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The Connection between Contraception and Abortion
lifeissues.net ^ | Janet E. Smith, Ph.D.

Posted on 06/09/2010 10:16:39 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM

The Connection between Contraception and Abortion

Janet E. Smith, Ph.D.


Philosophy Department,
University of Dallas


Many in the pro–life movement are reluctant to make a connection between contraception and abortion. They insist that these are two very different acts — that there is all the difference in the world between contraception, which prevents a life from coming to be and abortion, which takes a life that has already begun.

With some contraceptives there is not only a link with abortion there is an identity. Some contraceptives are abortifacients; they work by causing early term abortions. The IUD seems to prevent a fertilized egg — a new little human being — from implanting in the uterine wall. The pill does not always stop ovulation but sometimes prevents implantation of the growing embryo. And, of course, the new RU 486 pill works altogether by aborting a new fetus, a new baby. Although some in the pro–life movement occasional speak out against the contraceptives that are abortifacients most generally steer clear of the issue of contraception.

This seems to me to be a mistake. I think that we will not make good progress in creating a society where all new life can be safe, where we truly display a respect for life, where abortion is a terrible memory rather than a terrible reality until we see that there are many significant links between contraception and abortion and that we bravely speak this truth. We need to realize that a society in which contraceptives are widely used is going to have a very difficult time keeping free of abortions since the lifestyles and attitudes that contraception fosters create an alleged "need" for abortion.

Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the recent Supreme Court decision that confirmed Roe v. Wade, stated, “in some critical respects abortion is of the same character as the decision to use contraception . . . . for two decades of economic and social developments, people have organized intimate relationships and made choices that define their views of themselves and their places in society, in reliance on the availability of abortion in the event that contraception should fail.”

The Supreme Court decision has made completely unnecessary any efforts to “expose” what is really behind the attachment of the modern age to abortion. As the Supreme Court candidly states, we need abortion so that we can continue our contraceptive lifestyles. It is not because contraceptives are ineffective that a million and half women a year seek abortions as back–ups to failed contraceptives. The “intimate relationships” facilitated by contraceptives are what make abortions “necessary”. “Intimate” here is a euphemism and a misleading one at that. Here the word “intimate” means “sexual”; it does not mean “loving and close.” Abortion is most often the result of sexual relationships in which there is little true intimacy and love, in which there is no room for a baby, the natural consequence of sexual intercourse. Contraception enables those who are not prepared to care for babies, to engage in sexual intercourse; when they become pregnant, they resent the unborn child for intruding itself upon their lives and they turn to the solution of abortion.

Contraception currently is hailed as the solution to the problems conosequent on the sexual revolution; many believe that better contraceptives and more responsible use of contraceptives will reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies and abortions and will prevent to some extent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

To support the argument that more responsible use of contraceptives would reduce the number oof abortions, some note that most abortions are performed for “contraceptive purposes”. That is, few abortions are had because a woman has been a victim of rape or incest or because a pregnancy would endanger her life, or because she expects to have a handicapped or deformed newborn. Rather, most abortions are had because men and women who do not want a baby are having sexual intercourse and facing pregnancies they did not plan for and do not want. Because their contraceptive failed, or because they failed to use a contraceptive, they then resort to abortion as a back–up. Many believe that if we could convince men and women to use contraceptives responsibly we would reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies and thus the number of abortions. Thirty years ago this position might have had some plausibility, but not now. We have lived for about thirty years with a culture permeated with contraceptive use and abortion; no longer can we think that greater access to contraception will reduce the number of abortions. Rather, wherever contraception is more readily available the number of unwanted pregnancies and the number of abortions increases greatly.

The connection between contraception and abortion is primarily this: contraception facilitates the kind of relationships and even the kind of attitudes and moral characters that are likely to lead to abortion. The contraceptive mentality treats sexual intercourse as though it had little natural connection with babies; it thinks of babies as an “accident” of pregnancy, as an unwelcome intrusion into a sexual relationship, as a burden. The sexual revolution has no fondness — no room for — the connection between sexual intercourse and babies. The sexual revolution simply was not possible until fairly reliable contraceptives were available.

