Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Bipolar Loved Ones: Encouraging Them to Seek Treatment
Article Alley ^ | December 16, 2009 | Richard Jarzynka

Posted on 01/02/2010 10:00:22 AM PST by YaZhynka

During a recent talk regarding my book, “Blessed with Bipolar,” I was stumped by the question, “How does a person get to where you are now from where you were in the psych ward?” I actually have a 380 page answer to that question. What stumped me was the question behind the question: “How do I get my bipolar daughter into treatment?”

(Excerpt) Read more at articlealley.com ...


TOPICS: General Discusssion; Ministry/Outreach
KEYWORDS: counseling; depression; disorders; mentalhealth; mentalillness; psychiatry; psychology

1 posted on 01/02/2010 10:00:25 AM PST by YaZhynka
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: YaZhynka

Being diagnosed as bipolar just give you a medical excuse to be an @$$hole. Add it to the ever growing list of genetic predispositions.


2 posted on 01/02/2010 10:04:18 AM PST by DogBarkTree
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: YaZhynka

Many people treat their bipolar condition with alcohol. They feel that alcohol levels their moods.

But then, sadly, they may become addicted to alcohol. These are two very serious conditions: bipolar and alcholic. Each is difficult to treat on its own; treating both at the same time is a real killer.


3 posted on 01/02/2010 10:10:39 AM PST by i_dont_chat (Our black President is quite blackmailable.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

My son’s wife is bipolar and refuses to get treatment. She seems to flip out during every holiday, as well as some random times. It’s very trying for him and the 3 kids.


4 posted on 01/02/2010 10:10:52 AM PST by EggsAckley (There's an Ethiopian in the fuel supply. W.C. Fields)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

Yes. Bipolar may be a genetic predisposition. I have it and I have, indeed, acted like an asshole many times. But that genetic predisposition is not an excuse.


5 posted on 01/02/2010 10:11:17 AM PST by YaZhynka
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: i_dont_chat

“Many people treat their bipolar condition with alcohol”

I have thought this also. I think the depressive effect of alcohol represses the mania.

I would also caution anybody about laughing off bi-polar disorder. Some folks may just be overly moody, but many bi-polar people can become seriously delusional.


6 posted on 01/02/2010 10:21:21 AM PST by jocon307
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

I have a family member (in law for 35 years) that is Bipolar. This piece sounds nice and caring, good in theory. Never worked for us.

One of the problems is that the real hard cases are people that have so much more baggage than the Bipolar-ism.

In the case of the person to whom I refer, if we could medicate away that ailment, she is so dysfunctional (at 53) that she still couldn’t function in society. Maturity level of a 10 year old. Compulsive liar on every front. Lazy as hell. Petty, selfish, whiny. Shall I go on?

Sadly, a person that has been untreated (or unsuccessfully treated) for most of their life has never developed normally on so many fronts that they have no life skills, the capabilities that most of us have had a lifetime to gradually learn and practice.

I suspect that, unfortunately, that applies to a lot of people with this affliction.


7 posted on 01/02/2010 10:28:04 AM PST by ChildOfThe60s
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ChildOfThe60s

bump


8 posted on 01/02/2010 10:34:39 AM PST by hoosiermama (ONLY DEAD FISH GO WITH THE FLOW.......I am swimming with Sarahcudah! Sarah has read the tealeaves.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ChildOfThe60s

My late (estranged) husband put us through so much hell with his bipolar and alcoholic behavior that I still get upset just reading this article. It made bipolar sound so benign. His behaviors were not benign.
He finally took his own life, but at least he didn’t take mine or the kids, which we were afraid he would do.


9 posted on 01/02/2010 10:40:12 AM PST by Shimmer1 (Illegitimi non carborundum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

So your suggestion would be..”just stop being an asshole” ?
Any ideas how these people might go about that?


10 posted on 01/02/2010 10:47:48 AM PST by Jerry Attrick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

Dog Bark Tree: I don’t know the basis of your unsubstaniated opinion, but I do know, from personal experience the impact of Manic/Depression, now called bipolar and you couldn’t be farther wrong than you are. Having lived with most of my life and having been under pharmaceutical treatment for nearly 25 years, I’m proof, as rare as it may actually be, that it is so and it’s real, very real.


11 posted on 01/02/2010 10:52:05 AM PST by easttennesseejohn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

Dog Bark Tree: I don’t know the basis of your unsubstaniated opinion, but I do know, from personal experience the impact of Manic/Depression, now called bipolar and you couldn’t be farther wrong than you are. Having lived with most of my life and having been under pharmaceutical treatment for nearly 25 years, I’m proof, as rare as it may actually be, that it is so and it’s real, very real.


12 posted on 01/02/2010 10:52:11 AM PST by easttennesseejohn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Shimmer1

As someone who has been victimized by mentally ill people in my life, I can sympathize and I fully support you. I am sick of the irony that eccentrics are labeled maniacs while the real crazy people are getting away with murder.


13 posted on 01/02/2010 10:56:19 AM PST by Niuhuru (The Internet is the digital AIDS; adapting and successfully destroying the MSM host.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Shimmer1

There were times when I feared homicidal possibilities with my mother. Fortunately, she didn’t get to that level of severity until we kids were teenagers and able to protect ourselves against that possibility.

When discussing mental health problems (or any personality/behavioral issues) it is impossible to keep any single variable in isolation. How do you separate some of this stuff? Can’t.


14 posted on 01/02/2010 11:17:52 AM PST by ChildOfThe60s
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Shimmer1

Agree with you, bipolars can be WAY past just being assholes.

