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Benedict XVI’s sermon at St. Patrick’s in NYC (With Fr. Z's Commentary)
WDTPRS ^ | 4/19/2008 | Benedict XVI (commentary by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf )

Posted on 04/19/2008 8:14:57 AM PDT by Pyro7480

Here is the text of the Holy Father’s sermon from St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City.  My emphases and comments:

Keep in mind that the readings for this Mass will be from the Mass of Pentecost, a theme similar to that celebrated in Nationals Stadium.  The Holy Father is trying to help American’s look for a new "anointing" of the United States, with its special role in the world, by the Holy Ghost.   This is a Votive Mass for the Universal Church.

Keep in mind that this Mass is for priests and religious.  Backdrop: The Holy Father has already addressed issues of the scandals of a few years ago.  He has also called for love by Catholics for their priests.

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

With great affection in the Lord, I greet all of you, who represent the Bishops, priests and deacons, the men and women in consecrated life, and the seminarians of the United States. I thank Cardinal Egan for his warm welcome and the good wishes which he has expressed in your name as I begin the fourth year of my papal ministry. I am happy to celebrate this Mass with you, who have been chosen by the Lord, who have answered his call, and who devote your lives to the pursuit of holiness, the spread of the Gospel and the building up of the Church in faith, hope and love.

Gathered as we are in this historic cathedral, how can we not think of the countless men and women who have gone before us, [continuity with the past] who labored for the growth of the Church in the United States, and left us a lasting legacy of faith and good works? [legacy’s must be respected] In today’s first reading we saw how, in the power of the Holy Spirit, the Apostles went forth from the Upper Room to proclaim God’s mighty works to people of every nation and tongue. In this country, the Church’s mission has always involved drawing people "from every nation under heaven" (cf. Acts 2:5) into spiritual unity, and enriching the Body of Christ by the variety of their gifts. [true inculturation, so long as what the Church gives is logically prior to what the world gives] As we give thanks for past blessings, and look to the challenges of the future, let us implore from God the grace of a new Pentecost for the Church in America.  [There is the over-arching theme.] May tongues of fire, combining burning love of God and neighbor with zeal for the spread of Christ’s Kingdom, descend on all present!

In this morning’s second reading, Saint Paul reminds us that spiritual unity – the unity which reconciles and enriches diversity – has its origin and supreme model in the life of the triune God.  [Interesting: a theological basis for a pluralistic society and Church in that society – even perhaps a political theory for a nation] As a communion of pure love and infinite freedom, the Blessed Trinity constantly brings forth new life in the work of creation and redemption. The Church, as "a people made one by the unity of the Father, the Son and the Spirit" (cf. Lumen Gentium, 4), is called to proclaim the gift of life, to serve life, and to promote a culture of life. Here in this cathedral, our thoughts turn naturally to the heroic witness to the Gospel of life borne by the late Cardinals Cooke and O’Connor. [a great legacy of which New York’s Church can ] The proclamation of life, life in abundance, must be the heart of the new evangelization. For true life – our salvation – can only be found in the reconciliation, freedom and love which are God’s gracious gift.

This is the message of hope we are called to proclaim and embody in a world where self-centeredness, greed, violence, and cynicism so often seem to choke the fragile growth of grace in people’s hearts. Saint Irenaeus, with great insight, understood that the command which Moses enjoined upon the people of Israel: "Choose life!" (Dt 30:19) was the ultimate reason for our obedience to all God’s commandments (cf. Adv. Haer. IV, 16, 2-5). Perhaps we have lost sight of this: in a society where the Church seems legalistic and "institutional" to many people, our most urgent challenge is to communicate the joy born of faith and the experience of God’s love.

I am particularly happy that we have gathered in Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. Perhaps more than any other church in the United States, this place is known and loved as "a house of prayer for all peoples" (cf. Is 56:7; Mk 11:17). Each day thousands of men, women and children enter its doors and find peace within its walls. Archbishop John Hughes, who – as Cardinal Egan has reminded us – was responsible for building this venerable edifice, wished it to rise in pure Gothic style. He wanted this cathedral to remind the young Church in America of the great spiritual tradition to which it was heir, and to inspire it to bring the best of that heritage to the building up of Christ’s body in this land. [Continuity.]  I would like to draw your attention to a few aspects of this beautiful structure which I think can serve as a starting point for a reflection on our particular vocations within the unity of the Mystical Body.  [Remember that the Holy Father addressed, if I remember correctly, priests and seminarians in a book called Built of Living Stones. We are to be built up in a spiritual ediface, as St. Paul describes.]

The first has to do with the stained glass windows, which flood the interior with mystic light. From the outside, those windows are dark, heavy, even dreary. But once one enters the church, they suddenly come alive; reflecting the light passing through them, they reveal all their splendor. Many writers – here in America we can think of Nathaniel Hawthorne – have used the image of stained glass to illustrate the mystery of the Church herself. It is only from the inside, from the experience of faith and ecclesial life, that we see the Church as she truly is: flooded with grace, resplendent in beauty, adorned by the manifold gifts of the Spirit. It follows that we, who live the life of grace within the Church’s communion, are called to draw all people into this mystery of light.  [Marvelous.  Simply wonderful.]

This is no easy task in a world which can tend to look at the Church, like those stained glass windows, "from the outside": a world which deeply senses a need for spirituality, yet finds it difficult to "enter into" the mystery of the Church. Even for those of us within, the light of faith can be dimmed by routine, and the splendor of the Church obscured by the sins and weaknesses of her members. [Yes… I find this to be true at times.] It can be dimmed too, by the obstacles encountered in a society which sometimes seems to have forgotten God and to resent even the most elementary demands of Christian morality. [This is a rather strong comment about our society, I think.] You, who have devoted your lives to bearing witness to the love of Christ and the building up of his Body, know from your daily contact with the world around us how tempting it is at times to give way to frustration, disappointment and even pessimism about the future. In a word, it is not always easy to see the light of the Spirit all about us, the splendor of the Risen Lord illuminating our lives and instilling renewed hope in his victory over the world (cf. Jn 16:33).

Yet the word of God reminds us that, in faith, we see the heavens opened, and the grace of the Holy Spirit lighting up the Church and bringing sure hope to our world. "O Lord, my God," the Psalmist sings, "when you send forth your spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the earth" (Ps 104:30). [Renew the face of the American Church!]  These words evoke the first creation, when the Spirit of God hovered over the deep (cf. Gen 1:2). And they look forward to the new creation, at Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles and established the Church as the first fruits of a redeemed humanity (cf. Jn 20:22-23). These words summon us to ever deeper faith in God’s infinite power to transform every human situation, to create life from death, and to light up even the darkest night. [Life from death… another comment on our society, in a way.  This is not an entire condemnation of course, but an observation.  Life from death or from sterility is, in Scripture, a real sign of God’s presence and favor.  It is also what sets Christianity apart from all other religions… creatio ex nihilo.] And they make us think of another magnificent phrase of Saint Irenaeus: "where the Church is, there is the Spirit of God; where the Spirit of God is, there is the Church and all grace" (Adv. Haer. III, 24, 1).

This leads me to a further reflection about the architecture of this church. Like all Gothic cathedrals, it is a highly complex structure, whose exact and harmonious proportions symbolize the unity of God’s creation. [If the light image perhaps reflected a faith dimension, this will underscore the rational aspect of our faith and the Church.  Faith and reason in harmony.  Light fills a highly "articulated" space.]  Medieval artists often portrayed Christ, the creative Word of God, as a heavenly "geometer", compass in hand, who orders the cosmos with infinite wisdom and purpose. Does this not bring to mind our need to see all things with the eyes of faith, and thus to grasp them in their truest perspective, in the unity of God’s eternal plan? This requires, as we know, constant conversion, and a commitment to acquiring "a fresh, spiritual way of thinking" (cf. Eph 4:23). It also calls for the cultivation of those virtues which enable each of us to grow in holiness and to bear spiritual fruit within our particular state of life. Is not this ongoing "intellectual" conversion as necessary as "moral" conversion for our own growth in faith, our discernment of the signs of the times, and our personal contribution to the Church’s life and mission? [This is fantastic, folks.]

For all of us, I think, one of the great disappointments which followed the Second Vatican Council, [!  He mentions Vatican II and "disappointment" in the same sentence!] with its call for a greater engagement in the Church’s mission to the world, has been the experience of division between different groups, different generations, different members of the same religious family. We can only move forward if we turn our gaze together to Christ! In the light of faith, we will then discover the wisdom and strength needed to open ourselves to points of view which may not necessarily conform to our own ideas or assumptions. Thus we can value the perspectives of others, be they younger or older than ourselves, and ultimately hear "what the Spirit is saying" to us and to the Church (cf. Rev 2:7). In this way, we will move together towards that true spiritual renewal desired by the Council, a renewal which can only strengthen the Church in that holiness and unity indispensable for the effective proclamation of the Gospel in today’s world.  [We seem not to have been moving correctly toward that spiritual renewal in a terribly straight line.]

Was not this unity of vision and purpose – rooted in faith and a spirit of constant conversion and self-sacrifice – the secret of the impressive growth of the Church in this country? We need but think of the remarkable accomplishment of that exemplary American priest, the Venerable Michael McGivney, [founder of the Knights of Columbus… recently the decree for his heroic life of virtue, an important step in a cause for beatification, was issued by the Congregation for Saints and approved by the Holy Father.] whose vision and zeal led to the establishment of the Knights of Columbus, or of the legacy of the generations of religious and priests who quietly devoted their lives to serving the People of God in countless schools, hospitals and parishes.  [The KofC are in many ways similar the Catholic Verein phenomenon Papa Ratzinger would have known in German speaking countries.]

[This is where he touches the painful points.]