Far from being a check to the sexual revolution, contraception is the fuel that facilitated the beginning of the sexual revolution and enables it to continue to rage. In the past, many men and women refrained from illicit sexual unions simply because they were not prepared for the responsibilities of parenthood. But once a fairly reliable contraceptive appeared on the scene, this barrier to sex outside the confines of marriage fell. The connection between sex and love also fell quickly; ever since contraception became widely used, there has been much talk of, acceptance of, and practice of casual sex and recreational sex. The deep meaning that is inherent in sexual intercourse has been lost sight of; the willingness to engage in sexual intercourse with another is no longer a result of a deep commitment to another. It no longer bespeaks a willingness to have a child with another and to have all the consequent entanglements with another that babies bring. Contraception helps reduce one's sexual partner to just a sexual object since it renders sexual intercourse to be without any real commitments. Certainly one can easily imagine how attractive abortion would be in the face of a contraceptive failure — one has made not commmitment to one's sexual partner or exacted one, so how can one expect one's self or one's sexual partner to take on the responsiblity of raising a child. Some clinics report that up to 50% of the abortions are of pregnancies that resulted from contraceptive failure.

Futhermore, the casualness with which sexual unions are now entered is accompanied by a casualness and carelessness in the use of contraceptives. Studies show that the women having abortions are very knowledgeable about birth control methods; the great majority — eighty per cent — are experienced contraceptors but they display carelessness and indifference in their use of contraception for a variety of reasons. Contraception has enabled them to enter a sexual relationship or a life style, but while the relationship or life style continues the contraceptive practise does not continue..

One researcher reports the reasons why sexually active, contraceptively experienced women stop contracepting: she observes that some have broken up with their sexual partners and believe they will no longer need a contraceptive but they find themselves sexually active anyway. Others dislike the physical exam required for the pill, or dislike the side–effects of the pill and some are deterred by what inconvenience or difficulty there is in getting contraceptives. Many unmarried women do not like to think of themselves as sexually active; using contraceptives conflicts with their preferred self–image. The failure to use birth control is a sign that many women are not comfortable with being sexually active. That is, many of the women are engaged in an activity that, for some reason, they do not wish to admit to themselves.

One researcher, Kristin Luker, a pro-abortion social scientist, in a book entitled Taking Chances: Abortion and the Decision not to Contracept attempted to discover why, with contraceptives so widely available, so many women, virtually all knowledgeable about contraception, had unwanted pregnancies and abortions. The conclusions of her studies suggest that it is not simple “carelessness” or “irresponsibility” that lead women to have abortions, but that frequently the pregnancies that are aborted are planned or the result of a calculated risk. She begins by dismissing some of the commonly held views about why women get abortions; she denies that they are usually had by panic–stricken youngsters or that they are had by unmarried women who would otherwise have had illegitimate births. She also maintains that statistics do not show that abortion is an act of final desperation used by poor women and “welfare mothers” or that abortion is often sought by women who have more children than they can handle. What she attempts to discern is what reason women had for not using contraception although they were contraceptively experienced and knew the risks involved in not using contraception. Luker seeks to substantiate in her study that “unwanted pregnancy is the end result of an informed decision–making process. That pregnancy occurred anyway, for the women in this study, is because most of them were attempting to achieve more diffuse goals than simply preventing pregnancy.”

Luker argues that for these women (women who are having non–contracepted sex, but who are not intending to have babies), using contraceptives has certain “costs” and getting pregnant has certain “benefits”. The women make a calculation that the benefits of not using contraception and the benefits of a pregnancy outweigh the risks of getting pregnant and the need to have an abortion. She concurs that many women prefer “spontaneous sex” and do not like thinking of themselves as “sexually active”. She notes that some wondered whether or not they were fertile and thus did not take contraceptives. The “benefits” of a pregnancy for many women were many; pregnancy proves “that one is a woman”, or that one is fertile; it provides an excuse for “forcing a definition in the relationship”; it forces a woman's or girl's parents to deal with her; it is used as a “psychological organizing technique.”

