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St. John Chrysostom: The Prophet of Charity
http://www.orthodoxytoday.org/articles4/FlorovskyChrysostom.php ^ | Unknown | Georges Florovsky

Posted on 09/13/2008 9:46:12 AM PDT by stfassisi

CHRYSOSTOM was a powerful preacher. He was fond of preaching, and regarded preaching as the duty of a Christian minister. Priesthood is authority, but it is authority of word and conviction. This is the distinctive mark of Christian power. Kings compel, and pastors convince. The former act by orders, the latter by exhortations. Pastors appeal to human freedom, to human will and call for decisions. As Chrysostom used to say himself, "We have to accomplish the salvation of men by word, meekness, and exhortation." The whole meaning of human life for Chrysostom was in that it was, and had to be, a life in freedom, and therefore a life of service. In his preaching he spoke persistently about freedom and decision. Freedom was for him an image of God in man. Christ came, as Chrysostom used to remind, precisely to heal the will of man. God always acts in such a way as not to destroy our own freedom. God Himself acts by calls and exhortations, not by compulsion. He shows the right way, calls and invites, and warns against the dangers of wickedness, but does not constrain. Christian pastors must act accordingly. By temperament, Chrysostom was rather a maximalist, sharp and rigoristic, but he was always against compulsion, even in the struggle with heretics. Christians are forbidden, he used to insist, to apply violence even for good aims: "Our warfare does not make the living dead, but rather makes the dead to live, because it is conducted in the spirit of meekness and humility. I persecute by word, not by acts. I persecute heresy, not heretics. It is mine more to be persecuted, than to persecute. So Christ was victorious as a Crucified, and not as a crucifier." The strength of Christianity was for him in humility and toleration, not in power. One had to be strict about oneself, and meek to the others.

Yet, Chrysostom was in no sense a sentimental optimist. His diagnosis of the human situation was stern and grim. He lived in a time when the Church was suddenly invaded by crowds of nominal converts. He had an impression that he was preaching to the dead. He watched the lack of charity, and the complacent injustice and saw them almost in an apocalyptic perspective: "We have quenched the zeal, and the body of Christ is dead." He had an impression that he was speaking to people for whom Christianity was just a conventional fashion, an empty form, a manner and little more: "Among the thousands one can hardly find more than a hundred of them who are being saved, and even about that I am doubtful." He was rather embarrassed by the great number of alleged Christians: "an extra food for fire."

Prosperity was for him a danger, the worst kind of persecution, worse than an open persecution. Nobody sees dangers. Prosperity breeds carelessness. Men fall asleep, and the devil kills the sleepy. Chrysostom was disturbed especially by an open and deliberate lowering of standards and requirements, even among the clergy. Salt was losing its savour. He reacted to this not only by a word of rebuke and reprimand, but by deeds of charity and love. He was desperately concerned with the renewal of society, with the healing of social ills. He was preaching and practising charity, founding hospitals and orphanages, helping the poor and destitute. I le wanted to recover the spirit of practising love. He wanted more activity and commitment among Christians. Christianity for him was precisely "the Way," as it had been sometimes described in Apostolic times, and Christ Himself was "the Way." Chrysostom was always against all compromises, against the policy of appeasement and adjustment. He was a prophet of an integral Christianity.

Chrysostom was mainly a preacher of morality, but his ethics was deeply rooted in the faith. He used to interpret Scripture to his flocks, and his favorite writer was St. Paul. It was in his epistles that one could see this organic connection between faith and life. Chrysostom had his favorite dogmatic theme, to which he would constantly return first of all, the theme of the Church, closely linked to the doctrine of Redemption, being the sacrifice of the High Priest Christ; the Church is the new being, the life in Christ, and the life of Christ in men. Secondly, the theme of Eucharist, a sacrament and a sacrifice. It is but fair to call Chrysostom, as he was actually called, "the teacher of Eucharist," doctor eucharisticus. Both themes were linked together. It was in the Eucharist, and through it, that the Church could be alive.

