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To: wmfights
Not likely, conservatives are a minority in the RCC.

Sorry, I forgot this part. I would say this is incorrect. Simply because it is true that, if you discount "Christmas and Easter" Catholics, "Cafeteria Catholics" and the like from the mix, you will find that those who are left - actual "practicing Catholics," are much more likely to be conservative politically than their name-only confreres.

I would say that this is the basis for a fair comparison. Certainly, there are millions of name-only and lapsed members of just about any major denomination in this country; lumping them into the mix would yield similar accusations of "liberal tendencies" in just about all of the denominations they represent. Yet the media and pollsters convieniently find other labels for them, and fail to make the distinction for Catholics. Similarly, among those who say they're still believers, they make distinctions for ethnic subsets within non-Catholic ranks that they categorically refuse to do within Catholic ranks. Case in point: a large percentage of blacks in this country are churchgoers, yet they, as a group, voted for Obama at rates exceeding 95%. They are never lumped-in with the evangelical or fundamentalist Christian groups they belong to, for purposes of political polling. Yet, Hispanic Catholics, who voted for Obama at an 80% rate or so, get counted twice. Their voting trends are referenced within the Hispanic mantle, and, in other polls, they find themselves lumped-in with Catholics in general when the "Catholic vote" is dealt with by pollsters.

I would file this "Catholic Vote" business under Looks Can Be Deceiving.

20 posted on 11/21/2008 8:50:30 AM PST by magisterium
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To: magisterium
Sorry, I forgot this part. I would say this is incorrect. Simply because it is true that, if you discount "Christmas and Easter" Catholics, "Cafeteria Catholics" and the like from the mix, you will find that those who are left - actual "practicing Catholics," are much more likely to be conservative politically than their name-only confreres.

I would agree to some extent. I believe the numbers go up to 55% for McCain in that group. The same can be done for Evangelicals and you get about 75%. Overall I think when you lump all Protestants together it was about 55% for McCain and for Roman Catholics it was 45%.

I'm looking at the %'s and see that Christian churches in this country have a huge problem. We can look at the %'s and argue my #'s are better than your #'s but it doesn't explain why so many people who say they are Christian can vote for someone who believes babies that survive an abortion should be left to die.

I think the decentralized structure of Evangelical churches lends itself to this problem and the social justice bent of the RCC churches does the same. Also, I think churches have become meeting places and not centers for worship. Finally, the concept of church discipline doesn't get talked about enough, or exercised.

21 posted on 11/22/2008 6:05:53 AM PST by wmfights (Elections have Consequences!)
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