In the end, almost all of the unmarried women Luker interviewed had the option to marry (and supposedly to complete the pregnancy) but none chose this option. Luker attributes this to unwillingness of women to get married under such conditions, to the disparity between this kind of marriage and their fantasy marriage, and to their belief that they were responsible for the pregnancy, and thus they had no claim on the male's support. One of her examples is of an unmarried woman who did not like using the pill because it made her gain weight. Coupled with this was her wish to force her boyfriend to openly admit his relationship with her to his parents who rejected her, and possibly to force marriage and thus she decided not to use contraception. Upon becoming pregnant, this woman had an abortion.

Much of this data suggests that there is something deep in our natures that finds the severing of sexual intercourse from love and commitment and babies to be unsatisfactory. As we have seen, women are careless in their use of contraceptives for a variety of reasons, but one reason for their careless use of contraceptives is precisely their desire to engage in meaningful sexual activity rather than in meaningless sexual activity. They want their sexual acts to be more meaningful than a handshake or a meal shared. They are profoundly uncomfortable with using contraceptives for what they do to their bodies and for what they do to their relationships. Often, they desire to have a more committed relationship with the male with whom they are involved; they get pregnant to test his love and commitment. But since the relationship has not been made permanent, since no vows have been taken, they are profoundly ambivalent about any pregnancy that might occur. They are very likely to abort a pregnancy they may even have desired. It may sound far–fetched to claim that some women may in some sense “plan” or “desire” the very pregnancies that they abort but this analysis is borne out by studies done by pro–abortion sociologists.

Contraception clearly leads to many abortions by those who have sex outside of marriage. Even within marriage, those who contracept are more likely to abort than those who do not, especially those who use NFP. It is easy to understand why contraceptors would be more likely to abort. Those using contraception who get pregnant unexpectedly, are generally very angry, since they did everything they could to prevent a pregnancy. The pregnancy is seen as a crisis. The married have often planned a life that is not receptive to children and are tempted to abort to sustain the child–free life they have designed. I am not, of course, saying that all those who contracept are likely to abort; I am saying that many more of those who contracept do abort than those who practice natural family planning.

It should be no surprise that unlike contraceptors, those using methods of natural family planning are highly unlikely to resort to abortion should an unplanned pregnancy occur. Some argue that couples using natural family planning are as closed to having babies as are those that use contraceptives; that they too wish to engage in “baby–free” sexual intercourse. But the crucial difference is that those using NFP are not engaging in an act whose nature they wish to thwart; they are keeping to the principles of sexual responsibility. Their sexual acts remain as open to procreation as nature permits. They are refraining from sexual intercourse when they know they may conceive and engaging in sexual intercourse when they are unable to conceive — precisely because of their desire to be responsible about their child–bearing.

It should be no surprise that countries that are permeated by contraceptive sex, fight harder for access to abortion than they do to ensure that all babies can survive both in the womb and out. It is foolish for pro–lifers to think that they can avoid the issues of contraception and sexual irresponsibility and be successful in the fight against abortion. For, as the Supreme Court stated, abortion is “necessary” for those whose intimate relationships are based upon contraceptive sex.


TOPICS: Apologetics; Moral Issues; Religion & Culture; Religion & Politics
KEYWORDS: abortion; catholic; contraception; moralabsolutes; nfp; prolife

1 posted on 06/09/2010 10:16:39 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Paved Paradise

Here’s another one from Janet Smith.


2 posted on 06/09/2010 10:18:01 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

Most people still believe that contraception is different from abortion.


3 posted on 06/09/2010 10:19:53 PM PDT by Saundra Duffy (For victory & freedom!!!)
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To: Saundra Duffy
Except for the IUD, the pill and other hormonal contraceptives, which are abortifacient, contraception is different from abortion.
4 posted on 06/09/2010 10:22:38 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

I really can’t find any moral reason to be against contraception. The only link I’ve noticed between contraception and abortion is that people engaging in the latter very rarely bother with the former.


5 posted on 06/09/2010 10:25:06 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: exDemMom
I really can’t find any moral reason to be against contraception.

Well, all of Christianity up till 1930 was against it, based on scripture and Natural Law. That's good enough for me.

By 1960, all of Christianity had caved on contraception, except Catholicism (and to a lesser degree the Orthodox.)

6 posted on 06/09/2010 10:28:10 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

You got it right there. First divorce became okay, then contraception, then childlessness, now homosexuality. Strange how the first book of Romans in the Bible says this is how things go. What is meant by women turning away from the natural function of their bodies THEN lusting aver each other?


