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Catechism of the Catholic Church: Prologue
Vatican ^ | 1997

Posted on 06/14/2008 1:01:32 PM PDT by markomalley

PROLOGUE

"FATHER, . . . this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent."1 "God our Savior desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth."2 "There is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved"3 - than the name of JESUS.

I. THE LIFE OF MAN - TO KNOW AND LOVE GOD

1 God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

2 So that this call should resound throughout the world, Christ sent forth the apostles he had chosen, commissioning them to proclaim the gospel: "Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age."4 Strengthened by this mission, the apostles "went forth and preached everywhere, while the Lord worked with them and confirmed the message by the signs that attended it."5

3 Those who with God's help have welcomed Christ's call and freely responded to it are urged on by love of Christ to proclaim the Good News everywhere in the world. This treasure, received from the apostles, has been faithfully guarded by their successors. All Christ's faithful are called to hand it on from generation to generation, by professing the faith, by living it in fraternal sharing, and by celebrating it in liturgy and prayer.6

II. HANDING ON THE FAITH: CATECHESIS

4 Quite early on, the name catechesis was given to the totality of the Church's efforts to make disciples, to help men believe that Jesus is the Son of God so that believing they might have life in his name, and to educate and instruct them in this life, thus building up the body of Christ.7

5 "Catechesis is an education in the faith of children, young people and adults which includes especially the teaching of Christian doctrine imparted, generally speaking, in an organic and systematic way, with a view to initiating the hearers into the fullness of Christian life."8

6 While not being formally identified with them, catechesis is built on a certain number of elements of the Church's pastoral mission which have a catechetical aspect, that prepare for catechesis, or spring from it. They are: the initial proclamation of the Gospel or missionary preaching to arouse faith; examination of the reasons for belief; experience of Christian living; celebration of the sacraments; integration into the ecclesial community; and apostolic and missionary witness.9

7 "Catechesis is intimately bound up with the whole of the Church's life. Not only her geographical extension and numerical increase, but even more her inner growth and correspondence with God's plan depend essentially on catechesis."10

8 Periods of renewal in the Church are also intense moments of catechesis. In the great era of the Fathers of the Church, saintly bishops devoted an important part of their ministry to catechesis. St. Cyril of Jerusalem and St. John Chrysostom, St. Ambrose and St. Augustine, and many other Fathers wrote catechetical works that remain models for us.11

9 "The ministry of catechesis draws ever fresh energy from the councils. The Council of Trent is a noteworthy example of this. It gave catechesis priority in its constitutions and decrees. It lies at the origin of the Roman Catechism, which is also known by the name of that council and which is a work of the first rank as a summary of Christian teaching. . . ."12

The Council of Trent initiated a remarkable organization of the Church's catechesis. Thanks to the work of holy bishops and theologians such as St. Peter Canisius, St. Charles Borromeo, St. Turibius of Mongrovejo or St. Robert Bellarmine, it occasioned the publication of numerous catechisms.

10 It is therefore no surprise that catechesis in the Church has again attracted attention in the wake of the Second Vatican Council, which Pope Paul VI considered the great catechism of modern times. The General Catechetical Directory (1971) the sessions of the Synod of Bishops devoted to evangelization (1974) and catechesis (1977), the apostolic exhortations Evangelii nuntiandi (1975) and Catechesi tradendae

(1979), attest to this. The Extraordinary Synod of Bishops in 1985 asked "that a catechism or compendium of all Catholic doctrine regarding both faith and morals be composed"13 The Holy Father, Pope John Paul II, made the Synod's wish his own, acknowledging that "this desire wholly corresponds to a real need of the universal Church and of the particular Churches."14 He set in motion everything needed to carry out the Synod Fathers' wish.

III. THE AIM AND INTENDED READERSHIP OF THE CATECHISM

11 This catechism aims at presenting an organic synthesis of the essential and fundamental contents of Catholic doctrine, as regards both faith and morals, in the light of the Second Vatican Council and the whole of the Church's Tradition. Its principal sources are the Sacred Scriptures, the Fathers of the Church, the liturgy, and the Church's Magisterium. It is intended to serve "as a point of reference for the catechisms or compendia that are composed in the various countries".15

12 This work is intended primarily for those responsible for catechesis: first of all the bishops, as teachers of the faith and pastors of the Church. It is offered to them as an instrument in fulfilling their responsibility of teaching the People of God. Through the bishops, it is addressed to redactors of catechisms, to priests, and to catechists. It will also be useful reading for all other Christian faithful.

IV. STRUCTURE OF THIS CATECHISM

13 The plan of this catechism is inspired by the great tradition of catechisms which build catechesis on four pillars: the baptismal profession of faith (the Creed), the sacraments of faith, the life of faith (the Commandments), and the prayer of the believer (the Lord's Prayer).