Chrysostom was a witness of the living faith, and for that reason his voice was so eagerly listened to, both in the East and in the West; but for him, the faith was a norm of life, and not just a theory. Dogmas must be practised. Chrysostom was preaching the Gospel of Salvation, the good tidings of the new life. He was not a preacher of independent ethics. He preached Christ, and Him crucified and risen, the Lamb and the High Priest. Right life was for him the only efficient test of right beliefs. Faith is accomplished in the deeds, the deeds of charity and love. Without love faith, contemplation, and the vision of the mysteries of God are impossible. Chrysostom was watching the desperate struggle for truth in the society of his own days. He was always concerned with living souls; he was speaking to men, to living persons. He was always addressing a flock, for which he felt responsibility. He was always discussing concrete cases and situations.

One of his constant and favorite subjects was that of wealth and misery. The theme was imposed or dictated by the setting in which Chrysostom had to work. He had to face the life in great and overcrowded cities, with all the tensions between the rich and the poor. He simply could not evade social problems without detaching Christianity from life, but social problems were for him emphatically religious and ethical problems. He was not primarily a social reformer, even if he had his own plans for Christian society. He was concerned with the ways of Christians in the world, with their duties, with their vocation.

In his sermons we find, first of all, a penetrating analysis of the social situation. He finds too much injustice, coldness, indifference, and suffering and sorrow in the society of his days. And he sees well to what extent it is connected with the acquisitive character of the contemporary society, with the acquisitive spirit of life. This acquisitive spirit breeds inequality, and therefore injustice. He is not only upset by fruitless luxury of life; he is apprehensive of wealth as a standing temptation. Wealth seduces the rich. Wealth itself has no value. It is a guise, under which the real face of man is concealed, but those who hold possessions come to cherish them, and are deceived; they come to value them and rely on them. All possessions, not only the large ones, are dangerous, in so far as man learns to rely upon what is, by its very nature, something passing and unreal.

Chrysostom is very evangelical at this point. Treasures must be gathered in heaven, and not on earth, and all earthly treasures are unreal and doomed to corruption. "A love for wealth is abnormal," says Chrysostom. It is just a burden for the soul, and a dangerous burden. It enslaves the soul; it distracts it from the service to God. The Christian spirit is a spirit of renunciation, and wealth ties man to inanimate things. The acquisitive spirit distorts the vision, perverts the perspective. Chrysostom is closely following the injunctions of the Sermon on the Mount. "Do not be anxious for your life, what you shall eat, nor for your body, what you shall put on. . ." Life is greater than clothing or food, but it is anxiety which is the prevailing temper of the acquisitive society.

Christians are called to renounce all possessions and to follow Christ in full confidence and trust. Possessions can be justified only by their use: feed the hungry, help the poor, and give everything to the needy. Here is the main tension, and the main conflict, between the spirit of the Church and the mood of the worldly society. The cruel injustice of actual life is the bleeding wound of this society. In a world of sorrow and need, all possessions are wrong--they are just proofs of coldness, and symptoms of little faith. Chrysostom goes so far as to denounce even the splendor of the temples. "The Church," he says, "is a triumphant company of angels, and not a shop of a silversmith. The Church claims human souls, and only for the sake of the souls does God accept any other gifts. The cup which Christ offered to the disciples at the Last Supper was not made of gold. Yet it was precious above all measure. If you want to honor Christ, do it when you see Him naked, in the person of the poor. No use, if you bring silk and precious metals to the temple, and leave Christ to suffer cold and nakedness in the outside. No use, if the temple is full of golden vessels, but Christ himself is starving. You make golden chalices, but fail to offer cups of cold water to the needy. Christ, as a homeless stranger, is wandering around and begging, and instead of receiving Him you make decorations."

