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Vatican praises washing machines on International Women's Day
The Herald-Sun ^ | 03/09/2009 | The Staff

Posted on 03/09/2009 3:03:53 PM PDT by Alex Murphy

THE washing machine had a greater liberating role for women than the pill, the official Vatican daily said in an International Women's Day commentary.

"The washing machine and the emancipation of women: put in the powder, close the lid and relax," said the headline on the article in Osservatore Romano.

"In the 20th cenutry, what contributed most to the emancipation of western women?" questioned the article.

"The debate is still open. Some say it was the pill, others the liberalisation of abortion, or being able to work outside the home. Others go even further: the washing machine," it added.

The long eulogy to the washing machine - for which the first rudimentary models appeared in the 18th century - highlighted "the sublime mystique to being able to 'change the sheets on the beds twice a week instead of once'," quoting the words of late American feminist Betty Friedan.

While the machines were at first unreliable, technology has developed so quickly that now there is "the image of the super woman, smiling, made up and radiant among the appliances of her house", wrote Osservatore.

While the Vatican was issuing its opinion on washing machines, women rallied worldwide to demand equal rights and protest against domestic violence and growing poverty in the global economic crisis as they marked International Women's Day.

Thousands gathered in public squares from Bangalore to Kinshasa to the capitals of Europe, drawing attention to discrimination and fears facing women in their respective countries.

For Europeans, deteriorating financial security in the face of recession has made life more precarious for women workers. "Masculine globalisation equals female poverty" read a banner at a march in Madrid, while in Warsaw calls for equality were linked to paychecks: "Equal rights, equal pay."

(Excerpt) Read more at news.com.au ...


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 03/09/2009 3:03:53 PM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: Alex Murphy

Well,
Aren’t there women who like to sit on their washers and dryers?


2 posted on 03/09/2009 3:06:20 PM PDT by Kansas58
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To: Alex Murphy

They’re probably right. Women used to spend hours doing things that now can be done in a few minutes, thanks to machines. Of course, once the cap and trade stuff comes along and electricity becomes a thing of the past, I guess it’s back to the washboard...


3 posted on 03/09/2009 3:06:32 PM PDT by livius
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To: Alex Murphy

There’s a reason the Pope isn’t married.....


4 posted on 03/09/2009 3:07:07 PM PDT by Fido969 ("The hardest thing in the world to understand is income tax." - Albert Einstein)
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To: Alex Murphy
THE washing machine had a greater liberating role for women than the pill, the official Vatican daily said in an International Women's Day commentary.

Wouldn't doubt it.

It's the little things that count most. Soap, and clean water, probably extended human lifespan more than any medicine.

5 posted on 03/09/2009 3:07:39 PM PDT by Lee N. Field ("How can there be peace when the sorceries and whordoms of your mother TBN are so many?")
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To: Alex Murphy

Was the Maytag Neptune exempt for being named after a pagan god?


6 posted on 03/09/2009 3:08:30 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: Alex Murphy

The Vatican did not praise washing machines, it diminished the liberating aspects of “the pill” with the comparison. It also stated that having more quality time to spend with your family is more liberating than sex without consequence.


7 posted on 03/09/2009 3:10:42 PM PDT by Natural Law
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To: Kansas58

>>Well,
Aren’t there women who like to sit on their washers and dryers?<<

Well,
That was crass.


8 posted on 03/09/2009 3:12:37 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Psalm 109:8 - Let his days be few; and let another take his office)
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To: Alex Murphy

9 posted on 03/09/2009 3:13:42 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Natural Law

Some will never get it.

I have a wonderful Goddaughter that attends Columbia in Chicago. She came to my house this weekend. During a quiet moment, she lamented how many of her friends were used by guys and left to live with it.

She is a 20 year old and very wise.


10 posted on 03/09/2009 3:14:43 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Psalm 109:8 - Let his days be few; and let another take his office)
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To: netmilsmom

Eggggsactly.