Here, within the context of our need for the perspective given by faith, and for unity and cooperation in the work of building up the Church, I would like say a word about the sexual abuse that has caused so much suffering. I have already had occasion to speak of this, and of the resulting damage to the community of the faithful. Here I simply wish to assure you, dear priests and religious, of my spiritual closeness as you strive to respond with Christian hope to the continuing challenges that this situation presents. I join you in praying that this will be a time of purification for each and every particular Church and religious community, and a time for healing. I also encourage you to cooperate with your Bishops who continue to work effectively to resolve this issue. May our Lord Jesus Christ grant the Church in America a renewed sense of unity and purpose, as all – Bishops, clergy, religious and laity – move forward in hope, in love for the truth and for one another.  [It is appropriate that he speaks only of ]

Dear friends, these considerations lead me to a final observation about this great cathedral in which we find ourselves. The unity of a Gothic cathedral, we know, is not the static unity of a classical temple, but a unity born of the dynamic tension of diverse forces which impel the architecture upward, pointing it to heaven. [Upward!  Transcendence!  The "vertical" focus of worship!] Here too, we can see a symbol of the Church’s unity, which is the unity – as Saint Paul has told us – of a living body composed of many different members, each with its own role and purpose. Here too we see our need to acknowledge and reverence the gifts of each and every member of the body as "manifestations of the Spirit given for the good of all" (1 Cor 12:7). Certainly within the Church’s divinely-willed structure there is a distinction to be made between hierarchical and charismatic gifts (cf. Lumen Gentium, 4). Yet the very variety and richness of the graces bestowed by the Spirit invite us constantly to discern how these gifts are to be rightly ordered in the service of the Church’s mission. [Both orders must be respected.] You, dear priests, by sacramental ordination have been configured to Christ, the Head of the Body. You, dear deacons, have been ordained for the service of that Body. You, dear men and women religious, both contemplative and apostolic, have devoted your lives to following the divine Master in generous love and complete devotion to his Gospel. All of you, who fill this cathedral today, as wells as your retired, elderly and infirm brothers and sisters, who unite their prayers and sacrifices to your labors, are called to be forces of unity within Christ’s Body. By your personal witness, and your fidelity to the ministry or apostolate entrusted to you, you prepare a path for the Spirit. For the Spirit never ceases to pour out his abundant gifts, to awaken new vocations and missions, and to guide the Church, as our Lord promised in this morning’s Gospel, into the fullness of truth (cf. Jn 16:13).

So let us lift our gaze upward! And with great humility and confidence, let us ask the Spirit to enable us each day to grow in the holiness that will make us living stones in the temple [as I mentioned above…] which he is even now raising up in the midst of our world. If we are to be true forces of unity, let us be the first to seek inner reconciliation through penance. Let us forgive the wrongs we have suffered and put aside all anger and contention. Let us be the first to demonstrate the humility and purity of heart which are required to approach the splendor of God’s truth. In fidelity to the deposit of faith entrusted to the Apostles (cf. 1 Tim 6:20), let us be joyful witnesses of the transforming power of the Gospel!

Dear brothers and sisters, in the finest traditions of the Church in this country, may you also be the first friend of the poor, the homeless, the stranger, the sick and all who suffer. [The Holy Father is speaking very much from the point of view of Spe salvi, but do not forget his encyclical Deus caritas est.  Faith is authentic when it also tends to works of mercy, and works of mercy must have the proper starting point.] Act as beacons of hope, casting the light of Christ upon the world, and encouraging young people to discover the beauty of a life given completely to the Lord and his Church. I make this plea [!] in a particular way to the many seminarians and young religious present. All of you have a special place in my heart. Never forget that you are called to carry on, with all the enthusiasm and joy that the Spirit has given you, a work that others have begun, a legacy that one day you too will have to pass on to a new generation. Work generously and joyfully, for he whom you serve is the Lord!  [The Holy Father’s motto was "co-workers of the truth".]

The spires of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral are dwarfed by the skyscrapers of the Manhattan skyline, [an apt metaphor for the Church in the modern world] yet in the heart of this busy metropolis, they are a vivid reminder of the constant yearning of the human spirit to rise to God. As we celebrate this Eucharist, let us thank the Lord for allowing us to know him in the communion of the Church, to cooperate in building up his Mystical Body, and in bringing his saving word as good news to the men and women of our time. And when we leave this great church, let us go forth as heralds of hope in the midst of this city, and all those places where God’s grace has placed us. In this way, the Church in America will know a new springtime in the Spirit, and point the way to that other, greater city, the new Jerusalem, whose light is the Lamb (Rev 21:23). For there God is even now preparing for all people a banquet of unending joy and life. Amen.

Truly amazing.

I am struck by the use of the Gothic architecture.

Medieval architecture is distinguished by its "articulation", its division into balanced defined parts or sections.

"Articulation" comes from the Latin word artus, "joint", as in the knuckle or your fingers or joints of your limbs.  Think of St. Thomas Aquinas, who wrote in "articles".  Ancient and medieval teachers would organize their arguments and present each point while holding up a hand, palm outward, and pointing to the joints of their fingers as they delivered their points.

In a sense, the articulation of a gothic structure reveals the same organization of thought.  It is highly rational, which gives structure to faith.  Pope Benedict has been very interested in the question of the priority of faith and of reason and how they fit together.  This sermon reveals decades of deep reflection on this relationship of faith and reason.

The Holy Father has articulated a foundation for a new view on the part of clergy for the Church in the United States and their vocations for and within it.


TOPICS: Catholic; Current Events; Religion & Culture; Theology
KEYWORDS: benedictxvi; bxvi; catholic; homily; nyc; pope; transcript
Wow!
1 posted on 04/19/2008 8:14:57 AM PDT by Pyro7480
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To: Siobhan; Canticle_of_Deborah; NYer; Salvation; sandyeggo; american colleen; Desdemona; ...

