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Victims' group accuses Catholic church of sending problem priests to military
The Baltimore Sun ^ | March 24, 2011 | Tricia Bishop

Posted on 03/28/2011 4:24:33 AM PDT by Gamecock

Advocates for victims of clergy abuse called Thursday for an investigation into its allegations that the Roman Catholic church purposely funneled problem priests into the chaplain corps of the U.S. military.

....members of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests called for congressional hearings to determine "how frequently and why Catholic officials dumped predator priests on military bases."

And they distributed documents that they said showed that Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien ignored sexual misconduct by chaplains when he headed the U.S. Archdiocese for the Military Services.

(Excerpt) Read more at articles.baltimoresun.com ...


TOPICS: General Discusssion
KEYWORDS: edwinfobrien; priest; rape
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1 posted on 03/28/2011 4:24:40 AM PDT by Gamecock
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To: Alex Murphy; Quix; metmom; Dr. Eckleburg; HarleyD; TSgt; Dr. Scarpetta; RnMomof7

Isn’t that special?

Out brave Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen go to fight for us and Rome sends Priests to “comfort” the wives and children left behind.

What a convenient setup for Priests who have a thing for vulnerable children!


2 posted on 03/28/2011 4:27:57 AM PDT by Gamecock (I didn't reach the top of the food chain just to become a vegetarian.)
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To: Gamecock

What do you do with a priest who has given his life to his ministry, when someone has made credible, but unprovable accusations against him? You send him into a ministry where you don’t risk the chance that he is a perv.

... if that’s what’s happening here.


3 posted on 03/28/2011 4:31:57 AM PDT by dangus
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To: Gamecock
Let's see -- this is what the PCA/OPC preaches instead --> your two groups preach hatred to Pentecostals and Methodists (accusing them of being damnable heretics and preaching the gospel of satan), hatred to Lutherans etc.

The OPC (OrthodoPresbyterian C) and PCA (Presbyterian C in America) attack on American Christians

OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Pentecostals from the OPC doctrinal website
{the OPC} sharply contradicts the view popularized today by the neo-Pentecostal movement. In essence this view would have us believe that we can have the same charismatic gifts that we read about in the age of the Apostles - such as prophecy, speaking in tongues, and healing - today.

This is a very serious error (of the Pentecostals). In essence it is a result of a failure to grasp the Biblical teaching concerning the history of salvation.

OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Lutherans "The liberal church teaching of free will has infected the Lutherans, too, in contradiction to what Martin Luther taught from Scripture" by an OPC poster:
OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Pentecostals and Methodists: From the opc doctrinal website:
. Are Arminian (Methodists, Pentecostals, Baptist etc) preachers heretics? yes
. Is Arminianism (Methodism, Pentecostalism, Baptists) a damnable heresy? Yes.
. the teachings of Arminianism are contrary to Scripture, they are manifestly false. They are serious perversions of the gospel of Jesus Christ
"we see the inherent Satanism of Free-Will Arminianism" (accusing Methodists, Pentecostals, etc. who disagree with Calvin of preaching a gospel of Satan
OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Methodists "John Wesley preached Universal Infant Damnation for unbaptized infants -- which is unsurprising, because Wesley preached the Gospel of Satan" by a PCA poster
OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Judaism Acording to the OPC "Christians should not celebrate the Seder or other Jewish festivals. "
OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Pentecostals and Catholics together as targets of the OPC/PCA message of hate The PCA view: "This goes to what the Reformers taught; that is the "enthusiasts" or what we call today
Pentecostals, are really no different from the Roman Catholics
."

And I think this is one reason why it is easy for certain evangelicals, often from the "enthusiast" wing, find it easy to become Roman Catholic.

