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Shrove Tuesday: 'Pancake Day' Explained
DomesticChurch.com ^ | not given | DomesticChurch.com

Posted on 02/15/2010 2:19:07 PM PST by Salvation

Shrove Tuesday

'Pancake Day' Explained

Catherine Fournier

I remember Pancake Day from my childhood. A bizarre tradition, one that turned my mother's nutritional schedule upside down, one that transformed math class into a picnic in our school rooms. Though I asked, there was little or no explanation for the inexplicable adult actions, and offered plates of pancakes brimming with butter and dripping with syrup, I didn't question the matter too closely.

During my first Lenten season as a Catholic, I finally began to gain some understanding and explanation for this strange habit. Actually not so strange at all, it makes perfect sense when viewed in a liturgical light, as does all of Catholic tradition.

Shrove Tuesday (Fat Tuesday, Mardi Gras or fetter Dienstag) is the day before Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. Since Lent is a time of abstinence, traditionally of meat, fat, eggs and dairy products (one wonders what was left) Shrove Tuesday's menu was designed to use up all the fat, eggs and dairy products left in the kitchen and storeroom. It is also a 'feast' to prepare for the time of 'famine' in the desert. In some cultures, it is traditional to eat as much as possible on Shrove Tuesday, sometimes up to 12 times a day.

The English term "shrovetide" (from "to shrive", or hear confessions) is explained by a sentence in the Anglo-Saxon "Ecclesiastical Institutes" translated from Theodulphus by Abbot Aelfric (q.v.) about A.D. 1000: "In the week immediately before Lent everyone shall go to his confessor and confess his deeds and the confessor shall so shrive him as he then my hear by his deeds what he is to do [in the way of penance]".

In many traditions, Lent is a time for cleaning, in preparation for Easter and spring. First your soul, then your kitchen, then the rest of the house was cleansed and purified of the past year's accumulations. Old clothes are mended, and new clothes purchased at this time of year. In the Ukraine, houses were whitewashed inside and out during Lent. In this way, everything was made ready to face the season of Salvation and Rebirth. Traditions of 'spring cleaning' stem from this religious observance.

Pancake Recipes:

Plain Mlyntsi (Griddle Cakes)

Ingredients:

Directions:

Oatmeal Apple Pancakes

Ingredients: (for 1 2/3 inch pancakes)

Directions:

Potato Pancakes

Crisp and brown, these are great with sour cream or yogurt, bacon and applesauce. This year, I'm going to try cooking them in the waffle iron.

Ingredients: (for nine 3 1/2 inch pancakes)

Directions:



TOPICS: Catholic; Current Events; History; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: bacon; lent
In my childhood home, this was the chance to use up all the bacon grease that my mom used to save to season and fry dishes with.

We still at the dairy products and eggs, however.

Any other childhood or family stories out there?

1 posted on 02/15/2010 2:19:08 PM PST by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; markomalley; ...
Tomorrow is Shrove Tueday -- MardiGras. The day before Lent begins! Are you ready for the wearing of the purple, green and gold of Mardi Gras?

Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

2 posted on 02/15/2010 2:21:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
FWIW - The pancake reached its modern form in the 900's.

The only real changes have come in the varieties of wheat and the quality of the milling.

'La bonne cuisine est la base du véritable bonheur.' - Auguste Escoffier
(Good food is the foundation of genuine happiness.)

LonePalm, le Républicain du verre cassé (The Broken Glass Republican)

3 posted on 02/15/2010 2:27:29 PM PST by LonePalm (Commander and Chef)
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To: LonePalm

Thanks, FRiend.


