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To: Salvation
At La Rochelle, a Protestant town, it seems that Montfort showed particular zeal for the Rosary; he preached his first three missions there, in the church of the Dominicans, during the summer of 1711. According to Besnard, "The apostle of the Rosary . . . used this heavenly devotion very advantageously to convert the Protestants, who had based some of their false doctrines on the Albigensian heresy. He left the controversies to those whom the Bishop had designated for this ministry, and dedicated himself to stimulating devotion to the Holy Rosary, and to explaining the mysteries that are called to mind at the beginning of each decade."18 The conversion of an important Protestant woman, Madame de Mailly, "caused a great sensation and convinced several people who were hesitant." It was specifically stated that "until her death in 1749, she was faithful to the daily recitation of the Rosary"19 ....

....We might add that in the context of the Counter-Reformation, the Rosary appeared like a sign and a providential weapon against "heretics," very similar to how it had been used by Saint Dominic against the Cathars....

The above is not appropriate for a Catholic Caucus. Ecumenical thread, maybe, but not caucus material.

6 posted on 04/28/2010 2:49:03 PM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: Alex Murphy; Religion Moderator

This is historical. It does not distract from the Catholic Caucus, in my opinion.


7 posted on 04/28/2010 2:53:15 PM PDT by Salvation ( "With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Alex Murphy; Religion Moderator
The above is not appropriate for a Catholic Caucus. Ecumenical thread, maybe, but not caucus material.

Are you a moderator? If not, please address your problem to the Moderator. Otherwise, this is a Catholic Caucus thread. If you are not Catholic, please leave the thread.

8 posted on 04/28/2010 3:08:03 PM PDT by Judith Anne
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To: All
Protestants, who had based some of their false doctrines on the Albigensian heresy

From Philip Schaff's HISTORY of the CHRISTIAN CHURCH, volume 5, chapter 10:

In Southern France they were called Albigenses, from the town of Albi, one of the centres of their strength. From the territory in Eastern Europe, whence their theological tenets were drawn, they were known as Bulgari, Bugares, or Bugres.968 Other titles were given to them in France, such as Tessarants, Textores, from their strength among the weavers and industrial classes, or Publicani and Poplicani, a corruption of Paulicians.969

It was the general belief of the age that the Cathari derived their doctrinal views from heretical sects of Eastern Europe and the Orient, such as the Paulicians and Bogomili. This was brought out in the testimony of members of the sect at their trials, and it has in its favor the official recognition which leaders from Eastern Europe, Bosnia, and Constantinople gave to the Western heretics. The Paulicians had existed since the fifth century in Asia Minor, and had pushed their way to Constantinople.970 The Bogomili, who were of later origin, had a position of some prominence in Constantinople in the early part of the twelfth century.971 It is also possible that seeds of Manichaean and Arian heresy were left in Italy and Southern France after these systems were supposed to be stamped out in those regions.

The Paulicians rejected the Old Testament and taught a strict dualism. The Bogomili held to the Sabellian Trinity, rejected the eucharist, and substituted for baptism with water a ritual of prayer and the imposition of hands. Marriage they pronounced an unclean relationship. The worship of images and the use of the cross were discarded.

From the article on Catharism at Wikipedia
Like many medieval movements, there were various schools of thought and practice amongst the Cathari; some were dualistic (believing in a God of Good and a God of Evil), others Gnostic, some closer to orthodoxy while abstaining from an acceptance of Roman Catholicism[citation needed]. The dualist theology was the most prominent, however, and was based upon the complete incompatibility of love and power. As matter was seen as a manifestation of power, it was also incompatible with love. They did not believe in one all-encompassing god, but in two, both equal and comparable in status. They held that the physical world was evil and created by Rex Mundi (translated from Latin as "king of the world"), who encompassed all that was corporeal, chaotic and powerful; the second god, the one whom they worshipped, was entirely disincarnate: a being or principle of pure spirit and completely unsullied by the taint of matter. He was the god of love, order and peace.

According to some Cathars, the purpose of man's life on Earth was to transcend matter, perpetually renouncing anything connected with the principle of power and thereby attained union with the principle of love. According to others, man's purpose was to reclaim or redeem matter, spiritualising and transforming it.

This placed them at odds with the Catholic Church in regarding material creation, on behalf of which Jesus had died, as intrinsically evil and implying that God, whose word had created the world in the beginning, was a usurper. Furthermore, as the Cathars saw matter as intrinsically evil, they denied that Jesus could become incarnate and still be the son of God. Cathars vehemently repudiated the significance of the crucifixion and the cross. In fact, to the Cathars, Rome's opulent and luxurious Church seemed a palpable embodiment and manifestation on Earth of Rex Mundi's sovereignty.

See also the article Albigensian Crusade, at Wikipedia

20 posted on 04/28/2010 8:54:03 PM PDT by Alex Murphy
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