A lot of people, even supposedly sympathetic-to-the-pope Catholics will jump on him and say, “see, these guys in the Vatican don’t understand the P.R. wars. Sure, his point was that the pill enslaved rather than liberated, but they should have found a better way to get the point across.”

Well, I don’t know what exactly he said in the address from which this slogan was torn, but even apart from that, Jesus was not particularly known for his P.R. skills. Even his closest disciples were exasperated with him and asked him why some of the things he said were such “hard sayings” and all he said to them was, “those who have ears to hear, let them hear.”

Your Goddaughter has ears to hear. So do most women, if they’ll be honest with themselves. Maybe the very “outrageousness” of the statement (pulled out of context) will jar at least a few women out of their complacency so tha they realize that they are the real losers in the sexual revolution made possible by the pill.


11 posted on 03/09/2009 3:21:07 PM PDT by Houghton M.
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To: Alex Murphy

Ya know, men are more than capable of washing their own skid marked boxers.


12 posted on 03/09/2009 3:30:34 PM PDT by bgill
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To: Alex Murphy

That’s racist!


13 posted on 03/09/2009 4:09:06 PM PDT by BobbyT
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To: Alex Murphy

No, the great liberating thing for me was to go into typical male dominated roles such as when in HS band (part of home schooling agenda) I played trumpet, then into aviation .... then freeing myself mentally of what is termed “female roles in society” ..... OK sure, women have been fighting this sort of thing for decades but you still get the “looks” if you venture into male areas .... to me it’s the religious part of society that tries to keep us in what they feel is “female roles” .....


14 posted on 03/09/2009 4:14:26 PM PDT by SkyDancer ('Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not..' ~ Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Fido969

That’s right... go ahead and believe the rabidly anti-Catholic characterizations of the press.


15 posted on 03/09/2009 4:20:33 PM PDT by dangus
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To: Alex Murphy

Rush says the Vatican is wrong—everyone knows it’s the vacuum cleaner.


16 posted on 03/09/2009 4:22:12 PM PDT by Conservativegreatgrandma (When the righteous rule, the people rejoice; when the wicked rule the people mourn. Proverbs 29;2)
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To: Fido969

Besides... it’s not THAT outrageous. Women moved into the workplace as home-making chores moved away from a matter of living decently and towards a matter of women feeling like their purpose in life was so their husbands could show off. As modern conveniences made basic homemaking tasks less essential, there became higher and higher expectations of what a home was supposed to look like. Eventually, women said, “Screw working so hard just so I can have carpets so clean you can eat off of... I want to do something fulfilling.”

So really, washing machines and vacuum cleaners and dishwashers and pressure cookers (the microwaves of the 1930s) and refrigerators really did spur the “women’s liberation” movement... as well as public schools, mass communication, the modern office building etc.


17 posted on 03/09/2009 4:28:41 PM PDT by dangus
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To: Conservativegreatgrandma

womens shoes seemed to have helped liberate them a bit further, at least

:)


18 posted on 03/09/2009 4:29:37 PM PDT by sten
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To: All

So... did the gas-powered lawn mower do more to liberate men than Viagra?


19 posted on 03/09/2009 5:51:17 PM PDT by coop71 (Being a redhead means never having to say you're sorry...)
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To: Alex Murphy

According to Reuters,this comes from an article in l’Osservatore Romano written by a woman not the Pope or some official of the Church.


20 posted on 03/09/2009 6:23:01 PM PDT by ardara
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To: Alex Murphy

I truly love my washing machine and I sure don’t ever want to take the pill! I’d say this quote was perfect! :0)


21 posted on 03/09/2009 7:34:25 PM PDT by samiam1972 ("It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish."-Mother Teresa)
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To: Alex Murphy
Here's the original article.

