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I Give You Freedom (The Whippoorwill Song) [Barf Alert]

Posted on 09/19/2008 10:34:16 PM PDT by Gamecock

In the tradition of shallow, insipid, diabetic coma inducing "Christian" music, ladies and gentlemen, from Pensacola Christian College:

The Joy Quartet


TOPICS: Evangelical Christian; General Discusssion; Mainline Protestant
KEYWORDS: calvinst; reformed
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For those who can't bear the singing, here are the lyrics:

I Give You Freedom (The Whippoorwill Song)

I set the boundries of the ocean vast,
Carved out the mountains from the distant past,
Moulded a man from the miry clay,
Breathed in him life, but he went astray.

CHORUS:
I own the cattle on a thousand hills,
I write the music for the whippoorwills,
Control the planets with their rocks and rills,
But give you freedom to use your own will.

And if you want Me to, I’ll make you whole,
I’ll only do it tho’ if you say so.
I’ll never force you, for I love you so,
I give you freedom - Is it “yes” or “no”?

I hold the waters in My mighty hand
Spread out the heavens with a single span,
Make all creation tremble at My voice,
But My own children come to Me by choice.
(chorus)

Even the oxen knows the master’s stall,
And sheep will recognize the shepherd’s call
I could demand your love - I own you twice,
But only willing love is worth the price!
(chorus)

My holy word now I give to you,
As a shining lamp to guide you through,
My yoke is easy and My burden is light,
Keep looking up, your Heavenly home’s in sight.
(chorus)

1 posted on 09/19/2008 10:34:17 PM PDT by Gamecock
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To: Gamecock
I own the cattle on a thousand hills,

I write the music for the whippoorwills,

Control the planets with their rocks and rills,

But give you freedom to use your own will.

Thanks for posting The Official Obama Campaign Theme Song

2 posted on 09/19/2008 10:37:58 PM PDT by Darkwolf377 (Sarah Palin--the man Biden and Obama wish they could be.)
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To: Dr. Eckleburg; HarleyD; Alex Murphy; irishtenor

Ping


3 posted on 09/19/2008 10:41:32 PM PDT by Gamecock
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To: Gamecock

I dunno Gamecock. I think the greater tragedy may be those outfits and their lack of ability to stay on pitch.

In all my years as a Wesleyan, I’ve never heard that song.


4 posted on 09/19/2008 10:42:06 PM PDT by Corin Stormhands (Community Organizers for McCain-Palin now at http://www.cafepress.com/writeside)
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To: Corin Stormhands

***I think the greater tragedy may be those outfits and their lack of ability to stay on pitch.**

That was implied. ;-)


5 posted on 09/19/2008 10:44:32 PM PDT by Gamecock
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To: Gamecock
In the tradition of shallow, insipid, diabetic coma inducing "Christian" music

Music serves many purposes, some of which apparently meet with your disapproval. Your use of "Christian," in quotes, is interesting. Say what you will regarding the aesthetics; the message of Christianity (no quotes necessary) is contained in the lyrics.

Maybe you should consider listening to something a tad less guileless, in order to avoid diabetic coma in the future.

6 posted on 09/19/2008 10:51:35 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

**the message of Christianity (no quotes necessary) is contained in the lyrics.**

Actually, no it’s not.


7 posted on 09/19/2008 10:53:09 PM PDT by Gamecock
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To: Gamecock

Some things are implied, rather than overt. Other than that, what critique would you like to proffer regarding the Christianity, or the lack you seem to perceive thereof, contained within this innocent little effort by a quartet from a small school?


8 posted on 09/19/2008 10:58:51 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

Glorifies man above God.

Unscriptural theme.


9 posted on 09/19/2008 11:25:39 PM PDT by Gamecock
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To: Gamecock
Glorifies man above God. Unscriptural theme.

Huh? Who do you think the "I" is, in these lyrics, which are written in a colloquial style, but are drawn from scripture?

10 posted on 09/19/2008 11:34:08 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Gamecock

I’m listening to it, and I’m thinking that the guy is really nervous.

Even when you are a good singer, a good case of nerves can make you flat as a pancakes.


11 posted on 09/20/2008 12:33:59 AM PDT by I still care (A thousand screaming Germans, some fake columns and swooning girly-men does not a campaign make.)
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To: Gamecock

I kind of like this one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ_jQDfFaZI

“The Man Comes Around”


12 posted on 09/20/2008 12:57:44 AM PDT by Califreak (Rome is burning and nobody cares)
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To: Califreak
LOVE Johnny Cash, who gave hope to millions with his testimony.

