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Artist rescues statues from closed Catholic churches
Canton Rep ^ | September 14, 2010 | Charita Goshay

Posted on 09/14/2010 10:13:47 AM PDT by NYer


Lou McClung of Lakewood is opening a museum to house statues he rescued from closed Catholic churches and monasteries. The Museum of Divine Statues will be housed in a former church. McClung said restoring the pieces not only helps preserve history, they’re inspirational works of art.


LAKEWOOD —

Lou McClung’s past life as a handyman, and his present career as a photographer, makeup artist and manufacturer, were perfect preparation for his future as a curator of an unusual museum.

The owner of Lusso Studio and Lusso Statuary recently purchased a decommissioned church, 104-year-old St. Hedwig at 12903 Madison Ave., which will serve as the Museum of Divine Statues.

McClung said his mission to rescue religious statues, many of which come from parishes closed recently by the Cleveland Catholic Diocese, will help ensure the history of those churches.

Several statues — many more than a century old — were in great need of cleaning and repair. Stuffed in closets, storage rooms and choir lofts, some pieces fell victim to a push for modernism in the 1960s and 1970s.

“It’s interesting how all the little things you learn to do can contribute,” he said. “You wonder why you’re doing things, then it comes in handy for something like this.”

McClung, who has been footing the restoration costs out of his own pocket, taught himself how to clean and repaint the pieces, as well as craft missing fingers and arms.

“My goal as an artist is to make the statues as realistic as possible,” he said.

NEW LIFE

In graceful repose, numerous images of Jesus, Mary, angels and martyred saints crowd McClung’s makeup studio. People from across the country have found their way to Lusso Studio, which itself is housed in a century-old greenhouse at 13519 Detroit Ave.

McClung said people marvel at being able to get a close-up look at statues they had seen all their lives from afar. The collection also includes a 13-foot crucifix, beneath which his own parents were married.

McClung said the nonprofit museum is a natural outgrowth of his hobby and business as an art collector.

“I bought my first statue at an antiques store,” he said. “I thought it was a great type of art to save and to rescue.”

When churches began to close, friends, acquaintances and even clergy started bringing statues to McClung’s attention. Some parishioners from defunct churches bought and donated statues in memory of their families.

“The statues have become familiar faces in their churches,” he said. “If I can pull this off, it’ll give every (closed) church some recognition.”

PERFECT STORM

The closing in 2009 of 50 parishes in the eight counties that make up the Cleveland Diocese  triggered a wave of grief and anger among parishioners.

Longtime symbols of a city’s ethnic diversity, several historic parishes in Cleveland fell victim to a perfect storm of dwindling attendance, a shortage of priests, a population shift to the suburbs and high energy costs.

The trend of reconfiguring Catholic parishes is national. Earlier this year, the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown, which includes Stark County, announced plans to reduce the number of its parishes.

However, 14 Cleveland parishes that were ordered closed have appealed to the Vatican. A decision is pending. In defiance of their closing, parishioners from the former St. Peter’s parish started an independent church that celebrates Mass in a warehouse.

ART OF THE GOSPEL

“If people don’t get their churches back, we’ll rescue their statues,” McClung said.

“Religious art has been at the core of our history, long since the early Christian days,” said M.J. Albacete, executive director of the Canton Museum of Art and a recognized expert on religious art.

Albacete said the tradition of church sculptures originates with Greek and Roman art.

“When Christianity came in, they were quick to adopt the idea of sculpting religious figures, at first representations of Jesus,” he said.

Albacete said churches regarded paintings, stained glass and sculpture as a means to raise Christianity’s profile as the faith spread around the world.

“Any kind of art in those days was seen as an ability to spread the Gospel and Bible stories,” he said.

Albacete said the high point of church art occurred during the Renaissance, and that many of history’s greatest works of art, such as Michaelangelo’s “Pieta,” are religious in nature.

“The time and labor he spent working on that, it’s a wonderful devotional piece,” Albacete said. “I’ve seen it a number of times. It’s a great masterpiece.”

REPAYING A KINDNESS

Planned renovations at St. Hedwig’s include replacing its contemporary sanctuary windows with antique stained-glass panels, removing two ceiling murals, restoring its original hardwood floor, reinstalling St. Hedwig’s statue on the front of the building, and moving a 10-foot tile mural of the patron saint to the front entrance.

“There’s no greater use for a decommissioned church than a Catholic museum,” McClung said.

McClung also plans to move his makeup business into the old St. Hedwig’s School, which is adjacent to the church. The 6,000-square-foot museum will feature a coffee shop, gift store and a “memory kiosk” featuring photos and recorded recollections by parishioners in the diocese.

There will be a nominal admission fee to cover the cost of operation.

“As far as the diocese is concerned, we have been supportive and have been working with (McClung) in his efforts; we know he does have some fundraising challenges,” diocese spokesman Robert Tayek said.

Tayek said the diocese takes protection of artifacts seriously.

“We don’t readily sell or offer the type of statues outside the church realm, if you will,” he said. “In his case, there has been an exception made because we know what he’s doing with it.”

