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The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part One: The Apostlesí Creed, The Basic Profession of Faith
TheRealPresence.org ^ | 2002 | Pocket Catholic Catechism

Posted on 10/12/2009 7:06:35 PM PDT by Salvation

Part One:  The Apostles’ Creed

The Basic Profession of Faith


Table of Contents    



St. Peter's Basilica The Apostles’ Creed was originally a profession of faith required of converts to Christianity before they were baptized. As a formula of belief it goes back in substance, if not in words, to the twelve apostles.

Following Christ’s declaration that “He who believes and is baptized will be saved” (Mark 16:16), the Apostles’ Creed was the precondition for baptism. Only believers could be baptized. Even when children were baptized in the early Church, someone had to profess the faith for them.

Since the Apostles’ Creed was first formulated, there have been many other creeds approved and used by the Church. But this creed still remains the most common profession of the Christian faith in the world.

There is no other place to start talking about Christianity than with the Christian faith. “Our faith,” we are told, “can guarantee the blessings that we hope for and prove the existence of the realities that at present remain unseen.” (Hebrews 11:1)

What the Apostles’ Creed tells us is what everyone who calls himself a Christian must accept on the word of God, that is, on faith.

We accept three fundamental truths in the Apostles' Creed.

  • We believe that the world did not always exist, but was created by God who existed from all eternity.

  • We believe that God became man in the person of Jesus Christ, that He was born of the Virgin Mary, died on the cross and rose from the dead, and that He will return on the last day to judge the living and the dead.

  • We believe that Christ sent His Holy Spirit, who is the soul of the Church which Christ founded, and that through the Church we receive all the graces we need to reach the eternal life for which we were made.

What needs to be emphasized is that belief in these revealed truths is the foundation of Christianity. We can hope only in what we know to be true; faith provides us with the guarantee that our hope is not in vain. We can love only what we know to be good; faith provides us with the vision that God is so good we should love Him with our whole heart and soul.

The Vine and the Branches


Copyright © 2002 Inter Mirifica
Pocket Catholic Catechism


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; History; Theology
KEYWORDS: apostlescreed; catholic; catholiclist
Part One: The Apostles' Creed
1 posted on 10/12/2009 7:06:36 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; markomalley; ...
Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

2 posted on 10/12/2009 7:08:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
What’s the Point of Creeds?
Who Needs a Creed? (part 1 of 12)

Creed 7: Ascended Into Heaven
Beginning Catholic: Creeds: Apostles, Nicene, Athanasian [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: Basic Tenets of Catholicism [Ecumenical]
The Catholic Nicene Creed
We Believe in One God...: The Nicene Creed at Mass [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
I Believe [Apostle's Creed]

Why the Creed Doesn't Mention the Eucharist
The Apostles' Creed in Public and Private Worship
More Than Our Father [The Creed]
The Nicene Creed in Greek and Latin
The Creed - latest revisions proposed by ICEL

3 posted on 10/12/2009 7:12:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

THE CREDO

The Apostles Creed The Nicene Creed
I believe in God,
the Father almighty,
creator of heaven and earth.
We believe in one God,
the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
and of all that is, seen and unseen.
I believe in Jesus Christ,
his only Son, our Lord.
We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,
the only Son of God,
eternally begotten of the Father,
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made,
one in Being with the Father.
Through him all things were made.
For us men and for our salvation,
he came down from heaven:
He was conceived by the
power of the Holy Spirit
and born of the Virgin Mary.
by the power of the Holy Spirit
he was born of the Virgin Mary,
and became man.
He suffered under Pontius Pilate,
was crucified, died, and was buried.
He descended into hell.
For our sake he was crucified
under Pontius Pilate;
he suffered died and was buried.
On the third day he rose again. On the third day he rose again
in fulfillment of the Scriptures;
He ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again to judge
the living and the dead
he ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory
to judge the living and the dead,
and his kingdom will have no end.
I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the holy catholic Church,
the communion of saints,
the forgiveness of sins,
the resurrection of the body,
and the life everlasting.
Amen.
We believe in the Holy Spirit,
the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the
Father and the Son.
With the Father and the Son
he is worshipped and glorified.
He has spoken through the Prophets.
We believe in one holy
catholic and apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one
baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
We look for the resurrection of the dead,
and the life of the world to come.
Amen.