It might surprise you, but Bob Dylan's "Slow Train Coming" and "Gotta Serve somebody," are some of my favorites.

In is a testimony to a Post-Christian ethos that the best music in the Occident is no longer celebrating Christ.

13 posted on 09/20/2008 2:45:50 AM PDT by Prospero (non est ad astra mollis e terris via)
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To: Gamecock
I seem to have heard this song somewhere before. It was just as wrong then as it is now.

Like Paul on the Damascus Road, no one can know the Son unless He reveals Himself to us. We don't choose Him. He chooses us.

14 posted on 09/20/2008 7:00:36 AM PDT by HarleyD
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To: Gamecock; xzins; P-Marlowe
Is that where that came from?

The church I grew up in used to sing that absolutely insipid song. My dad confiscated the overhead and told the song leader never to sing it again in his church.

15 posted on 09/20/2008 7:04:23 AM PDT by jude24
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To: Gamecock; xzins; P-Marlowe
Here's a practical question:

Assume you're in a new area, looking for a church. Assume you've found one which seems to have mostly good teaching. But then they sing "prom songs to Jesus." And one of them is pretty bad, and sounds almost like you want to make love to Jesus. (Lest you think I'm exaggerating, here it is.). Then you email the pastor and say what your objection to the song is, and he agrees. Then they sing it again.

Would you ever go back to that church?

16 posted on 09/20/2008 7:09:26 AM PDT by jude24
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To: jude24
Is this a purely theoretical question, or something you've actually run into?

Sounds like the pastor isn't actually running the worship service. Maybe there's a "worship team" that's doing it's own thing during the allotted time.

Would I go back? At one time, yes. Now, I'd be inclined to keep looking.

17 posted on 09/20/2008 7:34:27 AM PDT by Lee N. Field ("I've studied bible prophecy 30 years" usually means "I have everything Hal Lindsay ever wrote.")
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To: RegulatorCountry

It all points back to “me.”


18 posted on 09/20/2008 8:55:05 AM PDT by Gamecock
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To: jude24
Assume you're in a new area, looking for a church. Assume you've found one which seems to have mostly good teaching. But then they sing "prom songs to Jesus." And one of them is pretty bad, and sounds almost like you want to make love to Jesus.

I would say the doctrine of the local church drives the hymn/music selection.

I would keep looking. Life is to short for bad theology.

19 posted on 09/20/2008 8:57:56 AM PDT by Gamecock (Life is to short for bad theology.)
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To: Lee N. Field; Gamecock; xzins; P-Marlowe
Is this a purely theoretical question, or something you've actually run into?

Oh, it was very real.

I moved to a new area, and my fiancee and I decided to go church hunting. (I still am.) Anyway, we checked out this one - and at first, we loved it. Then came that song. I told my fiancee I wasn't putting up with that, and so emailed the pastor. He said he'd talk to the worship leader. Two or three weeks later, the song popped up again. I didn't walk out of the service, but I didn't ever come back.

Before I even raised the issue, I emailed the lyrics to some old college buddies, and they agreed that I was not over-analyzing them. They're pretty inappropriate.

Musical style isn't a defining criteria in my church hunt; I don't much care if a church sings all from the Trinity Hymnal or if they sing all Chris Tomlin choruses. But I will not put up with churches that have us sing songs about Jesus that my fiancee couldn't say to me in public without blushing.

All I could think of during that song was the "South Park" about Christian Rock. (Warning: it's South Park - and therefore pretty off-color, but also pretty good satire.)

20 posted on 09/20/2008 9:31:57 AM PDT by jude24
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To: Gamecock
It all points back to “me.”

Well, ok then. Above and beyond your distaste for their choice of apparel and general lack of polish, it apparently comes down to:

And if you want Me to, I’ll make you whole,
I’ll only do it tho’ if you say so.
I’ll never force you, for I love you so,
I give you freedom - Is it “yes” or “no”?

So, you're interpreting this as being "me" centered, as if the author considers God to be at the beck and call of those seeking salvation? The choice of life or death does reside with the individual though, Gamecock. That God has always known the outcome does not reduce you or me to some sort of thoughtless automaton. Free will is there, to choose God, or not. That is what this expresses, even if you don't give them style points for presentation.

