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ELCA pastor drives ‘God talk’ initiative
United Methodist News Service ^ | 16 Auguat AD 2010 | Susan Hogan

Posted on 08/17/2010 2:00:48 PM PDT by lightman

ELCA pastor drives ‘God talk’ initiative

By Susan Hogan* A UMNS Report

CHICAGO – Can Christians discuss the language of faith without it becoming a battle over political correctness or theological orthodoxy?

The National Council of Churches hopes so.

To begin the conversation, its Justice for Women Working Group brought 28 people to Chicago in August for a three-day symposium, “Language Matters.”

S. Kim Coffing, the lone United Methodist participant, did not know what to expect.

“The issue of how we talk about God and faith stirs up pain for many people,” said Coffing, an executive with the denomination’s Commission on the Status and Role of Women.

From the minute I walked in, it was obvious what they wanted was to listen to us,” she said. “This was not about prescribing language or setting policies. They wanted to hear our stories. They wanted to know how the words used to talk about faith and God impacted us.”

The Rev. Ann Tiemeyer, NCC program director for women’s ministries, said the diverse gathering helped provide a direction for the council’s effort.

“This was the beginning of a process — a time for listening and conversation,” Tiemeyer said. “We do not want to pit people against one another.”

Stories of God

The first task assigned Coffing at the symposium: Describe a time when language restricted her understanding of God. She had three minutes to tell her story.

Drawing on a childhood memory, she described a question she posed after her mother bathed her.

“As she was rubbing me dry, I asked, ‘Mom, does God turn his back or close his eyes when I’m naked?’”

Up to that point in her life, Coffing had only heard God spoken of as male. She wanted to make sure he was a gentleman.

As she listened to others, Coffing heard people not of one mind on the issues. Yet, their personal stories drew her in.

“I saw how hungry people are to have meaningful conversations that are descriptive of their faith,” she said. “They want to connect with other people around these issues. If there was a common theme, it was our need to listen.”

God talk

America is more diverse than ever before, Coffing said. The church draws people from a wide spectrum of races, ethnicities, cultures and customs.

“How does a mother explain the blond-haired, blue-eyed Jesus at church to her dark-skinned child?” she said. “Faith language can alienate some people, while rendering others invisible.”

As a United Methodist pastor in Duluth, Minn., in the 1990s, the Rev. David Wheeler routinely alternated imagery for God. Later, while serving as a pastor at a Minneapolis church, he encountered language obstacles starting a contemporary worship service.

“We had to rewrite the words to be inclusive since much of the praise music out there was sexist,” said Wheeler, who now works with a nonprofit agency assisting people with disabilities.

“I don’t want to de-sex God,” he said. “But for some people, male imagery and patriarchy gives them a sense of power and tradition. We need to be sensitive about using language that is inviting to people across cultures and faith traditions.”

The NCC also says the issues are bigger than gender. It talks about using “expansive” language rather than merely gender-inclusive language.

Changing times

Talking about the words of faith isn’t new to United Methodists. It happens in Sunday school classes, Bible studies and other settings.

“We’ve had an active history in addressing inclusive language,” Coffing said. “It’s not necessarily a history of agreeing on the issues. But there has been legislation to affirm language diversity and educational materials historically provided.”

Efforts to raise sensitivity to language emerged on a large scale among mainline Protestants in the 1970s with the influx of female students and faculty and the development of feminist theologies.

Inclusive language lectionaries and Bibles emerged. Theologians produced a range of books on the issues.

Still, “Inclusive language never really took root in the mainstream,” said M. Garlinda Burton, top executive of the Commission on the Status and Role of Women.

Challenging traditional language for God was viewed by some as an attack on their faith.

“It’s a volatile issue,” Burton said. “Some in the church underestimated the value of having conversations with one another rather than having a policy dictated.”

Starting the conversation

For many years afterward, the public conversations seemed to stop.

“Part of the impetus to have a meeting on language is the impression of some observers that the use of gender-inclusive language throughout our NCC member communions has declined,” the council said.

News of the gathering excited Heather Morgan Dethloff, though she wasn’t invited to attend.

Dethloff, 30, a Lutheran doctoral candidate at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, Ill., requires that students use inclusive language in the classes she teaches. At the same time, in the doctoral dissertation she’s writing on the Trinity, she prefers to talk of God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

“Father is a relational title,” she said. “God is only known as father in relation to Jesus, his son. For me, using inclusive language is not about abandoning all masculine language.”

Burton concurs.

“There are people like my mom, who doesn’t want the words to hymns changed,” she said. “But she’s also learning new hymns that don’t use father language. You can use old and new.”

The council’s working group says the language used to talk about faith is a justice issue — a view Burton shares.

“Like any other Christian social justice issue, you continue to look at the Holy Spirit for transformation,” she said.