Chrysostom was afraid that everything kept aside was in a sense stolen from the poor. One cannot be rich, except at the cost of keeping others poor. The root of wealth is always in sortie injustice. Yet, poverty was not for Chrysostom just a virtue by itself. Poverty meant for him first of all need and want, and suffering and pain. For this reason Christ can be found among the poor, and he comes to us in the guise of a beggar, and not in that of a rich man. Poverty is a blessing only when it is cheerfully accepted for Christ's sake. The poor have less anxiety than the rich and are more independent-or at least may be. Chrysostom was fully aware that poverty can be tempting too, not only as a burden, but as an incentive of envy or despair. For that very reason he wanted to fight poverty, in order not only to ease the suffering, but to remove temptations also.

Chrysostom was always concerned with ethical issues. He had his own vision of a just society, and the first prerequisite was, in his opinion, equality. It is the first claim of any genuine love. But Chrysostom would go much further. He felt that there was but one owner of all things in the world-God Himself, the Maker of all. Strictly speaking, no private property should exist at all. Everything belongs to God. Everything is loaned rather than given by God in trust to man, for God's purposes. Chrysostom would add: Everything is God's except the good deeds of man--it is the only thing that man can own. As everything belongs to God, our common Master, everything is given for common use. Is it not true even of worldly things? Cities, market-places, streets-are they not a common possession? God's economy is of the same kind. Water, air, sun and moon, and the rest of creation, are intended for common use. Quarrels begin usually when people attempt to appropriate things which, by their very nature, were not intended for the private possession of some, to the exclusion of others.

Chrysostom had serious doubts about private property. Does not strife begin when the cold distinction mine" and "thine" is first introduced? Chrysostom was concerned not so much with the results, as with causes-with the orientation of the will. Where is man going to gather his treasures? Chrysostom was after justice in defense of human dignity. Was not every man created in God's image? Did God not wish salvation and conversion of every single man, regardless of his position in life, and even regardless of his behavior in the past? All are called to repentance, and all can repent. There was, however, no neglect of material things in his preaching. Material goods come also from God, and they are not bad in themselves. What is bad, is only the unjust use of goods, to the profit of some, while others are left starving. The answer is in love. Love is not selfish, "is not ambitious, is not self-seeking." Chrysostom was looking back to the primitive Church. "Observe the increase of piety. They cast away their riches, and rejoiced, and had great gladness, for greater were the riches they received without labor. None reproached, none envied, none grudged; no pride, no contempt. No talk of 'mine' and 'thine.' Hence gladness waited at their table; no one seemed to eat of his own, or another's. Neither did they consider their brethren's property foreign to themselves; it was a property of the Master; nor again deemed they ought their own, all was the brethren's." How was this possible, Chrysostom asks: By the inspiration of love, in recognition of the unfathomable love of God.

In no sense was Chrysostom preaching "communism." The pattern itself may be deceitful and misleading as any other. The real thing is the spirit. What Chrysostom was preaching in the cities, monks were fervently practising in their communities, professing by deeds that God was the only Master and owner of everything. Chrysostom did not regard monastic life just as an advanced course for the select, but rather as a normal evangelical pattern intended for all Christian. At this point he was in full agreement with the main tradition of the early Church, from St. Basil and St. Augustine up to St. Theodore of Studium in the later times. But the strength of monasticism is not in the pattern itself, but in the spirit of dedication, in the choice of a "higher calling." Was this calling only for the few? Chrysostom was always suspicious of inequality. Was it not dangerous to discriminate between the "strong" and the "weak"? Who could judge and decide in advance? Chrysostom was always thinking about real men. There was some kind of individualism inherent in his approach to people, but he valued unanimity most highly--the spirit of solidarity, of common care and responsibility, the spirit of service. No person can grow in virtue, unless he serves his brethren. For that reason he always emphasized charity. Those who fail to do charity will be left outside the bridal chamber of Christ. It is not enough, he says, to lift our hands to heaven-stretch them to the needy, and then you will be heard by the Father. He points out that, according to the Parable of the Last Judgment, the only question which will be asked then, is that about charity. But again it was not just a moralism with him. His ethics had an obvious mystical depth. The true altar is the body of men itself. It is not enough to worship at the altars. There is another altar made of living souls, and this altar is Christ Himself, His Body. The sacrifice of righteousness and mercy should be offered on this altar too, if our offerings are to be acceptable in God's sight. The deeds of charity had to be inspired by the ultimate dedication and devotion to Christ, who came into the world to relieve all want, and sorrow, and pain.