21 posted on 09/20/2008 10:01:19 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Prospero

Serve Somebody is one of my favorites too.


22 posted on 09/20/2008 11:45:32 AM PDT by Califreak (Rome is burning and nobody cares)
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To: RegulatorCountry

Free will is never used in the context of Salvation.

It is God who decides. Three times in Scripture we read God saying “I will have mercy on who I will have mercy.” We see god picking individuals, groups and a country. We see God tell us He is the potter and we are clay. God chides us when we question his elective purpose. He brings us to life. he turns out stone hearts to flesh. He brings our dead bones to life. He gives us a new birth.

No my FRiend, God chooses us. We are at war with him until he brings us to life.


23 posted on 09/20/2008 11:57:16 AM PDT by Gamecock (Life is to short for bad theology.)
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To: jude24; Gamecock; P-Marlowe

I wouldn’t return. You’ll never find a church that doesn’t sing at least one korny song, but your attitude is now negative toward that church. You find them to have only “mostly good teaching” instead of “good teaching.” You don’t really seem to like it.

Keep looking.


24 posted on 09/20/2008 12:27:21 PM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain Opposing -> ZerObama: zero executive, military, or international experience)
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To: Gamecock
Free will is never used in the context of Salvation.

John 3:16 and Romans 10:9-10. God knows who will be saved, God chooses who will be saved, and we must choose Christ in order to be saved.

25 posted on 09/20/2008 3:28:34 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

***God knows who will be saved, God chooses who will be saved***

God knows who will be saved BECAUSE God choose who will be saved.

***and we must choose Christ in order to be saved.***

And only those who God selected from before the foundation of the earth will choose Christ.

John 3:16 has nothing to do with the myth of free will, nor does Romans 10:9-10.


26 posted on 09/21/2008 5:55:50 AM PDT by Gamecock (Life is to short for bad theology.)
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To: jude24; Gamecock; xzins
And one of them is pretty bad, and sounds almost like you want to make love to Jesus. (Lest you think I'm exaggerating, here it is.).

Have you read Song of Solomon?

27 posted on 09/21/2008 7:54:45 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: P-Marlowe

Song of Solomon is not about God.


28 posted on 09/21/2008 8:44:40 AM PDT by jude24
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock
Song of Solomon is not about God.

I guess you know more than John Gill.

29 posted on 09/21/2008 9:43:42 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: Gamecock
Such fatalism. Are you saved, Gamecock? How do you know?

As we discussed earlier in this thread, that God has known the outcome from the beginning does not reduce us all to mindless automatons.

30 posted on 09/21/2008 9:52:37 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: P-Marlowe

Gill is wrong in this instance.


31 posted on 09/21/2008 9:53:20 AM PDT by jude24
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To: jude24; P-Marlowe

Gill or not Gill is moot in this case.

My advice is that there’s no way you can now go to this church.

Keep looking.


32 posted on 09/21/2008 9:54:39 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain Opposing -> ZerObama: zero executive, military, or international experience)
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To: jude24; Gamecock; xzins
Gill is wrong in this instance.

So you DO know better than Gill. That's pretty arrogant.

What Christian commentator can you name who does NOT note the allegorical references to Christ and his Bride in Song of Solomon?

Can you name ANY?

33 posted on 09/21/2008 9:55:47 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: P-Marlowe
What Christian commentator can you name who does NOT note the allegorical references to Christ and his Bride in Song of Solomon?

Well, to start with, the New American Commentary rejects it.

The strongest refutation of the allegorical interpretation of Song of Songs, however, is in the obviously sexual nature of the language. Fairly unambiguous allusions to love play appear in the text (e.g., 5:1). Such language is simply inappropriate as a description of the love between God and his people, other biblical metaphors notwithstanding. The very beginning of the song, “Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth,” implies that this is not divine-human love. We can hardly imagine Christ describing his love for the church in the terms of 7:7–8.53 While the Bible does speak of the people of God as his bride, it never indulges in explicitly sexual imagery to describe the relationship.54​

However good one’s intentions may be, sexual language should not be brought into the vocabulary of worship and devotion via allegorism or any other means. The linking of religious adoration to erotic impulses is a mark of paganism and can only be regarded as a dangerous intrusion into the Christian understanding of both life and worship.55 The two spheres of sexuality and devotion to God should not be confounded or intermingled lest both suffer distortion.