La lavatrice e l'emancipazione della donna

Metti il detersivo
chiudi il coperchio e rilassati


di Giulia Galeotti

Cosa nel Novecento ha maggiormente concorso all'emancipazione delle donne occidentali? Il dibattito è acceso. C'è chi dice la pillola, chi la liberalizzazione dell'aborto, chi il lavoro extradomestico. Qualcuno, però, osa maggiormente:  la lavatrice.
Fu un teologo a porre le basi per questa rivoluzione. Nel 1767, infatti, Jacob Christian Schäffern di Ratisbona inventò la prima rudimentale macchina per lavare, perfezionata poi a fine Ottocento nel modello a catino con manovella girevole. Gli inizi del xx secolo videro quindi i primi esemplari elettrici, destinati però all'uso industriale. Una volta tanto, le campagne non erano escluse dal progresso:  anzi, fu proprio lì che tutto prese avvio. Ci si accorse subito dell'enorme utilità di questi macchinari, e così, creatasi la domanda, molte ditte si riconvertirono. Fu il caso della Calor (società svedese che installava impianti di riscaldamento) e della Miele (che a Herzebrock, minuscola cittadina della Westfalia, produceva scrematrici), ditte note ancora oggi. Se le prime lavatrici per uso domestico fecero la loro comparsa negli anni Trenta, fu però necessario attendere il secondo dopoguerra per vederne il boom nel quotidiano. Il momento non fu casuale:  la diffusione, infatti, avvenne in base a un calcolo ben preciso.
Nel tentativo di ricacciare le donne in casa dopo l'esperienza bellica, gli uomini trovarono un potente alleato proprio nella lavapanni (come del resto in tanti altri elettrodomestici). Il messaggio fu martellante:  se sposarsi presto, trovare una sistemazione definitiva nel matrimonio, abbandonando studio e lavoro, era l'unico destino capace di permettere alle donne di realizzare la loro vera natura, tutto ciò - ed è questa la grande novità della modernità - poteva e doveva essere fatto senza sforzo né fatica. Cinema, televisione, giornali, pubblicitari, medici, psicologi e sociologi, tutti rivelarono alle donne la loro piacevole e appagante vocazione. Tutti mostrarono la sublime mistica del poter cambiare "le lenzuola due volte la settimana invece di una", tanto per citarne la massima esperta (e la più tenace critica), e cioè la Betty Friedan del 1963. L'immagine fu quella della super casalinga sorridente, truccata, vestita di tutto punto, radiosa e raggiante tra gli elettrodomestici di casa.
Da principio i macchinari erano ingombrantissimi. Nella sua autobiografia, Lisa Foa racconta:  "La mia prima lavatrice me la mandò mia madre da Torino negli anni Cinquanta quando ancora non ce l'aveva nessuno. Era una lavatrice Fiat, enorme, e quando faceva la centrifuga correva per la stanza". Ben presto, però, la tecnologia mise a punto modelli più stabili, leggeri ed efficienti, fino ad arrivare alla lavatrice bilingue, lanciata dall'Electrolux in India:  nel programma di lavaggio, infatti, la Washy talky fornisce sia in inglese che in indi preziosi indicazioni (come "metti il detersivo, chiudi il coperchio e rilassati!").
Alla loro salvatrice, le donne non hanno lesinato lodi. Un recente tributo è venuto dalla musica. Quando, dopo più di un decennio di silenzio, l'inconfondibile voce di Kate Bush è tornata a cantare, il cd Aerial (2005) conteneva una canzone, Mrs. Bartolozzi, dedicata proprio alla lavatrice. Persa tra i suoi pensieri, la casalinga protagonista si lancia in considerazioni esistenziali e filosofiche mentre guarda i panni che girano nel cestello. Il brano è espressione della nuova poetica della (allora) quarantottenne cantautrice inglese:  la pluriennale pausa di riflessione lontana dalle scene le ha permesso infatti di riacquistare un sano rapporto con la quotidianità, ricchissima di spunti d'ispirazione.
In realtà però, Kate Bush s'è svegliata tardi. La casalinga che fa il bucato nella solitudine domestica pare ormai un'immagine vecchia, stantia e sessista. O almeno così ci dicono industriali, pubblicitari ed esperti di costume. Il designer spagnolo Pep Torres (per esempio) s'è messo a capo di un'autentica crociata antidiscriminazione sessuale (chi manda la lavatrice, il maschio?), creando il primo elettrodomestico al mondo che si attiva soltanto se il lavoro viene suddiviso fra tutti i membri della casa. La lavapanni, infatti, eloquentemente battezzata Your turn, è dotata di uno scanner che identifica le impronte digitali dell'utilizzatore:  se viene accesa per due volte consecutive dalla stessa persona, semplicemente si rifiuta di fare il bucato.
Oltre che emancipare le donne, le lavatrici hanno fatto di più:  uscendo di casa e insediandosi nei locali alla moda hanno emancipato loro stesse. Alle pubbliche lavanderie che da oltre trent'anni vanno incontro ai bisogni delle fasce più povere della popolazione americana, si stanno infatti affiancando un po' ovunque esercizi di lavaggio integrati con bar o ristoranti (da San Francisco ad Amburgo, da Miami Beach a Parigi, da Berlino a Londra). Cappuccini, aperitivi, cocktail, cene, collegamenti a internet e televisori al plasma fanno del bucato un momento di socializzazione, intrattenimento e seduzione (apripista, qui, il clip anni Ottanta con un indimenticabile Nick Kamen, e i suoi jeans).
Nessuna novità, sia chiaro:  il bucato collettivo è, infatti, un ritorno all'antico. Se nell'Ippolito di Euripide è alla fonte dove si sono recate a fare il bucato che le donne di Trezene vengono a conoscenza della malattia di Fedra (che scatenerà il dramma), già nell'Odissea il bucato aveva permesso a Nausicaa, intenta con le sue ancelle a lavare i panni sulle rive del fiume, di incontrare "il ricco di espedienti" Ulisse. Persa poi la memoria di figlie di re alle prese con faticosi lavaggi, nei secoli l'operazione ha continuato a essere per tante donne occasione di chiacchiere, conoscenze e canti, come ci dice l'oleografia tradizionale.
Oggi però questo ritorno al passato è condito con indelebili tracce di modernità. Completamente assente la fatica e superata una scena solo femminile, "lavare i panni sporchi in famiglia" è ormai, almeno nel mondo occidentale, una frase preistorica. Fare il bucato è trendy solo se diviene un fenomeno collettivo. E cos'altro potrebbe essere in un contesto in cui la famiglia viene sempre più centrifugata?