Part One: The Profession of Faith

14 Those who belong to Christ through faith and Baptism must confess their baptismal faith before men.16

First therefore the Catechism expounds revelation, by which God addresses and gives himself to man, and the faith by which man responds to God (Section One). The profession of faith summarizes the gifts that God gives man: as the Author of all that is good; as Redeemer; and as Sanctifier. It develops these in the three chapters on our baptismal faith in the one God: the almighty Father, the Creator; his Son Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior; and the Holy Spirit, the Sanctifier, in the Holy Church (Section Two).

Part Two: The Sacraments of Faith

15 The second part of the Catechism explains how God's salvation, accomplished once for all through Christ Jesus and the Holy Spirit, is made present in the sacred actions of the Church's liturgy (Section One), especially in the seven sacraments (Section Two).

Part Three: The Life of Faith

16 The third part of the Catechism deals with the final end of man created in the image of God: beatitude, and the ways of reaching it - through right conduct freely chosen, with the help of God's law and grace (Section One), and through conduct that fulfills the twofold commandment of charity, specified in God's Ten Commandments (Section Two).

Part Four: Prayer in the Life of Faith

17 The last part of the Catechism deals with the meaning and importance of prayer in the life of believers (Section One). It concludes with a brief commentary on the seven petitions of the Lord's Prayer (Section Two), for indeed we find in these the sum of all the good things which we must hope for, and which our heavenly Father wants to grant us.

V. PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS FOR USING THIS CATECHISM

18 This catechism is conceived as an organic presentation of the Catholic faith in its entirety. It should be seen therefore as a unified whole. Numerous cross-references in the margin of the text (numbers found at the end of a sentence referring to other paragraphs that deal with the same theme), as well as the analytical index at the end of the volume, allow the reader to view each theme in its relationship with the entirety of the faith.

19 The texts of Sacred Scripture are often not quoted word for word but are merely indicated by a reference (cf.). For a deeper understanding of such passages, the reader should refer to the Scriptural texts themselves. Such Biblical references are a valuable working-tool in catechesis.

20 The use of small print in certain passages indicates observations of an historical or apologetic nature, or supplementary doctrinal explanations.

21 The quotations, also in small print, from patristic, liturgical, magisterial or hagiographical sources, are intended to enrich the doctrinal presentations. These texts have often been chosen with a view to direct catechetical use.

22 At the end of each thematic unit, a series of brief texts in small italics sums up the essentials of that unit's teaching in condensed formula. These IN BRIEF summaries may suggest to local catechists brief summary formula that could be memorized.

VI. NECESSARY ADAPTATIONS

23 The Catechism emphasizes the exposition of doctrine. It seeks to help deepen understanding of faith. In this way it is oriented towards the maturing of that faith, its putting down roots in personal life, and its shining forth in personal conduct.17

24 By design, this Catechism does not set out to provide the adaptation of doctrinal presentations and catechetical methods required by the differences of culture, age, spiritual maturity, and social and ecclesial condition among all those to whom it is addressed. Such indispensable adaptations are the responsibility of particular catechisms and, even more, of those who instruct the faithful:

Whoever teaches must become "all things to all men" (1 Cor 9:22), to win everyone to Christ. . . . Above all, teachers must not imagine that a single kind of soul has been entrusted to them, and that consequently it is lawful to teach and form equally all the faithful in true piety with one and the same method! Let them realize that some are in Christ as newborn babes, others as adolescents, and still others as adults in full command of their powers. . . . Those who are called to the ministry of preaching must suit their words to the maturity and understanding of their hearers, as they hand on the teaching of the mysteries of faith and the rules of moral conduct.18

Above all - Charity

25 To conclude this Prologue, it is fitting to recall this pastoral principle stated by the Roman Catechism:

The whole concern of doctrine and its teaching must be directed to the love that never ends. Whether something is proposed for belief, for hope or for action, the love of our Lord must always be made accessible, so that anyone can see that all the works of perfect Christian virtue spring from love and have no other objective than to arrive at love.19


1 Jn 17 3.

And this is eternal life, that they know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent.

2 1 Tim 2:3-4.

This is good, and it is acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.

3 Acts 4:12.

And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved."

4 Mt 28:19-20.

Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age."

5 Mk 16:20.

And they went forth and preached everywhere, while the Lord worked with them and confirmed the message by the signs that attended it. Amen.

6 Cf. Acts 2:42.

And they devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.

7 Cf. John Paul II, Apostolic Exhortation Catechesi tradendae 1; 2.

Christ's Final Command

1. The Church has always considered catechesis one of her primary tasks, for, before Christ ascended to His Father after His resurrection, He gave the apostles a final command - to make disciples of all nations and to teach them to observe all that He had commanded.(1) He thus entrusted them with the mission and power to proclaim to humanity what they had heard, what they had seen with their eyes, what they had looked upon and touched with their hands, concerning the Word of Life.(2) He also entrusted them with the mission and power to explain with authority what He had taught them, His words and actions, His signs and commandments. And He gave them the Spirit to fulfill this mission.

Very soon the name of catechesis was given to the whole of the efforts within the Church to make disciples, to help people to believe that Jesus is the Son of God, so that believing they might have life in His name,(3) and to educate and instruct them in this life and thus build up the Body of Christ. The Church has not ceased to devote her energy to this task.