Allegorization is now widely acknowledged to be a false reading of the text,56 although a few interpreters have in effect tried to reintroduce it through the back door.57 Such temptations should be resisted. Although the allegorical interpretation may appear to be pious, anything that draws the reader away from the intended message58 of the text is destructive.


34 posted on 09/21/2008 10:05:51 AM PDT by jude24
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To: Darkwolf377
I own the cattle on a thousand hills,
I write the music for the whippoorwills,
Control the planets with their rocks and rills,
But give you freedom permission to use your own will.
Thanks for posting The Official Obama Campaign Theme Song
35 posted on 09/21/2008 10:10:09 AM PDT by LakeLady (Above the fray; below the fray....I just wanna be in the fray!!! Defeat 'Bama/Bidet)
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock

Who wrote that commentary and what hare his credentials when to Gill’s?


36 posted on 09/21/2008 10:15:34 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock
Let me rephrase that.

Who wrote that commentary and what are his credentials when compared to Gill's?

37 posted on 09/21/2008 10:18:48 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: P-Marlowe
Irrelevant. The text gives no indication that it is to be interpreted allegorically - nor is there any New Testament warrant to do so.

Gill or no, it is a construct imposed upon the text. The plain, grammatical-historical interpretation of the Song of Solomon that it is about a (perhaps idealized, but nonetheless very human) man and wife.

38 posted on 09/21/2008 10:27:27 AM PDT by jude24
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To: jude24

Is it “Scripture”?


39 posted on 09/21/2008 10:29:08 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: P-Marlowe

Is “Gill”?


40 posted on 09/21/2008 10:32:22 AM PDT by jude24
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock

Mathew Henry's Commentary


Song of Solomon -

An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Song of Solomon

All scripture, we are sure, is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for the support and advancement of the interests of his kingdom among men, and it is never the less so for there being found in it some things dark and hard to be understood, which those that are unlearned and unstable wrest to their own destruction. In our belief both of the divine extraction and of the spiritual exposition of this book we are confirmed by the ancient, constant, and concurring testimony both of the church of the Jews, to whom were committed the oracles of God, and who never made any doubt of the authority of this book, and of the Christian church, which happily succeeds them in that trust and honour. I. It must be confessed, on the one hand, that if he who barely reads this book be asked, as the eunuch was Understandest thou what thou readest? he will have more reason than he had to say, How can I, except some man shall guide me?

The books of scripture-history and prophecy are very much like one another, but this Song of Solomon's is very much unlike the songs of his father David; here is not the name of God in it; it is never quoted in the New Testament; we find not in it any expressions of natural religion or pious devotion, no, nor is it introduced by vision, or any of the marks of immediate revelation. It seems as hard as any part of scripture to be made a savour of life unto life, nay, and to those who come to the reading of it with carnal minds and corrupt affections, it is in danger of being made a savour of death unto death; it is a flower out of which they extract poison; and therefore the Jewish doctors advised their young people not to read it till they were thirty years old, lest by the abuse of that which is most pure and sacred (horrendum dictu - horrible to say!) the flames of lust should be kindled with fire from heaven, which is intended for the altar only.

But, II. It must be confessed, on the other hand, that with the help of the many faithful guides we have for the understanding of this book it appears to be a very bright and powerful ray of heavenly light, admirable fitted to excite pious and devout affections in holy souls, to draw out their desires towards God, to increase their delight in him, and improve their acquaintance and communion with him. It is an allegory, the letter of which kills those who rest in that and look no further, but the spirit of which gives life, 2Co_3:6; Joh_6:63.

It is a parable, which makes divine things more difficult to those who do not love them, but more plain and pleasant to those who do, Mat_13:14, Mat_13:16. Experienced Christians here find a counterpart of their experiences, and to them it is intelligible, while those neither understand it nor relish it who have no part nor lot in the matter. It is a song, an Epithalamium, or nuptial song, wherein, by the expressions of love between a bridegroom and his bride, are set forth and illustrated the mutual affections that pass between God and a distinguished remnant of mankind. It is a pastoral; the bride and bridegroom, for the more lively representation of humility and innocence, are brought in as a shepherd and his shepherdess.

Now, 1. This song might easily be taken in a spiritual sense by the Jewish church, for whose use it was first composed, and was so taken, as appears by the Chaldee-Paraphrase and the most ancient Jewish expositors. God betrothed the people of Israel to himself; he entered into covenant with them, and it was a marriage-covenant. He had given abundant proofs of his love to them, and required of them that they should love him with all their heart and soul. Idolatry was often spoken of as spiritual adultery, and doting upon idols, to prevent which this song was penned, representing the complacency which God took in Israel and which Israel ought to take in God, and encouraging them to continue faithful to him, though he might seem sometimes to withdraw and hide himself from them, and to wait for the further manifestation of himself in the promised Messiah.