Catholic ping!


2 posted on 04/19/2008 8:15:41 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: Pyro7480

Thanks.. looking forward to reading this thread.


3 posted on 04/19/2008 8:17:11 AM PDT by big'ol_freeper ("Preach the Gospel always, and when necessary use words". ~ St. Francis of Assisi)
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To: big'ol_freeper

I don’t think you’re on my ping list. Do you want to be on it?


4 posted on 04/19/2008 8:19:36 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: Pyro7480

Sure thing.


5 posted on 04/19/2008 8:23:48 AM PDT by big'ol_freeper ("Preach the Gospel always, and when necessary use words". ~ St. Francis of Assisi)
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To: Pyro7480
Goosebumps. Inspiring!
6 posted on 04/19/2008 8:35:05 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: Pyro7480
Absolutely SPLENDID. Everything was beautiful, and the Mass was celebrated very reverently by all, and the music was great.

I could have done without "I Am the Bread of Life", but that's de minimis.

The Biebl was perfect, the Beethoven "Hallelujah" was out of this world, they really hit it square on the head.

Does anybody know what the first organ postlude was? We're pretty sure it's French, and we're taking bets that it was Gabriel Faure' or Louis Vierne, much beloved of the organ department at Juilliard . . . .

7 posted on 04/19/2008 8:45:38 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: AnAmericanMother
Does anybody know what the first organ postlude was?

I can't seem to find it. I only found the list of sung music.

9 posted on 04/19/2008 8:52:39 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: Pyro7480
Me too.

I'm betting on Vierne just because (1) it definitely sounded French - there's a 20th c. school of French organ music that has a distinct sound both in the chords and in the rippling effect of arpeggios over the big chords, and Vierne was the master of that style; (2) our choirmaster got his Ph.D. in organ performance at Juilliard and taught there. Odds are the organist at St. Pat's is a graduate too. They LOVE the French organ composers at Juilliard. We hear them all the time!

10 posted on 04/19/2008 8:57:48 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother
You definitely have an ear for music!

I have that skill to a limited nature. If I turn on the classical music radio station down here, and if the piece is by Vivaldi, Bach, or Mozart, I usually know it's by them almost immediately, even if it's not a famous piece.

11 posted on 04/19/2008 9:01:41 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: Pyro7480
The organist has her doctorate in organ performance from Eastman, not Juilliard - not a local. Her name is Jennifer Pascual, she is the first woman to hold the appointment, and she selected most of the music in conference with Cardinal Egan, who is also a musician.

The prelude was Bach "In Dir ist Freude" - have been able to find that.

12 posted on 04/19/2008 9:07:59 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

Ah! So it was Bach! Where did you find that information?


13 posted on 04/19/2008 9:08:54 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: Pyro7480
What really throws me is when a piece is by one of the lesser known composers who sounds kinda like a famous one, but isn't. Or something transitional, like very early Beethoven (which sounds something like Mozart).

I've had a crash course in musical listening since we joined this parish! Our prep school attached to the parish offers college level courses in conjunction with Spring Hill College in Mobile - and our choirmaster taught one, "History of Western Church Music." It was astounding - so far as I can tell, he knows everything about everybody from Mr. Ockeghem forward, and we just lapped it up. The man is a genius. I can't remember half of what he said, but even that puts you way ahead of the game.

14 posted on 04/19/2008 9:11:07 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Pyro7480
Let's see, now, where did I go? I went to St. Pat's website to find out who the organist was and read her C.V., then googled her name, and found a recent news story about selecting the music for the service. The story mentioned the title of the prelude.

Still don't know what that postlude was, and it's bugging me. I'm sure that our choirmaster will know, we're singing a wedding tonight so I'll ask him and he'll be sure to know - if he was listening (and I'm pretty sure he would unless he had something going on at church).

15 posted on 04/19/2008 9:13:24 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Pyro7480

And what a beautiful preparation for hearing the Epistle for the Fifth Sunday of Easter:

1 Peter 2:4-10

Come to him, a living stone, through rejected by mortals yet chosen and precious in God’s sight, and like living stones, let yourselves be built into a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.

For it stands in scripture:

“See, I am laying in Zion a stone,
a cornerstone chosen and precious;
and whoever believes in him will never be put to shame.”

To you then who believe, he is precious; but for those who do not believe,

“The stone that the builders rejected
has become the very head of the corner,”

and

“A stone that makes them stumble,
and a rock that will make them fall.”

They stumble because they disobey the word, as they were destined to do.

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation. God’s own people, in order that you may proclaim the mighty acts of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.

Once you were not a people
but now you are God’s people;
one you had not received mercy,
but now you have received mercy.


16 posted on 04/19/2008 9:13:32 AM PDT by lightman (Waiting for Godot and searching for Avignon.)
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To: AnAmericanMother
A very fitting choice, given all the struggles that the American Church has faced this past decade:

Text: Johann Lindemann; trans. by Catherine Winkworth
Music: Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi
Tune: IN DIR IST FREUDE, Meter: Irr.

