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A Shepherd Speaks (Eucharistic Adoration) -- Bishop Edward J. Slattery [Catholic Caucus]
Vultus Christi.org ^ | 06-20-08 | Bishop Edward J. Slattery

Posted on 06/21/2008 12:24:44 PM PDT by Salvation

June 20, 2008

A Shepherd Speaks

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His Excellency, Bishop Edward J. Slattery of the Diocese of Tulsa, Oklahoma speaks to his people of Divine Intimacy, the holiness of the clergy, Eucharistic adoration, the maternity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and his plans for a Cenacle of Eucharistic Adoration for priests. Emphases in boldface are my own. The full article can be found in the June 8, 2008 edition of Eastern Oklahoma Catholic.

Assessments aren’t audits

As a living organism, the Diocese must be assessed not at the level of measurable material things, but at the level of spiritual health, that is, the level of our ever growing intimacy with Jesus Christ. Since the spiritual life is based on love, not to advance in this dynamic relationship with God in Christ is to retreat. One either grows in Divine intimacy or retreats from it; but the spiritual life is never static. Let me stress then that when we study the various homilies, talks and addresses of the Holy Father, we do so in order to better comprehend the vibrant, evangelical vision he proposes for the Church in America. We want to understand his vision so thoroughly that we will see it with our own eyes, hear it with our own ears and feel it beat - pulse for pulse - within our own Oklahoma heart. Then, with that deep understanding we hope to achieve, we will be able to look at our situation here and assess more honestly and more humbly the life of the Church in Eastern Oklahoma according to the pope’s universal vision.

Not measuring things but gauging the depth of our faith

In effect, I want you to understand that I am not proposing an evaluation of our programs, but of our vision. We are not looking to assess how effectively our programs work, but how well they reflect the Gospel we preach. We are not measuring things but gauging the depth of our faith in God and our trust in His Providence. And with that, let me introduce an idea, which is evidently a strongly felt part of the pope’s vision, but oddly enough, a part which he did not communicate to us personally while he was in Washington and New York. Instead the pontiff expressed his desires several months prior to his trip through the Congregation for the Clergy in a circular letter from the Prefect of that Congregation, Cláudio Cardinal Hummes. That idea, briefly put, is this: Since there is an undeniable link between - on the one hand - the holiness of our clergy, the effectiveness of their pastoral ministry and the depth of their personal commitment and – on the other hand - the centrality of prayer and Eucharistic adoration in their lives, then of all the things which are necessary for the good of the Church, nothing can be considered more important, more necessary or more vital than helping our priests and deacons grow in Divine intimacy.

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The holiness of priests and deacons

The holiness to which Jesus calls his priests and deaconsflows from their configuration to Christ the Priest and Christ the Servant as our Lord stands before the Father in the Kingdom of Heaven. All the baptized, including the priest and the deacon are united to Christ; but each priest and each deacon - by virtue of his ordination- is configured to Christ the High Priest or to Christ, the suffering Servant; but in either case, by their ordination these men become in a sacramental sense the ministers of Christ’s self-giving love. Thus, their growth in holiness depends upon their exercise of that ministry into which they were ordained. This is why, after their ordination, priests and deacons step to the altar of sacrifice and kiss it. They embrace a life of sacrifice which opens them up and makes them vulnerable to their Master’s redeeming love and allows His Eucharistic love to flow through them to sanctify the communities they serve. As Pope Benedict said “The secret of (priestly) holiness lies precisely in the Eucharist. The priest must be first and foremost an adorer who contemplates the Eucharist.”(Sept. 18, 2005) In order to emphasize the intrinsic link between the Eucharist and the holiness of the ordained, while at the same time exploring the special maternity of Our Blessed Lady, Cardinal Hummes asked that Eucharistic adoration be fostered in every parish and Catholic institution, with priests, chaplains and directors encouraged to strengthen the practice of adoration where it is already firmly established and introduce this devotion in places where it has not been known or where it has been allowed to disappear.

Eucharistic adoration in the Diocese

Cardinal Hummes would be pleased to know that the kind of Eucharistic renewal he envisions has been quietly but steadily growing in our Diocese. Already eight parishes (plus St. John Hospital – a ninth site!) offer continuous (daily or even24-hour) adoration, and a further 32 offer weekly periods of adoration. In fact, fully 72 out of our 78 parishes and missions have some form of Eucharistic Adoration during the course of the year! Given the great variety of parish life in eastern Oklahoma, you can well imagine that this Adoration assumes a variety of different forms depending on whether a parish is large or small, located in a city or rural area, or whether the parish population is predominantly elderly or enjoys a mixture of young and old. But among these different forms we could include all-night adoration leading into First Fridays, our diocesan Holy Hour of Adoration in Reparation each Friday night, adoration between Masses on Sundays or immediately following morning Mass on one or more days during the week. Several parishes foster periods of special Adoration for school children, CCD students or young adults, and 21 parishes encourage Eucharistic Adoration on Corpus Christi with special devotions and processions.