2. It may more easily be taken in a spiritual sense by the Christian church, because the condescensions and communications of divine love appear more rich and free under the gospel than they did under the law, and the communion between heaven and earth more familiar. God sometimes spoke of himself as the husband of the Jewish church (Isa_64:5, Hos_2:16, Hos_2:19), and rejoiced in it as his bride, Isa_62:4, Isa_62:5. But more frequently is Christ represented as the bridegroom of his church (Mat_25:1; Rom_7:4; 2Co_11:2; Eph_5:32), and the church as the bride, the Lamb's wife, Rev_19:7; Rev_21:2, Rev_21:9.

Pursuant to this metaphor Christ and the church in general, Christ and particular believers, are here discoursing with abundance of mutual esteem and endearment. The best key to this book is the 45th Psalm, which we find applied to Christ in the New Testament, and therefore this ought to be so too. It requires some pains to find out what may, probably, be the meaning of the Holy Spirit in the several parts of this book; as David's songs are many of them level to the capacity of the meanest, and there are shallows in them learned, and there are depths in it in which an elephant may swim. But, when the meaning is found out, it will be of admirable use to excite pious and devout affections in us; and the same truths which are plainly laid down in other scriptures when they are extracted out of this come to the soul with a more pleasing power. When we apply ourselves to the study of this book we must not only, with Moses and Joshua, put off our shoe from off our foot, and even forget that we have bodies, because the place where we stand is holy ground, but we must, with John, come up hither, must spread our wings, take a noble flight, and soar upwards, till by faith and holy love we enter into the holiest, for this is no other than the house of God and this is the gate of heaven.



41 posted on 09/21/2008 10:39:50 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: P-Marlowe
Once again, why do I care what Gill or Henry wrote?

Modern conservative evangelical scholarship has pointed out the cultural blindnesses which have led to that being forced on the text.

I will not put up with a church that does that, and forces me to sing "Jesus is my boyfriend" songs.

I will leave first. I already have.

42 posted on 09/21/2008 10:54:07 AM PDT by jude24
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock
Once again, why do I care what Gill or Henry wrote?

How about Spurgeon?

Starting Text

Title

Song of Solomon  1: 13    

"A bundle of myrrh is my well-beloved unto me." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  1: 16    

"Behold, Thou art fair, my Beloved." - Charles Spurgeon

Song Of Solomon  1: 2    

Let Him Kiss Me With The Kisses Of His Mouth! - Don Fortner

Song of Solomon  1: 2    

"Thy love is better than wine." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  1: 2    

"Let Him kiss me with the kisses of His mouth." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  1: 4    

"The upright love Thee" - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  1: 4    

"We will remember Thy love more than wine." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  1: 4    

"We will be glad and rejoice in Thee." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  1: 7    

"Tell me . . . where Thou feedest, where Thou makest Thy flock to rest at noon." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  1: 7    

"Thou whom my soul loveth." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  2: 1    

"I am the rose of Sharon." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  2: 10    

"Rise up my love, my fair one, and come away." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  2: 12    

"The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  2: 15    

"Take us the foxes, the little foxes that spoil the vines." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  2: 16-17    

"My Beloved is mine, and I am His: He feedeth among the lilies. Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, turn, my Beloved, and be Thou like a roe or a young hart upon the mountains of Bether." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  2: 3    

"His fruit was sweet to my taste." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  2: 8    

"My beloved." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  3: 1    

"I sought him, but I found him not." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  3: 4    

"I found Him whom my soul loveth: I held Him, and would not let Him go." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  4: 12    

"My sister, my spouse." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  4: 12    

"A spring shut up, a fountain sealed." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  4: 16    

"Awake, O north wind; and come, thou south; blow upon my garden, that the spices thereof may flow out." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  4: 7    

"There is no spot in thee." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  4: 7    

"Thou art all fair, my love." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 1    

"I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 11    

"His head is as the most fine gold, His locks are bushy, and black as a raven." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 13    

"His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 16    

"Yea, He is altogether lovely." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 2    

"I sleep, but my heart waketh." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 4    

"My Beloved put in His hand by the hole of the door, and my bowels were moved for Him." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 6    

"I called Him, but He gave me no answer." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  5: 8    

"I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  7: 11-12    

"Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field . . . let us see if the vine flourish." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  7: 13    

"Pleasant fruits, new and old, which I have laid up for thee, O my beloved." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  8: 13    

"Thou that dwellest in the gardens, the companions hearken to Thy voice: cause me to hear it." - Charles Spurgeon

Song of Solomon  8: 6    

"Love is strong as death." - Charles Spurgeon



43 posted on 09/21/2008 10:59:16 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock
Once again, why do I care what Gill or Henry wrote?