OPC/PCA preaching hatred and evil against Christians martyred by Moslems in the Middle East This man followed the wrong teachings of Rome and we know what happens to such people. Heaven is for the elect.
preaching hatred against the Eastern Orthodox Insinuating that the E. Orthodox are not helping others in Japan
preaching hatred against Adventists The Adventists are a cult that is as dangerous as the Jehovahs Witnesses or the Mormons
revealing their true beliefs that Christianity means only Calvinism and only their particular brand of Calvinism
  • OPC poster: "That's Christianity. That's Calvinism"
  • OPC " The problem with non-denominational churches is that there's nothing to stop the congregation from deciding to become Mormon or Unitarian, etc.
    There is something to be said for a diagonal form of church structuring, like the Presbyterians -- organized by a representative group of congregants. This actually strengthens the Christian imperative rather than dilutes it as so many non-denominational churches tend to do."
  • "Calvinism is the Gospel and to teach Calvinism is in fact to preach the Gospel."
    Arthur C. Custance, The Sovereignty of Grace, 1979.
  • "Calvinism is evangelicalism in its purest and only stable expression."
    B.B. Warfield, Calvin and Augustine, ed. Samuel G. Craig, 1956
  • "We believe with the great Baptist preacher, Charles Haddon Spurgeon, that Calvinism is just another name for Christianity."
    John H. Gerstner, Wrongly Dividing the Word of Truth: A Critique of Dispensationalism, 1991.

4 posted on 03/28/2011 4:32:00 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Gamecock

The one thing Bishop O’Brien was sure to do was Punish Father Thomas Doyle ,bacause Fr. Doyle supported Abused children.
O’Brien Had Fr. Doyle dismissed from the military , 2 Years before Fr. Doyles retirement.


5 posted on 03/28/2011 4:32:57 AM PDT by chatham
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To: Gamecock
You can also read this:
WHY THE PCA IS NOT A DULY CONSTITUTED CHURCH

and Why Faithful Christians Should Separate From This Corrupt "Communion"

Oh, and I understand that the OPC considers the PCA to be borderline close to heretics (since the OPC view is anyone who doesn't worship Gresham Machen with them is a heretic)

what differentiates you PCA types from the OPC?

  1. Do you PCA types believe that Charismatic gifts (healing, talking in tongues) is still possible today?
  2. Do you PCA types have a liturgy?
  3. does the PCA have drama in its services?
  4. Does the PCA have liturgical dance in its services?
  5. Does the PCA like the OPC deal with dissent in a back-room manner?
  6. Do you allow singing with guitars, choirs etc. or just psalms?
  7. Do you hold to a literal 6 day creationism view?

What about the PCA view of Jews, Methodists, Pentecostals? Do you deny that the PCA just like the OPC considers these to be damnable heretics?

Is it true what they say about the PCA that

the PCA has the following beliefs (as shown on it's website www.pcahistory.org)

  1. A disbelief in the literal meaning of Genesis (there's a long-winded statement there, quite typical)
  2. A belief that many if not most miscarried and abortion victims (babies killed) go to hell,
  3. A belief that Methodists and Pentecostals are damnable heretics
  4. A belief that only Calvinism is pure Christianity
  5. A belief that sharing a meal with Jews as on Seder etc. is not only wrong but a horrendous sin (latent anti-semitism)
  6. A belief that Pentecostals are on the verge of if not already not Christians

Among many other strange beliefs.

As the PCA has grown, there are more cases of abuse, of money extorted etc. This sub-group is heading for having homosexual practising pastors living in "partnerships".

and what do you say to the OPC types who would say that

The PCA is no more than an extension of the PCUSA

It lures folks in and will soon reveals itself as

the Pinko C in America


6 posted on 03/28/2011 4:35:28 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Gamecock

My closest friend while deployed was the Catholic chaplain.

I can’t think of anyone who was more brave, selfless, tireless, and mission oriented than he.

And the Catholic chaplains have a much harder life than any other chaplains because Catholics chaplains actually go to the soldiers in the smallest outposts to bring them the sacraments. They spend far more time out where the action is in order to comfort and lift up those men who are doing the heavy lifting in these wars. The other chaplains visit when they can, and feel that it does not matter who visits an outpost, as long as it is a chaplain of any variety. Not so with the Catholic chaplains - they want to bring the sacraments as often as they can, and no one else can do that except a Catholic priest.

Shame on you for highlighting the few bad apples and denigrating the vast majority of Catholic chaplains who are heroic servants of Christ and His Church.


7 posted on 03/28/2011 5:04:38 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Gamecock
The personnel files of one Boston priest on the list contain a 1987 notation that he "fools around with kids," according to newspaper accounts, yet the man was subsequently assigned to a VA hospital in Palo Alto., Calif.

Cardinal Law's legacy lives on.


8 posted on 03/28/2011 5:09:08 AM PDT by TSgt (Colonel Allen West & Michele Bachman - 2012 POTUS Dream Team Ticket!)
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To: Notwithstanding; Gamecock
Notwithstanding:
My closest friend while deployed was the Catholic chaplain.