1. In thee is gladness, amid all sadness,
Jesus, sunshine of my heart.
By thee are given the gifts of heaven,
thou the true Redeemer art.
Our souls thou makest, our bonds thou breakest;
who trusts thee surely hath built securely,
and stands forever. Alleluia!
Our hearts are pining to see thy shining;
dying or living, to thee are cleaving;
naught can us sever. Alleluia!

2. If God be ours, we fear no powers,
not of earth or sin or death.
God sees and blesses in worst distresses,
and can change them in a breath.
Wherefore the story tell of God's glory
with heart and voices; all heaven rejoices,
singing forever; Alleluia!
We shout for gladness, triumph o'er sadness,
loving and praising, voices still raising
glad hymns forever: Alleluia!

17 posted on 04/19/2008 9:21:43 AM PDT by lightman (Waiting for Godot and searching for Avignon.)
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To: lightman
Catherine Winkworth was one of those unsung geniuses.

Her translations of German hymns are superb. She manages to hit the meaning quite closely, while preserving meter and rhyme.

18 posted on 04/19/2008 10:05:05 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Pyro7480
The first has to do with the stained glass windows, which flood the interior with mystic light. From the outside, those windows are dark, heavy, even dreary. But once one enters the church, they suddenly come alive; reflecting the light passing through them, they reveal all their splendor. Many writers – here in America we can think of Nathaniel Hawthorne – have used the image of stained glass to illustrate the mystery of the Church herself. It is only from the inside, from the experience of faith and ecclesial life, that we see the Church as she truly is: flooded with grace, resplendent in beauty, adorned by the manifold gifts of the Spirit. It follows that we, who live the life of grace within the Church’s communion, are called to draw all people into this mystery of light.

WOW!!! This is a beautiful and in my mind a perfect analogy! It's the kind of thought that has been in my mind, in an inchoherent, unassembled manner and when I read it it was a real 'eureka' moment. Fantastic!

19 posted on 04/19/2008 10:09:49 AM PDT by pgkdan (Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions - G.K. Chesterton)
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To: pgkdan

Interesting. I thought this as I walked along the outside of my church after Mass last Sunday. From the outside, the windows have no meaning, the colors do not show. But, from inside, the pictures and colors in them come alive and the changing light streaming in illuminates the people in the pews. This is only outward symbol of what we experience inwardly. This is why I want many others to come into the Church, and join us.


20 posted on 04/19/2008 11:28:55 AM PDT by La Enchiladita (God bless you.)
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To: pgkdan

Double WOW!


21 posted on 04/19/2008 11:31:37 AM PDT by RobbyS
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To: Pyro7480

Caught bits and pieces on the Catholic Radio station while running around town.

LOVED the analogy Papa B made about the Catholic Church as a whole is like a moving glacier.


22 posted on 04/19/2008 12:54:55 PM PDT by Global2010 (Prayer Bump for Catholic Freeper Salvation)
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To: AnAmericanMother
Papa B plays the piano um cant recollect what classical music he plays but it was his choice to learn that particular composer because Beethoven was to complicated for him.

It is the piano. Right?

Someone correct me if I am wrong.

What an God given intellect.

Also heard commentary that he didnt even have any desire to be the next Pope.

He was ready to retire and live near his brother who is also a Priest.

I am also thankful that the Pope/Catholic faith visit threads here at FRee pub have not brought out bitter non Catholics/ ex Catholics.

Have been so busy that I have not been plagued with the Views Joy Bashers nasty mouth deny ing her own Church.

I like the show on prior to the view but as work at home goes I dont have a clicker handy and we like the show after the View so we just leave the tv be.

We the People have been givin the gift of wisdom in choosing the new Pope....2008 years of leaders folks.

23 posted on 04/19/2008 1:07:15 PM PDT by Global2010 (Prayer Bump for Catholic Freeper Salvation)
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To: trisham

Yes definitely Feelin the Holy Spirit sweep through all.

I cant imagine life without the Holy Spirit here on Earth.


24 posted on 04/19/2008 1:09:42 PM PDT by Global2010 (Prayer Bump for Catholic Freeper Salvation)
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To: Pyro7480; kosta50

Here’s what its all about:

“This is the message of hope we are called to proclaim and embody in a world where self-centeredness, greed, violence, and cynicism so often seem to choke the fragile growth of grace in people’s hearts. Saint Irenaeus, with great insight, understood that the command which Moses enjoined upon the people of Israel: “Choose life!” (Dt 30:19) was the ultimate reason for our obedience to all God’s commandments (cf. Adv. Haer. IV, 16, 2-5). Perhaps we have lost sight of this: in a society where the Church seems legalistic and “institutional” to many people, our most urgent challenge is to communicate the joy born of faith and the experience of God’s love.”

There, P, is one of the reasons we Orthodoxers find so much to admire and “listen to” with this pope.


25 posted on 04/19/2008 1:12:50 PM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated)
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To: Pyro7480; AnAmericanMother

Typical Freeper.

(info laden)

: )

Hello AnAmeriMom from our Cold Nose Crew.

Just bought 3 new first time for the CNCrew doggie goody filled Rubic cube chew toys.....hours of fun. Ruff.


26 posted on 04/19/2008 1:14:28 PM PDT by Global2010 (Prayer Bump for Catholic Freeper Salvation)
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To: Pyro7480; Salvation

Catholic Ping.