How about Jonathan Edwards?

Christ and his church rejoice in each other’s beauty. The church rejoices in Christ’s divine beauty and glory. She, as it were, sweetly solaces herself in the light of the glory of the Sun of righteousness; and the saints say one to another, as in Isa. ii. 5. “Oh house of Jacob, come ye, let us walk in the light of the Lord.” The perfections and virtues of Christ are as a perfumed ointment to the church, that make his very name to be to her as ointment poured forth; Cant. i. 3. “Because of the savour of they good ointments thy name is as ointment poured forth, therefore do the virgins love thee.” And Christ delights and rejoices in the beauty of the church, the beauty which he hath put upon her: her Christian graces are ointments of great price in his sight, 1 Peter iii. 4. And he is spoken of as greatly desiring her beauty, Psalms xlv. 11. Yea, he himself speaks of his heart as ravished with her beauty, Cant. iv. 9. “Thou hast ravished my heart, my sister, my spouse; thou has ravished my heart with one of mine eyes, with one chain of thy neck.”

22Christ and his church, as the bridegroom and bride, rejoice in each other’s love. Wine is spoken of, Psalms civ. 15. as that which maketh glad man’s heart: but the church of Christ is spoken of as rejoicing in the love of Christ, as that which is more pleasant and refreshing than wine, Cant. i. 4. “The king hath brought me into his chambers: we will be glad and rejoice in thee, we will remember thy love more than wine.” So on the other hand, Christ speaks of the church’s love as far better to him than wine, Cant. iv. 10. “How fair is thy love, my sister, my spouse! How much better is thy love than wine!”

Christ and his church rejoice in communion with each other, as in being united in their happiness, and having fellowship and a joint participation in each other’s good: as the bridegroom and bride rejoice together at the wedding-feast, and as thenceforward they are joint partakers of each other’s comforts and joys: Rev. iii. 20 “If any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and sup with him, and he with me.” The church has fellowship with Christ in his own happiness, and his divine entertainments; his joy is fulfilled in her, John xv. 11. and xvii. 13. She sees light in his light; and she is made to drink at the river of his own pleasures, Psalms xxxiv. 8, 9. And Christ brings her to eat and drink at his own table, to take her fill of his own entertainments; Cant. v. 1. “Eat, oh friends, drink, yea, drink abundantly, oh beloved.” And he, on the other hand, has fellowship with her; he feasts with her; her joys are his; and he rejoices in that entertainment that she provides for him. So Christ is said to feed among the lilies, Cant. ii. 16. and vii. 13. she speaks of all manner of pleasant fruits, new and old, which she had laid up, and says to him, in verse iv. 16, “Let my beloved come into his garden, and eat his pleasant fruits,” and he makes answer in the next verse, “I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse; I have gathered my myrrh with my spice, I have eaten my honey-comb with my honey, I have drunk my wine with my milk.”

And lastly, Christ and his church, as the bridegroom and bride, rejoice in conversing with each other. The words of Christ by which he converses with his church, are most sweet to her; and therefore she says of him, Cant. v. 6. “His mouth is most sweet.” And on the other hand, he says of her, verse 2:14., “Let me hear thy voice: for sweet is thy voice.” And verse iv. 11., “Thy lips, oh my spouse, drop as the honey-comb: honey and milk are under thy tongue.”