Chrysostom did not believe in abstract schemes; he had a fiery faith in the creative power of Christian love. It was for that reason that he became the teacher and prophet for all ages in the Church. In his youth he spent some few years in the desert, but would not stay there. For him monastic solitude was just a training period. He returned to the world to proclaim the power of the Gospel. He was a missionary by vocation; he had an apostolic and evangelistic zeal. He wanted to share his inspiration with his brethren ' He wanted to work for the establishment of God's Kingdom. He prayed for such things in common life so that nobody would need to retire to the wilderness in search for perfection, because there would be the same opportunity in the cities. He wanted to reform the city itself, and for that purpose lie chose for himself the way of priesthood and apostolate.

Was this a utopian dream? Was it possible to reshape the world, and to overrule the wordliness of the world? Was Chrysostom successful in his mission? His life was stormy and hard, it was a life of endurance and martyrdom. He was persecuted and rejected not by the heathen, but by false brethren, and died homeless as a prisoner in exile. All he was given to endure he accepted in the spirit of joy, as from the hand of Christ, Who was Himself rejected and executed. The Church gratefully recognized that witness and solemnly acclaimed Chrysostom as one of the "ecumenical teachers" for all ages to come.

There is some unusual flavor of modernity in the writings of Chrysostom. His world was like ours, a world of tensions, a world of unresolved problems in all walks of life. His advice may appeal to our age no less than it did to his own. But his main advice is a call to integral Christianity, in which faith and charity, belief and practice, are organically linked in an unconditional surrender of man to God's overwhelming love, in an unconditional trust in His mercy, in an unconditional commitment to His service, through Jesus Christ, our Lord.


TOPICS: Catholic; Orthodox Christian
KEYWORDS:
Chrysostom was always thinking about real men. There was some kind of individualism inherent in his approach to people, but he valued unanimity most highly--the spirit of solidarity, of common care and responsibility, the spirit of service. No person can grow in virtue, unless he serves his brethren. For that reason he always emphasized charity. Those who fail to do charity will be left outside the bridal chamber of Christ. It is not enough, he says, to lift our hands to heaven-stretch them to the needy, and then you will be heard by the Father. He points out that, according to the Parable of the Last Judgment, the only question which will be asked then, is that about charity. But again it was not just a moralism with him. His ethics had an obvious mystical depth. The true altar is the body of men itself. It is not enough to worship at the altars. There is another altar made of living souls, and this altar is Christ Himself, His Body. The sacrifice of righteousness and mercy should be offered on this altar too, if our offerings are to be acceptable in God's sight. The deeds of charity had to be inspired by the ultimate dedication and devotion to Christ, who came into the world to relieve all want, and sorrow, and pain.
1 posted on 09/13/2008 9:46:12 AM PDT by stfassisi
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To: AveMaria1; Friar Roderic Mary; fr maximilian mary; Kolokotronis; Carolina; sandyeggo; Salvation; ...