4 posted on 02/15/2010 2:29:14 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Shrove Tuesday: 'Pancake Day' Explained
MARDI GRAS PARADE CAM - Live Webcam of New Orleans Uptown Streetcar and Mardi Gras Parades
On Pancakes [for Shrove Tuesday]
The Day After Fat Tuesday [Ash Wednesday, Beginning of Lent]

Pre-Lenten Days -- Family activities-Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras)[Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
And so it begins - The Questions, the questions... [Shrove Tuesday]
On Pancakes
Mardi Gras' Catholic Roots [Shrove Tuesday]
New Orleans: A Tale of Two Cities (Rosary Walk Before Mardi Gras)

5 posted on 02/15/2010 2:29:53 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

“Pancake and fritters, say the bells of St. Peter’s”


6 posted on 02/15/2010 2:29:58 PM PST by Chi-townChief
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To: Salvation
Watch for the annual Pancake Race between Liberal Kansas and Olney England!
7 posted on 02/15/2010 2:30:44 PM PST by Kansas58
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To: Salvation

Pancakes? Bah
Paczki or nothing.

1800 calories of yummy goodness.


8 posted on 02/15/2010 2:33:08 PM PST by netmilsmom (I am Ilk)
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To: netmilsmom

Can you share your recipe?


9 posted on 02/15/2010 2:38:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: netmilsmom; lizol

Just looked it up — Polish donuts of a kind, correct?


10 posted on 02/15/2010 2:43:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

I have my Mardi Gras striped shirt from 1996’s parade in jefferson, tx.

I’m shaking my head driving past a Catholic church - “Ash Wednesday Fish Fry” they so don’t get it - a fish fry on a day of fast & abstinence?


11 posted on 02/15/2010 2:47:29 PM PST by RebelTXRose
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To: Salvation

I wonder if this grew out of the Jewish tradition of stripping the house and the cupboards of any type of leavening and flour in preparation for Passover? I had a Jewish friend who used to get rid of everything, cleane the cupboards, stove, refrigerator, and then start over.


12 posted on 02/15/2010 2:49:36 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: RebelTXRose

Fasting is one full meal and two small meals.

Abstinence means eating no meat.

Nothing wrong with a Fish Fry if you only have two other light meals on Ash Wednesday.


13 posted on 02/15/2010 2:51:16 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Seems like a waste of food unless it was given to the poor.


14 posted on 02/15/2010 2:52:22 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: netmilsmom

Smacznego!


15 posted on 02/15/2010 2:56:09 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: Salvation

Ash Wednesday has always been a solemn day to me - Fish Fry doesn’t sound solemn to me. Just the way my family observed it - nothing else.

Friday AFTER Ash Wednesday was always the first one - big gathering of the congregation after Stations of the Cross.


16 posted on 02/15/2010 3:06:27 PM PST by RebelTXRose
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To: Salvation

It’s in memory of when the Jews were hounded out of their homes and they had to flee and didn’t have time to let the bread rise (hence unleavened bread). We use unleavened bread in our ceremonies too (hosts). And many references to “the lamb”. They marked their door posts with the blood of the lamb and the marked houses were “passed over” and lived for another day. Our Easter is called Pasch, or Paschal, which is a derivitive of the Hebrew word for Passover. They get rid of the flour, cake mixes, etc. because they use only potato flour during Passover — not wheat.

I am a Catholic trying to describe the meaning of the Jewish traditions, so please forgive any inaccuracies. This is what I was told and how I remember it from my co-worker’s explanation.

I did not know about stripping the kitchen of all leavening and flour and starting over until I knew Fern. I haven’t seen her for years, but I’ve been thinking about her a lot because I’m currently doing the same to my pantry so that I can paint. Not as extreme a strip, but when I look at the age of some of the packages in the back of the cupboards, I’m thinking that it is not such a bad idea. :)


17 posted on 02/15/2010 3:10:42 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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Comment #18 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation

I drive to the Polish Bakery and wait in line at 4am.
They are way too much work!


19 posted on 02/15/2010 3:14:19 PM PST by netmilsmom (I am Ilk)
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To: Salvation
In Detroit, many people, regardless of religious affiliation line up for paczki--the best (IMHO) are from the bakeries in Hamtramck, a small city that used to be predominantly Polish. These rich "calorie bombs" are similar to jelly donuts, but they pack about twice the fat & sugar. They use a lot of eggs and butter and are fried in lard. Yum!