Paul VI's Solicitude

2. The most recent Popes gave catechesis a place of eminence in their pastoral solicitude. Through his gestures, his preaching, his authoritative interpretation of the Second Vatican Council (considered by him the great catechism of modern times), and through the whole of his life, my venerated predecessor Paul VI served the Church's catechesis in a particularly exemplary fashion. On March 18, 1971, he approved the General Catechetical Directory prepared by the Sacred Congregation for the Clergy, a directory that is still the basic document for encouraging and guiding catechetical renewal throughout the Church. He set up the International Council for Catechesis in 1975. He defined in masterly fashion the role and significance of catechesis in the life and mission of the Church when he addressed the participants in the first International Catechetical Congress on September 25, 1971,(4) and he returned explicitly to the subject in his Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii nuntiandi.(5) He decided that catechesis, especially that meant for children and young people, should be the theme of the fourth general assembly of the synod of Bishops,(6) which was held in October 1977 and which I myself had the joy of taking part in.

8 CT 18.

Catechesis as a Stage in Evangelization

18. Catechesis cannot be dissociated from the Church's pastoral and missionary activity as a whole. Nevertheless it has a specific character which was repeatedly the object of inquiry during the preparatory work and throughout the course of the fourth general assembly of the synod of Bishops. The question also interests the public both within and outside the Church.

This is not the place for giving a rigorous formal definition of catechesis, which has been sufficiently explained in the General Catechetical Directory.(47) It is for specialists to clarify more and more its concept and divisions.

In view of uncertainties in practice, let us simply recall the essential landmarks - they are already solidly established in Church documents - that are essential for an exact understanding of catechesis and without which there is a risk of failing to grasp its full meaning and import.

All in all, it can be taken here that catechesis is an education of children, young people and adults in the faith, which includes especially the teaching of Christian doctrine imparted, generally speaking, in an organic and systematic way, with a view to initiating the hearers into the fullness of Christian life. Accordingly, while not being formally identified with them, catechesis is built on a certain number of elements of the Church's pastoral mission that have a catechetical aspect, that prepare for catechesis, or that spring from it. These elements are: the initial proclamation of the Gospel or missionary preaching through the kerygma to arouse faith, apologetics or examination of the reasons for belief, experience of Christian living, celebration of the sacraments, integration into the ecclesial community, and apostolic and missionary witness.

Let us first of all recall that there is no separation or opposition between catechesis and evangelization. Nor can the two be simply identified with each other. Instead, they have close links whereby they integrate and complement each other.

The Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii nuntiandi of December 8, 1975, on evangelization in the modern world, rightly stressed that evangelization - which has the aim of bringing the Good News to the whole of humanity, so that all may live by it - is a rich, complex and dynamic reality, made up of elements, or one could say moments, that are essential and different from each other, and that must all be kept in view simultaneously.(48) Catechesis is one of these moments - a very remarkable one - in the whole process of evangelization.

9 CT 18.

See footnote 8, above
10 CT 13.

Councils and Missionary Activity

13. The ministry of catechesis draws ever fresh energy from the councils. The Council of Trent is a noteworthy example of this. It gave catechesis priority in its constitutions and decrees. It lies at the origin of the Roman Catechism, which is also known by the name of that council and which is a work of the first rank as a summary of Christian teaching and traditional theology for use by priests. It gave rise to a remarkable organization of catechesis in the Church. It aroused the clergy to their duty of giving catechetical instruction. Thanks to the work of holy theologians such as St. Charles Borromeo, St. Robert Bellarmine and St. Peter Canisius, it involved the publication of catechisms that were real models for that period. May the Second Vatican Council stir up in our time a like enthusiasm and similar activity.

The missions are also a special area for the application of catechesis. The People of God have thus continued for almost 2,000 years to educate themselves in the faith in ways adapted to the various situations of believers and the many different circumstances in which the Church finds herself.

Catechesis is intimately bound up with the whole of the Church's life. Not only her geographical extension and numerical increase, but even more, her inner growth and correspondence with God's plan depend essentially on catechesis. It is worthwhile pointing out some of the many lessons to be drawn from the experiences in Church history that we have just recalled.

11 Cf. CT 12.

The Fathers of the Church

12. This mission of teaching that belonged to the apostles and their first fellow workers was continued by the Church. Making herself day after day a disciple of the Lord, she earned the title of "Mother and Teacher."(40) From Clement of Rome to Origen,(41) the post-apostolic age saw the birth of remarkable works. Next we see a striking fact: Some of the most impressive Bishops and pastors, especially in the third and fourth centuries considered it an important part of their espiscopal ministry to deliver catechetical instructions and write treatises. It was the age of Cyril of Jerusalem and John Chrysostom, of Ambrose and Augustine, the age that saw the flowering, from the pen of numerous Fathers of the Church, of works that are still models for us.