Prayer of Saint John Chrysostom

O Lord, deprive me not of Thy heavenly blessings;
O Lord, deliver me from eternal torment;
O Lord, if I have sinned in my mind or thought, in word deed, forgive me.
O Lord, deliver me from every ignorance and heedlessness, from pettiness of the soul and stony hardness of heart;
O Lord, deliver me from every temptation;
O Lord, enlighten my heart darkened by evil desires;
O Lord, I, being a human being, have sinned; do Thou, being God, forgive me in Thy lovingkindness, for Thou knowest the weakness of my soul.
O Lord, send down Thy grace to help me, that I may glorify Thy holy Name;
O Lord Jesus Christ, inscribe me, Thy servant, in the Book of Life, and grant me a blessed end;
O Lord my God, even if I have done nothing good in Thy sight, yet grant me, according to Thy grace, that I may make a start in doing good.
O Lord, sprinkle on my heart the dew of Thy grace;
O Lord of heaven and earth, remember me, Thy sinful servant, cold of heart and impure, in Thy Kingdom.
O Lord, receive me in repentance;
O Lord, leave me not;
O Lord, save me from temptation;
O Lord, grant me pure thoughts;
O Lord, grant me tears of repentance, remembrance of death, and the sense of peace;
O Lord, grant me mindfulness to confess my sins;
O Lord, grant me humility, charity, and obedience;
O Lord, grant me tolerance, magnanimity, and gentleness;
O Lord, implant in me the root of all blessings: the fear of Thee in my heart;
O Lord, vouchsafe that I may love Thee with all my heart and soul, and that I may obey in all things Thy will;
O Lord, shield me from evil persons and devils and passions and all other lawless matters;
O Lord, Who knowest Thy creation and that which Thou hast willed for it; may Thy will also be fulfilled in me, a sinner, for Thou art blessed forevermore. Amen


2 posted on 09/13/2008 9:49:04 AM PDT by stfassisi ( ("Above all gifts that Christ gives his beloved is that of overcoming self"-St Francis Assisi))
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To: stfassisi
John Chrysostom was a rabid anti-semite.

Yah'shua was/is/will always be a Jew.

Yah'shua will rule and reign the world from Jerusalem on the throne of King David, another Jew.

During the millennium the whole world will celebrate the Feast of Sukkoth.
See Zechariah 14:18

shalom b'SHEM Yah'shua HaMashiach Adonai

3 posted on 09/13/2008 10:02:50 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 78:35 And they remembered that God was their ROCK, And the Most High God their Redeemer.)
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To: stfassisi

Thank you!

“O Lord, deliver me from every ignorance and heedlessness, from pettiness of the soul and stony hardness of heart;”

Great reminder! (Especially on RF and election season)

Guilty as charged!

The great saints are so humble, aren’t they?

God gives us such great gifts in them.


4 posted on 09/13/2008 10:03:46 AM PDT by OpusatFR (As we bicker about faith, the faithful are witnesses by their martyrdom.)
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To: XeniaSt; Kolokotronis; kosta50
“”John Chrysostom was a rabid anti-semite””

I think you should do research on this before you make such blatant claims,Dear Friend

This is a good article to start with
http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/phronema/antisemitism.aspx

I would think that my Dear Friends Kost50 and Kolokotronis can add more than I can on this?

5 posted on 09/13/2008 10:19:54 AM PDT by stfassisi ( ("Above all gifts that Christ gives his beloved is that of overcoming self"-St Francis Assisi))
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To: stfassisi
St. John Chrysostom: The Prophet of Charity

Benedict XVI’s Nearly Unnoticed Letter on St. John Chrysostom (Fr. Z)

On Chrysostom's Social Doctrine

On St. John Chrysostom's Antioch Years

Synaxis of The Three Hierarchs: Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian, & John Chrysostom, Jan.30

The Translation of the Relics of St. John Chrysostom (Jan 27 or Feb 9 Julian calendar)

The Easter Sermon of St. John Chrysostom (c. 400 AD)

The Easter Sermon of St. John Chrysostom (c. 400 AD)

The Life of Saint John Chrysostom

PASCHAL Homily of St John Chrysostom

The Golden Mouthed Preacher-St.John Chrysostom [Bishop,Doctor of Catholic and Orthodox Churches]

6 posted on 09/13/2008 10:46:24 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: stfassisi; XeniaSt; Kolokotronis
I think you should do research on this before you make such blatant claims,Dear Friend This is a good article to start with http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/phronema/antisemitism.aspx

The article is very good, much better than anything I could have written on the fly, in being able to put the whole issue into proper historical and cognitive context, but it also states that on this topic any discussion will do very little to change people's minds. I have to agree with that.