20 posted on 02/15/2010 4:03:58 PM PST by MaggieCarta (We're all Detroiters, now.)
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To: netmilsmom

Pic at #20—I’m gaining weight looking at it...


21 posted on 02/15/2010 4:04:47 PM PST by MaggieCarta (We're all Detroiters, now.)
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To: Salvation

I have fond memories of Shrove Tuesday - the only other time we had pancakes for dinner was if Mom was low on groceries before payday! It was such a treat! We just gave up meat on Fridays and we each did an individual Lenton fast.

Despite my no longer being Catholic I appreciate the liturgical calandar and still do a Lenton fast of some sort every year. This year I think it’s going to be unnecessary internet usage, so it will be goodbye to lurking on FR for six weeks...


22 posted on 02/15/2010 4:29:17 PM PST by amzgirl
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To: Salvation

I grew up Protestant.

My grandmother always stored bacon grease and other drippings, though, and so did my father. It grossed my mother out - she used vegetable oil to cook!


23 posted on 02/15/2010 4:42:53 PM PST by Tax-chick (Sarah Palin is a thing of beauty and a joy forever.)
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To: RebelTXRose

I agree on the solemn part. When we are reminded that “Dust thou art, and into dust thou shall return.” is not really the basis for a celebration.

You’re right — I see where you are coming from. A Fish Fry on Ash Wednesday does not sound appropriate.


24 posted on 02/15/2010 4:43:27 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Saint Alphonzo’s Pancake Breakfast *ping*

Where I stole the margarine...


25 posted on 02/15/2010 4:44:01 PM PST by Bean Counter (I keeps mah feathers numbered, for just such an emergency...)
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To: Salvation; informavoracious; larose; RJR_fan; Prospero; Conservative Vermont Vet; ...
+

Freep-mail me to get on or off my pro-life and Catholic List:

Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of general interest.

26 posted on 02/15/2010 4:44:59 PM PST by narses ("lex orandi, lex credendi, lex vivendi")
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To: Salvation

Will be having the famous “Polish donuts” or packi’s tomorrow. :)


27 posted on 02/15/2010 4:46:00 PM PST by Biggirl ("Jesus talked to us as individuals"-Jim Vicevich/Thanks JimV!=^..^==^..^==^..^==^..^==^..^=)
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To: Salvation; RebelTXRose

I’ve got oatmeal on the schedule for Ash Wednesday. If we want to “celebrate” Lent later, we’ll go to a KofC fish fry on a Friday night.

It’s hard to get my family serious about fasting/abstinence, since we have only two family members (my husband and our oldest boy) who are “officially” covered by the rules. I try to hold the rest of the family to abstaining from meat, anyway, but the way the little boys are growing, “small meals” just doesn’t work ;-).


28 posted on 02/15/2010 4:46:31 PM PST by Tax-chick (Sarah Palin is a thing of beauty and a joy forever.)
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To: amzgirl

I’ve decided to TV in the morning. I always want to know what the news is.

Hopefully I can extend it into the afternoon too.

No TV for six weeks — I’ll keep you posted on how I do.


29 posted on 02/15/2010 4:46:36 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: MaggieCarta

That is what I had posted about. Will be having one tommorrow. :)


30 posted on 02/15/2010 4:47:43 PM PST by Biggirl ("Jesus talked to us as individuals"-Jim Vicevich/Thanks JimV!=^..^==^..^==^..^==^..^==^..^=)
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To: Salvation

I don’t think I would try potato in the waffle iron.

The apple oatmeal looks tasty.


31 posted on 02/15/2010 5:17:49 PM PST by TASMANIANRED (Liberals are educated above their level of intelligence.. Thanks Sr. Angelica)
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To: Salvation

Did it for many years when I was young. Now I like to stay home with my husband and spend a quiet day together.


32 posted on 02/15/2010 5:23:52 PM PST by murron (Proud Mom of a Marine Vet)
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To: Salvation

Did it for many years when I was young. Now I like to stay home with my husband and spend a quiet day together.