It would be impossible here to recall, even very briefly the catechesis that gave support to the spread and advance of the Church in the various periods of history, in every continent, and in the widest variety of social and cultural contexts. There was indeed no lack of difficulties. But the word of the Lord completed its course down the centuries; it sped on and triumphed, to use the words of the Apostle Paul.(42)

12 CT 13.

See note 10, above

13 Extraordinary Synod of Bishops 1985, Final Report, II B a, 4.

Suggestions

Very many have expressed the desire that a catechism or compendium of all Catholic doctrine regarding both faith and morals be composed, that it might be, as it were, a point of reference for the catechisms or compendiums that are prepared in the various regions. The presentation of doctrine must be biblical and liturgical. It must be sound doctrine suited to the present life of Christians. The formation of candidates to the priesthood must be looked after in a particular way. In it, the philosophical formation and the manner of teaching theology proposed by the Decree "Optatam Totius" n.16 merit attention. It is recommended that the manuals, besides offering an exposition of sound theology in a scientific and pedagogical manner, be permeated by a true sense of the Church.

14 John Paul II, Discourse at the Closing Of the Extraordinary Synod of Bishops, 7 December 1985: AAS 78, (1986).

15 Extraordinary Synod of Bishops 1985, Final Report II B a, 4.

See note 13, above

16 Cf. Mt 10:32; Rom 10:9.

Matt 10:32 - So every one who acknowledges me before men, I also will acknowledge before my Father who is in heaven;

Rom 10:9 - So every one who acknowledges me before men, I also will acknowledge before my Father who is in heaven;

17 Cf. CT 20-22; 25.

Specific Aim of Catechesis

20. Nevertheless, the specific aim of catechesis is to develop, with God's help, an as yet initial faith, and to advance in fullness and to nourish day by day the Christian life of the faithful, young and old. It is in fact a matter of giving growth, at the level of knowledge and in life, to the seed of faith sown by the Holy Spirit with the initial proclamation and effectively transmitted by Baptism.

Catechesis aims therefore at developing understanding of the mystery of Christ in the light of God's word, so that the whole of a person's humanity is impregnated by that word. Changed by the working of grace into a new creature, the Christian thus sets himself to follow Christ and learns more and more within the Church to think like Him, to judge like Him, to act in conformity with His commandments, and to hope as He invites us to.

To put it more precisely: within the whole process of evangelization, the aim of catechesis is to be the teaching and maturation stage, that is to say, the period in which the Christian, having accepted by faith the person of Jesus Christ as the one Lord and having given Him complete adherence by sincere conversion of heart, endeavors to know better this Jesus to whom he has entrusted himself: to know His "mystery," the kingdom of God proclaimed by Him, the requirements and promises contained in His Gospel message, and the paths that He has laid down for anyone who wishes to follow Him.

It is true that being a Christian means saying "yes" to Jesus Christ, but let us remember that this "yes" has two levels: It consists in surrendering to the word of God and relying on it, but it also means, at a later stage, endeavoring to know better - and better the profound meaning of this word.

Need for Systematic Catechesis

21. In his closing speech at the fourth general assembly of the synod, Pope Paul VI rejoiced "to see how everyone drew attention to the absolute need for systematic catechesis, precisely because it is this reflective study of the Christian mystery that fundamentally distinguishes catechesis from all other ways of presenting the word of God."(50)

In view of practical difficulties, attention must be drawn to some of the characteristics of this instruction:

I am not forgetting the interest of the many different occasions for catechesis connected with personal, family, social and ecclesial life - these occasions must be utilized and I shall return to them in Chapter VI - but I am stressing the need for organic and systematic Christian instruction, because of the tendency in various quarters to minimize its importance.

Catechesis and Life Experience

22. It is useless to play off orthopraxis against orthodoxy: Christianity is inseparably both. Firm and well-thought - out convictions lead to courageous and upright action, the endeavor to educate the faithful to live as disciples of Christ today calls for and facilitates a discovery in depth of the mystery of Christ in the history of salvation.

It is also quite useless to campaign for the abandonment of serious and orderly study of the message of Christ in the name of a method concentrating on life experience. "No one can arrive at the whole truth on the basis solely of some simple private experience, that is to say, without an adequate explanation of the message of Christ, who is `the way, and the truth, and the life' (Jn. 14:6)."(51)

Nor is any opposition to be set up between a catechesis taking life as its point of departure and a traditional doctrinal and systematic catechesis.(52) Authentic catechesis is always an orderly and systematic initiation into the revelation that God has given of Himself to humanity in Christ Jesus, a revelation stored in the depths of the Church's memory and in Sacred Scripture, and constantly communicated from one generation to the next by a living, active traditio. This revelation is not however isolated from life or artificially juxtaposed to it. It is concerned with the ultimate meaning of life and it illumines the whole of life with the light of the Gospel, to inspire it or to question it.

