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"Grave Sin" = Mortal Sin [Catholic Caucus]
Jimmy Akin ^ | May 6, 2010 | Jimmy Akin

Posted on 05/08/2010 1:40:13 PM PDT by NYer

Confessional

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states:

1857 For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: "Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent."

What if a sin has been committed that has grave matter but lacks the knowledge and consent needed to make it mortal? How might one refer to such a sin?

Since it has grave matter, one might refer to it--logically--as a grave sin. That would seem pretty straightforward: Sin with grave matter is grave sin. Add the needed knowledge and consent and it becomes mortal. Right?

Well, you'd think that. Only you wouldn't be right.

For some years it's been clear (to me, anyway) that ecclesiastical documents like the Code of Canon Law and the Catechism of the Catholic Church regularly use the phrase "grave sin" to mean "mortal sin."

But until recently I haven't had an explicit statement documenting this fact. Now I do (CHT to the reader who provided it!)

The statement is found in a post-synodal apostolic exhortation by John Paul II from 1984. The synod of bishops had been held the previous year on the theme of reconciliation and penance, and in the resulting exhortation, 

During the synod, some apparently proposed a spectrum of sins consisting of venial, grave, and mortal sins--apparently using the middle category not the way proposed above but as a sin that is worse than venial but less than mortal. This is perhaps related to the mistranslation of "grave" as "serious" in English that was common for a long time.

In any event, that kind of division would be wrong, and so John Paul II wrote:

During the synod assembly some fathers proposed a threefold distinction of sins, classifying them as venial, grave and mortal. This threefold distinction might illustrate the fact that there is a scale of seriousness among grave sins. But it still remains true that the essential and decisive distinction is between sin which destroys charity and sin which does not kill the supernatural life: There is no middle way between life and death.

And so (here comes the money quote) . . .

Considering sin from the point of view of its matter, the ideas of death, of radical rupture with God, the supreme good, of deviation from the path that leads to God or interruption of the journey toward him (which are all ways of defining mortal sin) are linked with the idea of the gravity of sin's objective content. Hence, in the church's doctrine and pastoral action, grave sin is in practice identified with mortal sin.

So. Glad we've got that cleared up.


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Ministry/Outreach; Moral Issues
KEYWORDS: canonlaw; catholic; gravesin; mortalsin; sin

1 posted on 05/08/2010 1:40:13 PM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; markomalley; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; ...
Of course, we all know this :-)
2 posted on 05/08/2010 1:40:49 PM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: NYer

kiss over 10 seconds was a mortal sin....1961....so....you learned to breathe on 10.....


3 posted on 05/08/2010 1:44:26 PM PDT by Sacajaweau (What)
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To: NYer

I’m puzzled as to what is supposed to be the benefit of this excursion. The quick reader might get the impression that the author is trying to say that all sin involving “grave matter” is a mortal sin, but he did not and it is not.


4 posted on 05/08/2010 1:50:01 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Amateurish," agreed Janet Napolitano, the White House amateurishness czar.)
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To: Sacajaweau

No, some nun made the prudential judgment that a kiss over ten seconds must have an erotic purpose, and therefore be mortal sin. The notion that breathing every tenth second somehow made a distinction between mortal sin and spiritually healthy is, was, and always has been absurd.


5 posted on 05/08/2010 1:51:15 PM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus
The 10 second rule was via our chaplain (all girl Catholic High School) as part of a pre-marriage course.

He must have tried it out. He left the priesthood (Father Finks) and married one of the nuns.

6 posted on 05/08/2010 1:55:33 PM PDT by Sacajaweau (What)
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To: Tax-chick
I’m puzzled as to what is supposed to be the benefit of this excursion.

He addresses it in describing the outcome of of VCII where they attempted to redefine sin.

a threefold distinction of sins, classifying them as venial, grave and mortal.

He then quotes JPII who 'clarified' the fact that grave sin = mortal sin.