33 posted on 02/15/2010 5:24:32 PM PST by murron (Proud Mom of a Marine Vet)
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To: Salvation

For several years, our Parish had a Shrove Tuesday Pancake/Jambalaya Dinner with the local Episcopal Parish in town. It was a lot of fun.


34 posted on 02/15/2010 6:55:43 PM PST by SuziQ
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To: afraidfortherepublic
It wasn't from the Jews being 'hounded' out of their homes, that they started the unleavened bread tradition. It came about from the Flight from Egypt, and Moses told them to prepare for the journey by going ahead and baking the loaves, not giving the dough time to rise. He also told the Jews to mark the lintels above their doors with the blood of the animal that was killed to provide food for their journey. This was the way the Angel of Death would identify those homes belonging to the "Chosen People", and he would pass over them, hence the term "Passover".

We saw a TV show several years ago talking about a strange outbreak of mental illness and death in the Middle Ages. The study determined that it was the toxin, Ricin, showing up in rye flour, that was the cause. It was the Jewish habit of preparing for Passover, by throwing out old flour, etc, that saved the lives of many of them, because they threw out old stocks of flour, so didn't ingest the Ricin.

I don't know if it's a geographical, or ethnic thing, or what, but I don't remember ever hearing about Shrove Tuesday, or having pancakes on that day, when I was growing up in S. Mississippi. It was always just Mardi Gras for us. I never heard of it until we moved up here to MA, and the impetus for the Shrove Tuesday dinner in our Parish came from a couple, the husband of which was a member of the local Episcopal Parish, and heard about it from one of his fellow parishoners.

35 posted on 02/15/2010 7:18:28 PM PST by SuziQ
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To: Salvation

I’m giving up shroves for Lent.


36 posted on 02/16/2010 12:05:17 AM PST by ElkGroveDan (Now can we forget about that old rum-runner Joe Kennedy and his progeny of philandering drunks?)
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To: Salvation

The idea of Pancake Day was to use up the milk and eggs in the house before Lent because in the past they weren’t supposed to be eaten.

I remember this rhyme from childhood:

Pancake Day is a very happy day,
If we don’t have a holiday we’ll all run away,
Where shall we run, up High Lane,
And here comes the teacher with a great big cane!


37 posted on 02/16/2010 1:01:34 AM PST by bronxville
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To: Salvation

I’m doing the same - no TV.


38 posted on 02/16/2010 1:03:41 AM PST by bronxville
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To: Biggirl

Enjoy! My favorite are the raspberry jelly (pictured above, I think) However, according to the local news this morning, custard filled are the biggest sellers. They even make prune filled ones, too.


39 posted on 02/16/2010 2:51:24 AM PST by MaggieCarta (We're all Detroiters, now.)
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To: SuziQ
The study determined that it was the toxin, Ricin, showing up in rye flour, that was the cause.

Reminds me of a book I read years ago that tried to make the case that the seizures, craziness, babbling and deaths in MA that were associated with the "witches" and their later trials came from toxic mold that formed on stored flour. It was a great book, and I wish I could remember the name. It could have been by Kellerman. Or, that other author who was an author and who wrote whole series of mystery novels based on biological ephemera. The one whose novel set back organ donations about 50 years.

40 posted on 02/16/2010 5:52:47 AM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: netmilsmom

Did you get a Paczki this morning? LOL!


41 posted on 02/16/2010 7:16:11 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

You betcha!!!!


42 posted on 02/16/2010 7:23:51 AM PST by netmilsmom (I am Ilk)
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To: SuziQ

The Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper is an English tradition - which is why you will find it in most Episcopal parishes. Since the Gulf Coast was settled by the French and Spanish Catholics, the traditions follow those in France and Spain, which would be Mardi Gras and Carnivale. It’s interesting, too, that when I was Episcopalian, we would celebrate Epiphany with the purple, green, and gold King Cake (the beginning of Epiphanytide), but would not see the green, gold, and purple again (it was just pancakes and bacon in the Parish Hall with no decorations of any kind) - whereas those who celebrate Mardi Gras (the end of Epiphanytide) celebrate with green, gold, and purple and King Cake festivities. I used to work with a lady from Louisiana who would bring a King Cake to work to share with us on Shrove Tuesday.