That is why we can apply to catechists an expression used by the Second Vatican Council with special reference to priests: "Instructors (of the human being and his life) in the faith."(53)

Catechesis in the Wide Sense Necessary for Maturity and Strength of Faith

25. Thus through catechesis the Gospel kerygma (the initial ardent proclamation by which a person is one day overwhelmed and brought to the decision to entrust himself to Jesus Christ by faith) is gradually deepened, developed in its implicit consequences, explained in language that includes an appeal to reason, and channelled towards Christian practice in the Church and the world. All this is no less evangelical than the kerygma, in spite of what is said by certain people who consider that catechesis necessarily rationalizes, dries up and eventually kills all that is living, spontaneous and vibrant in the kerygma. The truths studied in catechesis are the same truths that touched the person's heart when he heard them for the first time. Far from blunting or exhausting them, the fact of knowing them better should make them even more challenging and decisive for one's life.

In the understanding expounded here, catechesis keeps the entirely pastoral perspective with which the synod viewed it. This broad meaning of catechesis in no way contradicts but rather includes and goes beyond a narrow meaning which was once commonly given to catechesis in didactic expositions, namely, the simple teaching of the formulas that express faith.

In the final analysis, catechesis is necessary both for the maturation of the faith of Christians and for their witness in the world: It is aimed at bringing Christians to "attain to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to mature manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ"(55); it is also aimed at making them prepared to make a defense to anyone who calls them to account for the hope that is in them.(56)

18 Roman Catechism, Preface II; cf. 1 Cor 9:22; 1 Pt 2:2.

1 Cor 9:22 - To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all men, that I might by all means save some.

1 Pet 2:2 - Like newborn babes, long for the pure spiritual milk, that by it you may grow up to salvation;

19 Roman Catechism, Preface 10; cf. 1 Cor 13:8.

Love never ends; as for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away.


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Theology
KEYWORDS: ccc
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As you can tell, this is as much a "utility" section of the CCC as anything else. But there are still a couple of gems in there.

These paragraphs talk about the importance of a good catechesis in the formation of the young and of the neophytes. How many things result from a poor catechesis?

The footnotes, as through the rest of the CCC, are really the key to understanding it: as one can use them to reference the actual source documents. Reading from Catechesi Tradendae was really informative for me, particularly in light of the fact that it came out right at the beginning of John Paul II's papacy.

One other thing that I noted reading this section: This work is intended primarily for those responsible for catechesis: first of all the bishops, as teachers of the faith and pastors of the Church. It is offered to them as an instrument in fulfilling their responsibility of teaching the People of God. (paragraph 12) -- The intended readership was catechists, not those to be catechized. That actually explains much in the tone and language of the document!

1 posted on 06/14/2008 1:01:32 PM PDT by markomalley
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To: glide625; defconw; trisham; Running On Empty; OpusatFR; Malacoda; sitetest; Salvation; Mad Dawg; ...

test run ping!


2 posted on 06/14/2008 1:02:10 PM PDT by markomalley (Extra ecclesiam nulla salus)
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To: Religion Moderator

Can you throw an [ECUMENIC] tag on this thread, please?

Thanks.


3 posted on 06/14/2008 1:03:00 PM PDT by markomalley (Extra ecclesiam nulla salus)
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To: markomalley

An ecumenic is a person. Ecumenical is an adjective describing someone or something.

To me, (Yeah, the teacher>) this should be Ecumenical.

FWIW!


4 posted on 06/14/2008 1:05:41 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: markomalley

Present! :)


5 posted on 06/14/2008 1:07:12 PM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: Salvation
An ecumenic is a person. Ecumenical is an adjective describing someone or something.

To me, (Yeah, the teacher>) this should be Ecumenical.

FWIW!

Quote: Ecumenic threads are closed to antagonism.

- Religion Moderator homepage

Just trying to follow the rules...

6 posted on 06/14/2008 1:08:18 PM PDT by markomalley (Extra ecclesiam nulla salus)
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To: markomalley

Beautifully done, with footnotes too!

It’s so refreshing just to see proper references to it as the Catechism of the Catholic Church and CCC.


7 posted on 06/14/2008 1:09:35 PM PDT by Petronski (Scripture & Tradition must be accepted & honored w/equal sentiments of devotion & reverence. CCC 82)
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To: markomalley

Very Nice Bump

Will this be daily, weekly?


8 posted on 06/14/2008 1:46:52 PM PDT by OpusatFR (I'm right. All the time. Ask my groom.)
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To: markomalley

I spent two years in a program studying the Catechism. There is so much richness in the text. Does anyone know if the new (not sure what to call it) for lack of a better term, book with all the footnotes expanded is complete yet?


9 posted on 06/14/2008 1:46:52 PM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: Salvation

LOL!


10 posted on 06/14/2008 1:48:44 PM PDT by OpusatFR (I'm right. All the time. Ask my groom.)
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To: OpusatFR

I know, I know.


11 posted on 06/14/2008 1:52:35 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: markomalley

so wouldn’t Ecumenical threads be closed to antagonism also?


12 posted on 06/14/2008 1:53:42 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

You can tag the thread “ecumenic” “ecumenical” or “ecumenism” - it will be treated the same way. No antagonism allowed.


13 posted on 06/14/2008 2:09:05 PM PDT by Religion Moderator
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To: markomalley; Alex Murphy; Gamecock; OLD REGGIE; Uncle Chip; fortheDeclaration; Marysecretary; ...
Can you throw an [ECUMENIC] tag on this thread, please?