I can’t think of anyone who was more brave, selfless, tireless, and mission oriented than he.

Catholics chaplains actually go to the soldiers in the smallest outposts to bring them the sacraments. They spend far more time out where the action is in order to comfort and lift up those men who are doing the heavy lifting in these wars. The other chaplains visit when they can, and feel that it does not matter who visits an outpost, as long as it is a chaplain of any variety. Not so with the Catholic chaplains - they want to bring the sacraments as often as they can, and no one else can do that except a Catholic priest.

Shame on you for highlighting the few bad apples and denigrating the vast majority of Catholic chaplains who are heroic servants of Christ and His Church.

It's part of the plan of some to discredit Christianity as a whole.

the problem is that they believe in spreading their hatred against all Christians (see my post 5 above) --> Gamecock, why does the PCA/OPC hate everyone, Pentecostals, Lutherans, Methodists, Orthodox, Christian martyrs, Catholics, Baptist etc.?

9 posted on 03/28/2011 5:11:40 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Gamecock

Where are the victims groups protesting the shuffling of NYC school district pedophiles?
LA school district pedophiles?
Boston school district pedophiles?
Chicago school district pedophiles?


10 posted on 03/28/2011 5:15:13 AM PDT by G Larry
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To: Cronos
21 pages of testimonials from soldiers thanking their priest chaplains from

http://www.catholicmil.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=34&Itemid=177

Chaplain Testimonies

 
 
  
 
 


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Chaplain Testimonies

"You have a great responsibility. People serving in the military have to be ready mentally, physically, and spiritually. That's one-third of it right there. And if that's missing, I see catastophe. It's a very rigorous responsibility taking care of the spiritual part of it. And actively taking care of it," says retired USMC Major General James J. McMonagle. Here are first hand accounts of US Catholic chaplains honorably serving pro Deo et Patria.



Traveling Chaplain Graces Kearsarge PDF Print E-mail
Written by PO2 Steve Tate   
Thursday, 17 March 2011 20:43

MEDITERRANEAN SEA 11March2011– Sailors and Marines of the Roman Catholic faith aboard USS Kearsarge were given the opportunity to give confession and participate in Mass when the crew was visited by Roman Catholic chaplain Lt. John Kelly, March 11. Kearsarge does not have a Catholic priest permanently assigned to its command religious ministries department, but

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 March 2011 20:56
Read more...
 
Desperate Plea for Catholic Chaplains to Serve PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brian Fraga   
Saturday, 29 January 2011 17:24

This Christmas, many Catholics in uniform won’t have access to the sacraments. Why that’s bad.

OSV Newsweekly, 12/26/2010: U.S. Army Spc. Regina Tetreault arrived in Afghanistan with the 101st Airborne Division just a few days before Christmas in 2008. 

Tetreault, 21, a lifelong Catholic, attended Mass on Christmas morning. For the next 11 months of her deployment, Tetreault, a transportation specialist, said her demanding work schedule made it difficult to attend Mass, but added that it was also not easy because only one Catholic military chaplain was stationed in her region. 

“I felt like there wasn’t the opportunity to receive the Eucharist or to have a priest hear my confession,” Tetreault said. “That was hard, but you have to be flexible. Since we didn’t have many priests, you do what you can.”

Invaluable moral support 

“The shortage makes it very difficult for us to serve the needs of the Catholic community,” said Father Gregory Caiazzo, an active-duty Navy captain assigned to the Office of the Chief of Navy Chaplains. 

Catholic military chaplains are needed to administer the sacraments and to celebrate Mass aboard Navy destroyers and in far-flung base camps. On Christmas, many of them will drive long distances and board helicopters to celebrate several Masses for troops in Afghanistan and Iraq. They will also provide invaluable moral support for those troops, many of whom will be conducting nonstop combat operations. 

“The chaplains kept people focused and helped them give an understanding and acceptance of the things they saw,” said Matt Chandler, 33, of Dartmouth, Mass. Chandler, a Marine Corps veteran who served two tours in Iraq as an infantryman, recalled a Catholic chaplain who celebrated a memorial Mass for three Marines in his platoon who were killed when their Humvee struck an anti-tank mine in April 2006. 

“I learned to accept God’s will from our chaplain,” said Chandler, who is Catholic. 