TOPICS: Current Events; Mainline Protestant; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: elca; feminazi; homosexualagenda; methodist; ncc; religiousleft; um

The Rev. Ann Tiemeyer, an ELCA pastor, is helping to spearhead an inclusive language initiative by the National Council of Churches. She's the NCC's program director for women's ministry. (Courtesy photo)

1 posted on 08/17/2010 2:00:53 PM PDT by lightman
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To: aberaussie; Aeronaut; aliquando; AlternateViewpoint; AnalogReigns; Archie Bunker on steroids; ...


Lutheran (EL C S*A) Ping!

* as of August 19, AD 2009, a liberal protestant SECT, not part of the holy, catholic and apostolic CHURCH.

Be rooted in Christ!

2 posted on 08/17/2010 2:02:28 PM PDT by lightman (Adjutorium nostrum (+) in nomine Domini)
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To: Ad Orientam; antonius; aposiopetic; arielguard; blinachka; bob808; branicap; Calabash; ...
It is bovine excrement such as this which drives many Lutherans into Orthodoxy, where the sacred Liturgy declares "Blessed is the kingdom of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit" without shame or apology.

Indeed, our local Antiochian congregation finds most of its new members coming from Lutheranism. For that reason:

Orthodox Ping!

3 posted on 08/17/2010 2:05:44 PM PDT by lightman (Adjutorium nostrum (+) in nomine Domini)
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To: lightman

This is a cartload of horse manure. Social justice is a code word for socialism and wealth redistribution. G_D the Father is not a phrase to be toyed with.


4 posted on 08/17/2010 2:07:16 PM PDT by aliquando (A Scout is T, L, H, F, C, K, O, C, T, B, C, and R.)
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To: lightman
Hope G_d appreciates the favor that as we evolve ever onwards towards perfection, we're bringing Him along as well. What would He do without us? /sarc
5 posted on 08/17/2010 2:30:48 PM PDT by throwback ( The object of opening the mind, as of opening the mouth, is to shut it again on something solid)
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To: lightman

There have been a couple of “inclusive language” bibles published (TNIV, NRSV) and they have been disasters. Luckily, they can’t give them away - the market is miniscule.


6 posted on 08/17/2010 2:39:34 PM PDT by circlecity
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To: lightman
How does a mother explain the blond-haired, blue-eyed Jesus at church to her dark-skinned child?”

Is she crazy? Jesus is everyman. He looked like an Asiatic Jew: brown skinned, most likely brown eyed and black hair. He would have looked like a Yemeni Jew


And, Jesus can be depicted as black, white, asian, whatever -- He was / is God after all, and transcends silly things like color and race


7 posted on 08/17/2010 3:02:51 PM PDT by Cronos (Omnia mutantur, nihil interit. "Allah": Satan's current status)
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To: lightman
This is the follow-up to Are Protestants failing inclusive language?.
Are Protestant denominations backsliding when it comes to using inclusive language? Some members of the National Council of Churches think so. Read on.
Just don't call this nonsense "politically correct".
8 posted on 08/17/2010 3:24:34 PM PDT by SmithL
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To: lightman
Greetings and Salutations!
I had the good fortune of having heard a sermon Jaynan Clark, President of Word Alone Ministies. She speaks in a respectful, but demanding tone which is both grounded in pragmatism yet also provides evidemce of her intellectual strength. Her written work is just as inspired and inspiring. This is quite a departure from the "I'm OK, you're ok" namby pambyism seen here and described by Lewis as a watered down message.

Regarding the painting prophets and saints in the colors of culture and race: This is neither recent, nor is it exclusive to Christendom. I have seen depictions of Buddah in statuary from Afghanistan and the Middle East in which the statues look like those modeled of classical antiquity and far different from statuary I have seen in China and Japan. Diverse examples in Christianity not only include the works Michaelangelo but also include the portfolios of Albrecht Duerer and Fra Angelico.

9 posted on 08/17/2010 3:54:34 PM PDT by StarfireIV (Atlas Punted)
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To: lightman
I won't have anything to do with a denominational group that ordains women as pastors/priests/leaders. Such teaching invariable involves distorting truth and proliferating heresy.

Can anyone tell me, do all branches of Methodism affirm women in the priesthood?

10 posted on 08/17/2010 4:01:34 PM PDT by fwdude (Anita Bryant was right.)
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To: lightman

Lord.
Have.
Mercy.

That’s all I’ve got. When I see these “wimmen” in Western clerical collars...it’s such a ridiculous parody...

Lord, have mercy.


11 posted on 08/17/2010 4:02:26 PM PDT by Yudan (Living comes much easier once we admit we're dying.)
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To: SmithL
Thanks for the link.

I read the material there, then a number of the comments (I couldn't manage force myself to wade through them all).

It saddened me to read about what some people spend their time, and apparently much of their lives, arguing about, as they try to reform God, Jesus, and the Holy Ghost into something that they "can be comfortable with".

I pray that they will open their hearts to the light of Jesus, and let him lead them out of the darkness they now reside within, where they endlessly argue about (and against) the only one who can provide their salvation.