27 posted on 04/19/2008 1:17:56 PM PDT by Global2010 (Prayer Bump for Catholic Freeper Salvation)
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To: Global2010
Three barks and a tail wag to the Handsome Yellow Boys from the Black-Choc Duo.

Goody filled Rubiks . . . sounds interesting! Who makes 'em?

Little Ruby got her CGC (don't know how - judges must have been bribed!) and just took her second Agility class and did very well. She LOVES clicker training (lotza treats!) When Ruby's ready to compete I'll probably restart Shelley in Preferred (lower jump heights and slower times for older dogs) so that she gets to play too. But Ruby is a rocket and bids fair to be extremely fast on course . . . .

28 posted on 04/19/2008 1:29:14 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Global2010
I think BXVI plays Mozart . . . and I think it was Brahms he didn't feel he was up to (can't blame him - Brahms is tough.)

He is a pianist, quite a good one despite his modesty. He really is such a humble man - his statement at the end of the Mass that he was hopeful of God's grace to fill the shoes of St. Peter . . . the goodness just shines forth from his face. He seems to me like a wise and much-loved uncle or grandpapa with his loving children gathered around his feet.

29 posted on 04/19/2008 1:31:45 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

Excellant news on Ruby.

My poop thief (a local teacher does weekly yard doggie doo pick up as a side job to pay for her agility trial trips) has had her older dog out of trial due to a 6 month long leg injury but I will ask her (if a can catch her thieving here) about the clicker training to get her view.

The Rubic cube is my made up word for the black rubber ball with all the lil slots to salavitate all over and try and solve the puzzle for the boys to get the goody.

I didn’t read the package I will take a look as the packaging is sitting in the recycle bin.


30 posted on 04/19/2008 1:37:03 PM PDT by Global2010 (Prayer Bump for Catholic Freeper Salvation)
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To: Pyro7480

Father Z, you’re great, I love ya, I relish every comment on your blog...but...the words of the Holy Father are perfect and complete just as they are. This is one time you can lay down your red pencil, relax, and just enjoy the profound beauty and insights!


31 posted on 04/19/2008 1:40:01 PM PDT by baa39 ("God bless America" - Pope Benedict XVI, April 16, 2008)
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To: AnAmericanMother; All

Pope just arrived at St. Joseph seminary in Yonkers for youth rally PING.

CNN live.

What a great break from Hillary live....she actually/literally promised the American people the MOON and back.

Back to the subject of Papa B just wow the stirring in my heart.


32 posted on 04/19/2008 1:41:52 PM PDT by Global2010 (Prayer Bump for Catholic Freeper Salvation)
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To: baa39

LOL. I was trying to find the homily without the commentary, but it wasn’t available at the time.


33 posted on 04/19/2008 1:43:17 PM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: Pyro7480

Here’s the same sermon, without the Cardinal’s comments or bolding. Seems helpful to read it both ways...

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

With great affection in the Lord, I greet all of you, who represent the Bishops, priests and deacons, the men and women in consecrated life, and the seminarians of the United States. I thank Cardinal Egan for his warm welcome and the good wishes which he has expressed in your name as I begin the fourth year of my papal ministry. I am happy to celebrate this Mass with you, who have been chosen by the Lord, who have answered his call, and who devote your lives to the pursuit of holiness, the spread of the Gospel and the building up of the Church in faith, hope and love.

Gathered as we are in this historic cathedral, how can we not think of the countless men and women who have gone before us, who labored for the growth of the Church in the United States, and left us a lasting legacy of faith and good works? In today’s first reading we saw how, in the power of the Holy Spirit, the Apostles went forth from the Upper Room to proclaim God’s mighty works to people of every nation and tongue. In this country, the Church’s mission has always involved drawing people “from every nation under heaven” (cf. Acts 2:5) into spiritual unity, and enriching the Body of Christ by the variety of their gifts. As we give thanks for past blessings, and look to the challenges of the future, let us implore from God the grace of a new Pentecost for the Church in America. May tongues of fire, combining burning love of God and neighbor with zeal for the spread of Christ’s Kingdom, descend on all present!

In this morning’s second reading, Saint Paul reminds us that spiritual unity – the unity which reconciles and enriches diversity – has its origin and supreme model in the life of the triune God. As a communion of pure love and infinite freedom, the Blessed Trinity constantly brings forth new life in the work of creation and redemption. The Church, as “a people made one by the unity of the Father, the Son and the Spirit” (cf. Lumen Gentium, 4), is called to proclaim the gift of life, to serve life, and to promote a culture of life. Here in this cathedral, our thoughts turn naturally to the heroic witness to the Gospel of life borne by the late Cardinals Cooke and O’Connor. The proclamation of life, life in abundance, must be the heart of the new evangelization. For true life – our salvation – can only be found in the reconciliation, freedom and love which are God’s gracious gift.

This is the message of hope we are called to proclaim and embody in a world where self-centeredness, greed, violence, and cynicism so often seem to choke the fragile growth of grace in people’s hearts. Saint Irenaeus, with great insight, understood that the command which Moses enjoined upon the people of Israel: “Choose life!” (Dt 30:19) was the ultimate reason for our obedience to all God’s commandments (cf. Adv. Haer. IV, 16, 2-5). Perhaps we have lost sight of this: in a society where the Church seems legalistic and “institutional” to many people, our most urgent challenge is to communicate the joy born of faith and the experience of God’s love.

