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Which of the 12 apostles were martyred? {Martyrdom of the Apostles]
Apostles.com ^ | not given | Apostles.com

Posted on 08/17/2008 4:07:18 PM PDT by Salvation

Which of the 12 apostles were martyred?

All except one. According to tradition, all of the twelve apostles died as martyrs during the first century A.D. Only St. John, the writer of the Gospel with his name and the Book of Revelation died a natural death. It is believed he died near the year 100 A.D.

The possible causes of death of each of the Twelve Apostles:

Sources for the above information:

1The Catholic Encyclopedia

2Catholic Community Forum



TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; History; Theology
KEYWORDS: catholic; catholiclist; saints
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I thought this might be an interesting discussion. Another thread mentions that the apostles were the first priests.
1 posted on 08/17/2008 4:07:18 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: All
 
Andrew   Bartholomew   James the Greater   James the Lesser   John   FAQ 
Jude   Judas   Matthew   Matthias   Peter   Philip   Simon   Thomas 

2 posted on 08/17/2008 4:07:50 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: nickcarraway; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; markomalley; ...
Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

3 posted on 08/17/2008 4:09:19 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

I just want to note that Judas, though a disciple, was not an apostle.

Paul was not a disciple, but was an apostle.


4 posted on 08/17/2008 4:12:38 PM PDT by donmeaker (You may not be interested in War but War is interested in you.)
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To: Salvation
I firmly believe that John did not die as a martyr because he was at the foot of the cross when Jesus died.

He was willing to be discovered as a follower of Jesus, when everyone else fled in fear.

5 posted on 08/17/2008 4:13:27 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E. That spells free. freerepublic.com baby)
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Comment #6 Removed by Moderator

To: mware
Catholic First

The Sacrament of Holy Order (Ordo)

 

  1. Holy Order is a true and proper Sacrament which was instituted by Christ. (De fide.)

  2. The four Minor Orders and the Subdiaconate are not Sacraments but merely Sacramentals. (Sent. Communior.)

  3. The consecration of priests is a Sacrament. (De fide.)

  4. The consecration of a Bishop is a Sacrament. (Sent. certa.)

  5. Bishops are superior to priests. (De fide.)

  6. The Order of Diaconate is a Sacrament. (Sent. certa.)

  7. The matter of the Orders of Diaconate, Priesthood, and Episcopate is the imposition of hands alone. (Sent. fidei proxima).

  8. The handing over (tradition) of the instruments is not necessary for the validity of the consecration of Deacons, Priests, and Bishops. (Sent. fidei proxima.)

  9. The form of the Order of Deacon, Priest, and Bishop consists solely in the words which more closely determine the imposition of the hands. (Sent. fidei proxima.)

  10. The Sacrament of Order confers sanctifying grace on the recipient. (De fide.) Cf. D843a, 959,964.

  11. The Sacrament of Order imprints a character on the recipient. (De fide.)

  12. The Sacrament of Order confers a permanent spiritual power on the recipient. (De fide.) Cf. D960 et seq.

  13. The ordinary dispenser of all grades of Order, both the sacramental and the non-sacramental, is the validly consecrated bishop alone. (De fide.)

  14. The extraordinary dispenser of the four Minor Orders and of the Order of the Subdiaconate is the presbyter. (Sent. certa.)

  15. The Sacrament of Order can be validly received by a baptised person of the male sex only. (Sent. certa.) CIC 968, Par. 1.


7 posted on 08/17/2008 4:16:43 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: donmeaker
Judas, though a disciple, was not an apostle.

Incorrect, according to the Gospel of Luke:

Luke 12: 13-16 "When day came, he called his disciples to himself, and from them he chose Twelve, whom he also named apostles: Simon, whom he named Peter, and his brother Andrew, James, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, James the son of Alphaeus, Simon who was called a Zealot, and Judas the son of James, and Judas Iscariot, who became a traitor.

8 posted on 08/17/2008 4:18:19 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Obama: Can't kill the innocent fast enough, can't free the guilty soon enough!~ Diana in WI)
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To: mware; Salvation
I firmly believe that John did not die as a martyr because he was at the foot of the cross when Jesus died.

Interesting point.

However, I thought that John is "technically" considered a martyr. When he was boiled alive he SHOULD have died, yet the Lord used this event to convert others -- I was always taught that this made him a martyr because NOBODY could survive without Divine Intervention and John emerged unharmed.

9 posted on 08/17/2008 4:19:22 PM PDT by wagglebee ("A political party cannot be all things to all people." -- Ronald Reagan, 3/1/75)
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To: Salvation
Which of the 12 apostles were martyred? All except one.

Oops... Judas wasn't martyred as your list points out; he committed suicide. So technically it should read "All except two."