7 posted on 05/08/2010 2:08:20 PM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: NYer
Being hearing-impaired is a big detriment to confession, as many churches do not have face-to-face as an option. Also Opus Dei priests, for example, do not allow face-to-face confession anyway. So after I lost too much hearing to be "in the booth" with my Opus Dei confessor, my confessions dropped off. Of course, I could arrange a special time with our priest at the rectory, but since my top two sins are sloth and gluttony, well ...

Fast forward to our current Sunday parish, St. John Cantius, in Chicago, where confession is highly promoted by the Canons Regular (before, during, and after all Sunday masses), I wondered if they were also sensitive to the issue of hearing loss. After my husband talked with the pastor, he said, "Sure, just hail a priest for your wife, and we'll find a spot." Well, the photograph shown is my confessional (sans all those people, of course). So, how do you like that? Hearing loss has its pluses. :):)
8 posted on 05/08/2010 2:09:55 PM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: mlizzy
Awesome ... and such a beautiful sanctuary.

One of my Catholic neighbors suffered brain damage which presents a problem expressing herself. She comprehends everything but is challenged in finding the words to verbalize what it is she wants to say. Unable to find a RC priest to hear her confession, I brought her to my Maronite pastor. He was very amenable to working with her. (We lost our confessional when the shrine/church was renovated last year; we now have confession face to face in the sacristy.) I brought my neighbor to our Lenten Penance Service, she went in alone and emerged with a big smile on her face. It had been years since she went to confession and she was so pleased to have unburdened herself through this remarkable priest.

Sadly, our pastor has been transferred to Williamsville NY and will be leaving at the end of this month. His replacement is a young and spiritual priest. I have great faith that our Lord has sent him here now to draw lapsed Catholics back to the Church.

9 posted on 05/08/2010 2:37:49 PM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: NYer

I’ve never heard of a “grave sin”. I have heard of mortal sin and cardinal sin. So, what is cardinal sin? Is every sin a grave, mortal or cardinal sin, or is the lowest level just sin.

Sometimes, I think we are all going to hell, if there be a hell. Staying abreast of every sin in the bible and living in such a way as not to commit them, is impossible.


10 posted on 05/08/2010 2:52:37 PM PDT by Freedom_Is_Not_Free (Bye bye Miss American Freedom. When did we vote for Communism?)
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To: NYer

Voting for a pro-abortion politician should be a mortal sin.


11 posted on 05/08/2010 3:01:25 PM PDT by dancusa (Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy. W. Churchill)
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To: Freedom_Is_Not_Free
So, what is cardinal sin?

The Seven Deadly Sins, also known as the Capital Vices or Cardinal Sins, is a classification of the most objectionable vices that has been used since early Christian times to educate and instruct followers concerning (immoral) fallen humanity's tendency to sin.

Deadly Sin * **
Opposing Virtue
Brief description
Pride
(1) (18%)
Humility Seeing ourselves as we are and not comparing ourselves to others is humility. Pride and vanity are competitive. If someone else's pride really bothers you, you have a lot of pride.
Avarice/Greed
(5) (5%)
Generosity This is about more than money. Generosity means letting others get the credit or praise. It is giving without having expectations of the other person. Greed wants to get its "fair share" or a bit more.
Envy
(2) (5%)
Love "Love is patient, love is kind…" Love actively seeks the good of others for their sake. Envy resents the good others receive or even might receive. Envy is almost indistinguishable from pride at times.
Wrath/Anger
(3) (20%)
Kindness Kindness means taking the tender approach, with patience and compassion. Anger is often our first reaction to the problems of others. Impatience with the faults of others is related to this.
Lust
(7) (31%)
Self control Self control and self mastery prevent pleasure from killing the soul by suffocation. Legitimate pleasures are controlled in the same way an athlete's muscles are: for maximum efficiency without damage. Lust is the self-destructive drive for pleasure out of proportion to its worth. Sex, power, or image can be used well, but they tend to go out of control.
Gluttony
(6) (8%)
Faith and Temperance Temperance accepts the natural limits of pleasures and preserves this natural balance. This does not pertain only to food, but to entertainment and other legitimate goods, and even the company of others.
Sloth
(4) (13%)
Zeal Zeal is the energetic response of the heart to God's commands. The other sins work together to deaden the spiritual senses so we first become slow to respond to God and then drift completely into the sleep of complacency.