12 posted on 08/17/2010 4:15:05 PM PDT by Col Freeper (FR is a smorgasbord of Conservative thoughts and ideas - dig in and enjoy it to its fullest!)
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To: lightman

Sponsored by the National Council of Churches. ‘nuff said.


13 posted on 08/17/2010 4:16:19 PM PDT by bjorn14 (Woe to those who call good evil and evil good. Isaiah 5:20)
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To: lightman

I highly recommend a smallish book, “The Seduction of Extremes,” by Peter Kurowski, a pastor in the LCMS, published by Torelion Productions LLC, 10005 Keith Inct. Ct., St. Louis MO 63114. See also www.lawgospel.com.
Rev. Kurowski’s chapter on female ordination is the best argument against it that I’ve ever seen, covering both scriptural and worldly/practical aspects.


14 posted on 08/17/2010 4:38:59 PM PDT by Elsiejay (.)
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To: Cronos

Aye.

One of my favorite Christmas songs from recent decades:

Some children see Him lily white,
The Baby Jesus born this night,
Some children see Him lily white,
With tresses soft and fair.
Some children see Him bronzed and brown,
The Lord of heavn’ to earth come down;
Some children see Him bronzed and brown,
With dark and heavy hair.

Some children see Him almond eyed
This Savior whom we kneel beside.
Some children see Him almond-eyed,
With skin of yellow hue.
Some children see Him dark as they
Sweet Mary’s Son to whom we pray;
Some children see Him dark as they,
And ah! They love Him too!

The children in each diff’rent place
Will see the Baby Jesus’ face
Like their, but bright with heavn’ly grace,
And filled with holy light.
O lay aside each earthly thing,
And with thy heart as offering,
Come worship now the Infant King,
‘Tis love that’s born tonight.


15 posted on 08/17/2010 5:16:11 PM PDT by lightman (Adjutorium nostrum (+) in nomine Domini)
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To: lightman

This conference is so 70’s. As a seminary educated woman, I would much rather see women clergy spending their discussions and time on learning how to revitalize churches that are struggling and need solid leaders to help turn them around.


16 posted on 08/17/2010 10:10:02 PM PDT by MarilynBr
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To: MarilynBr; All

Indeed, another reminder as to why I left the Lutheran Church to embrace and be embraced by Orthodoxy.


17 posted on 08/18/2010 4:28:36 AM PDT by firebasecody (Orthodoxy, telling it straight since AD 33)
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To: SmithL

You’re right — it’s not “politically correct”, it is “brainless idiots who have nothing better to do and don’t even know how to pray”, or “idiots” for short :)


18 posted on 08/18/2010 7:23:22 AM PDT by Cronos (Omnia mutantur, nihil interit. "Allah": Satan's current status)
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To: lightman

nice, where is it from? I’ve not heard it before


19 posted on 08/18/2010 7:24:29 AM PDT by Cronos (Omnia mutantur, nihil interit. "Allah": Satan's current status)
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To: firebasecody

welcome home..


20 posted on 08/18/2010 7:24:50 AM PDT by Cronos (Omnia mutantur, nihil interit. "Allah": Satan's current status)
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To: lightman

I’m Orthodox now, but I studied at a United Methodist seminary thirty years ago. They were big on “inclusive language” and had an alternative hymnbook called “Songs for the People of God.” It included “Come, Holy Ghost, Our Souls Inspire” which, in its traditional form, has the doxology, “Praise to Thine eternal merit, Father, Son and Holy Spirit,” which was rendered, “Praise to Thine eternal merit, Mother-Father, Holy Spirit.”

I was talking about this to a friend, who wasn’t a Christian at the time, and I asked him what was wrong with this. He said, “They’ve left out Jesus.”

So I decided to bring this up in a class one day with a female professor. My question was what would cause the hymn-revisor to render it that way, and she admitted that some people “have problems with the second person of the Trinity,” AKA Jesus.


21 posted on 08/18/2010 9:04:09 AM PDT by Southside_Chicago_Republican ("During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." --Orwell)
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To: lightman

And thus is the ELCA warring against those pernicious masculine pronouns: “God so loved the world that God gave God’s only Son that whosoever believes in God’s Son shall not perish but have everlasting life.”


22 posted on 08/18/2010 9:51:53 AM PDT by rhema ("Break the conventions; keep the commandments." -- G. K. Chesterton)
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To: rhema
“God so loved the world that God gave God’s only Son that whosoever believes in God’s Son shall not perish but have everlasting life.”

“Godself so loved the world that God gave God’s only Son Child that whosoever believes in God’s Son Child shall not perish but have everlasting life.”

Fixed it--and I've seen that.

Should have included a hurl alert.

Out of that convoluted language come "theologians" who speak of the Eucharist as a "reinactment of Divine child abuse".

23 posted on 08/18/2010 3:44:00 PM PDT by lightman (Adjutorium nostrum (+) in nomine Domini)
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