4 posted on 10/12/2009 7:14:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

As I understand it, in the new liturgical translations for the Mass we will once again being saying “CREDO” “I believe”

Hooray!


5 posted on 10/12/2009 7:15:17 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

The new Nicene Creed per the USCCB website:

I believe in one God,
the Father almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all things visible and invisible.
And in one Lord Jesus Christ,
the Only Begotten Son of God,
born of the Father before all ages.
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made,
consubstantial with the Father;
through him all things were made.
For us men and for our salvation
he came down from heaven,
and by the Holy Spirit
was incarnate of the Virgin Mary,
and became man.
For our sake
he was crucified under Pontius Pilate,
he suffered death and was buried,
and rose again on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures.
He ascended into heaven and is seated
at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory
to judge the living and the dead
and his kingdom will have no end.
And in the Holy Spirit, the Lord,
the giver of life, who proceeds
from the Father and the Son,
who with the Father and the Son
is adored and glorified,
who has spoken through the prophets.
And one, holy, catholic
and apostolic Church.
I confess one baptism
for the forgiveness of sins
and I look forward to the resurrection
of the dead
and the life of the world to come. Amen.

The new Apostles’ Creed:

believe in God, the Father almighty,
Creator of heaven and earth,
and in Jesus Christ, his only Son,
our Lord,
who was conceived
by the Holy Spirit,
born of the Virgin Mary,
suffered under Pontius Pilate,
was crucified, died and was buried;
he descended into hell;
on the third day he rose again
from the dead;
he ascended into heaven,
and is seated at the right hand
of God the Father almighty;
from there he will come to judge
the living and the dead.
I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the holy catholic Church,
the communion of saints,
the forgiveness of sins,
the resurrection of the body,
and life everlasting. Amen.


6 posted on 10/12/2009 7:37:52 PM PDT by clockwise
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To: clockwise; informavoracious; larose; RJR_fan; Prospero; Conservative Vermont Vet; ...
+

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Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of interest.

Obama Says A Baby Is A Punishment

Obama: “If they make a mistake, I don’t want them punished with a baby.”

7 posted on 10/12/2009 7:43:19 PM PDT by narses ("These are the days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed except his own.")
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To: Salvation

I have a dumb question (yes, it’s dumb):

Do any of my fellow Catholics bow at the words “by the power of the Holy Spirit
he was born of the Virgin Mary,
and became man.”

I do, and I noticed that some others began doing that after seeing me do it (in my new parish) but I was under the impression that the bow ended after “On the third day He rose again” yet I see very few others who remain bowed until that phrase.

I remember seeing it in a misselette some years ago, and since I am a convert for the past 30 years, all these things have great emotional and spiritual meaning to me. Nevertheless, if I am doing something wrong, I need to know.


8 posted on 10/12/2009 7:46:05 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Drill in the USA and offshore USA!! Drill NOW and build more refineries!!!! Defund the EPA!)
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To: Salvation
Catechetical Hymn based on the Creed

“We All Believe in One True God”
by Martin Luther, 1525

1. We all believe in one true God,
Who created earth and heaven,
The Father, who to us in love
Hath the right of children given.
He both soul and body feedeth,
All we need He doth provide us;
He through snares and perils leadeth,
Watching that no harm betide us.
He careth for us day and night,
All things are governed by His might.

2. We all believe in Jesus Christ,
His own Son, our Lord, possessing
An equal Godhead, throne, and might,
Source of every grace and blessing.
Born of Mary, virgin mother,
By the power of the Spirit,
Made true man, our elder Brother,
That the lost might life inherit;
Was crucified for sinful men
And raised by God to life again.

3. We all confess the Holy Ghost,
Who sweet grace and comfort giveth
And with the Father and the Son
In eternal glory liveth;
Who the Church, His own creation,
Keeps in unity of spirit.
Here forgiveness and salvation
Daily come through Jesus’ merit.
All flesh shall rise, and we shall be
In bliss with God eternally. Amen.

Hymn #251
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: The Nicene Creed
Author: Martin Luther, 1525
Titled: “Wir glauben all’ einen Gott”
Tune: “Wir glauben all’ an einen Gott”

9 posted on 10/12/2009 7:48:29 PM PDT by lightman (Adjutorium nostrum (+) in nomine Domini)
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To: clockwise

Lots of changes in the Nicene Creed, but I didn’t detect any in the Apostles’ Creed. It’s the old way — the way I have always said it.