12 posted on 05/08/2010 3:29:24 PM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: dancusa
Voting for a pro-abortion politician should be a mortal sin.

Voting for a pro-abortion politician always has been a mortal sin as long as the necessary knowledge and consent is given in the commission of this sin. The current crop of politically correct, progressive bishops have just refused to enforce or teach that fact for decades.

13 posted on 05/08/2010 3:32:41 PM PDT by old republic
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To: NYer
I brought my neighbor to our Lenten Penance Service, she went in alone and emerged with a big smile on her face. It had been years since she went to confession and she was so pleased to have unburdened herself through this remarkable priest.

Great uplifting story! You done good!:) I understand the "big smile." Maybe your new young priest will hear her confession too.
14 posted on 05/08/2010 3:38:10 PM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: mlizzy; NYer

My father-in-law’s wife (that would be my husband’s stepmother, a dear Sicilian lady) came back to the Church a couple of years ago. She said she went to the priest at the nearest church and said, “Father, I haven’t been to Confession in a long, long time,” and the priest said, “Okay, but you’re here now!” She was so happy!


15 posted on 05/08/2010 5:41:18 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Amateurish," agreed Janet Napolitano, the White House amateurishness czar.)
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Comment #16 Removed by Moderator

Comment #17 Removed by Moderator

Comment #18 Removed by Moderator

To: NYer; informavoracious; larose; RJR_fan; Prospero; Conservative Vermont Vet; ...
+

Freep-mail me to get on or off my pro-life and Catholic List:

Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of general interest.

19 posted on 05/08/2010 6:01:09 PM PDT by narses ( 'Prefer nothing to the love of Christ.')
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To: Jedediah

Guinness has historical cachet and is very nutritious. If you drink Guinness, you don’t have to eat Vegemite with eggs on toast.


20 posted on 05/08/2010 6:01:49 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Amateurish," agreed Janet Napolitano, the White House amateurishness czar.)
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To: Sacajaweau

49 years later a 10 second kiss could simply be fatal. Ah to be young again!


21 posted on 05/08/2010 6:01:52 PM PDT by narses ( 'Prefer nothing to the love of Christ.')
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To: dancusa

According to my priest, it is. You can be an accessory to sin even if you didn’t commit the sin. If you know a politician is pro-abortion, and you willfully cast your ballot for them, you are an accessory to that sin.

From the Catechism:

1868 Sin is a personal act. Moreover, we have a responsibility for the sins committed by others when we cooperate in them:

- by participating directly and voluntarily in them;
- by ordering, advising, praising, or approving them;
- by not disclosing or not hindering them when we have an obligation to do so;
- by protecting evil-doers.

This is summarized by the nine ways of being an accessory to sin:

1.By Counsel
2.By Command
3.By Consent
4.By Concealment
5.By Defense of Evil Done
6.By Partaking
7.By Provocation
8.By Praise
9.By Silence


22 posted on 05/08/2010 6:37:45 PM PDT by Crolis ("Nemo me impune lacessit!" - "No one provokes me with impunity!")
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To: NYer
Can I ask a question? This topic is one of the things that has confused me about some of the teachings of the Catholic Church. One of the quotes in the article was “sin which destroys charity and sin which does not kill the supernatural life”...how does this fit with Romans 6:23 For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord...? Or Matthew 5:19-20 “Anyone who breaks one of the LEAST of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever practices and teaches these commands will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. For I tell you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven.”

Since all sin separates us from God, what is the spiritual benefit of trying to rate them from mild to worst?

23 posted on 05/08/2010 9:26:05 PM PDT by WorldviewDad (following God instead of culture)
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To: Tax-chick

Cool I’ll do anything to avoid vegemite


24 posted on 05/08/2010 11:22:50 PM PDT by Jedediah
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To: WorldviewDad
Can I ask a question? This topic is one of the things that has confused me about some of the teachings of the Catholic Church.

Apologies for not getting back to you sooner. You wrote:

Since all sin separates us from God, what is the spiritual benefit of trying to rate them from mild to worst?