7 posted on 06/09/2010 10:49:21 PM PDT by SorosOwnsObama
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

it is ironic how the advent of the pill did little to stop unwanted pregnancies if abortion is any guide


8 posted on 06/09/2010 10:53:44 PM PDT by wardaddy (I am not in favor of practical endorsements in primaries, endorse the conservative please)
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To: exDemMom

Here it is: the separation of the procreative from the unitive aspect of sex. In the words of the infallible God-breathed Humanae Vitae: “The Church, nevertheless, in urging men to the observance of the precepts of the natural law, which it interprets by its constant doctrine, teaches that each and every marital act must of necessity retain its intrinsic relationship to the procreation of human life.”

You could read the whole document here:
http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/paul_vi/encyclicals/documents/hf_p-vi_enc_25071968_humanae-vitae_en.html

Still can’t find “a moral reason to be against contraception”?


9 posted on 06/09/2010 10:55:30 PM PDT by blackpacific
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

This is like the sixth or seventh thread you’ve done. Is this the Catholic caucus or what?


10 posted on 06/09/2010 11:03:14 PM PDT by ReneeLynn (Socialism is SO yesterday. Fascism, it*s the new black. Mmm Mmm Mmm.)
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp; exDemMom
Well, all of Christianity up till 1930 was against it, based on scripture and Natural Law.

Well, a few questions then. What types of contraception were even available in 1930? The oldest forms of birth control included coitus interruptus, pessaries, and the ingestion of herbs that were believed to be contraceptive or abortifacient. The earliest record of birth control use is an ancient Egyptian set of instructions on creating a contraceptive pessary. Condoms in some form or another are probably the oldest form of "barrier methods" but coitus interruptus goes back to ancient Biblical times.

It wasn't until the 18 th. century that the link was made biologically between the sperm and the fertile ovum causing fertilization. Once this was discovered, various methods were devised to prevent this from happening or if it did occur, to prevent implantation and normal gestation. Birth control in some form or another has been around for thousands of years. Seeing babies as consequences for illicit sexual pleasure is hardly a new concept.

11 posted on 06/09/2010 11:12:24 PM PDT by boatbums (God is ready to assume full responsibility for the life wholly yielded to him.)
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To: ReneeLynn

No. Its called a Religion Forum.


12 posted on 06/10/2010 6:50:42 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
Do you think government regulation / outlawing of contraception is compatible with the concept of a government of limited and enumerated powers?
13 posted on 06/10/2010 7:01:01 AM PDT by allmendream (Income is EARNED not distributed. So how could it be re-distributed?)
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To: allmendream
No. I'm not calling for outlawing contraception. I just want Christian to know that everything that's legal ain't necessarily moral.

On the other hand, dangerous medications which cause increased morbidity and mortality should be stringently regulated. If the birth control pill were an NSAID or a heart medication, it would have been outlawed years ago because of the known high number of mortalities associated with their use.

14 posted on 06/10/2010 7:11:22 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: exDemMom

You wrote:

“The only link I’ve noticed between contraception and abortion is that people engaging in the latter very rarely bother with the former.”

False. Overwhelmingly those who have abortions have used contraceptives. They might not have used them consistently, but they used them and quite often. People who embrace the contraceptive mentality invariably come to “tolerate” or embrace abortion.


15 posted on 06/10/2010 7:13:23 AM PDT by vladimir998 (Part of the Vast Catholic Conspiracy (hat tip to Kells))
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To: Saundra Duffy

One ends a pregnancy (stops a beating heart, KILLS a baby) the other simply prevents one from taking place, thus keeping people that do not want a child from having to raise one.


16 posted on 06/10/2010 7:16:30 AM PDT by Grunthor (Getting married, T minus 16 days.)
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

“I just want Christian to know that everything that’s legal ain’t necessarily moral.”

Is it moral to produce more children than you as a married couple can support?


17 posted on 06/10/2010 7:20:07 AM PDT by Grunthor (Getting married, T minus 16 days.)
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To: boatbums
Birth control in some form or another has been around for thousands of years.

Certainly, and for two thousand years, Christianity has universally taught that it is immoral, without exception until 1930.

