 posted on 10/24/2007 9:39:44 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: Pyro7480
Two of us on here have refuted what you've been saying, and you just carry on like nothing was ever said.

Remember your Gospel. Matthew 7:6

24 posted on 10/24/2007 9:42:04 AM PDT by Petronski (Congratulations Tribe! AL Central Champs)
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To: Petronski

:-)


25 posted on 10/24/2007 9:44:41 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
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To: Petronski
Remember your Gospel. Matthew 7:6

There's over 30,000 other scripture in there...You might do well to memorize some of those as well...

26 posted on 10/24/2007 9:52:17 AM PDT by Iscool (What if Jesus meant everything that He said...)
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To: Iscool

I remember my Matthew 7:6 too. Good day.


27 posted on 10/24/2007 9:55:50 AM PDT by Petronski (Congratulations Tribe! AL Central Champs)
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To: ladyinred
I do hope he has repented to God by himself. Do you know? Thanks.

Not to worry; he'll be going to Confession in a few more weeks ;-)

28 posted on 10/24/2007 9:56:14 AM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: Kolokotronis
Are the Maronite rubrics for Confession the same as the Latin Church ones?

Yes.

29 posted on 10/24/2007 10:31:37 AM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

Thanks, NYer. I wondered about that. The Melkites and the Ukrainians use the Orthodox rubrics but they also use the DL of +John Chrysostomos whereas the Maronite Divine Liturgy appears to be more Novus Ordo in form (if not in language!)Do you know if there is any move afoot to revise the rubrics of confession to an older Maronite form?


30 posted on 10/24/2007 12:15:13 PM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: Kolokotronis
Do you know if there is any move afoot to revise the rubrics of confession to an older Maronite form?

I have heard nothing about this whatsoever. For now, the Patriarch and his bishops are gradually implementing the changes agreed upon at the Synod held 2 years ago.

IMHO, the Patriarch has weightier matters on his mind right now. He traveled to the Vatican a few weeks ago. This is what he was apparently seeking.

Papal nuncio trying to get an agreement between Lebanese Christians

The situation in Lebanon is bleak.

31 posted on 10/24/2007 5:48:35 PM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: Iscool; ELS
I realize that's what yuor church teaches, but the scripture teaches that absolution comes directly from God to the sinner, any time, 24/7...No mediator...No priest...

According to Scripture

"And when he had said this, he breathed on [them], and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost: Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; [and] whose soever [sins] ye retain, they are retained." - John 20:22-23

Scripture is very clear on this.

In John 20:21, before He grants them the authority to forgive sins, Jesus says to the apostles, "as the Father sent me, so I send you." As Christ was sent by the Father to forgive sins, so Christ sends the apostles and their successors forgive sins.

In John 20:22, the Lord "breathes" on the apostles, and then gives them the power to forgive and retain sins. The only other moment in Scripture where God breathes on man is in Gen. 2:7, when the Lord "breathes" divine life into man. When this happens, a significant transformation takes place.

In John 20:23, Jesus says, "If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven. If you retain the sins of any, they are retained." In order for the apostles to exercise this gift of forgiving sins, the penitents must orally confess their sins to them because the apostles are not mind readers. The text makes this very clear.

But you know all this, dear friend, because you have read the Bible. And you have also read the posts from other freepers on the forum, defending Scripture. Why do you still pursue a false argument?

32 posted on 10/24/2007 6:00:23 PM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer

“The situation in Lebanon is bleak.”

Yeah, I know. Two of our families were over there this summer and got home the first week in September. Said things do not look good.


33 posted on 10/24/2007 6:22:26 PM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: NYer

There is one mediator between man and God, that is Jesus Christ.

Millions of non-Catholics, members of the catholic (universal Christian Church) church know that.

And also that the Bible says we (Christians) are all Priests.

I noticed up thread someone will get to go to confession in a couple of weeks.

He should not wait.

He can have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and talk to him, and confess his sins. Jesus will forgive him.

That’s so neat.


34 posted on 10/29/2007 12:27:01 AM PDT by Syncro
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To: ealgeone

Here is an open thread, ask away.


35 posted on 04/08/2014 7:56:26 PM PDT by narses (Matthew 7:6. He appears to have made up his mind let him live with the consequences.)
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To: NYer; KingOfVagabonds; Berlin_Freeper; UnRuley1; mlizzy; mc5cents; RichInOC; Prince of Space; ...
+

Freep-mail me to get on or off my pro-life and Catholic List:

Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of general interest.

36 posted on 04/08/2014 7:57:05 PM PDT by narses (Matthew 7:6. He appears to have made up his mind let him live with the consequences.)
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To: NYer

**Go to Confession. You must go. It is the only antidote of Mortal Sin, and thus the antidote of death.**

Amen!


37 posted on 04/08/2014 7:59:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: NYer

Thanks NYer. I went to confession last Saturday and it is amzing how that sacrament cleanses one’s soul and really helps with the temptation to commit the same sins again - it is truly stengthening to have a clean soul.

As far as the article: “at least 8 years of Catechism” and they still all feel holy enough to receive cofession without communion, it is because from the 1970’s on the catechesis didn’t address and completely purposefully ignored the true doctrine that it is a mortal sin to receive communion unworthily. They just don’t teach that anymore - at least not in the liberal northeastern dioceses where I was badly catchized in the 1970’s and then through the 40 years sicne as I have been raising ny daughters, they don’t. It was my own personal study and research that caused me to “stumble” on this incredibly important teaching!

It is right in the bible and vrey easy to understand:

1 Corinthians Chapter 11 verses 27 / 29
Therefore whosoever shall eat this bread, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord.

For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily eateth and drinketh judgment to himself, not discerning the body of the Lord.

These verses also clearly refer to the catholic (true) interpretation of the bible vs. the protestant - that the commemoration commanded in the Lord’s Supper includes the literal body of Christ, not a symbol.


38 posted on 04/09/2014 6:26:56 AM PDT by stonehouse01
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To: stonehouse01

sorry for mispellings - thought I had caught them all -
amazing
catechized
since


39 posted on 04/09/2014 6:29:27 AM PDT by stonehouse01
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To: Syncro

There is one mediator between man and God, that is Jesus Christ.

Correct:First Epistle of St. Paul to Timothy, Chapter 2 Verse 5
For there is one God, and one mediator of God and men, the Man Christ Jesus.

Jesus’ death on the cross performed this mediation so that men could now be saved by Grace.

THEN: according to the bible (John 20:22-23)

Jesus breathed on the apostles, gave them the Holy Ghost, and gave them the power to remit sins. it is in the bible.

If Jesus had not wanted this to be the method for the remission of sins, why would he have done it this way?

Jesus IS the one mediator. He AS the mediator sent the Holy Ghost to the apostles and explained to them HOW to remit sins.

BOTH facts are true since they are BOTH in scripture - one does not negate the other.


40 posted on 04/09/2014 8:16:47 AM PDT by stonehouse01
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To: NYer

The Pastor at our parish is a modernist. He took the occasion of Pope Benedict’s resignation to trash him and exult in the bad stuff he figured Francis would usher in.

(Many complaints deleted.)

He is hostile to me, and I resent him.

I know, I know: St. Francis said, “These hands have touched my Lord,” et cetera.

No one needs to be told that I am not a saint. It’s obvious. And I have trouble wilth receiving the sacrament from this priest.

What should I do?

Is it really all right to receive the eucharist if you are not aware of mortal sins, or is that just another VatII weasel notion?


41 posted on 04/09/2014 10:09:16 AM PDT by dsc (Any attempt to move a government to the left is a crime against humanity.)
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