I am particularly happy that we have gathered in Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. Perhaps more than any other church in the United States, this place is known and loved as “a house of prayer for all peoples” (cf. Is 56:7; Mk 11:17). Each day thousands of men, women and children enter its doors and find peace within its walls. Archbishop John Hughes, who – as Cardinal Egan has reminded us – was responsible for building this venerable edifice, wished it to rise in pure Gothic style. He wanted this cathedral to remind the young Church in America of the great spiritual tradition to which it was heir, and to inspire it to bring the best of that heritage to the building up of Christ’s body in this land. I would like to draw your attention to a few aspects of this beautiful structure which I think can serve as a starting point for a reflection on our particular vocations within the unity of the Mystical Body.

The first has to do with the stained glass windows, which flood the interior with mystic light. From the outside, those windows are dark, heavy, even dreary. But once one enters the church, they suddenly come alive; reflecting the light passing through them, they reveal all their splendor. Many writers – here in America we can think of Nathaniel Hawthorne – have used the image of stained glass to illustrate the mystery of the Church herself. It is only from the inside, from the experience of faith and ecclesial life, that we see the Church as she truly is: flooded with grace, resplendent in beauty, adorned by the manifold gifts of the Spirit. It follows that we, who live the life of grace within the Church’s communion, are called to draw all people into this mystery of light.

This is no easy task in a world which can tend to look at the Church, like those stained glass windows, “from the outside”: a world which deeply senses a need for spirituality, yet finds it difficult to “enter into” the mystery of the Church. Even for those of us within, the light of faith can be dimmed by routine, and the splendor of the Church obscured by the sins and weaknesses of her members. It can be dimmed too, by the obstacles encountered in a society which sometimes seems to have forgotten God and to resent even the most elementary demands of Christian morality. You, who have devoted your lives to bearing witness to the love of Christ and the building up of his Body, know from your daily contact with the world around us how tempting it is at times to give way to frustration, disappointment and even pessimism about the future. In a word, it is not always easy to see the light of the Spirit all about us, the splendor of the Risen Lord illuminating our lives and instilling renewed hope in his victory over the world (cf. Jn 16:33).

Yet the word of God reminds us that, in faith, we see the heavens opened, and the grace of the Holy Spirit lighting up the Church and bringing sure hope to our world. “O Lord, my God,” the Psalmist sings, “when you send forth your spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the earth” (Ps 104:30). These words evoke the first creation, when the Spirit of God hovered over the deep (cf. Gen 1:2). And they look forward to the new creation, at Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles and established the Church as the first fruits of a redeemed humanity (cf. Jn 20:22-23). These words summon us to ever deeper faith in God’s infinite power to transform every human situation, to create life from death, and to light up even the darkest night. And they make us think of another magnificent phrase of Saint Irenaeus: “where the Church is, there is the Spirit of God; where the Spirit of God is, there is the Church and all grace” (Adv. Haer. III, 24, 1).

This leads me to a further reflection about the architecture of this church. Like all Gothic cathedrals, it is a highly complex structure, whose exact and harmonious proportions symbolize the unity of God’s creation. Medieval artists often portrayed Christ, the creative Word of God, as a heavenly “geometer”, compass in hand, who orders the cosmos with infinite wisdom and purpose. Does this not bring to mind our need to see all things with the eyes of faith, and thus to grasp them in their truest perspective, in the unity of God’s eternal plan? This requires, as we know, constant conversion, and a commitment to acquiring “a fresh, spiritual way of thinking” (cf. Eph 4:23). It also calls for the cultivation of those virtues which enable each of us to grow in holiness and to bear spiritual fruit within our particular state of life. Is not this ongoing “intellectual” conversion as necessary as “moral” conversion for our own growth in faith, our discernment of the signs of the times, and our personal contribution to the Church’s life and mission?

For all of us, I think, one of the great disappointments which followed the Second Vatican Council, with its call for a greater engagement in the Church’s mission to the world, has been the experience of division between different groups, different generations, different members of the same religious family. We can only move forward if we turn our gaze together to Christ! In the light of faith, we will then discover the wisdom and strength needed to open ourselves to points of view which may not necessarily conform to our own ideas or assumptions. Thus we can value the perspectives of others, be they younger or older than ourselves, and ultimately hear “what the Spirit is saying” to us and to the Church (cf. Rev 2:7). In this way, we will move together towards that true spiritual renewal desired by the Council, a renewal which can only strengthen the Church in that holiness and unity indispensable for the effective proclamation of the Gospel in today’s world.

Was not this unity of vision and purpose – rooted in faith and a spirit of constant conversion and self-sacrifice – the secret of the impressive growth of the Church in this country? We need but think of the remarkable accomplishment of that exemplary American priest, the Venerable Michael McGivney, whose vision and zeal led to the establishment of the Knights of Columbus, or of the legacy of the generations of religious and priests who quietly devoted their lives to serving the People of God in countless schools, hospitals and parishes.