LOL! I’ll have to read the Nicene Creed from the book until I get it all memorized.

Thanks for that reference.


10 posted on 10/12/2009 7:48:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Judith Anne

**Do any of my fellow Catholics bow at the words “by the power of the Holy Spirit
he was born of the Virgin Mary,
and became man.”**

Yes, if you look at the missallette, it says to bow. Our priest does all the time.

Like you, I started doing a very low bow. It’s amazing how many people are bowing their heads now. I think part of our task (if you want to call it that) as practicing Catholics is to observe and participate in Mass correctly. Another example is receivng Holy Communion on the tongue.

It used to just be the Hispanics doing it. I started after several other people had started, and now it is amazing how many people are receiving the host on their tongue.

Blessings to you — and no, it wasn’t a dumb question!


11 posted on 10/12/2009 8:01:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Thanks! After the consecration of the host and the wine, I also whisper, “My Lord, my God” three times, as the bells are rung for each. When I was a n00b Catholic, my sponsor did that, and it impressed on me the central sacrifice of the mass, in a very powerful way.

Do you know if this is a tradition? My granddaughters (who were raised Catholic) noticed me doing that, and now do it themselves, very softly; no one has ever corrected any of us, so I don’t worry about it, just that I don’t observe that in others.


12 posted on 10/12/2009 8:08:25 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Drill in the USA and offshore USA!! Drill NOW and build more refineries!!!! Defund the EPA!)
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To: Salvation

Having been raised a Presbyterian—where holy Communion is only celebrated typically monthly (or even quarterly)...mainly for the purpose of people taking it seriously, and not for granted, we said the Apostles Creed every week—and I have it thoroughly memorized.

I believe in God the Father Almighty, Maker of Heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ His only Son. He was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified dead, and buried. He descended into Hell. On the third day He was arouse again from the dead. He ascended into Heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the quick and the dead. I believe in the Holy Ghost, the holy catholic Church, the communion of the Saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

I attend an Anglican Church now, where, we take Communion every week. As according to tradition, when the Eucharist is offered, the more detailed Nicene Creed is said—as is said at every Roman Catholic mass.

I don’t quite have the Nicene memorized...partly because it is so similar to the Apostles Creed.

Although I don’t buy the authority of the Bishop of Rome.... I will certainly call brother, anyone who is baptized and sincerely agrees to both these creeds.


13 posted on 10/12/2009 8:15:31 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: Judith Anne

Yes, that is correct. Not all the missalettes give the full rubrics, but one should bow at that point.

As for “I” or “we,” the Vatican has approved the new translation of the creed, after having earlier criticized the ICEL translation.

The official creeds are still in Latin and then translated into various languages. Both begin with “Credo,” which clearly should be translated “I believe.”

The creeds are not just statements of fact concerning what we believe, but professions of faith. No one can profess the faith for another, however; only “I believe” can amount to a profession and not just a factual statement.

“We believe” is a statement of fact, but “I believe” is a statement of fact AND a profession of faith.

I’m pretty sure that the guys on the ICEL who mistranslated the Latin were aware of that, and that it was one reason why they preferred to mistranslate it.

I don’t know why there has been such a long delay in implementing the new English translations approved by the Vatican. I would guess it is because Donald Trautman, one of those chiefly responsible for mucking up the liturgy earlier, is still chairman of the Bishops’ Committee on the Liturgy, and doesn’t want to admit that he was WRONG.


14 posted on 10/12/2009 8:19:53 PM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Judith Anne

Hi Judith
yes, I bow my head in that part of the creed. It says to do so in our missle at church. I don’t think it’s a dumb question. There are so many people who don’t read that and don’t know what to do..even tho it’s pretty clear to most. I beleive most people at mass don’t even know what’s going on.


15 posted on 10/12/2009 8:33:35 PM PDT by kaline
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To: kaline; Cicero

Thanks, FRiends.