(©L'Osservatore Romano - 8 marzo 2009)

If you actually compare the situation that a woman was in at the turn of the 20th century to whenever, I can actually understand that it's more or less a true statement. But it is a pretty tin-eared thing for L'Osservatore to put out.

22 posted on 03/09/2009 7:36:58 PM PDT by markomalley (Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus)
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To: Alex Murphy

The washing machine plays a way bigger role in my life than the pill ever will.


23 posted on 03/09/2009 7:46:27 PM PDT by mockingbyrd (patriotic dissent is a luxury of those protected by men and women better than they)
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To: Lee N. Field

And sewer systems. They make possible for humans to live together is mass without being subject to constant epidemic.


24 posted on 03/09/2009 8:01:26 PM PDT by RobbyS (ECCE homo)
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To: markomalley

Tin-eared to feminist cant.


25 posted on 03/09/2009 8:03:01 PM PDT by RobbyS (ECCE homo)
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To: RobbyS
They make possible for humans to live together is mass without being subject to constant epidemic.

Bourbon helps with that, too.

26 posted on 03/10/2009 5:54:54 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There are more enjoyable ways of going to Hell." ~ St. Bernard)
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To: Alex Murphy

LOL...was this what Rush was talking about yesterday? I didn’t hear his show but people mentioned this on the thread.


27 posted on 03/10/2009 6:40:49 AM PDT by Claud
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