Bishop Thomas J. Tobin, the head of the Diocese of Providence, R.I., told Our Sunday Visitor that the presentation that Archbishop Timothy Broglio of the U.S. Archdiocese for the Military Services gave last month to his fellow bishops on the need for more Catholic chaplains (see sidebar) was a well-received “eye-opener.” 

“It’s something we always haven’t talked about in a group before,” said Bishop Tobin, whose diocese has two priests on active duty in the military. He said that bishops, especially those in smaller dioceses, have to balance the pastoral needs of their local parish communities with those of their flock in the military. 

“It’s a very worthwhile ministry,” Bishop Tobin said. “With our men and women serving in the armed forces, they’re often very young, away from home, sometimes for the very first time. They can be placed in difficult situations, especially if they are in a combat zone. I think they need, and they deserve, all the spiritual and pastoral support we can give to them.” 

But Judy L. McCloskey, director of CatholicMil.org, an online resource for Catholic service members, told OSV that “too many bishops” fail to understand the need that exists beyond their dioceses. 

“If perhaps they did the math to see just what percent of their own serves in the military, in communities far beyond their diocesan borders, they would ‘tithe,’ if you will, a few of their priests to serve as chaplains,” said McCloskey, who also works on the canonization cause of Father Vincent Capodanno, a U.S. Navy chaplain killed in 1967 by enemy fire in Vietnam. 

Lack of access 

Father Michael R. Duesterhaus, a priest in the Diocese of Richmond, Va., completed three tours in Iraq as a chaplain in the Navy Reserve. His second deployment was extended by three months because of the shortage of priests in the country. Around that time, he said the 82nd Airborne Division arrived in Iraq for a 10-month tour expecting that their Catholic troops would not have access to a priest. 

“They were shocked when I greeted them,” Father Duesterhaus said. “But you know what, if you do that long enough, your marginal Catholics just drop off entirely. The Church becomes irrelevant. Those who are serious become distant from their faith because if you get so used to not having a chaplain, you stop asking for one.” 

Father David Daigle, a Navy lieutenant who serves as a chaplain aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt, an aircraft carrier, says bishops need to be more open to their priests serving in the military. 

“You look at the universal Church and you see military members going through hardships. You’re seeing the lay faithful going six to nine months without any connection to a Catholic priest,” said Father Daigle, who will lead an Advent penance service and a Christmas Mass for sailors and marines. 

Father Richard Erikson, the vicar general for the Archdiocese of Boston and himself a colonel in the Air Force Reserve, was one of two Catholic chaplains in 2004 assigned to Balad Air Base, a military installation in Northern Iraq manned by 30,000 troops. 

“We were under attack constantly. The questions of death, and life after death, were very present and permeable to each individual. The Mass you celebrated, the confession you heard, could literally be the last one an individual received,” said Father Erikson, now mobilization assistant to the Air Force deputy chief of chaplains.  

“Every diocese in the United States has hundreds of troops in the military. By providing priests for the military, you are caring for the people in your diocese,” said Father Erikson, adding that the Boston archdiocese has 10 priest-chaplains on active duty, one reservist recently called up to active duty and an additional 10 to 15 reservists. 

“I can’t think of a greater need for chaplains than in a war setting,” he said. “The sacraments we have become that much more important.” 

Brian Fraga writes from Massachusetts.

Underserved (sidebar)

A U.S. Army soldier prays during a Christmas Eve service at FOB Clark in Khowst province, Afghanistan, Dec. 24, 2009. Reuters photo by Zohra Bensemra

Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio, the head of the U.S. Archdiocese for the Military Services, underscored the Catholic chaplain shortage when he addressed the U.S. bishops’ fall general assembly on Nov. 15. 

He noted that the U.S. Armed Forces combined have 275 priest-chaplains on active duty — there are supposed to be 1,000 — to serve an estimated 400,000 Catholic military service members and their immediate families. He said the numbers of priest-chaplains are expected to decline, increasing the risk that Catholic soldiers, sailors, marines and airmen will be alienated from the faith. 