7 posted on 09/13/2008 11:13:15 AM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: stfassisi
XS>“”John Chrysostom was a rabid anti-semite””

I think you should do research on this before you make such blatant claims,Dear Friend

This is a good article to start with http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/phronema/antisemitism.aspx

Rather than read the "spin" about John,
I prefer to read John's own words.

Saint John Chrysostom (c.347-407) : Eight Homilies Against the Jews

shalom b'SHEM Yah'shua HaMashiach Adonai
8 posted on 09/13/2008 11:15:05 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 78:35 And they remembered that God was their ROCK, And the Most High God their Redeemer.)
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To: stfassisi; kosta50

Apolytikion in the Plagal of the Fourth Tone

The grace of your words illuminated the universe like a shining beacon. It amassed treasures of munificence in the world. It demonstrated the greatness of humility, teaching us by your own words; therefore, O Father John Chrysostom, intercede to Christ the Logos for the salvation of our souls.

Kontakion in the Plagal of the Second Tone

You received divine grace from Heaven, and by your own lips taught all to worship the One God in Trinity. All-blessed, venerable John Chrysostom, deservedly, we praise you for you are a teacher clearly revealing things divine.

In the Orthodox Church we commemorate +John Chrysostomos on November 13 on the New Calendar.


9 posted on 09/13/2008 12:43:10 PM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated)
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To: XeniaSt

Your allegations against Saint John Chrysostom are completely false.


10 posted on 09/13/2008 2:11:10 PM PDT by FormerLib (Sacrificing our land and our blood cannot buy protection from jihad.-Bishop Artemije of Kosovo)
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To: XeniaSt

All completely refuted in the article forwarded to you in post #5.


11 posted on 09/13/2008 2:14:18 PM PDT by FormerLib (Sacrificing our land and our blood cannot buy protection from jihad.-Bishop Artemije of Kosovo)
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To: XeniaSt; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis
Your source alleges that there is no good reason to explain +John Chrystostom's homilies. Out of context, as stfassisi's link (Post #5) indicated, it is indeed difficult to understand what motivated him.

What is lacking is the historical context. Your source also fails to make clear that the homilies were directed against Judaiziers (Christians who followed the Law), and not the Jews.

As the brief introduction below indicates, there was a sudden resurgences in the Sabbaterianism in Antioch to which +John Chrysotsom's anger was directed.


12 posted on 09/13/2008 4:12:08 PM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: kosta50; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis

Your source alleges that there is no good reason to explain +John Chrystostom's homilies. Out of context, as stfassisi's link (Post #5) indicated, it is indeed difficult to understand what motivated him.

What is lacking is the historical context. Your source also fails to make clear that the homilies were directed against Judaiziers (Christians who followed the Law), and not the Jews.

As the brief introduction below indicates, there was a sudden resurgences(sic) in the Sabbaterianism(sic) in Antioch to which +John Chrysotsom's anger was directed.

Reason or motivation aside, John is vehemently and rabidly anti-semitic.

Looking for reason or motivation is only done to excuse his words.

John does not in any way exhibit or demonstrate the chesed (lovingkindness)
of Yah'shua(Jesus) toward YHvH's chosen People.

As you noted there was a resurgence of following a worship as commanded by YHvH.

John was angry because the believers in Antioch wanted to worship YHvH as He has commanded them.

John wanted them to reject YHvH and instead embrace the Paganism of Constantine's Roman church.

I recommend that you avoid the "spin" and read the words of John Chrystostom
and judge John on his own words without the spin.

