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To: texan75010

Good post. Have you ever read the apocrypha? I have, and from what I remember reading, it definitely has a different spirit than the Holy Bible. The saying “cleanliness is next to godliness.” comes from there.


34 posted on 04/04/2008 1:16:33 PM PDT by LuxMaker (The Constitution is a mere thing of wax in the hands of the judiciary, Thomas J 1819)
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To: LuxMaker
I have, and from what I remember reading, it definitely has a different spirit than the Holy Bible.

Maybe you didn't read the stunning prophecy of the passion and death of Our Lord in Wisdom chapter 2, then.

The saying “cleanliness is next to godliness.” comes from there.

That's news to me.

37 posted on 04/04/2008 1:32:07 PM PDT by Campion
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To: LuxMaker

Interesting, since 3/4 of the Old Testament quotes attributed to Jesus in the New Testament come from the “Apocrypha”. Since He did not reject them I won’t.


40 posted on 04/04/2008 2:20:32 PM PDT by big'ol_freeper ("Preach the Gospel always, and when necessary use words". ~ St. Francis of Assisi)
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To: LuxMaker; texan75010
That's apparently not so. From "The Phrase Finder":

CLEANLINESS IS NEXT TO GODLINESS - "This ancient proverb is said by some to have come from ancient Hebrew writings. However, its first appearance in English - though in slightly altered form - seems to be in the writings of Francis Bacon. In his 'Advancement of Learning' (1605) he wrote: 'Cleanness of body was ever deemed to proceed from a due reverence to God.' Near two centuries later John Wesley in one of his sermons (1791) indicated that the proverb was already well known in the form we use today. Wrote Wesley: 'Slovenliness is no part of religion.'Cleanliness is indeed next to Godliness.'"

From "Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins" by William and Mary Morris (HarperCollins, New York, 1977, 1988). There are a couple more details in "Random House Dictionary of Popular Proverbs and Sayings" (1996) by Gregory Y. Titelman (Random House, New York, 1996): ".According to the fourteenth edition of 'Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable,' it is an old Hebrew proverb used in the late 2nd century by Rabbi Phinehas ben-Yair. First attested in the United States in the 'Monthly Anthology and Boston Review' (1806). The proverb is found in varying forms."

80 posted on 04/06/2008 6:46:52 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Please pray for me.)
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