16 posted on 10/12/2009 8:37:35 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Drill in the USA and offshore USA!! Drill NOW and build more refineries!!!! Defund the EPA!)
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To: Judith Anne

As the priest genuflects after the consecrations, first of the bread, and then of the wine, I gaze at the elevated and now transubstantiated bread and wine, and with his genuflection, bow my head, strike my breast and say the words, “My Lord and My God” to myself. I have always done it since I was a cradle Catholic.


17 posted on 10/12/2009 8:57:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Judith Anne

PS. I forgot to say that I say it three times with each eleevation and genuflection.


18 posted on 10/12/2009 9:00:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Again, thank you. I have only been at my new parish a few months, but those actions seem to have an impact on those around me. I sit in the back row, but evidently I’m not invisible...

One of the things I love the best about the parish is the strong pro-life inclination, and the way our priest gives homilies on basic Catholic beliefs almost every Sunday. There is a beautiful bronze statue of Christ in front of the Church, holding a very tiny baby in His Hand, with a tear on His face. Also—a number of parishioners have NoBama bumper stickers...

Also, every Wednesday, we cook and serve lunch to anyone who comes in; most are very poor, and obviously deeply grateful (and hungry). I love being part of that, working with the kitchen crew. Good women.


19 posted on 10/12/2009 9:08:57 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Drill in the USA and offshore USA!! Drill NOW and build more refineries!!!! Defund the EPA!)
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To: Judith Anne

**Also, every Wednesday, we cook and serve lunch to anyone who comes in; most are very poor, and obviously deeply grateful (and hungry). I love being part of that, working with the kitchen crew. Good women.**

We used to have a soup kitchen every week too, but it has fallen by the wayside.


20 posted on 10/12/2009 9:40:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Judith Anne

I found a web site called “Fish eaters” that has the traditions on it I have found very informative. It explains what you asked about. I also cross myself whenever the crucifix is carried down the aisle and bend towards the priest as he passes by in and out.


21 posted on 10/12/2009 9:54:04 PM PDT by Citizen Soldier (Just got up from Bedroomshire)
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To: Salvation
As the priest genuflects after the consecrations, first of the bread, and then of the wine, I gaze at the elevated and now transubstantiated bread and wine, and with his genuflection, bow my head, strike my breast and say the words, “My Lord and My God” to myself. I have always done it since I was a cradle Catholic.

I do the same and always have.

22 posted on 10/12/2009 10:09:18 PM PDT by notaliberal (Right-wing extremist)
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To: Judith Anne

I bow at those words, but am usually straightening back up during the words “On the third day, He rose again.”


23 posted on 10/12/2009 10:44:33 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: Judith Anne
My b-i-l is a priest, and just after he finishes the prayers of the Consecration, he genuflects and says, "My Lord and My God".

During the Summer, our Parish began the tradition of ringing the bells, just before the Prayers of the Consecration begin, and again, after they're finished. I love that, because it focuses everyone's attention to the altar, where it should be, during that most important time of the Mass.

24 posted on 10/12/2009 10:50:43 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: Salvation

I see that the USCCB Nicene Creed did not adopt the recommendation of the Joint Commission to dump the filioque. I suppose if it had, heads would have exploded all over Roman Catholic America.

BTW, “I believe” is not what the Nicene Fathers declared; it was “We believe”. Why everyone, including the Orthodox and now you folks, uses “I believe” is a mystery to me. Here’s a comment from the Vatican website on the question:

http://www.vatican.va/archive/catechism/p1s1c3a2.htm


25 posted on 10/13/2009 4:02:02 AM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: SuziQ
During the Summer, our Parish began the tradition of ringing the bells, just before the Prayers of the Consecration begin, and again, after they're finished. I love that, because it focuses everyone's attention to the altar, where it should be, during that most important time of the Mass.

It shouldn't be necessary to regain the attention of those participating in the eucharist, but, sadly, it is. Interestingly, both the use of the bells and the elevation come from the middle ages when the laity were so far removed from the action of the liturgy that it was necessary to use such practices to announce the critical moments.

26 posted on 10/13/2009 6:18:49 AM PDT by trad_anglican
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To: clockwise; Salvation
of all things visible and invisible.

Every truly reflected on those words?

27 posted on 10/13/2009 6:47:55 AM PDT by NYer ( "One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone"- Benedict XVI)
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To: Judith Anne
Do any of my fellow Catholics bow at the words “by the power of the Holy Spirit he was born of the Virgin Mary, and became man.”