Three specific suggestions

All of this is in a collective effort to enhance the prayer life of the Church, but the letter from the Vatican’s Congregation for the Clergy made several specific recommendations:

1. Cardinal Hummes asked that wherever possible, specific churches or oratories be set aside by the Bishop to serve the diocese as Eucharistic shrines, similar to Marian shrines. In these shrines of adoration, the Church’s special love for the Holy Eucharist, worthily celebrated and continuously adored, can be fostered and nourished until the light of Our Eucharistic Lord transfigures the whole Diocese. I have already decided to do this, but have prayed much that Our Lord direct me to the best location of our first such Eucharistic Cenacle of Prayer.

2. A second recommendation made by Cardinal Hummes was that in each Diocese a priest be appointed to the specific priestly ministry of promoting Eucharistic adoration. In some ways, the ministry of this priest-servant of the Eucharist would be to coordinate this important movement throughout the Diocese; but his ministry would be much more than simply coordination and management. Dedicating himself generously to making Our Eucharistic Lord better known and more loved, this priest would live a life of personal reparation and sacrifice offered for the holiness of the clergy. I am taking Cardinal Hummes’ recommendation very seriously; but I think that in this Diocese, it would be very beneficial to add to this priest’s ministry of sacrifice, a further responsibility, that of serving as spiritual director and confessor to our priests and deacons.

3. The final recommendation made by the Congregation for the Clergy is designed to make more obvious the intrinsic connection between Eucharistic Adoration and the sanctification of our priests and deacons by encouraging generous lay women to consecrate themselves to a life of spiritual motherhood of our clergy. Cardinal Hummes explained the idea of spiritual motherhood as a help to priests in their own self-offering, prayer and penance and specifically said that this could be done following the example of Our Lady, who gave to her Son the very flesh He would give us in the Sacrament and whose initial “fiat” led her to stand in silent acceptance of the Father’s will on Calvary.

In our next conversation here in the EOC, I will present more completely my plans for our first Eucharistic Cenacle of Prayer and will introduce to you the priest whom I have asked to come and help us in this vital mission. But until then, I would like to encourage your reaction to this initiative. Let me know your thoughts on ideas about adoration and reparation. And I would very much like to hear the initial reaction of the faithful women of the Diocese to the idea of spiritually adopting priests and offering sacrifices and prayers for them. Write me your thoughts at P.O. Box 690240,Tulsa, OK 74169-0240. And let me close by sharing with you, one of my favorite prayers: Receive, Oh Lord, all my liberty. Take my memory, my understanding and my entire will. Whatsoever I have or hold, You, Oh Lord, have given me. I give it all back to You and commit it wholly to be governed by Your will. Your love and Your grace give to me and I am rich enough and need ask for nothing more. - St. Ignatius Loyola



TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Prayer; Theology
KEYWORDS: adoration; catholic; catholiclist; eucharisticadoration
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For a prayerful and thoughtful discussion.
1 posted on 06/21/2008 12:24:46 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: All

Just emailed this to my pastor and to the person who oversees our Eucharistic Adoration.


2 posted on 06/21/2008 12:27:23 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; ...
Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

3 posted on 06/21/2008 12:29:45 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

The Core of Monasticism Is Adoration [Catholic Caucus](Homily of Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday

Why Eucharistic Adoration?(Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

The Real Presence and Perpetual Adoration(Catholic Caucus)

A Shepherd Speaks (Eucharistic Adoration) -- Bishop Edward J. Slattery [Catholic Caucus]

4 posted on 06/21/2008 12:36:37 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Bishop Slattery is the nicest Bishop I’ve ever known. A good, spiritual man, friendly, efficient, theologically sound, pro-home schooling, encouraging liturgical conservatism ... I just can’t say enough good things about him. And much more distinguished in appearance than my present Bishop (who is also one of the good guys, and can’t help his chin).

I don’t agree with Bishop Slattery on everything, but I don’t agree with *anyone* on everything.

Sorry, this doesn’t address the topic, does it? I go read the article now.


5 posted on 06/21/2008 12:42:53 PM PDT by Tax-chick (The dragons aren't as hungry as they were yesterday. Has anyone seen James?)
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To: Salvation

Okay, I’ve read it. Excellent article with great suggestions for promoted Eucharistic prayer in the clergy and laity. My parish has Adoration only on First Fridays and other special occasions, but I hope this is just the beginning of a greater devotion.


6 posted on 06/21/2008 12:52:49 PM PDT by Tax-chick (The dragons aren't as hungry as they were yesterday. Has anyone seen James?)
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To: Tax-chick

My parish has continuous adoration. Parishoners have signed up for one-hour vigils so that there is at least one person there at all times. Of course, others go as well.

We have a special chapel they carved out of a portion of the church’s walk-out basement, and it was refurbished with a donation from our last associate priest. It’s not grand like the chapels in cathedrals, but it is very pretty and the atmosphere is very dignified.

I suppose it could be called a coincidence, but our parish has 6 men in seminary, and one other was just ordained. I think it is directly related to the Perpetual Adoration.