The only bipolar I know a lot about, the sister of a friend, would run down the street naked, walk off and leave cars running with the keys in the ignition in strange towns, throw your purse, cell phones out of the car because ‘they’ were using them to follow her, etc.

Couldn’t keep her institutionalized - she didn’t want it - and she ALWAYS stopped taking her meds.

Finally, her mind deteriorated to the point that when a family member would write her a check, she could no longer write well enough or at all to endorse the check.

They originally removed all firearms from her home but she had an unknown gun squirreled away somewhere that, while she still had some ability to reason, she put in a gun safe. She eventually hacked the gun safe open with a hatchet and shot herself.


15 posted on 01/02/2010 11:21:25 AM PST by Let's Roll (Stop paying ACORN to destroy America! Cut off their government funding!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

I agree with you and would add that they don’t really have families they have hostages. My first husband was one and it made life really awful.


16 posted on 01/02/2010 11:28:56 AM PST by chris_bdba
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ChildOfThe60s

You just descibedby ex husband to a t. Add in addiction to anything he could get his hands on and uncontrollable rage and it would be his history. I’m glad I got out alive and very glad I haven’t had to see him in over 25 years!


17 posted on 01/02/2010 11:31:46 AM PST by chris_bdba
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: jocon307
I have thought this also. I think the depressive effect of alcohol represses the mania.

It has been my experience that alcohol is more useful in the depressive stage, but there is no denying that alcoholism is a major risk for bi-polar people.

My son has an interesting theory. He opines that bi-polar is actually the natural state of predators, but does not fit into an agrarian society.

18 posted on 01/02/2010 11:36:58 AM PST by lafroste
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: YaZhynka

Used to be, alcoholics were called drunks and bipolars were called moody.


19 posted on 01/02/2010 11:54:20 AM PST by DogBarkTree
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Let's Roll

It hasn’t been that long. It still makes me nauseated.


20 posted on 01/02/2010 12:54:34 PM PST by Shimmer1 (Illegitimi non carborundum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree
Bi-polar is a pretty serious disease. It's not just an excuse to be an @$$ hole as you say.

I've seen it up close, and still shudder at the word. Very skeery stuff.

21 posted on 01/02/2010 12:59:28 PM PST by Lakeshark (Thank a member of the US armed forces for their sacrifice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ChildOfThe60s

Yes, I have an In-Law who is Bi-Polar and we have recently found just the right blend of meds to keep her episodes to a minute chance. She really has been doing very well. However added to this (or maybe the cause of this) is her being somewhat abused as a child - mostly emotionally abused - by both her father and to some degree a sibling. So although her episodes of anxiety, mania and depression are minimized, she has a really deep self-esteem problem she needs to deal with now. The holidays are especially hard for her.


22 posted on 01/02/2010 1:04:33 PM PST by peteram
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree
Used to be twin babies were left on the mountain to freeze because they were seen as evil.

We've made advances in psychiatry since then, as well.
23 posted on 01/02/2010 1:10:41 PM PST by mysterio
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: peteram

Sounds promising. If she can be kept on an even keel, hopefully some of the other things can be dealt with.

MY SIL, on top of everything else is addicted to Xanax. She suffers physical problems that are, in all likelihood, side effects of the Xanax. Matter of fact, her ailment list reads like the side effects list of Xanax. We have unsuccessfully tried to explain to her that not only is it giving her these problems, but it’s the wrong medication for her. When a doctor that she went to told her that, and gave her bipolar meds, she got extremely indignant. Claimed that not only was he an idiot, but that she was told by another doctor that bipolar meds were dangerous for her, might even kill her.


24 posted on 01/02/2010 2:58:54 PM PST by ChildOfThe60s
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

20% of all people with bipolar will kill themselves.

50% of all people with bipolar will attempt to kill themselves at least once in their lives.

So hey don’t worry, those a$$holes will be out of your hair soon enough.

In the mean time, stay classy.


25 posted on 01/02/2010 5:09:58 PM PST by PanzerKardinal (Don't give up any of your rights. They were purchased for you by blood!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: PanzerKardinal

Yep and sometimes in a rage they will try to kill you too. My ex was tken from the house by the SWAT team for holding me hostge at gunpoint for hours after calling them to tell them he was going to kill me.


26 posted on 01/02/2010 5:34:00 PM PST by chris_bdba
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: PanzerKardinal

My 22 year old godson is bi-polar.
It is a dreadful illness that has affected his whole family.
He has threatened suicide and has made a couple attempts. He is in treatment and takes medication, but sometimes the meds have side effects that are as bad as the illness. His father had the same thing and was an alcoholic, he is now deceased. He died about 18 months ago, my godson found him. He now blames himself for not being able to save his father. Incredibly sad situation and not likely to get better.


27 posted on 01/02/2010 6:17:33 PM PST by kalee (The offences we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

You might want to stop now. While you’re only 250 years behind the times.


28 posted on 01/02/2010 6:21:39 PM PST by workerbee (My cat would be a better president than the Resident!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: DogBarkTree

not really.

In the “good old days” Bipolar people often had “nervous breakdowns”... all those stories of “crazy wives” in the attic were probably bipolar folks.

Many of them ended up dead from suicide during the depressive phase of the illness...

And a lot of them probably ended up dead or in jail during things they did in the manic phase......when they went crazy, and killed someone or they raped someone, or they stole something...


29 posted on 01/02/2010 9:03:33 PM PST by LadyDoc (liberals only love politically correct poor people)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: workerbee

You BPs have no sense of humor.


30 posted on 01/03/2010 7:54:43 AM PST by DogBarkTree
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson