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I thought this question had come up previously on FR and so jumped when I saw the article by Father McNamara



Readers may send questions to liturgy@zenit.org. Please put the word "Liturgy" in the subject field. The text should include your initials, your city and your state, province or country. Father McNamara can only answer a small selection of the great number of questions that arrive.

1 posted on 05/11/2010 11:12:55 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: All
Here's the Paschal Candle question:

Candles at the Gospel Reading


And More on Baptismal Fonts

ROME, APRIL 27, 2010 (Zenit.org).- Answered by Legionary of Christ Father Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy at the Regina Apostolorum university.

Q: During Easter season at the reading of the Gospel at Mass on Sundays, are the ministers dispensed from carrying lit candles to the ambo if there is an Easter candle? -- F.A., Rio de Mouro, Portugal

A: In principle, there is no such "dispensation" except during the Easter Vigil itself, because on this night the Easter candle itself suffices to honor the risen Lord in his Gospel.

The fact that the liturgical books specify that on this night Gospel candles are not used implies that they should be used on all other solemn occasions. At the same time, we recall that these candles, like incense, are recommended but not obligatory elements of the celebration of Mass and may be omitted.

During the rest of Eastertide the Easter candle and those that accompany the Gospel have different symbolic values.

The Easter candle represents the risen Christ and, while it is often placed near the ambo, this is not the only possibility. The other possibilities are at the center of the sanctuary or next to the altar. Because of this, the Easter candle is not necessarily or primarily associated with the Gospel.

The candles that accompany the Gospel are a means of honoring and emphasizing the particular centrality of the Gospel in salvation history and as the high point of the Liturgy of the Word.

As the Second Vatican Council's dogmatic constitution Dei Verbum points out, these liturgical honors also establish a certain parallel with the honors attributed to the Blessed Sacrament, which is also accompanied by lighted torches and incense. This serves to underline the particular real presence of Christ in the liturgical proclamation of the Word, though without detriment to the unique nature of the substantial real presence of the Eucharist.


2 posted on 05/11/2010 11:16:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: nickcarraway; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; markomalley; ...

Liturgical ping!


3 posted on 05/11/2010 11:17:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

We had a visiting priest from Mt. Saint Mary’s 2 weekends ago, he wore a blue vestment with a gold crown on the chest.

My eleven year old son picked up on the fact that the vestment was blue and that this was not a common color for celebrating the Mass.

I have to admit that I gave it no second thought, I told him it was May, which is the month of Mary. The color was a tribute to the Blessed Mother.


4 posted on 05/12/2010 12:11:52 AM PDT by incredulous joe
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To: Salvation; UriĀ’el-2012

Can you tell me what God says the color blue is to represent?


6 posted on 05/12/2010 12:43:36 AM PDT by roamer_1 (Globalism is just Socialism in a business suit)
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To: Salvation

The question of Blue vestements frequently surfaces around Advent.

In many Anglican and Lutheran parishes blue has become the preferred color for that season on the theory that the penitential preparation for the celebration of the Nativity is of a different character than the preparation for the Paschal celebration.

The unintended consequence is that de-emphasizing penitence during Advent fuels the popular, commerce-driven misconception that Christmas begins at Thanksgiving or possible as soon as Halloween decorations are put away and many a parish has an uphill battle to save the Christmas Carols for the Twelve Days, as some folks would like to sing “Silent Night” right after Thanksgiving.


10 posted on 05/12/2010 7:00:31 AM PDT by lightman (Adjutorium nostrum (+) in nomine Domini)
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