43 posted on 02/16/2010 7:26:04 AM PST by nanetteclaret (Unreconstructed Catholic Texan)
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To: All
The Observance of Lent - Part I Pre-Lenten Days (Shrove Tuesday)

The Observance of Lent - Part I
Pre-Lenten Days

From the Family Sourcebook for Lent and Easter

[Illustration, Book of Gospels - Midwest Theological Forum]

 

Part I - Pre-Lenten Days

Pre-Lenten season
Suggestions for family activities on Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras)

The penitential season of Lent is the period of forty week-days beginning on Ash Wednesday. It is a season of the Church year that commemorates the forty days Jesus fasted and prayed in the wilderness before He began His public ministry of preaching for repentance. Six Sundays are within the season; the last, Passion Sunday, marks the beginning of Holy Week. Holy Thursday begins the Triduum (three days) before Easter day, which includes Good Friday and Holy Saturday.

The Church has devoted a period of time to prayer and fasting as a preparation for the liturgical comemmoration of the Passion of Christ and the celebrations of the feast of the Resurrection, Easter Day, since very early times. In 604 Pope Gregory I defined Lent as "The spiritual tithing of the year", a time of solemn spiritual and physical preparation for our own acceptance of salvation through Christ's sacrifice. (Ordinary tithing meant to give a tenth part ­ a tithe ­ of one's goods to God. Lent's forty days represents about a tenth of the year.)

The word "Lent" comes from the Anglo-Saxon word "lencten", referring to the lengthening of days in the Spring. Lent, of course, is an English word. In Latin, still the official language of the the Catholic Church, the entire season is known as Quadrigesima, or "forty".

The season of Lent calls Christians to imitate the forty days of prayer and fasting of Jesus. The period of forty days is significant. When God punished the sinfulness of mankind by the Flood, the rain lasted forty days and forty nights. Moses led the Hebrew people out of bondage in Egypt, but they wandered forty years in the desert before reaching the promised land. Elijah fasted and sought God's will on Mount Horeb for forty days. Jonah prophesied the destruction of Nineveh in forty days.

Pre-Lenten Season
In the Eastern Churches the penitential season before Easter begins before the forty days, and eventually the Roman Church also anticipated the season for several weeks before the actual beginning of Lent.

Prior to the Second Vatican Council, the pre-Lenten penitential season began on the Sunday three weeks before the beginning of Lent, called Septuagesima. The word Septuagesima (seventieth) was supposed to be a reminder of the seventy years of the Babylonian captivity of the Jewish people, and thus of our captivity in sin, although this Sunday was actually only sixty-three days before Easter. The succeeding pre-Lenten Sundays were called Sexagesima and Quinquagesima. Just as in Lent, violet vestments were worn and the Alleluia was omitted from Mass.

The liturgical changes initiated by the Council removed this anticipated pre-Lenten penitential season, however, and the Church returned to the earlier practice of beginning Lent on Ash Wednesday. The Sundays between Epiphany and the beginning of Lent are now in the liturgical season called Ordinary Time.

 

Movable Feasts
The date of Easter is the first Sunday after the first full moon following the vernal (spring) equinox. So, unlike Christmas, which is celebrated on the same day each year, Easter and feasts and celebrations of the Church year related to Easter are called "movable feasts". The movable feasts include the Ascension (forty days after Easter), Pentecost (fifty days after Easter), and Trinity Sunday, the first Sunday after Pentecost. (Christ the King, the last Sunday of the liturgical year, or the Sunday before Advent, is also a movable feast, although its date is not determined by the date of Easter, but by the first Sunday of Advent, which is the Sunday nearest the Feast of St. Andrew, November 30.)