18 posted on 06/10/2010 7:21:59 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
OK, do we really want feral children walking the streets or (more likely in the US) a welfare system that takes care of the surplus children that would result if birth control is banned?

I have no problem if your religious conscience tells you not to use birth control. I do have a problem when 1. you want to make your beliefs on contraception law (not very likely) and 2. (More likely) I and millions of other tax payers have to pick up the tab for your brood.

19 posted on 06/10/2010 7:23:00 AM PDT by Clemenza (Remember our Korean War Veterans)
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To: Grunthor
My wife and I, through the grace of God, support my family. If I were to think I'm by myself in supporting my family, then my understanding of what number I can support might be far different than if I believe in Divine Providence.

Christianity has lost its sense of Divine Providence, and therefore embraced contraception.

At its root, that is a loss of Faith in God.

20 posted on 06/10/2010 7:24:44 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
An environment that is too hostile can not sustain life. Here's a useful picture of the human conception to implantation timeline: Conception to Implantation
"Birth Control" pills poison the womb, preventing implantation of the week old fetus. "Contraception" is a misnomer for IUD, birth control pills, etc. as Kopp points out, it is not conception which is countered but rather implantation.
21 posted on 06/10/2010 7:25:15 AM PDT by tgdunbar
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

“My wife and I, through the grace of God, support my family.”

It’s nice that you can. YOU. Let’s take a hypothetical couple, the wife is a homemaker, the young husband a HS drop out clerking at a gas station.

Should they start having a child every year until she wears out?


22 posted on 06/10/2010 7:26:59 AM PDT by Grunthor (Getting married, T minus 16 days.)
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To: Clemenza
I don't know any large Christian families that accept government assistance.

The "brood" you refer to is likely the welfare brood, which has nothing to do with the issues being discussed in these threads among Christians.

In fact, its insulting to even suggest that Christians are having children, only to have the government support them. That's ridiculous. That kind of stuff is going on among welfare queens, not the Christians engaging in these debates.

23 posted on 06/10/2010 7:28:24 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

“At its root, that is a loss of Faith in God.”

And when a young couple that has no education and not much income has 7 or 8 kids, is it faith in God or stealing from the taxpayer that supports those kids?


24 posted on 06/10/2010 7:28:51 AM PDT by Grunthor (Getting married, T minus 16 days.)
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To: Grunthor
If they have a moral reason for putting off pregnancy, NFP is just as effective as most forms of artificial birth control.

So you'd have the government force the couple to contracept, just like the Chinese? Maybe make them get a permit to procreate?

25 posted on 06/10/2010 7:32:36 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
Look at which racial and economic demographic that has the highest rate of church attendance and then get back to me. Most of the welfare brood are indeed Christians, albeit not as fanatically devout on certain issues.

Those that can feed those who they breed I have no objection to. Other than being a burden on the public schools (which their parents contribute to via property taxes anyway).

Subsidizing breeding and banning birth control are a recipe for a true demographic disaster. The other extreme (as seen in Europe) is ALSO causing a demographic meltdown, but that has more to do with social attitudes than birth control in and of itself.

26 posted on 06/10/2010 7:33:23 AM PDT by Clemenza (Remember our Korean War Veterans)
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To: Grunthor

You keep presenting hypothetical situations which have no base in reality among the Christian couples we are discussing here. You are confused.


27 posted on 06/10/2010 7:33:48 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
Some contraceptives are abortifacients; they work by causing early term abortions... The pill does not always stop ovulation but sometimes prevents implantation of the growing embryo

This is true, but for decision-making purposes I'd like to know the numbers, i.e., the ratio of prevented ovulations to prevented implantations. If, for example, the overall rate of prevented implantation (in # of occurrences per unit time) is lower than the rate of spontaneous miscarriages would be when using no contraception, then the pill is saving lives.

28 posted on 06/10/2010 7:35:20 AM PDT by Sloth (Civil disobedience? I'm afraid only the uncivil kind is going to cut it this time.)
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

“So you’d have the government force the couple to contracept”

Negative. I do however have NO problem with the idea of a married couple have no more children than they can afford to raise.


29 posted on 06/10/2010 7:35:46 AM PDT by Grunthor (Getting married, T minus 16 days.)
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To: Clemenza
Who is talking about banning birth control?!?

We're simply discussing educating Christians, on a Religion subforum, on the morality of contraception.

Why do you feel the need to spin and misrepresent this debate/discussion?

30 posted on 06/10/2010 7:35:48 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

That’s ok, if I wanted a straight answer I shouldn’t ask a hypothetical question.


31 posted on 06/10/2010 7:37:39 AM PDT by Grunthor (Getting married, T minus 16 days.)
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To: Sloth
If, for example, the overall rate of prevented implantation (in # of occurrences per unit time) is lower than the rate of spontaneous miscarriages would be when using no contraception, then the pill is saving lives.

The minipill, Norplant and other progestin only products are likely 100% abortifacient. Other hormonal contraceptives are likely abortifacient between 10 to 50% of cycles.

Regardless the deaths by blood clots, strokes, heart attacks, and the huge increase in breast and cervical cancer outweigh any possible benefits from hormonal contraceptives by orders of magnitude.

32 posted on 06/10/2010 7:40:28 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
Well that is a very important distinction that not everything that is legal is necessarily moral.

Moreover, not everything that is immoral needs to be made illegal, in my opinion.

Government coercion that precludes immorality is not the same as freely choosing to be a moral person.

33 posted on 06/10/2010 7:44:52 AM PDT by allmendream (Income is EARNED not distributed. So how could it be re-distributed?)
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

Really excellently great article, Brian. Thanks for posting it.


34 posted on 06/10/2010 7:54:53 AM PDT by sitetest ( If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
I think that we will not make good progress in creating a society where all new life can be safe, where we truly display a respect for life, where abortion is a terrible memory rather than a terrible reality until we see that there are many significant links between contraception and abortion and that we bravely speak this truth. We need to realize that a society in which contraceptives are widely used is going to have a very difficult time keeping free of abortions since the lifestyles and attitudes that contraception fosters create an alleged "need" for abortion.

**************************

Excellent article. Thanks for posting it.

35 posted on 06/10/2010 8:30:22 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: exDemMom

Except for abortion rates increasing in lockstep with contraception rates, yeah they’ve got nothing to do with each other.

Or the fact that Planned Parenthood is the largest abortion provider in the US.


36 posted on 06/10/2010 8:43:31 AM PDT by BenKenobi (I want to hear more about Sam! Samwise the stouthearted!)
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To: Clemenza

Yeah, as if the problem in America is too many kids.

That ‘demographic’ has around an 80 percent wedlock rate. Maybe if their men stepped up they wouldn’t need the government, eh?


37 posted on 06/10/2010 8:46:40 AM PDT by BenKenobi (I want to hear more about Sam! Samwise the stouthearted!)
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

Didn’t know it was okay to spam the Religion Forum. My bad.


38 posted on 06/10/2010 10:10:40 AM PDT by ReneeLynn (Socialism is SO yesterday. Fascism, it*s the new black. Mmm Mmm Mmm.)
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp
I am really not arguing with you about this. What I object to is placing the blame for it all on "Protestants" and other "non-Catholics" which earlier posts did.

I applaud the Catholic Church's stand against abortion, I just think they go a little too far in their mandates against any and all conception prevention methods that a married couple could use to control somewhat their family's expansion. This COULD possibly be why the majority of Catholics ignore their own church's teaching on the subject.

39 posted on 06/10/2010 2:06:54 PM PDT by boatbums (God is ready to assume full responsibility for the life wholly yielded to him.)
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To: vladimir998
You wrote: “The only link I’ve noticed between contraception and abortion is that people engaging in the latter very rarely bother with the former.”

False. Overwhelmingly those who have abortions have used contraceptives. They might not have used them consistently, but they used them and quite often. People who embrace the contraceptive mentality invariably come to “tolerate” or embrace abortion.

They may have used contraception at some time or another, but not at the time they got pregnant. Even the Alan Guttmacher institute, which has a financial interest in underestimating the role of personal irresponsibility as a cause of abortion, estimates that at least 65% of abortions occur because of failure to use contraceptives.

There are also those who do not use contraceptives because it's against their religion, but have no qualms whatsoever about killing baby after baby.