Saint John Chrysostom (c.347-407) : Eight Homilies Against the Jews

shalom b'SHEM Yah'shua HaMashiach Adonai
13 posted on 09/14/2008 10:01:56 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 78:35 And they remembered that God was their ROCK, And the Most High God their Redeemer.)
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To: XeniaSt; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis
John wanted them to reject YHvH and instead embrace the Paganism of Constantine's Roman church

The Church believed in Christ Jesus. That's really "pagan!" The Church opposed those who enticed Christians to embrace Judaism. That's not racist. The issue was religion, not ethnicity. His homilies are against Judaiziers, not Jews.

14 posted on 09/15/2008 4:46:40 AM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: kosta50; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis

XS>John wanted them to reject YHvH and instead embrace the Paganism of Constantine's Roman church

The Church believed in Christ Jesus. That's really "pagan!" The Church opposed those who enticed Christians to embrace Judaism. That's not racist. The issue was religion, not ethnicity. His homilies are against Judaiziers(sic), not Jews.

14 posted on September 15, 2008 5:46:40 AM MDT by kosta50

John Chrystostom condemned the worship of YHvH, the creator of the universe.

John argued for worship of the Man-made religion of Pagan Rome: Sunday, Easter.

What you call "church" is a man-made enterprise.

It was given a charter to operate as a state-sponsored enterprise
by the Pontiff, Constantine, the Pagan Emperor.

The Roman "church" rejected the YHvH commanded Feast of Passover( Nissan 14 )
and instead embraced the Pagan Easter(Pascha) on a very different date on a very
different calendar than than which was defined by the creator of the universe.

A careful reading of John Chrystostom's homilies against the Jews,
one would see it is racist as he calls YHvH's Chosen People unkind names.
These name are not based on the Charity of Yah'shua.

Clearly John Chrystostom is neither a Prophet nor is he Charitable.

YHvH commanded worship on Shabbat and not on the Pagan "Sunday" of the Roman "church".

YHvH commanded worship on Passover and not on the Pagan Easter(Pascha) of the Roman "church".

shalom b'SHEM Yah'shua HaMashiach Adonai
15 posted on 09/15/2008 8:32:48 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 78:35 And they remembered that God was their ROCK, And the Most High God their Redeemer.)
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To: XeniaSt

Saint Constantine the Great abandoned paganism for Christianity circa AD 313.

Sunday is the day Christ Rose from the Dead, and is thus a fitting day to worship Him. This is not pagan.

Easter is the annual celebration of the Resurrection of Christ. Again, decidedly NOT pagan. Quite the opposite of pagan, actually.


16 posted on 09/15/2008 8:35:54 AM PDT by Petronski (Please pray for the success of McCain and Palin. Every day, whenever you pray.)
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To: XeniaSt
What you call "church" is a man-made enterprise.

The Catholic Church was ordained by God the Father, the first Person of the Holy Trinity, founded by Jesus Christ, the second Person of the Holy Trinity, and is guided to this day by the Holy Spirit, the third Person of the Holy Trinity.

17 posted on 09/15/2008 8:38:08 AM PDT by Petronski (Please pray for the success of McCain and Palin. Every day, whenever you pray.)
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To: Petronski

18 posted on 09/15/2008 9:31:46 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 78:35 And they remembered that God was their ROCK, And the Most High God their Redeemer.)
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To: XeniaSt; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis
John Chrystostom condemned the worship of YHvH, the creator of the universe

Last time I checked, St John Chrystostom believed in the the Creator of the Universe, the Word of God, Pentrocrator, aka Christ. I assume you know what Pentocrator means.

19 posted on 09/15/2008 10:52:43 AM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: XeniaSt; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis
John argued for worship of the Man-made religion of Pagan Rome: Sunday, Easter.

Every religion is man-made because human beings try to make sense of the incomprehensible God. The problem every religion runs into is when it begins to claim that it was God who "chose" one over another, and literally "dictated" books, or personally wrote them.