Our Lord said to Pilate (John 19:11): 'He that hath delivered me to thee, hath the greater sin,' and yet it is evident that Pilate was guilty of some sin. Therefore one sin is greater than another.

Therefore it matters much to the gravity of a sin whether one departs more or less from the rectitude of reason: and accordingly we must say that sins are not all equal.

Here is what the Catechism of the Catholic Church has to say on the matter of degrees of sin:

1854. "Sins are rightly evaluated according to their gravity. The distinction between mortal and venial sin, already evident in Scripture, [Cf. 1 Jn 5:16-17.] became part of the tradition of the Church. It is corroborated by human experience."

1855. "Mortal sin destroys charity in the heart of man by a grave violation of God's law; it turns man away from God, who is his ultimate end and his beatitude, by preferring an inferior good to him. Venial sin allows charity to subsist, even though it offends and wounds it. "

1856. "Mortal sin, by attacking the vital principle within us - that is, charity - necessitates a new initiative of God's mercy and a conversion of heart which is normally accomplished within the setting of the sacrament of reconciliation: When the will sets itself upon something that is of its nature incompatible with the charity that orients man toward his ultimate end, then the sin is mortal by its very object . . . whether it contradicts the love of God, such as blasphemy or perjury, or the love of neighbor, such as homicide or adultery.... But when the sinner's will is set upon something that of its nature involves a disorder, but is not opposed to the love of God and neighbor, such as thoughtless chatter or immoderate laughter and the like, such sins are venial. [St. Thomas Aquinas, Su Th I-II, 88, 2, corp. art.] "

1862. "One commits venial sin when, in a less serious matter, he does not observe the standard prescribed by the moral law, or when he disobeys the moral law in a grave matter, but without full knowledge or without complete consent."

1863. "Venial sin weakens charity; it manifests a disordered affection for created goods; it impedes the soul's progress in the exercise of the virtues and the practice of the moral good; it merits temporal punishment. Deliberate and unrepented venial sin disposes us little by little to commit mortal sin. However venial sin does not set us in direct opposition to the will and friendship of God; it does not break the covenant with God. With God's grace it is humanly reparable. 'Venial sin does not deprive the sinner of sanctifying grace, friendship with God, charity, and consequently eternal happiness.' [John Paul II, RP 17 # 9.] While he is in the flesh, man cannot help but have at least some light sins. But do not despise these sins which we call 'light': if you take them for light when you weigh them, tremble when you count them. A number of light objects makes a great mass; a number of drops fills a river; a number of grains makes a heap. What then is our hope? Above all, confession. [St. Augustine, In ep. Jo. 1, 6: PL 35, 1982.]"

Hope this addresses your question.

25 posted on 05/09/2010 12:18:09 PM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: NYer
Thank you for your reply. I can understand that different sins will affect the sinner in different ways and as a result will make the persons conscious more or less receptive to God's correction...I believe I see that in some of what is written in your reply. The issue I would still have a problem with is...”venial sin...does not break the covenant with God”. I have not been able to find in scripture where any sin has been acceptable to God no matter how small we might think it is.

Thanks again for your response and God bless.

26 posted on 05/09/2010 2:29:37 PM PDT by WorldviewDad (following God instead of culture)
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To: NYer
Sorry to hear about losing your priest.

Today was the last day for my priest at our parish.

He is the facilitator for 3 churches that are merging in Bellmawr NJ.

I will miss him so much. Lots of weeping eyes after Mass.

A group of us are going in tomorrow, because he want the new priest to have a spick and span church to welcome him.

During confession yesterday I asked him if he could remain my Confessor. I have decided to remain at my present parish and attend Saturday Vigil, I will attend Sunday Mass in his new parish.

27 posted on 05/09/2010 2:47:22 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free, Free Republic.com baby.)
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To: WorldviewDad
I have not been able to find in scripture where any sin has been acceptable to God no matter how small we might think it is.