Christ rejoices over his saints as the bridegroom over the bride at all times: but there are some seasons wherein he doth so more especially. Such a season is the time of the soul’s conversion; when the good shepherd finds his lost sheep, then he brings it home rejoicing, and calls together his friends and neighbors, saying, Rejoice with me. The day of a sinner’s conversion is the day of Christ’s espousals; and so is eminently the day of his rejoicing; Sol. Song iii. 11. “Go forth, oh ye daughters of Zion, and behold king Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart.” And it is oftentimes remarkably the day of the saints’ rejoicing in Christ; for then God turns again the captivity of his elect people, and, as it were, fills their mouth with laughter, and their tongue with singing; as in Psa. cxxvi. at the beginning. We read of the jailer, that when he was converted, “he rejoiced, believing in God, with all his house,” Acts xvi. 34.—There are other seasons of special communion of the saints with Christ, wherein Christ doth in a special manner rejoice over his saints, and as their bridegroom brings them into his chambers, that they also may be glad and rejoice in him, Cant. i. 4.

Works of Jonathan Edwards, Volume Two (iii.ii) — Edwards, Jonathan (1703-1758)

44 posted on 09/21/2008 11:10:23 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock

Hymn 57

John Newton

8,6,8,6

The name of Jesus.Song of Solomon 1:3

How sweet the name of Jesus sounds

In a believer’s ear?

It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,

And drives away his fear.

It makes the wounded spirit whole,

And calms the troubled breast;

’Tis Manna to the hungry soul,

And to the weary rest.

Dear name! the rock on which I build,

My shield and hiding place;

My never–failing treas’ry filled

With boundless stores of grace.

By thee my prayers acceptance gain,

Although with sin defiled,73

Satan accuses me in vain,

And I am owned a child.

Jesus! my Shepherd, Husband, Friend,

My Prophet, Priest, and King;

My Lord, my Life, my Way, my End,

Accept the praise I bring.

Weak is the effort of my heart,

And cold my warmest thought;

But when I see thee as thou art,

I’ll praise thee as I ought.

’Till then I would thy love proclaim

With every fleeting breath,

And may the music of thy name

Refresh my soul in death.


45 posted on 09/21/2008 11:35:16 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: RegulatorCountry

***Are you saved, Gamecock? How do you know?***

Saved from what?

***does not reduce us all to mindless automatons.***

Nor does God’s election.


46 posted on 09/21/2008 11:46:20 AM PDT by Gamecock (Life is to short for bad theology.)
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To: jude24; xzins; Gamecock

WHO IS THIS FAIR ONE IN DISTRESS?

“Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her beloved?” Song of Solomon 8:5



Isaac Watts (1674-1748)
Words:Isaac Watts, Hymns and Spir­it­u­al Songs, 1707.

Music: Sho­el, in A Com­pil­a­tion of Gen­u­ine Church Music, by Joseph Funk (Win­ches­ter, Vir­gin­ia: J. W. Holl­is, 1832) (MI­DI, score).

Who is this fair one in distress,
That travels from the wilderness?
And pressed with sorrows and with sins,
On her belovèd Lord she leans.

This is the spouse of Christ our God,
Bought with the treasure of His blood;
And her request and her complaint
Is but the voice of every saint.

“O let my name engraven stand
Both on Thy heart and on Thy hand;
Seal me upon Thine arm, and wear
That pledge of love for ever there.

“Stronger than death Thy love is known,
Which floods of wrath could never drown;
And hell and earth in vain combine
To quench a fire so much divine.

“But I am jealous of my heart,
Lest it should once from Thee depart;
Then let Thy Name be well impressed,
As a fair signet on my breast.

“Till Thou hast brought me to Thy home,
Where fears and doubts can never come,
Thy countenance let me often see,
And often Thou shalt hear from me.

“Come, my Belovèd, haste away,
Cut short the hours of Thy delay;
Fly like a youthful hart or roe
Over the hills where spices grow.”

47 posted on 09/21/2008 11:53:47 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: P-Marlowe

One of the great hymns of Christendom, unlike the The Whippoorwill Song.

(BTW, Newton was a Calvinist)


48 posted on 09/21/2008 11:57:05 AM PDT by Gamecock (Life is to short for bad theology.)
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To: Gamecock; xzins; jude24
One of the great hymns of Christendom, unlike the The Whippoorwill Song.

Agreed. But the argument at this point is not the worship of freedom of will (as proclaimed in the Whippoorwill song), but in the meaning and inspiration of the Song of Solomon (and other Love Songs to Jesus).

(BTW, Newton was a Calvinist)

So was Edwards and Spurgeon and Watts.

49 posted on 09/21/2008 12:01:15 PM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: P-Marlowe
in the meaning and inspiration of the Song of Solomon (and other Love Songs to Jesus).

Show me some Biblical authority verifying that interpretation.

50 posted on 09/21/2008 12:03:36 PM PDT by jude24
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