Regarding the "Ecumenic" tag on this thread...

That contradicts your earlier intentions where you wrote the following on this thread...

"I was curious in measuring the interest of Catholic FReepers to starting a weekly discussion on the Catechism...

My inclination, as with other things, would be to make these discussions [OPEN] threads (as per the RM guidance on the subject)."

Therefore, since this is not to be an Open Thread with real discourse, please remove me from your ping list.

14 posted on 06/14/2008 2:09:54 PM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg ("I don't think they want my respect; I think they want my submission." - Flemming Rose)
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To: Dr. Eckleburg
Therefore, since this is not to be an Open Thread with real discourse…

This is not a "CAUCUS" thread. Discourse is absolutely allowed.

From the RM homepage:
To antagonize is to incur or to provoke hostility in others.

Unlike the “caucus” threads, the article and reply posts of an “ecumenic” thread can discuss more than one belief, but antagonism is not tolerable.

More leeway is granted to what is acceptable in the text of the article than to the reply posts. For example, the term “gross error” in an article will not prevent an ecumenical discussion, but a poster should not use that term in his reply because it is antagonistic. As another example, the article might be a passage from the Bible which would be antagonistic to Jews. The passage should be considered historical fact and a legitimate subject for an ecumenic discussion. The reply posts however must not be antagonistic.

Contrasting of beliefs or even criticisms can be made without provoking hostilities. But when in doubt, only post what you are “for” and not what you are “against.” Or ask questions.

Ecumenical threads will be moderated on a “where there’s smoke, there’s fire” basis. When hostility has broken out on an “ecumenic” thread, I’ll be looking for the source.

Therefore “anti” posters must not try to finesse the guidelines by asking loaded questions, using inflammatory taglines, gratuitous quote mining or trying to slip in an “anti” or “ex” article under the color of the “ecumenic” tag.

Posters who try to tear down other’s beliefs or use subterfuge to accomplish the same goal are the disrupters on ecumenic threads and will be booted from the thread and/or suspended.

Was there an objection to some point in the article? Does your belief system say something different?

I am, in fact, curious if it was objectionable to you...

, please remove me from your ping list.

Done, sadly.

15 posted on 06/14/2008 2:16:22 PM PDT by markomalley (Extra ecclesiam nulla salus)
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To: Dr. Eckleburg; Quix

I don’t have any interest in it, open or ecumenical. Is kind of funny though, the faith, if genuine, should be able to withstand the “feeble fifteen” nobody wants invited, lol


16 posted on 06/14/2008 2:17:34 PM PDT by 1000 silverlings (Everything that deceives also enchants: Plato)
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To: Salvation
so wouldn’t Ecumenical threads be closed to antagonism also?

See, this is the point that I am getting at. While I don't care to be the author of a 10,128 post "undead" thread, I would like to have genuine discussion.

Maybe the Ecumenic designation would provide a suitable compromise, maybe not. We'll see.

17 posted on 06/14/2008 2:19:09 PM PDT by markomalley (Extra ecclesiam nulla salus)
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To: OpusatFR
Will this be daily, weekly?

For now, approximately (piu o meno) weekly. I don't have the time during the week to dig out the footnotes.

18 posted on 06/14/2008 2:20:24 PM PDT by markomalley (Extra ecclesiam nulla salus)
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To: markomalley

“Catechesis aims therefore at developing understanding of the mystery of Christ in the light of God’s word, so that the whole of a person’s humanity is impregnated by that word. Changed by the working of grace into a new creature, the Christian thus sets himself to follow Christ and learns more and more within the Church to think like Him, to judge like Him, to act in conformity with His commandments, and to hope as He invites us to.”

Time. It takes time and the humility to start all over when we fall to conform yourself to Christ. Just understanding Charity can take a lifetime and Charity is the Queen of Virtues. I know it is one of my main failures.

How do we impress upon people that conforming our lives is not something that happens overnight especially since we live in a civilization that views time as a personal allotment, something they own, rather than God-given?


19 posted on 06/14/2008 2:35:35 PM PDT by OpusatFR (I'm right. All the time. Ask my groom.)
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To: markomalley

It would seem that we have ruined some peoples’s fun. ;)


20 posted on 06/14/2008 2:52:19 PM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: markomalley; P-Marlowe
You postulated an open thread for the RCC catechism, much like P-Marlowe is hosting Calvin's Institutes on an open thread.

However, for some reason you've changed your mind and have labeled this an Ecumenic thread.

Open threads are productive and challenging and informative.

Ecumenic threads are not a place for challenges. Therefore, I don't care to reread the RCC catechism without being permitted to challenge its manifold errors.

Thanks all the same.

21 posted on 06/14/2008 3:15:25 PM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg ("I don't think they want my respect; I think they want my submission." - Flemming Rose)
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To: Dr. Eckleburg

What the Ecumenic tread bars is antagonism. Challenges are fine.