Absolutely!!! Even in the Maronite Catholic Church, we bow at those words. I recently posted a thread on this topic. Will have to look for it and repost.

28 posted on 10/13/2009 6:55:58 AM PDT by NYer ( "One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone"- Benedict XVI)
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To: NYer; Judith Anne
Here are the liturgical threads I have saved up:

Mass appeal: "It's like Jolt Cola for the Soul" [Catholic Caucus]
WHERE THE PRIEST SHOULD BEGIN MASS Know Him in the Breaking of Bread - A Guide to the Mass
The (Catholic) Mass (as explained by a youth for Evangelical friends) [Ecumenical]

What the Catholic Mass means to converts
Good News for the [Catholic] Liturgy
'An Ordinance Forever' - The Biblical Origins of the Mass [Ecumenical]
The Sacrifice of the Mass: Liturgical Vestments

What Do You See at (Catholic) Mass?

Purification of Sacred Vessels in U.S. (and more on the Purification of our Lord)
Tyranny of Words (Catholic liturgy - NO vs. TLM)
Mass should be enlightening and elevating, not a cookie cutter ritual
What You {Catholics} Need to Know: Mass (Sacred Liturgy) [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
"The Catholic Mass ... Revealed"

The Battle Over the Mass [Catholic Caucus]
Scriptural Basis of the Mass as Sacrifice (Where is that in the Bible?)
Giving to God in Mass [Liturgy of the Eucharist]
Liturgy, Learning and the Language of the Catholic Faith
Cardinal Arinze's Mass Etiquette 101

Prostration and Vestments on Good Friday And More on the Precious Blood
Catholic Liturgy - Funeral Masses for a Suicide And More on Confession for RCIA Candidates
The Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass - A Primer for Clueless Catholics (Part 1)
The Orthodox Divine Liturgy, the Roman Catholic Mass and the Anglican Eucharist...
Catholic Liturgy - Dramatic Readings at Mass (And More on Processions, and Extra Hosts)

Catholic Liturgy - Mass Intentions
Catholic Liturgy - Pre-recorded Music at Mass And More on Communion Services
Vatican: Matters to be observed or to be avoided regarding the Most Holy Eucharist (April 23, 2004)
POPE ISSUES APOSTOLIC LETTER ON THE SACRED LITURGY
Liturgy: Are Glass Chalices OK for Mass?
EUCHARIST: HOLY MEAL

29 posted on 10/13/2009 7:04:34 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: clockwise

Why were these changes made? I see nothing wrong with the way either one has been written.


30 posted on 10/13/2009 7:06:05 AM PDT by tob2 (I would rather have a nuclear power plant in my backyard than Gitmo detainees.)
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To: Judith Anne; Salvation
After the consecration of the host and the wine, I also whisper, “My Lord, my God” three times, as the bells are rung for each. When I was a n00b Catholic, my sponsor did that, and it impressed on me the central sacrifice of the mass, in a very powerful way. Do you know if this is a tradition?

I am a cradle Catholic and this was taught to us by the nuns. By internally saying those words, you are reflecting on the great mystery of transubstantiation that has just taken place. in fact, the Eastern Catholic Churches refer to the Mass as the 'Divine Mysteries', which reflects the true nature of the sacrament. It is a mystery but, as we say in the Creed, "and of all that is, seen and unseen."

As I recall, in the story of his conversion, Dr. Scott Hahn's first experience at a RC Mass, when the priest elevated the host, Hahn looked up and immediately thought "My Lord and my God. It is truly you!"

31 posted on 10/13/2009 7:06:13 AM PDT by NYer ( "One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone"- Benedict XVI)
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To: tob2

The ICEL too many liberties in the U. S. English translations. It is going to go back to a more traditional form which more readily reflects the Greek and Latin from whence it came.

Traditional Catholics are very thankful (maybe I should say jubilant) about this!


32 posted on 10/13/2009 7:36:14 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: NYer

Thanks to you and everyone who commented on these questions of mine.

It’s been three decades since my conversion, yet I’m still learning about the mass, it becomes ever deeper a pool of the living water.

You know how, when the entire parish is focused on the consecration, there is such a breath of Holiness in the sanctuary? Even now, after all these years, it still brings tears to my eyes, when the priest says, “When supper was ended...etc.”