I'd love to see a study examining attitude towards abortion and contraceptive. I hypothesize that the study will show that the stronger someone's "pro-choice" attitude is, the less likely they are to consistently use contraceptive.

40 posted on 06/10/2010 4:35:47 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: exDemMom

You wrote:

“They may have used contraception at some time or another, but not at the time they got pregnant.”

Again, not true. Even the pill sometimes fails. What leads to abortion is the contraceptive mentality which reduces children to a commodity.

“I hypothesize that the study will show that the stronger someone’s “pro-choice” attitude is, the less likely they are to consistently use contraceptive.”

No, it’s probably the opposite.


41 posted on 06/10/2010 4:49:17 PM PDT by vladimir998 (Part of the Vast Catholic Conspiracy (hat tip to Kells))
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To: vladimir998
“They may have used contraception at some time or another, but not at the time they got pregnant.”

Again, not true. Even the pill sometimes fails. What leads to abortion is the contraceptive mentality which reduces children to a commodity.

The rate of contraceptive failure is low. The apparent rate of failure is probably higher than the real rate, since those having abortions are likely to lie and say they were taking precautions when they weren't. In any case, even if every woman who had a bona fide contraceptive failure had an abortion (and most of them don't), their numbers are not great enough to account for all the abortions that occur. Most abortions occur because of failure to use contraceptives, not because of contraceptive failure.

“I hypothesize that the study will show that the stronger someone’s “pro-choice” attitude is, the less likely they are to consistently use contraceptive.”

No, it’s probably the opposite.

That doesn't even make sense. By that reasoning, the highest contraceptive use would be among strongly pro-abortion women, so their abortion numbers would be negligible. And pro-life women wouldn't be having abortions to begin with... so the abortion industry would collapse. The fact (supported by studies) is that the vast majority of abortions take place because of lack of contraceptive use--the assumption is that those having the abortions choose not to use contraceptives because they know abortion is readily available, with the implicit secondary assumption that they are willing to use abortion as their primary means of birth control (not contraception) because of their strong "pro-choice" attitude.

42 posted on 06/10/2010 5:33:26 PM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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To: exDemMom
The rate of contraceptive failure is low.

Not in my family. There's quite a number of "pill babies" that the Good Lord wanted on this earth - and we love every one of them, despite their parents' wanting to beat the system God gave us. I can name a number conceived when medical textbooks say they couldn't be, even using perfectly natural means. We won't get into multiples. Only God knows that one for sure.

The whole "planning" thing is just selfish and thwarts God's will. God says "ha" from time to time. Get used to it.

43 posted on 06/10/2010 6:08:49 PM PDT by Desdemona
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To: exDemMom

You wrote:

“That doesn’t even make sense. By that reasoning, the highest contraceptive use would be among strongly pro-abortion women, so their abortion numbers would be negligible.”

No. All people who support abortion support contraception. All of them. There may indeed be someone out there who doesn’t want to swallow a pill everyday, but sees nothing inconvenient about having an abortion, but I have never met anyone like that ever. And even that woman will still turn out to be pro-contraception. She is just too lazy to use it herself. Everyone who supports murdering children supports undermining the natural use of sex. You cannot believe in one without believing in the other.

The contraceptive mentality leads to abortion. Every nation that allows artifical contraception allows abortion sooner or later. The former always leads to the latter. Those who support contraception are also supporting abortion even if they don’t know it. They are also supproting the destruction of the family, the end of traditional marriage roles and the general destruction of the moral fiber of society.

Ever read Lionel Tiger’s Decline of Males? You might want to. http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~ltiger/publications/declineofmales.html

The Church saw all of this coming decades ago. Pope Paul VI’s Humani Vitae was prophetic.


44 posted on 06/10/2010 6:14:58 PM PDT by vladimir998 (Part of the Vast Catholic Conspiracy (hat tip to Kells))
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To: Clemenza
Subsidizing breeding and banning birth control are a recipe for a true demographic disaster

Leaving aside the fact that the immorality of contraception does not necessarily result in banning birth control and child subsidies, let us examine the premise itself.

It is true that if the birth rate, say, doubled overnight that would be a stress on the national economy as a lot of babies would be in need of poverty relief, which the taxpayer will have to furnish, -- a "disaster".