Made out of plaster, horse hair, linden wood and marble, religious statues often are reflective of the many ethnic parishes and monasteries they once adorned. McClung said he researched the statues’ origins and learned, for example, that statues made in Spain always have brown eyes, dark hair and olive skin. Statues made in Germany, Poland and Slavic countries tend to be fair-haired, blue-eyed and fair-skinned.

Statues made in the 1920s feature realistic-looking eyes made of glass, including ocular veins made of red-silk thread.

“It’s an amazing process,” he said.

The collection’s oldest piece is that of St. Elizabeth of Hungary (1855), acquired from the former St. Ladislaus parish.

McClung, who grew up in the east Cleveland suburb of Willowick, views the nonprofit museum as a way of repaying the kindness he received as a Catholic child.

“Our parish was very good to our family,” he recalled. “We weren’t able to afford tuition for school, but they made it possible. My experiences with Catholic education was amazing.”

He points out that objects such as stained glass, statues and stations of the cross were used by the early church to teach the mostly-uneducated laity about their faith.

“My goal for this (museum) is so people, including non-Catholics, can understand the different parts of Catholic education,” he said. “It’s artwork that’s meant to inspire.”

“We’re praying and wishing him all the best, and we’re hoping it will be a successful venture,” Tayek said. “We’ve never seen anything quite like this.”

“Today, we don’t use statutes as much, but we have a long history of (religious) sculptures,” Albacete said. “They really do deserve to be preserved.”

McClung is ambitiously aiming for a December opening.

“This is definitely a calling,” he said. “I’ve been called crazy by a lot of priests; they said I was crazy to undertake it, but they meant it as a compliment.”


TOPICS: Catholic; Current Events; History
KEYWORDS: ladyofchichester; museum; saintsintheirniches; statues; stir1fridayatmass

1 posted on 09/14/2010 10:13:51 AM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; markomalley; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; ...

The Museum of Divine Statues will occupy the former St. Hedwig Catholic Church in Lakewood. Museum founder Lou McClung has amassed about 65 pieces for the nonprofit exhibit. A December opening is planned.


Museum of Divine Statues curator Lou McClung of Lakewood describes how environment and neglect have damaged this statue of St. Sebastian, rescued from a closed parish in Cleveland. A professional make-up artist, McClung taught himself restoration techniques.


Lou McClung of Lakewood applied his skills as a makeup artist and manufacturer to restore statues such as this sculpture of Jesus from the 1920s.

2 posted on 09/14/2010 10:16:56 AM PDT by NYer ("God dwells in our midst, in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar." St. Maximilian Kolbe)
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To: NYer

Cool!


3 posted on 09/14/2010 10:22:41 AM PDT by agere_contra (...what if we won't eat the dog food?)
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To: NYer

There is a church in Bad Axe, MI that put up a false wall to cover the Altar Arch. I would LOVE to see what’s behind it!


4 posted on 09/14/2010 10:24:16 AM PDT by netmilsmom (I am inyenzi on the Religion Forum)
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To: NYer

The taste for modernism notwithstanding, there must be a demand for these in Catholic churches or schools somewhere.


5 posted on 09/14/2010 10:25:28 AM PDT by Genoa (Titus 2:13)
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To: Genoa

There is!


6 posted on 09/14/2010 10:44:25 AM PDT by vladimir998 (Part of the Vast Catholic Conspiracy (hat tip to Kells))
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To: NYer

My “un-churched” and even then non-Catholic sister in law has brought back several old wooden sacred statutes from her travels in central and south America. I saw hello to them whenever we visit her home and hope that they confer some sort of blessing. She also has some rather demonic looking art too however.


7 posted on 09/14/2010 10:44:41 AM PDT by Mercat
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To: NYer; SunkenCiv
Very interesting article, and not least because it explains how he is legally rescuing the statues. All too often these days, especially in Lib-speak, "rescuing" has become an euphemism for breaking in and stealing.

Glad to see they are being restored & will be displayed...and, when appropriate, returned.

8 posted on 09/14/2010 1:25:04 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Islam: A Satanically Transmitted Disease spread by unprotected intimate contact with the Koranus)
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To: Mercat

“I saw hello to them whenever we visit her home and hope that they confer some sort of blessing.”

Sounds kind of like a graven image/pagan thing you have going on there. They are just chunks of stuff.


9 posted on 09/14/2010 1:28:06 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (Nothing to see here. Move along.)
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To: NYer

I’ll bet he has some of the most beautiful religious sculptures. I was given an Infant of Prague decades ago from an old church in Detroit..My daughter now has it in her formal living room....he is beautiful, stands about 2 feet tall.....very old and still had the original paint...