10 posted on 08/17/2008 4:19:25 PM PDT by HarleyD
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To: mware
Another reason is that it was to John that Jesus gave the care of His Mother. Thus St. John stayed with the Blessed Virgin Mary and was not martyred.

The Seven Last Words of Christ
A Reflection by Fred Schaeffer, SFO
 

11 posted on 08/17/2008 4:20:08 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Beautiful images available at these links.


12 posted on 08/17/2008 4:21:21 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Shadrach, Mesahach, and Abednego?


13 posted on 08/17/2008 4:22:58 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Salvation
Only St. John, the writer of the Gospel with his name and the Book of Revelation died a natural death. It is believed he died near the year 100 A.D.

BTW-There is at least one early Church father writings (Clements) that makes it plausible for John to have died around 70AD. This is often used in debating the date of Revelation.

14 posted on 08/17/2008 4:23:27 PM PDT by HarleyD
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To: HarleyD

You are right. Goofed on that, didn’t I? I wanted to correct the mistake of St. John that I totally forgot about Judas.


15 posted on 08/17/2008 4:23:33 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: HarleyD

When I taught a Bible study on Revelation our book brought this up too.


16 posted on 08/17/2008 4:24:40 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
St. Andrew

As one of the Twelve, Andrew was admitted to the closest familiarity with Our Lord during His public life; he was present at the Last Supper; beheld the risen Lord; witnessed the Ascension; shared in the graces and gifts of the first Pentecost, and helped, amid threats and persecution, to establish the Faith in Palestine.


17 posted on 08/17/2008 4:25:20 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Matthias took the place of Judas as one of the Twelve. I believe he was also martyred.


18 posted on 08/17/2008 4:27:35 PM PDT by Cincinnatus
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To: All
St. Bartholomew

Many scholars identify him with Nathaniel (John, i, 45-51; xxi, 2). The manner of his death, said to have occurred at Albanopolis in Armenia, is equally uncertain; according to some, he was beheaded, according to others, flayed alive and crucified, head downward, by order of Astyages, for having converted his brother, Polymius, King of Armenia. On account of this latter legend, he is often represented in art (e.g. in Michelangelo's Last Judgment) as flayed and holding in his hand his own skin.


19 posted on 08/17/2008 4:27:35 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: wagglebee
wagglebee, I see your point.

I still feel that because he was the one to witness the crucification, and comfort the Blessed Mother made him special in the eyes of God.

If I am not mistaken (and I could be, I converted in 2005) John is the only gospel read on the Vigil of Easter and Easter.

20 posted on 08/17/2008 4:28:31 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E. That spells free. freerepublic.com baby)
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To: All
St. James the Greater

In all four lists the names of Peter and Andrew, James and John form the first group, a prominent and chosen group (cf. Mark, xiii, 3); especially Peter, James, and John. These three Apostles alone were admitted to be present at the miracle of the raising of Jairus's daughter (Mark, v, 37; Luke, viii, 51), at the Transfiguration (Mark, ix, 1; Matt., xvii, 1; Luke, ix, 28), and the Agony in Gethsemani (Matt., xxvi, 37; Mark, xiv, 33).


21 posted on 08/17/2008 4:29:10 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
St. James the Lesser

St. Paul tells us he was a witness of the Resurrection of Christ; he is also a "pillar" of the Church, whom St. Paul consulted about the Gospel.


22 posted on 08/17/2008 4:31:27 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: mware; Salvation
If I am not mistaken (and I could be, I converted in 2005) John is the only gospel read on the Vigil of Easter and Easter.

I think you are correct (at least about the Vigil), but I'm not certain, I'm pretty certain that Salvation would know.

For as long as I can remember, John has always been my favorite (both as an Apostle and his writings).

23 posted on 08/17/2008 4:32:33 PM PDT by wagglebee ("A political party cannot be all things to all people." -- Ronald Reagan, 3/1/75)
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To: Salvation

Uhhhhh....not Paul?


24 posted on 08/17/2008 4:32:38 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (Who would McQueeg rather have mad at him: You or the liberals? FREE LAZAMATAZ!)
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To: All
St. John the Evangelist

After the Resurrection John with Peter was the first of the disciples to hasten to the grave and he was the first to believe that Christ had truly risen (John, xx, 2-10). When later Christ appeared at the Lake of Genesareth John was also the first of the seven disciples present who recognized his Master standing on the shore (John, xxi, 7). The Fourth Evangelist has shown us most clearly how close the relationship was in which he always stood to his Lord and Master by the title with which he is accustomed to indicate himself without giving his name: "the disciple whom Jesus loved".


25 posted on 08/17/2008 4:33:20 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
St. Jude

Jude is invoked in desperate situations because his New Testament letter stresses that the faithful should persevere in the environment of harsh, difficult circumstances, just as their forefathers had done before them. Therefore, he is the patron saint of desperate cases.


26 posted on 08/17/2008 4:35:00 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Traditionally, only St. John escaped martyrdom.