No sin is acceptable to God and that is why, in His great mercy, he left us with the Sacrament of Penance, where we are cleansed of our sins. Baptism was given to take away the sin inherited from Adam (original sin) and any sins we personally committed before baptism—sins we personally commit are called actual sins, because they come from our own acts. Thus on the day of Pentecost, Peter told the crowds, "Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit" (Acts 2:38), and when Paul was baptized he was told, "And now why do you wait? Rise and be baptized, and wash away your sins, calling on his name" (Acts 22:16). And so Peter later wrote, "Baptism . . . now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a clear conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ" (1 Pet. 3:21).

For sins committed after baptism, a different sacrament is needed. It has been called penance, confession, and reconciliation, each word emphasizing one of its.aspects. During his life, Christ forgave sins, as in the case of the woman caught in adultery (John 8:1–11) and the woman who anointed his feet (Luke 7:48). He exercised this power in his human capacity as the Messiah or Son of man, telling us, "the Son of man has authority on earth to forgive sins" (Matt. 9:6), which is why the Gospel writer himself explains that God "had given such authority to men" (Matt. 9:8).

Since he would not always be with the Church visibly, Christ gave this power to other men so the Church, which is the continuation of his presence throughout time (Matt. 28:20), would be able to offer forgiveness to future generations. He gave his power to the apostles, and it was a power that could be passed on to their successors and agents, since the apostles wouldn’t always be on earth either, but people would still be sinning.

God had sent Jesus to forgive sins, but after his resurrection Jesus told the apostles, "‘As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.’ And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained’" (John 20:21–23). (This is one of only two times we are told that God breathed on man, the other being in Genesis 2:7, when he made man a living soul. It emphasizes how important the establishment of the sacrament of penance was.)

28 posted on 05/09/2010 3:16:34 PM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: mware; Lorica
Lots of weeping eyes after Mass.

You have my sympathy. This is especially difficult when you have a priest with whom you have developed a rapport. The degree of pain is commensurate with one's involvement in any parish. It's of far less concern to those who show up on Sunday to fulfill their weekly obligation but rarely participate in any other aspect of the community.

For us, a community of only 40 families, this priest is the first one to fully take charge and lead the community in obtaining an actual church in which to celebrate Mass. He is a strong taskmaster which bothers some of the parishioners (one even went so far as to complain to the bishop that the priest "micromanages" every aspect of the parish). Yes! And that is how the work has been accomplished. Today, for example, was the last day of Religious Education classes. He decided it was time for the pre-K through 3rd grade children to learn to pray the rosary. (We also had a 3 year old in the group.) If you are familiar with children at that age level, then you know how fidgety they can be. The children had already been there 1 hour before he brought them forward, explained the rosary to them and then took the time to enforce proper position in the pews. "Sit straight, no turning around, no crossing legs, no twisting ... look forward towards me!" He faced them and used a microphone as we began the rosary. Each time a child began to fidget, he spoke directly to them and lauded those who followed his directions. At the end, we were both amazed at one little 4 y/o girl who loudly recited each and every prayer. He later commented that you can see which parents teach their children to pray.

He drove up to his future parish in Buffalo this afternoon and won't be back until Wednesday. He is determined, however, to see our project through to the end, despite his new assignment and the months of June and July at CUA to work on his Canon Law degree. Check out the pictures at our web site. Click on the Events button.

St. Ann Maronite Catholic Church

The web site has been designed by one of our younger parishioners. It's a work in progress, albeit slow because I am the one feeding him photos and information.

Thank you so much for the post and ping! I will remember you, your parish and your priest in my prayers. Please pray for us!

29 posted on 05/09/2010 4:20:11 PM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: NYer
Thank you for sharing the photos of your parish.

What wonderful priests we have.

Your priest sounds a lot like Fr Carmel. He too is a hard taskmaster, but he does not ask of anyone what he does not expect of himself. His first year at our parish was very rough with more than one letter going to the bishop. We lost some parishioners but as Fr has often said, " I love you all dearly, my people, but I will not go to hell for you."

Your words are basically what our priest final words were to us. We are a community and that community does not end as you walk out the door of the church, it is the only the beginning.

30 posted on 05/09/2010 4:40:25 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free, Free Republic.com baby.)
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To: mlizzy
Beautiful church!

but since my top two sins are sloth and gluttony, well ...