10 posted on 09/14/2010 1:44:40 PM PDT by goat granny
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To: netmilsmom
If you live in Michigan have you had the privilege of seeing the Shrine in Indian River. It has the largest wooden cross 70 feet tall and it took several years after the cross when up before the crucified Christ went up...It overlooks Burt Lake. (the cross was made out of one piece of wood...google it, its worth the trip. We use to have a cottage about 9 miles from Indian River so saw the whole thing unfold....The cross sits on a hill and there are steps for those that want to go to the cross on their knees.
11 posted on 09/14/2010 1:51:15 PM PDT by goat granny
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To: NYer

What a worthy task.


12 posted on 09/14/2010 1:58:26 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (Liberals are educated above their level of intelligence.. Thanks Sr. Angelica)
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To: goat granny

I’ll have to look that up. Thanks!


13 posted on 09/14/2010 2:35:29 PM PDT by netmilsmom (I am inyenzi on the Religion Forum)
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To: TheThirdRuffian; Mercat

>>Sounds kind of like a graven image/pagan thing you have going on there. They are just chunks of stuff.<<

And that picture of your mother is just a piece of paper. It’s not the paper that makes you think of your mom, it’s the image on it.

Same with statues. Mercat is not talking to the chunk of stone, rather to the Saint that it represents.


14 posted on 09/14/2010 2:39:54 PM PDT by netmilsmom (I am inyenzi on the Religion Forum)
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To: TheThirdRuffian
Sounds kind of like a graven image/pagan thing you have going on there. They are just chunks of stuff.

I was going to post "In before the first misunderstood praying to idols post" but you beat me. Congratulations.

15 posted on 09/14/2010 2:41:45 PM PDT by johniegrad
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To: netmilsmom; Mercat

“Mercat is not talking to the chunk of stone, rather to the Saint that it represents.”

I would hope so.

Not what his or her post says, though.


16 posted on 09/14/2010 2:52:53 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (Nothing to see here. Move along.)
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To: johniegrad

“I was going to post “In before the first misunderstood praying to idols post” but you beat me. Congratulations.”

You might want to read the post in question, before defending it. I’ll copy it for you:

“I saw hello to them whenever we visit her home and hope that they confer some sort of blessing. She also has some rather demonic looking art too however.”

That’s totemism, at best. It is not accepted Roman Catholic tradition.


17 posted on 09/14/2010 2:55:37 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (Nothing to see here. Move along.)
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To: TheThirdRuffian

>>Not what his or her post says, though.<<

Sometimes Catholics write like Catholics. We understand what we mean. Maybe it’s just that I’m Catholic but I understood exactly what Mercat meant.


18 posted on 09/14/2010 5:12:57 PM PDT by netmilsmom (I am inyenzi on the Religion Forum)
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To: ApplegateRanch; AdmSmith; Arthur Wildfire! March; Berosus; bigheadfred; blueyon; ...

Thanks ApplegateRanch.


19 posted on 09/14/2010 5:22:28 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Democratic Underground... matters are worse, as their latest fund drive has come up short...)
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To: NYer

In Soviet Russia, when Orthodox churches were summarily closed, looted for gold and bronze, desecrated, and the priests shot, the peasants would rescue the Holy Icons in their attics and basements, often at a risk of being branded as class enemies themselves.

As the Soviet regime mellowed after death of Stalin, icons were displayed in secular museums.

Somehow, in free America a similar, albeit far less violent dynamic of vandalism was in place not long ago. Thank God it is changing. Let us not forget, however, that the proper place for sacred art is a consecrated space.


20 posted on 09/14/2010 6:05:36 PM PDT by annalex
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To: NYer

What a wonderful thing to do! Some of those statues represent financial sacrifices made by immigrants to this country who helped pay for them because they wanted a beautiful place to worship, and visual reminders of their Lord, His Mother, and the Saints who loved Jesus.


21 posted on 09/14/2010 7:05:39 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: TheThirdRuffian; netmilsmom

I talk to my dogs, my cat, my red sports car. If I want to talk to what I consider sacred “chunks of stuff” I’m going to talk to them. As long as I don’t sacrifice children in the fire to them I don’t see why that would offend anyone.


22 posted on 09/14/2010 7:26:41 PM PDT by Mercat
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To: Mercat

>>As long as I don’t sacrifice children in the fire to them I don’t see why that would offend anyone.<<

You go!!!
All the best, my FRiend!


23 posted on 09/15/2010 4:38:26 AM PDT by netmilsmom (I am inyenzi on the Religion Forum)
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To: netmilsmom

I think you need to brush up on your Catechism, if you think what was posted is accurate Roman Catholic theology.

Statutes of Saints co-displayed with demon statutes?

Ick.


24 posted on 09/15/2010 7:53:25 AM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (Nothing to see here. Move along.)
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To: TheThirdRuffian; Mercat

>>I think you need to brush up on your Catechism, if you think what was posted is accurate Roman Catholic theology.<<

Of course it isn’t accurate to pray to chunks of stone. YOU took it at face value. I took it as I pray. I see a statue, I pray to the saint to intercede for me.

If Mercat wants to talk to a stone, it’s really none of your business anyway.


25 posted on 09/15/2010 1:12:46 PM PDT by netmilsmom (I am inyenzi on the Religion Forum)
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