Sunday is when Jesus resurrected. Your Sabbaterians have their own fuzzy math. I really don't care. Christianity is the New Covenant. We are not bound by Judaism.

Christmas is not the day when Jesus was born, and the New Year is not On Sep 14, as the OT claims, and no one seems perturbed about either one not being celebrated "as YHvH commanded."

20 posted on 09/15/2008 10:52:44 AM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: XeniaSt; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis
It was given a charter to operate as a state-sponsored enterprise by the Pontiff, Constantine, the Pagan Emperor

First, there was no "Pontiff." The title was "Episcopus Romanus," the Bishop of Rome. Second, just as in Israel, the faith was identified with the state. Third, Constantine became a believer in the Christian God (had a "vision"), and therefore he was no longer a pagan.

The Roman "church" rejected the YHvH commanded Feast of Passover( Nissan 14 )

Last time I checked, +Paul rejected the Law as a defining element in Christianity. Why should Christians follow anything Jewish? No one is forcing you to be a Christian. The Old Covenant is not binding to Christians.

21 posted on 09/15/2008 10:52:45 AM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: XeniaSt; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis
A careful reading of John Chrystostom's homilies against the Jews, one would see it is racist as he calls YHvH's Chosen People unkind names. These name are not based on the Charity of Yah'shua.

The Old Testament is full of examples where non-Jews are called by unkind names because they are not God's "chosen people." Very charitable indeed.

Clearly John Chrystostom is neither a Prophet nor is he Charitable

Oh, so one can be unkind and uncharitable only if one is God's prophet?

YHvH commanded worship on Shabbat and not on the Pagan "Sunday" of the Roman "church"

God commanded 613 mitzvot as well. Do you keep all of them? The hypocrisy of anyone calling himself righteous was made evident by +Paul when he reminds us that no one can keep the Law perfectly. It's not the Law, and it's not the Sabbath that saves you.

If you had to depend on your observance of the 613 commandments (not counting the rabbinical mitzvot) you'd be in great peril.

22 posted on 09/15/2008 10:52:58 AM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: XeniaSt; stfassisi; FormerLib; Kolokotronis
YHvH commanded worship on Passover and not on the Pagan Easter(Pascha) of the Roman "church"

Christian Passover is the day of Christ's Resurrection, a Sunday. It cannot fall on any other day as the 14 of Nissan can. To Christians, it is the day Christ delivered humanity to freedom from the bondage of death to which humanity was hopelessly bound by sin. No one called it "Easter." That is a western innovation, like the term "Byzantine."

The Romans had a seven-day calendar and they called the 7th day Dies Solis (the day of the Sun). It had nothing to do with pagan worship. The nomenclature was based on astronomical positions of celestial bodies and not gods. Those who lived in Rome had to call it by the convention of the state.

The first reference to Christian Sabbath as "Sunday" comes from +Justin Martyr (c. 150 AD) in his Apology, about 180 years before Constantine. Your historical context is not in order.

23 posted on 09/15/2008 11:01:30 AM PDT by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: XeniaSt; kosta50; Kolokotronis

Jesus came to fulfill the law. Our celebration of his Resurrection is the Passover of the New Covenant.

Slava Ocu i Sinu, i Svetome Duhu.
Sada i uvek, i u vekove vekova, Amin.


24 posted on 09/15/2008 5:48:16 PM PDT by FormerLib (Sacrificing our land and our blood cannot buy protection from jihad.-Bishop Artemije of Kosovo)
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To: FormerLib; kosta50; XeniaSt
Δόξα Πατρὶ καὶ Υἱῷ καὶ Ἁγίῳ Πνεύματι, καὶ νῦν καὶ ἀεὶ καὶ εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων. Ἀμήν.

Which means for those who know neither Serbian nor Greek (I know you know, Kosta & FL):

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, Both now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.

25 posted on 09/16/2008 8:00:09 AM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated)
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