On the other hand, this thread is not about the “RCC catechism,” but rather the Catechism of the Catholic Church.


22 posted on 06/14/2008 3:26:46 PM PDT by Petronski (Scripture & Tradition must be accepted & honored w/equal sentiments of devotion & reverence. CCC 82)
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To: Petronski
I never refer to myself as RCC, why do they insist on calling us that? Might be a dumb question, but I am curious.
23 posted on 06/14/2008 3:31:34 PM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: defconw

I believe it is to avoid casting even a faint, tangentially-reflected ray of respect on the Catholic Church.


24 posted on 06/14/2008 3:40:04 PM PDT by Petronski (Scripture & Tradition must be accepted & honored w/equal sentiments of devotion & reverence. CCC 82)
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To: 1000 silverlings
Is kind of funny though, the faith, if genuine, should be able to withstand the "feeble fifteen" nobody wants invited

LOL. Very true.

"Strengthen ye the weak hands, and confirm the feeble knees.

Say to them that are of a fearful heart, Be strong, fear not: behold, your God will come with vengeance, even God with a recompence; he will come and save you.

Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped." -- Isaiah 35:3-5


25 posted on 06/14/2008 3:49:15 PM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg ("I don't think they want my respect; I think they want my submission." - Flemming Rose)
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To: Petronski

Ah! I see, well I am a Roman Rite Catholic, but any Rite in a storm? :)


26 posted on 06/14/2008 3:50:07 PM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: defconw

Technically, isn’t it “Latin Rite?”

Not to be antagonistic, though.


27 posted on 06/14/2008 3:51:45 PM PDT by Petronski (Scripture & Tradition must be accepted & honored w/equal sentiments of devotion & reverence. CCC 82)
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To: Petronski

Yes, you are correct, what the H was I thinking? LOL, long day my friend.


28 posted on 06/14/2008 3:53:22 PM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: markomalley

I’m sure that you made this decision (to label it Ecumenic) based on the input you received.

I trust that it will prove worthwhile and free of antagonism.

Pax Christi

ROE


29 posted on 06/14/2008 4:10:13 PM PDT by Running On Empty ((The three sorriest words:"It's too late"))
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Comment #30 Removed by Moderator

To: 1000 silverlings; Dr. Eckleburg

Thanks for the ping.

However, I gave up Ecumenic for Valentine’s Day, Lent, Resurrection Sunday, Spring, Mother’s Day; Flag Day; Father’s Day; 4th of July, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day; Thanksgiving; Christmas and new Year’s . . . and all the days in between.

My finger’s just can’t wrap their pinkiness around all that gladhanding. They are afraid of being crushed by so much overwhelming niceness.

Therefore, I don’t bother much about the Ecumenic Threads.

Thanks anyway.


31 posted on 06/14/2008 4:19:57 PM PDT by Quix (GOD ALONE IS GOD; WORTHY; PAID THE PRICE; IS COMING AGAIN; KNOWS ALL; IS LOVING; IS ALTOGETHER GOOD)
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Comment #32 Removed by Moderator

Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: markomalley; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...
These paragraphs talk about the importance of a good catechesis in the formation of the young and of the neophytes. How many things result from a poor catechesis?

Catholics who are poorly formed in their faith!

When I attended Catholic elementary school, the St. Joseph's Catechism was the method of catechesis. It is all based on questions and answers.

Q: Why did God make us?

A: He made us to know, love and serve Him in this world and be happy with Him forever, in the next.

Many of the dioceses now resort to cutsy, new age teaching methods that simply don't work. It's time the Church restored the Catechism as the preferred method of catechesis.

34 posted on 06/14/2008 4:45:58 PM PDT by NYer (Ignorance of scripture is ignorance of Christ." - St. Jerome)
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To: NYer
We had the Baltimore Catechism in my schools. Sounds like the same questions.


35 posted on 06/14/2008 4:53:24 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines, RVN 1969. St. Peregrine, patron saint of cancer patients, pray for us.)
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To: Dr. Eckleburg

“Open threads are productive and challenging and informative.”

Yes, they are. But it does waste time having to scroll past the verbiage and drivel repeated on thread after thread after thread by the same boring, error-ridden posters who, while they have opinions and interpretations, are just that, opinions and interpretations.

~Not to mention the crayola gabble of others.

It does tend to waste time.


36 posted on 06/14/2008 5:08:46 PM PDT by OpusatFR (I'm right. All the time. Ask my groom.)
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To: NYer

“Q: Why did God make us?
A: He made us to know, love and serve Him in this world and be happy with Him forever, in the next.”

I remember that! I also remember being disappointed because the little materialist in my little self couldn’t understand it.

It’s only at this late age that I understand.

I have to check and see what they are teaching the young’uns at our parish. Maybe that is what we all must do. Ask questions. I never thought of finding out what they are teaching the little ones. I do know that they are called out of the Liturgy of the Word to have their own lesson on the Gospel and readings for the day.

But as far as the children preparing for FHC, I don’t know what their instruction is. Maybe the oldsters should ask more questions.