 

Carnival ­ Shrove Tuesday - Mardi Gras
Carnival is from the Latin Carnevale or "farewell to meat", and it is a time of joyful feasting and fun. The practice of celebrating carnival probably began in ancient times when the Sunday a week before the beginning of Lent was called Dominica Carnevala, or "farewell to meat Sunday" -- referring to the Lenten fast from meat and animal products. (For more information on the Catholic practice of fasting see Ash Wednesday page, and Fast and Abstinence page.)

The official day of "farewell" is Mardi Gras, French for "Fat Tuesday". The day was also called "Butter Tuesday", because the last of the animal products had to be used up ­ sometimes in fried pancakes. It is also known as Shrove Tuesday, which may refer to the diet being deprived or "shriven" of meat; or possibly that after the customary confession in preparation for Lent, one is "shriven" of sin. The famous celebration of Mardi Gras in New Orleans has become largely a secular festival, its religious meaning having been virtually obliterated in the revelries. And the word "carnival" has long since lost its religious significance.

Carnival celebrations are not confined only to Mardi Gras, however. In some parts of the world, the carnival season extends several weeks prior to Ash Wednesday. Even today, the carnival celebrations, especially in the Caribbean, South American and some European countries, begin on January 6 (Epiphany) and end on midnight before Ash Wednesday.

Celebrating Carnival with family, friends and parish community helps children and adults to understand and appreciate "that wonderful, eternal rhythm of high and low tide that makes up the year of the Church: times of waiting alternate with times of fulfillment, the lean weeks of Lent with the feasts of Easter and Pentecost, times of mourning with seasons of rejoicing", as Maria von Trapp said, in Around the Year with the Trapp Family (p. 85). The Carnival season has been a time of "blowing off steam", of entertaining guests in the spirit of Christian hospitality and generosity, and of partaking of rich food and drinks ­ and sometimes of excess, as the Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans vividly displays.

One of the reasons for the development of the Carnival season and the emphasis on revelry and merry-making was the very rigorous practice of Lenten fasting during the Middle Ages and beyond. During Carnival, housewives of the past rid their pantries of all butter, lard, eggs, bacon, cream and cheese in preparation for the Lenten fast. From the Middle Ages until the late Renaissance, eating all animal products except fish (which were considered bloodless) was forbidden.

Now, however, the Lenten fast and abstinence from meat in most parts of the world is confined to Ash Wednesday and all Fridays during Lent, and in modern times abstinence from meat does not include other animal products (eggs, milk and cheese, for example).

The custom of eating pancakes on Shrove Tuesday is still maintained in many places. (Pancakes require many eggs and much milk and butter in their preparation.) To this day there is an annual pancake race on Shrove Tuesday between the village of Olney, England and the small town of Liberal, Kansas. The outcome of this international contest, which originated in the story of a "war-bride" who was a native of Olney where the traditional pancake race originated several hundred years ago, usually appears in the national news on Tuesday before the beginning of Lent.

 

Suggestions for Family Activities on Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras)

  • A gathering of family or friends to celebrate before our Lenten fast officially begins on Ash Wednesday. A pot-luck dinner with each family bringing an especially delectable dish is one suggestion.
    Children can make simple decorations or funny hats and help make pancakes for the Mardi Gras evening meal. You might decorate with balloons ­ which would be popped with a satisfying bang at the end of the festivities. Whatever the decorations, they should be taken down at the end of the party -- as part of the preparation for Lent.

Mardi Gras Menu Suggestions
New Orleans French: Crepes or beignets, with quiche or egg/cheese main-dish casserole
Cafe au lait or hot chocolate, fruit juices or wine punch

Anglo-American: Pancakes or doughnuts with sausages, bacon or ham slices, scrambled eggs; fruit sauces, other fillings, syrups, etc.; honey-butter, whipped cream, cream cheese.