I always have a tissue in my pocket for those moments that are so moving; it doesn’t matter what parish, what priest, nothing except those sacred words that bring us together with Jesus Christ, Living Son of Almighty God.


33 posted on 10/13/2009 8:48:45 AM PDT by Judith Anne (Drill in the USA and offshore USA!! Drill NOW and build more refineries!!!! Defund the EPA!)
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To: SuziQ

That’s the way I read the directions, in the missel.


34 posted on 10/13/2009 8:50:19 AM PDT by Judith Anne (Drill in the USA and offshore USA!! Drill NOW and build more refineries!!!! Defund the EPA!)
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To: Judith Anne; Salvation
It’s been three decades since my conversion, yet I’m still learning about the mass, it becomes ever deeper a pool of the living water.

Not surprisingly, most cradle catholics are ignorant of what happens at the Mass. It is so important to understand this greatest of all sacraments. The Church is called the "Domus Dei" - House of God, and the Gate of Heaven. During the consecration, angels are present at the altar. That is one of the things we proclaim in the Creed when we say "all things seen and unseen". This aspect of our faith never occurred to me until I attended my first Maronite Mass. Just before communion, we sing a hymn: Hosts of Heaven stand with us at the altar. It hit me so profoundly! Not long after that, I read an article about a saint who actually saw these angels (sorry ... can't remember her name).

One of the best articles written on the Mass is from the Boston Catholic Journal. It is in several parts. I posted these to the forum several years ago but here is the link to the original and all its links. May it benefit you in your understanding.

The Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass - a Primer for Clueless Catholics.

35 posted on 10/13/2009 9:32:34 AM PDT by NYer ( "One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone"- Benedict XVI)
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To: NYer

Thank you! Heading off to read, now.


36 posted on 10/13/2009 9:39:52 AM PDT by Judith Anne (Drill in the USA and offshore USA!! Drill NOW and build more refineries!!!! Defund the EPA!)
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To: NYer

Thanks for that link!! I’m going to share that with my Confirmation class. I’d begun the discussion of the Mass in the class before last, but I’m going to find ways to incorporate it in every class, as I go through the year. I already determined that the ONLY reason the kids go, is because their parents make them; sad, but true.


37 posted on 10/13/2009 10:24:31 AM PDT by SuziQ
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To: SuziQ
Which book are you using? Several years ago, I taught the Confirmation class at my (now former) parish. The book was ridiculous, advising the instructor to give each student a small smooth stone and bring a large rock to the first class, along with pillar candles, mood music, newsprint paper, markers, a boom box and the last item on the list was a Bible. I brought the Bible, a copy of the Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel and rosaries. We progressed from there. When it came time for them to pick a Confirmation name, I gave them a link to a web site with the names and histories of thousands of blesseds and saints. There were 6 classes that year and my group was the only one where all of the students chose a saints name.

Yes ... definitely use the information at that link to help them understand what happens at Mass. You might also want to have them close their eyes while you read some of this material to them ... move them to Calgary through those words .... "you are there" .... "Jesus looks down at you" .... "does He speak to you? What does He say? " This is a form of Ignatian contemplation. It is very powerful! One night, I brought my students into the darkened chapel and had them sit quietly in the presence of our Lord. I read them a passage from the gospel of John about the pool at Bethesda. It is important to read any passage to them slowly, leaving time for reflection in between statements and or questions. The kids were relaxed and enjoyed it so much they asked to do it again.

God bless you in your work!

38 posted on 10/13/2009 1:35:26 PM PDT by NYer ( "One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone"- Benedict XVI)
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To: NYer
I don't have a book. When I taught a few years ago, I DID have a book, and I couldn't stand it! The new Director of the program ditched the books, and created her own curriculum. She thought the books were inane, and she's done a pretty good job on her own.

I've added lines of discussion, as I've read through and thought about connections that would make sense to the kids. The Director and I are good friends, and she trusts what I present, because she knows that I am orthodox in my beliefs, and I won't be teaching anything that's incorrect.

39 posted on 10/13/2009 4:36:23 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: Judith Anne

I, too, am always prepared with a fresh tissue for the tears.


40 posted on 10/13/2009 8:51:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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