The same is true about any sensible economic policy if it is introduced abruptly. For example, being on this forum you are likely to agree with me that it would be a good policy to reduce the taxes by half. But if the taxes are halved overnight, we are going to have starving people on the street -- also a "disaster". Likewise if we drop safety regulations, deport every illegal alien, close all public schools, etc, -- all policies that I would heartily support if introduced gradually.

A policy is good of bad judged by its effect when the new equilibrium is found. So is doubling of the birthrate in America desirable overtime? I think it manifestly is. The real crisis America is facing is the ratio of workers to the retired population. No matter how you organize the social security, -- I would love to see it privatized wholly -- that ratio will remain a problem, unless the birth rate in America goes up substantially. That will not happen so long as America continues to misdirect her sexual energy to what is, essentially, masturbation.

If I were in charge, I would ban the advertizing and sale of contraception in most places, and the little that is prudent to allow, -- for example, sale of condoms in red light districts -- I would tax heavily and use the money to educate people about natural family planning. I would also criminalize adultery and demand fault determination in all divorce cases. With these reforms in place it should not be difficult to subsidize the cases of true poverty in fecund families.

45 posted on 06/10/2010 7:00:30 PM PDT by annalex
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To: exDemMom

Here is a link, a good place to start, to many papers in this subject. Why continue to filibuster, get the facts.

http://www.hli.org/index.php/hli-research


46 posted on 06/11/2010 10:02:10 AM PDT by blackpacific
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To: Dr. Brian Kopp

Besides the moral shipwreck that the contraceptive mentality breeds, there are serious health ramifications due to the adverse affects of the pill on the flora living in the human body, and this spills over into the TH1 and TH2 arms of the immune system. Here is a clip from Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride’s GAPS diet book:

“Contraceptive pills
have a devastating effect on the beneficial (good) bacteria in the gut. One of the
major functions of the good bacteria in the gut flora is controlling about 500
different known to science species of pathogenic (bad) and opportunistic
microbes. When the beneficial bacteria get destroyed the opportunists get a
special opportunity to grow into large colonies and occupy large areas of the
digestive tract. A modern diet of processed and fast foods provides perfect
nourishment for these pathogens and that is a typical diet a modern mum had as
a child and a young adult. As a result of all these factors a modern mum has
seriously compromised gut flora by the time she is ready to have children. And
indeed clinical signs of gut dysbiosis (abnormal gut flora) are present in almost
100% of mothers of children with autism and other neurological and psychiatric
conditions.
But why are we talking about mother’s gut flora? Because her baby is born with a
sterile gut. In the first 20 or so days of life the baby’s virgin gut surface gets
populated by a mixture of microbes. This is the child’s gut flora, which will have a
4
tremendous effect on this child’s health for the rest of his/her life. Where does
this gut flora come from? Mainly from the mother.
So, whatever microbial flora the mother has she would pass to her new-born
child.
Gut flora is something we do not think much about. And yet the number of
functions the gut flora fulfils is so vital for us that if some day our digestive tract
got sterilised we probably would not survive.”


47 posted on 06/11/2010 10:09:40 AM PDT by blackpacific
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To: allmendream
Do you think government regulation / outlawing of contraception is compatible with the concept of a government of limited and enumerated powers?

In short: YES! The fundamental, implied and explicit DUTY of government is to protect civilization. The very basis of civilization is the LAW OF GOD as passed down through the scriptures. Our entire legal system and Constitution are built upon the Biblical world view.

There is NO SUCH THING as a "religiously neutral" government. And if our laws are going to reflect SOMEBODY'S values, then they should reflect the values of the LIVING GOD -- and those of the founders and builders of American society going back to the early 1600s.
48 posted on 06/20/2010 6:47:22 PM PDT by USALiberty
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To: USALiberty
How about eating meat on Fridays? Should that also be outlawed?

Should church attendance or other commemorations of the Sabbath also be compulsory?

Should taking the Lord's name in vain be illegal?

How about having other gods before God? Should that be illegal?

49 posted on 06/21/2010 7:28:51 AM PDT by allmendream (Income is EARNED not distributed. So how could it be re-distributed?)
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