  • An impromptu neighborhood Mardi Gras parade of children, with fancy paper hats and decorated wagons and tricycles is fun and fairly simple, if you're up to organizing it and the weather permits.
  • Families can make Shrove Tuesday (or Mardi Gras - "fat Tuesday", in French) a spiritual time of preparation for Lent by going to confession where this is possible (a sort of spiritual "pantry cleaning").
  • Decide on Lenten sacrifices appropriate to the age of each child, reminding them that our souls need this spiritual exercise to gain strength for living as Christians, just as our bodies need exercise to remain healthy. Our sacrifices are like a gift offered to God, and all real gifts "cost" the giver something. (No fair "giving up" hitting your sister for Lent!)
  • Our Lenten spiritual preparation should not be confined only to "giving up" things; we should "take on" things, also ­ extra prayers, for example, especially family prayers. If your family has not already established some form of family prayer, Lent is a good time to begin. We are prepared to do something special during this season. Praying together as a family, in our busy times, is difficult, so do set aside some time this Lent to do it. Fathers and mothers can plan together what form this will take ­ whether as simple as saying the Angelus every night at dinner, or as elaborate as saying the Daily Office together in the evening.
  • Make a "Journey of the Cross" poster for keeping tack of the sacrifices children make during Lent. For each child, on a sheet of poster paper, draw a crooked path leading to a cross at the top of the path . Mark the path into 46 sections representing the forty days of Lent plus the Sundays; marking the Sunday spaces to distinguish them from the other days. (Or you may Click here for our design to print out for each child.)
    After the children have done their task or sacrifice for each Lenten day, they place a star or sticker (or color with crayons) on the space representing that day on the "journey" to Easter Day. The posters can be taped to the refrigerator door.
  • At midnight on Mardi Gras (or just before bedtime) the family kneels down and says one "Our Father" together and then rises, saying, "I wish you a blessed season of Lent". In the morning they will begin their observance of Lent in anticipation of Our Lord's Passion and Resurrection.

44 posted on 02/16/2010 7:36:20 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Happy Shrove Tuesday to all of you!

SHROVETIDE

The few days before Ash Wednesday, particularly the day before Shrove Tuesday. It is associated with confessing one's sins and has in many places become a time for holding carnivals, as the last time for festivity before the Lenten season of penance.

All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.

45 posted on 02/16/2010 7:45:50 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Yes, we always had pancakes on Shrove Tuesday. I loved it. Lent was a big deal in our house, and Mother never missed Stations on Fridays, even though getting there could be a hassle for her with 9 kids.

Tonight the husband and I will be attending a Pancake Supper at our church hall presented by the KOC.

I was just thinking this morning, though, what a shame it is that Mardi Gras and Carnival are just big parties now for so many people and totally lacking in any connection to preparing one for the spiritual experience of Lent.


46 posted on 02/16/2010 9:47:23 AM PST by Bigg Red (Palin/Hunter 2012 -- Bolton their Secretary of State)
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To: RebelTXRose

...a fish fry on a day of fast & abstinence?

&&
I hear you. I used to work in a Catholic school, and every Lent a bunch of teachers would oder pizza since we were not supposed to eat meat. Duh!

I made it part of my Lenten sacrifice to smell and see my favorite food in the faculty lounge. :-)


47 posted on 02/16/2010 9:51:42 AM PST by Bigg Red (Palin/Hunter 2012 -- Bolton their Secretary of State)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

My Irish Catholic mother kept a spotless house, and during Holy Week, our house got a thorough cleaning from attic to cellar. (Same thing the week before Christmas.)


48 posted on 02/16/2010 9:54:48 AM PST by Bigg Red (Palin/Hunter 2012 -- Bolton their Secretary of State)
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To: bronxville

Coffee and alcohol for me. And I plan to incorporate more praying into my daily routine.


49 posted on 02/16/2010 10:02:33 AM PST by Bigg Red (Palin/Hunter 2012 -- Bolton their Secretary of State)
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To: nanetteclaret
OK, well that 'splains why I never heard about it when growing up. It was definitely Mardi Gras where I lived!

When we did the Pancake Dinner at our Parish, we included Jambalaya and lots of Mardi Gras decorations!

50 posted on 02/16/2010 6:13:08 PM PST by SuziQ
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