Here, within the context of our need for the perspective given by faith, and for unity and cooperation in the work of building up the Church, I would like say a word about the sexual abuse that has caused so much suffering. I have already had occasion to speak of this, and of the resulting damage to the community of the faithful. Here I simply wish to assure you, dear priests and religious, of my spiritual closeness as you strive to respond with Christian hope to the continuing challenges that this situation presents. I join you in praying that this will be a time of purification for each and every particular Church and religious community, and a time for healing. I also encourage you to cooperate with your Bishops who continue to work effectively to resolve this issue. May our Lord Jesus Christ grant the Church in America a renewed sense of unity and purpose, as all – Bishops, clergy, religious and laity – move forward in hope, in love for the truth and for one another.

Dear friends, these considerations lead me to a final observation about this great cathedral in which we find ourselves. The unity of a Gothic cathedral, we know, is not the static unity of a classical temple, but a unity born of the dynamic tension of diverse forces which impel the architecture upward, pointing it to heaven. Here too, we can see a symbol of the Church’s unity, which is the unity – as Saint Paul has told us – of a living body composed of many different members, each with its own role and purpose. Here too we see our need to acknowledge and reverence the gifts of each and every member of the body as “manifestations of the Spirit given for the good of all” (1 Cor 12:7). Certainly within the Church’s divinely-willed structure there is a distinction to be made between hierarchical and charismatic gifts (cf. Lumen Gentium, 4). Yet the very variety and richness of the graces bestowed by the Spirit invite us constantly to discern how these gifts are to be rightly ordered in the service of the Church’s mission. You, dear priests, by sacramental ordination have been configured to Christ, the Head of the Body. You, dear deacons, have been ordained for the service of that Body. You, dear men and women religious, both contemplative and apostolic, have devoted your lives to following the divine Master in generous love and complete devotion to his Gospel. All of you, who fill this cathedral today, as wells as your retired, elderly and infirm brothers and sisters, who unite their prayers and sacrifices to your labors, are called to be forces of unity within Christ’s Body. By your personal witness, and your fidelity to the ministry or apostolate entrusted to you, you prepare a path for the Spirit. For the Spirit never ceases to pour out his abundant gifts, to awaken new vocations and missions, and to guide the Church, as our Lord promised in this morning’s Gospel, into the fullness of truth (cf. Jn 16:13).

So let us lift our gaze upward! And with great humility and confidence, let us ask the Spirit to enable us each day to grow in the holiness that will make us living stones in the temple which he is even now raising up in the midst of our world. If we are to be true forces of unity, let us be the first to seek inner reconciliation through penance. Let us forgive the wrongs we have suffered and put aside all anger and contention. Let us be the first to demonstrate the humility and purity of heart which are required to approach the splendor of God’s truth. In fidelity to the deposit of faith entrusted to the Apostles (cf. 1 Tim 6:20), let us be joyful witnesses of the transforming power of the Gospel!

Dear brothers and sisters, in the finest traditions of the Church in this country, may you also be the first friend of the poor, the homeless, the stranger, the sick and all who suffer. Act as beacons of hope, casting the light of Christ upon the world, and encouraging young people to discover the beauty of a life given completely to the Lord and his Church. I make this plea in a particular way to the many seminarians and young religious present. All of you have a special place in my heart. Never forget that you are called to carry on, with all the enthusiasm and joy that the Spirit has given you, a work that others have begun, a legacy that one day you too will have to pass on to a new generation. Work generously and joyfully, for he whom you serve is the Lord!

The spires of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral are dwarfed by the skyscrapers of the Manhattan skyline, yet in the heart of this busy metropolis, they are a vivid reminder of the constant yearning of the human spirit to rise to God. As we celebrate this Eucharist, let us thank the Lord for allowing us to know him in the communion of the Church, to cooperate in building up his Mystical Body, and in bringing his saving word as good news to the men and women of our time. And when we leave this great church, let us go forth as heralds of hope in the midst of this city, and all those places where God’s grace has placed us. In this way, the Church in America will know a new springtime in the Spirit, and point the way to that other, greater city, the new Jerusalem, whose light is the Lamb (Rev 21:23). For there God is even now preparing for all people a banquet of unending joy and life.

Amen.


34 posted on 04/19/2008 1:56:47 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: AnalogReigns

Thanks! I was thinking about doing that myself.


35 posted on 04/19/2008 1:58:47 PM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: baa39
Father Z, you’re great, I love ya, I relish every comment on your blog...but...the words of the Holy Father are perfect and complete just as they are. This is one time you can lay down your red pencil, relax, and just enjoy the profound beauty and insights!

*****************

I don't know. I liked having the good Father's observations.

36 posted on 04/19/2008 2:02:51 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: Tax-chick

bttt


37 posted on 04/19/2008 2:04:45 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("It's hard to be stressed out over your spouse while you're in a bathtub drinking wine together.")
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To: baa39

My thoughts exactly, see post #34 above...


38 posted on 04/19/2008 2:06:27 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: Pyro7480

Thanks for the flag. Most inspiring.

And the music for the NY Mass was just wonderful. What a contrast to the inappropriate stuff they put in the DC Mass!


39 posted on 04/20/2008 9:50:24 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Position Wanted: Expd Rep voter looking for a party that is actually conservative.)
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