LOL.

In my area the push is face to face only, grudgingly letting the those who want anonymity have a screen.

Fast forward to our current Sunday parish, St. John Cantius, in Chicago, where confession is highly promoted by the Canons Regular (before, during, and after all Sunday masses),

Wow, what a blessing and an example for other dioceses. I'm not surprised then that they were so accommodating to you.

31 posted on 05/09/2010 8:36:17 PM PDT by fortunecookie (Please pray for Anna, age 7, who waits for a new kidney.)
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To: mware
We lost some parishioners but as Fr has often said, " I love you all dearly, my people, but I will not go to hell for you."

Yes!!! He says exactly the same thing to us. They are both remarkable priests and we should thank God for the blessing of their gifts to us and our respective parishes. We also need to pray for our new pastors. May they continue the work begun by their predecessors.

32 posted on 05/10/2010 6:37:48 AM PDT by NYer ("Where Peter is, there is the Church." - St. Ambrose of Milan)
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To: fortunecookie
In my area the push is face to face only, grudgingly letting the those who want anonymity have a screen.

Wow! That's awesome. What state/country are you from? Face-to-face is Divine for those with disabilities. Not only hearing loss, but those with wheelchairs, claustrophobia, bad knees, and so on. Folks with disabilities are not always the ones who speak up the loudest, so I was hinting to my husband that I should start a movement of sorts through our town's church (not St. John Cantius) for more frequent face-to-face (they only offer it a couple times a year) ... but the sloth thing got in the way, and, for the time being anyway, we drive to Chicago instead :):) ...
33 posted on 05/10/2010 6:50:49 AM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: mware
I will miss him so much. Lots of weeping eyes after Mass.

Understandably so!! Just from the video I saw that you posted on another thread, I can see he is a very special Father. If you want, you can post that link again. After our confessions (my husband's and mine) yesterday, and both of us desiring to get our kids back in the pews (it was recommended that we say the Rosary daily "together" to procure their return) I'm still really thinking of asking your priest (originally from Malta; I love Malta) if he can "lift" up our 200 lb. kids.:):)
34 posted on 05/10/2010 7:02:21 AM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: mlizzy
I'm in northwest PA. I agree it is awesome for those with disabilities. Wonderful to have it offered. My only chagrin is that those who request the screen are sometimes referred to as those people in my area. And it ought to be up to the person to choose. It is however wonderful to encourage face to face and myself having received the sacrament the anonymous way for years find a sort of sloth-like resistance to the courage, if you will, to go face to face.
35 posted on 05/10/2010 10:55:17 AM PDT by fortunecookie (Please pray for Anna, age 7, who waits for a new kidney.)
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To: mlizzy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVR7I72-KrE


36 posted on 05/10/2010 12:59:47 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free, Free Republic.com baby.)
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To: mware

Thank you ... so beautiful!


37 posted on 05/10/2010 1:01:44 PM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: fortunecookie
My only chagrin is that those who request the screen are sometimes referred to as those people in my area. And it ought to be up to the person to choose. It is however wonderful to encourage face to face and myself having received the sacrament the anonymous way for years find a sort of sloth-like resistance to the courage, if you will, to go face to face.

Oh, I agree with you. One should always be able to choose. If I could hear, I'd probably be behind the screen. It's a difficult Sacrament at first, but once you get the ball rolling :):), it goes much more smoothly either way.
38 posted on 05/10/2010 1:05:36 PM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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To: mlizzy
It's a difficult Sacrament at first, but once you get the ball rolling :):), it goes much more smoothly either way.

Isn't that the truth. I am a convert (5 years) and at first I was lucky to make one confession a month. Now I go every week.

39 posted on 05/10/2010 1:09:03 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free, Free Republic.com baby.)
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To: mware
Isn't that the truth. I am a convert (5 years) and at first I was lucky to make one confession a month. Now I go every week.

Wow! Very good! I'm a convert too (26 years). I get to confession (just recently) every other week (used to be not so much), and such a difference it makes.:):)
40 posted on 05/10/2010 2:50:15 PM PDT by mlizzy ("Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person" --Mother Teresa.)
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