The information about the passions of the various apostles was pretty well known and recorded fairly consistantly in the stained glass and paintings of the Middle Ages.

Two other sources that pretty much verify your opening post are the Catholic “Golden Legend” and the Protestant “Fox’s Book of Martyrs”, both books were huge best sellers.


27 posted on 08/17/2008 4:37:16 PM PDT by I_Like_Spam
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To: All
St. Matthew

When summoned by Jesus, Matthew arose and followed Him and tendered Him a feast in his house, where tax-gatherers and sinners sat at table with Christ and His disciples. This drew forth a protest from the Pharisees whom Jesus rebuked in these consoling words: "I came not to call the just, but sinners".


28 posted on 08/17/2008 4:37:22 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation; HarleyD
Judas I. shouldn't count, having been replaced by Matthias. (Acts 1)

St. Matthias - Martyr

29 posted on 08/17/2008 4:38:30 PM PDT by Enosh (†)
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To: wagglebee

The Bread of Life discourse is one of my favorite parts of the Bible.


30 posted on 08/17/2008 4:39:17 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Cincinnatus

Well, you know what they say:

Lousy pay, but the retirement plan is out of this world!


31 posted on 08/17/2008 4:39:23 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Cyber Liberty

Was Paul one of the original 12 Apostles? No........


32 posted on 08/17/2008 4:40:15 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Cincinnatus
St. Matthias

Matthias was one of the seventy disciples of Jesus, and had been with Him from His baptism by John to the Ascension (Acts i, 21, 22). It is related (Acts, i, 15-26) that in the days following the Ascension, Peter proposed to the assembled brethren, who numbered one hundred and twenty, that they choose one to fill the place of the traitor Judas in the Apostolate. Two disciples, Joseph, called Barsabas, and Matthias were selected, and lots were drawn, with the result in favour of Matthias, who thus became associated with the eleven Apostles.


33 posted on 08/17/2008 4:41:40 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
St. Peter

While journeying along with His Apostles, Jesus asks them: "Whom do men say that the Son of man is?" The Apostles answered: "Some John the Baptist, and other some Elias, and others Jeremias, or one of the prophets". Jesus said to them: "But whom do you say that I am?" Simon said: "Thou art Christ, the Son of the living God". And Jesus answering said to him: "Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona: because flesh and blood hath not revealed it to thee, but my Father who is in heaven. And I say to thee: That thou art Peter [Kipha, a rock], and upon this rock [Kipha] I will build my church [ekklesian], and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven". Then he commanded his disciples, that they should tell no one that he was Jesus the Christ (Matt., xvi, 13-20; Mark, viii, 27-30; Luke, ix, 18-21).


34 posted on 08/17/2008 4:43:01 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
St. Philip

He may have been a disciple of John the Baptist and is mentioned as one of the Apostles in the lists of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and in Acts. Aside from the lists, he is mentioned only in John in the New Testament. He was called by Jesus Himself and brought Nathanael to Christ. Philip was present at the miracle of the loaves and fishes, when he engaged in a brief dialogue with the Lord, and was the Apostle approached by the Hellenistic Jews from Bethsaida to introduce them to Jesus. Just before the Passion, Jesus answered Philip's query to show them the Father.


35 posted on 08/17/2008 4:44:01 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

I think if I had to choose a “favorite” passage, it would probably be Christ’s description of the Last Judgment in Matthew 25:31-46 (which many Protestants incorrectly believe is a parable).


36 posted on 08/17/2008 4:44:20 PM PDT by wagglebee ("A political party cannot be all things to all people." -- Ronald Reagan, 3/1/75)
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To: I_Like_Spam; HarleyD

Unless you count Judas like Harley mentioned


37 posted on 08/17/2008 4:45:19 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: wagglebee
31
14 "When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit upon his glorious throne,
32
and all the nations 15 will be assembled before him. And he will separate them one from another, as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats.
33
He will place the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.
34
Then the king will say to those on his right, 'Come, you who are blessed by my Father. Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.
35
For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me,
36
naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me.'
37
Then the righteous 16 will answer him and say, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink?
38
When did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you?
39
When did we see you ill or in prison, and visit you?'
40
And the king will say to them in reply, 'Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.'
41
17 Then he will say to those on his left, 'Depart from me, you accursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels.
42
For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink,
43
a stranger and you gave me no welcome, naked and you gave me no clothing, ill and in prison, and you did not care for me.'
44
18 Then they will answer and say, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or ill or in prison, and not minister to your needs?'
45
He will answer them, 'Amen, I say to you, what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for me.'
46
And these will go off to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life."

38 posted on 08/17/2008 4:50:12 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
"Another thread mentions that the apostles were the first priests."

BTW, an argument can be made that the first one was...

... Enosh.

