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To: Mrs. Don-o
Therese volunteered to take care of the dying nun. She didn't expect to become infected, one would assume. The mother was obsessed with having at least one of her children enter a convent, become a priest and eventually become a saint.

At that point in history, 'consumption' was seen as a near-glamorous disease by many.

The public library has several biographies of Therese and the books on tape version of one of them is very frank about the social and emotional conflicts experienced by Therese. She adored her sister and could not imagine a life without her so she finagled her way into a carmelite convent years too early on the good word of her sister.

Her older sister egged her on to be 'holier than thou' and insisted that Therese write her book that made her a doctor of the church.

None of this diminshes the facts regarding the spiritual elightenment of Therese and the miracles she experienced and performed.

14 posted on 12/13/2007 6:59:30 PM PST by x_plus_one (The entire Islamic moral universe devolves solely from the life and teachings of Muhammad.)
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To: x_plus_one

Teresa’s social and emotional conflicts are well-covered in the literture, and I agree that they don’t diminish her greatness. After all, all thr saints had conflicts, and there’s nary a one who can be said to be free of neurosis and cdontradiction. It’s the human condition. The human condition is what God makes saints out of.


15 posted on 12/14/2007 3:20:35 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Point of information)
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