37 posted on 06/14/2008 5:22:52 PM PDT by OpusatFR (I'm right. All the time. Ask my groom.)
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To: 1000 silverlings

Another non-edifying post.


38 posted on 06/14/2008 5:48:26 PM PDT by Running On Empty ((The three sorriest words:"It's too late"))
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To: ConorMacNessa
We had the Baltimore Catechism in my schools. Sounds like the same questions.

Yes - the St. Joseph Cathechism is the Baltimore Catechism.


39 posted on 06/14/2008 5:54:18 PM PDT by NYer (Ignorance of scripture is ignorance of Christ." - St. Jerome)
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To: defconw
"Does anyone know if the new (not sure what to call it) for lack of a better term, book with all the footnotes expanded is complete yet?"

Yes. "The Companion to the Catechism of the Catholic Church" came out in 2002.

40 posted on 06/14/2008 5:55:32 PM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: NYer
I still have my 1st Grade Catechism from 1953 - complete with Imprimatur from the Bishop of Brooklyn.


41 posted on 06/14/2008 5:59:53 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines, RVN 1969. St. Peregrine, patron saint of cancer patients, pray for us.)
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To: markomalley

“God our Savior desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth”. (Footnote #2 from 1Timothy).

For starters, this is a very important point. It tells me that as Catholics, we believe that the message of the Gospel is meant for all men.

Because these words are used to open up the Catechism, I see them as considered of primary importance to us.

It matters to me that this is the starting point of the catechism.


42 posted on 06/14/2008 7:45:24 PM PDT by Running On Empty ((The three sorriest words:"It's too late"))
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To: Wonder Warthog

Yes, theere were two editions that came out. One was printed with an orange color cover and the other a dark green cover.

There is also a smaller size white with blue print model.


43 posted on 06/14/2008 8:18:01 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Here's the online version with several ways to access, topic, numbers, etc.

enter the Table of Contents of the Catechism of the Catholic Church here
The Second Edition English Translation of the Catechism of the Catholic Church includes the corrections promulgated by Pope John Paul II on 8 September 1997. These corrections to the English text of the Catechism of the Catholic Church were made to harmonize it with the official Latin text promulgated by Pope John Paul II on the same date. For details of the corrections, see the editio typica modifications to the Catechism of the Catholic Church.
 
 

Catechism of the Catholic Church is available online!

44 posted on 06/14/2008 8:19:45 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: markomalley

I did not know this:

“One other thing that I noted reading this section: This work is intended primarily for those responsible for catechesis: first of all the bishops, as teachers of the faith and pastors of the Church. It is offered to them as an instrument in fulfilling their responsibility of teaching the People of God. (paragraph 12) — The intended readership was catechists, not those to be catechized. That actually explains much in the tone and language of the document!”

Thank you.


45 posted on 06/15/2008 5:13:12 AM PDT by Judith Anne
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To: Wonder Warthog

Thanks, I live in a rather remote area, no Catholic book stores any where. I have gotten rid of my credit cards. So I will have to get one of my big city friends to send it to me.


46 posted on 06/15/2008 5:58:05 AM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: NYer
That is why I quit teaching Religious Ed. I could not get good books or material. It was all this new age, fluffy crap.

Plus half the time the parents were not even taking the kid to Mass. Unbelievable.

47 posted on 06/15/2008 6:00:51 AM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: defconw
"That is why I quit teaching Religious Ed. I could not get good books or material. It was all this new age, fluffy crap."

All you really need are the the Catechism and the Companion (but it helps to have a Bible around, too). But there are LOTS of good books out there. The CCC is a masterpiece of clear writing--even kids should be able to grasp a lot of it. Ignore the "Catechism of the United States" (or whatever they call the piece of pablum put out by the US council of Catholic Bishops).

"Plus half the time the parents were not even taking the kid to Mass. Unbelievable."

Well, the problem is probably because those PARENTS had lousy "Religious Ed" classes, too. The breakdown in Catechesis in the Church is appalling. And the same "education majors" mentality that has destroyed public education is the cause.

48 posted on 06/15/2008 6:29:00 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: Wonder Warthog
Well I know the books were out there, but the Rel. Ed. Dir. was a fuzzy new ager and I hate to say it, but public school children do not read well enough for the Catechism. My nephews and nieces that go to the Parish school where I used to teach read several years ahead of their grade and they are of just average intelligence.

I had only an hour and a half and it took a half hour to get the kids to sit down and shut up. Even to do a fun activity.

I did learn an important lesson however, if it's not important to the parents, it will never be important to the kids. We need to catechize the adults.

49 posted on 06/15/2008 6:42:19 AM PDT by defconw (Pray for Snow!)
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To: NYer

“Many of the dioceses now resort to cutsy, new age teaching methods” and I might add, devoid of meaningful content; I looked in on that at our church about 15 years ago and was appalled. I’m still at the church, but I’ve not looked in again on the education dept. (Sigh)


50 posted on 06/15/2008 8:37:01 AM PDT by glide625 (I know too much, I understand too little, I just keep praying.)
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