(Genesis 4:26)

:^D

39 posted on 08/17/2008 4:50:24 PM PDT by Enosh (†)
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To: Salvation

Just a guess. Please carry on.


40 posted on 08/17/2008 4:51:43 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (Who would McQueeg rather have mad at him: You or the liberals? FREE LAZAMATAZ!)
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To: All
St. Simon the Apostle

In the New Testament he is sometimes called Simon the Zealot because of the zeal he showed for the Mosaic law which he practised before his call.


41 posted on 08/17/2008 4:52:00 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
St. Thomas the Apostle

St. Thomas is remembered for his incredulity when the other Apostles announced Christ's Resurrection to him: "Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the place of the nails, and put my hand into his side, I will not believe" (John 20:25); but eight days later he made his act of faith, drawing down the rebuke of Jesus: "Because thou hast seen me, Thomas, thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen, and have believed" (John 20:29).


42 posted on 08/17/2008 4:54:00 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Enosh

Of course, the first priest was Jesus Christ. High Priest.


43 posted on 08/17/2008 5:02:29 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: wagglebee; mware

Gospels for Easter Vigil follow the regular rotation. I checked back.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/search?SX=48a8c3990376d2fc2be44d5462ba4da7a58de33e;m=all;o=time;q=deep;s=catholic%20caucus%20easter%20vigil


44 posted on 08/17/2008 5:04:14 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

The recent book “Jesus of Nazareth” by Pope Benedict XVI has a very good analysis of the Gospel of John, which connects authorship to the Apostle John. If John the Evangelist did not write it himself, it appeared to be written by his disciples whom John obviously gave his oral testimony to.

Just like the early chapters of Luke. How did those events find their way into print? Because Mary kept all those things in her heart, just like it says! She told the Apostles her story, and they passed it on, and it was eventually written down by Luke.

The other Evangelists (other than John) were also martyred, just in case anyone is keeping track.


45 posted on 08/17/2008 5:06:35 PM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5:14)
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To: Enosh; Salvation
Judas I. shouldn't count, having been replaced by Matthias. (Acts 1)

Hmmm...well that's true. It could be argued that Paul was actually the twelfth apostle. But then he also was martyred. In fact, the term "apostle" gets a bit murky as Paul refers to Apollos as an apostle.

If we're just sticking to the twelve apostles that were actually with our Lord Jesus during His earthly ministry, that would rule out both Matthias and Paul. If not then the issue becomes more cloudy.

46 posted on 08/17/2008 5:10:44 PM PDT by HarleyD
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To: Salvation
What if St. John didn't die? I'm not saying I believe it one way or the other, just consider it a possibility.

And I do believe the traditions that the rest were martyred except Judas. Oddly, I do think Judas was sorry but succumbed to despair, guess it isn't for us to know his ultimate destiny, the "Son of Perdition." Sometimes I wonder what would have happened if he had asked forgiveness at the foot of the cross. It would have taken great humility and faith to do such a thing, don't like to think about it too much; my mind goes into a pretzel :-)

47 posted on 08/17/2008 5:11:40 PM PDT by Aliska
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To: Enosh
What about Melchizedek from the Old Testament? He is referenced in the First Eucharistic Prayer

Our Catholic Faith.com.

Father, we celebrate the memory of Christ, your Son. We, your people and your ministers, recall his passion, his resurrection from the dead, and his ascension into glory; and from the many gifts you have given us we offer to you, God of glory and majesty, this holy and perfect sacrifice: the bread of life and the cup of eternal salvation.

 

Look with favor on these offerings and accept them as once you accepted the gifts of your servant Abel, the sacrifice of Abraham, our father in faith, and the bread and wine offered by your priest Melchizedek.

 

Almighty God, we pray that your angel may take this sacrifice to your altar in heaven. Then, as we receive from this altar the sacred body and blood of your Son, let us be filled with every grace and blessing. [Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]

 

Remember, Lord, those who have died and have gone before us marked with the sign of faith, especially those for whom we now pray, {names deceased loved ones whom the celebrant or parishioner wishes to offer before God}. May these, and all who sleep in Christ, find in your presence light, happiness, and peace. [Through Christ our Lord. Amen.]

 

For ourselves, too, we ask some share in the fellowship of your apostles and martyrs, with John the Baptist, Stephen, Matthias, Barnabas, [Ignatius, Alexander, Marcellinus, Peter, Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia] and all the saints. Though we are sinners, we trust in your mercy and love. Do not consider what we truly deserve, but grant


48 posted on 08/17/2008 5:12:24 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Amen. Hallelujah!


49 posted on 08/17/2008 5:13:06 PM PDT by Enosh (†)
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To: Salvation

Thanks, I wasn’t certain either.


50 posted on 08/17/2008 5:14:30 PM PDT by wagglebee ("A political party cannot be all things to all people." -- Ronald Reagan, 3/1/75)
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