7 posted on 06/21/2008 4:17:46 PM PDT by Miss Marple
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To: Miss Marple

In parishes such as mine,which has perpetual adoration I suggest that the priests should sign up for a regular weekly hour of adoration.


8 posted on 06/21/2008 4:56:57 PM PDT by ardara
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To: Miss Marple

I doubt it’s a coincidence! Adoration is growing in this diocese, and I’m sure ordinations will as well, although things aren’t too bad now. We’re ordaining 5-8 men per year.


9 posted on 06/21/2008 6:15:39 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Tell me what a man will fight for, and I’ll tell you what he’s made of." ~ Don Feder)
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To: Tax-chick

Does your parish have a mission during Lent?

If so, encourage your pastor to have one of the Missionaries of the Blessed Sacrament come and do the mission.

Our mission took place in March a couple of years ago, I believe, and by the 6th of May we had an Adoration Chapel up and going 24/7.

It is such a blessing!


10 posted on 06/21/2008 7:49:52 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Miss Marple

** suppose it could be called a coincidence, but our parish has 6 men in seminary, and one other was just ordained. I think it is directly related to the Perpetual Adoration.**

I don’t believe it is a coincidence at all. We have one young man in seminary preparation and I have a hunch on another one.

No girls choosing to become religious yet.

We need to keep praying.

For what it’s worth, our Adoration Chapel was carved out of what used to be part of the sacristy and was then a Confessional. The Confessional was moved and we have room for four chairs in our little chapel.


11 posted on 06/21/2008 7:53:26 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

We often have a mission during Lent. Last year, we had Father McBride, the popular Biblical commentator, who’s a friend of our (departing) pastor from Up North. Maybe next year we’ll get someone with a Eucharistic emphasis. (Not that Father McBride wasn’t nice.)


12 posted on 06/21/2008 7:53:50 PM PDT by Tax-chick (There is no "overkill." There is only, "Open fire," and, "I need to reload.")
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To: ardara

Our priest has a little tabernacle and chapel in his house. He does one hour of Adoration EVERY day!


13 posted on 06/21/2008 7:54:14 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Tax-chick

5-8 new ordinands is great news!

Thanks be to God.


14 posted on 06/21/2008 7:54:58 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Just as Bishop Sheen recommended!

The Mexican parish (let’s not mince words ...) in Tulsa bought a little house up the street from the church, established an adoration chapel, and brought in nuns from Mexico to “man” it, and also teach catechism.

Eucharistic adoration takes commitment from the Bishop, like Bishop Slattery, and also from the parish. St. Benedict’s in Broken Arrow had Adoration Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 6:00, iirc, and I wasn’t free those hours. I kept asking them to have middle-of-the-night hours for those who were home with kids at reasonable times of the day!


15 posted on 06/21/2008 7:59:54 PM PDT by Tax-chick (There is no "overkill." There is only, "Open fire," and, "I need to reload.")
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To: Salvation
5-8 new ordinands is great news!

It is, especially here in "What's a Catholic?" country. Our new Bishop is really making an impact. The old Bishop, fine man in his day, was just too old. He's terrific now as an inspirational speaker and especially at haranguing confirmation students!

16 posted on 06/21/2008 8:01:48 PM PDT by Tax-chick (There is no "overkill." There is only, "Open fire," and, "I need to reload.")
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To: Tax-chick

**Our new Bishop is really making an impac**

Pope Benedict is one smart cookie, isn’t he? (when it comes to appointing bishops)


17 posted on 06/21/2008 8:05:28 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

I think Bishop Jugis was appointed under Pope John Paul II, but I was pregnant and incoherent at the time, so maybe it was Pope Benedict. If he predates B16, it must have been luck :-).

Charlotte wasn’t really suffrin’ under the old Bishop; he was just old. Raleigh was doing really badly, until Pope Benedict hit them with Bishop Burbidge out of Philadelphia. Now the whole state is in good shape, with two sharp, young Bishops.


18 posted on 06/21/2008 8:10:04 PM PDT by Tax-chick (There is no "overkill." There is only, "Open fire," and, "I need to reload.")
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To: Tax-chick

**Now the whole state is in good shape, with two sharp, young Bishops.**

What good news!


19 posted on 06/21/2008 8:20:16 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation; Frank Sheed
What good news!

It is. The Mid-South is *the* growth area of the Catholic Church in the US these days - English, Latin, and Spanish. We need top-notch Bishops who can pull the whole thing together.

I like to think that my family - Midwestern white people in the Hispanic Ministry - are on the front lines of integration. We just happened to have the music skills (my husband's) and the language skills (mine) that the parish needed. In a few years, I hope that everyone will have enough vocabulary ("Hi, howaya?" "Muy bien. Toma una Guinness?") that it won't matter whether we came from Oklahoma or Ecuador.

20 posted on 06/21/2008 8:26:42 PM PDT by Tax-chick (There is no "overkill." There is only, "Open fire," and, "I need to reload.")
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