“I would like to be able return them to you as Catholics,” said Archbishop Broglio, who requested each bishop consider sending one additional priest to the military. The shortage is such that several military bases contract civilian priests while chaplains in war zones are stretched thin in covering large geographic areas by themselves.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 01 February 2011 20:50
 
2SCR Chaplains Corps PDF Print E-mail
Written by Sgt Gerald Wilson   
Friday, 07 January 2011 04:41

ZABUL, Afghanistan - The spiritual welfare of each Trooper of the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment rest squarely on the shoulders of the Regimental Chaplain’s Corps. During their current deployment to Afghanistan, there are six chaplains to service over 4,000 Dragoons stretched over an area of operation the size of Texas.

Last Updated on Friday, 11 March 2011 23:11
Read more...
 
CH Piontkowski in Iraq PDF Print E-mail
Written by Spc. Zane Craig   
Sunday, 02 January 2011 23:20

JOINT BASE BALAD, Iraq - With the candles lighted on the altar, making the gold crucifix nearby shine, a transformation took place as a soldier in the Army Combat Uniform dons his vestments; first the white alb, then the stole, and finally the purple chasuble, becoming a priest of the Roman Catholic Church.
     Lt. Col. Richard Piontkowski, deputy command chaplain with the 103rd Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), and a Grand Island, Neb., native, is one of nine Roman Catholic chaplains in Iraq ministering to the spiritual needs of more than 10,000 Catholic service members in Iraq.

Last Updated on Friday, 04 February 2011 14:50
Read more...
 
1st Cavalry Greets New Chaplain, Fr Eric Albertson PDF Print E-mail
Written by Amanda Kim Stairrett   
Tuesday, 06 July 2010 00:00
A change of the stole ceremony is a sacred tradition and unique ceremony, the 1st Cavalry Division's commander said last week at Fort Hood.  Change of command ceremonies are common in the Army, and Maj. Gen. Daniel Allyn said a change of stole was far more important than a change of command because it marked the passing of responsibility for the spiritual sustenance of the division's soldiers and families.
Last Updated on Friday, 29 October 2010 16:09
Read more...
 
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Page 1 of 21

11 posted on 03/28/2011 5:22:36 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

“The victims’ group, known as SNAP, released a list online Thursday of about 100 priests who worked as chaplains in the military or in Veterans Affairs hospitals during the past 50 years and were accused of sexual misconduct either before, during or after their service.

The names were compiled from public court, church and military records with help from BishopAccountability.org, which tracks abuse within the Catholic church.

SNAP Maryland Director Frank Dingle said they represent a sampling of perpetrators.

The personnel files of one Boston priest on the list contain a 1987 notation that he ‘fools around with kids,’ according to newspaper accounts, yet the man was subsequently assigned to a VA hospital in Palo Alto, Calif.

Another Boston priest who was accused of violence and sexual abuse against a preteen boy was later sent to work for the Army, according to personnel records available online.”

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2011-03-24/news/bs-md-ci-snap-20110324_1_predator-priests-boston-priest-survivors-network


12 posted on 03/28/2011 5:23:42 AM PDT by Dr. Scarpetta
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To: Gamecock

A Preliminary LIST...

Priests Accused of Sexual Misconduct
Who Worked As Military Chaplains
or Chaplains at VA Hospitals

“This page presents a preliminary list of accused priests who have worked as military chaplains and chaplains at Veteran’s Administration hospitals.

It has been common practice for bishops and superiors of religious orders in the United States to use chaplaincies in the armed forces as a convenient place to send priests who have molested children.

As a result, servicemen have been sexually assaulted, the children of soldiers have been abused, and children visiting a parent or relative at a VA hospital have been endangered.

A priest’s time in the military often ends with a transfer back into a parish, where parishioners know nothing of their new priest’s sexual history, and the priest can use his military career in grooming new victims.

In the military, a sexually abusive priest has a powerful new tool to continue his sexual misconduct – his rank and the authority it gives him over soldiers of lower rank and their families.

The Catholic church’s cynical and criminal use of the armed forces as a warehouse for sex offending priests is a neglected and important aspect of the sexual abuse crisis.

The bishops’ practice of not reporting crimes to the police, and of moving priests who molest to unsuspecting parishes, already dishonors the justice system, the people of the parishes, and the priesthood itself.

The bishops’ use of the military dishonors and the men and women who protect our country, and the families that they are raising.”

http://www.bishop-accountability.org/Military_Chaplains/


13 posted on 03/28/2011 5:30:46 AM PDT by Dr. Scarpetta
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To: Dr. Scarpetta
Interesting -- this is what the OPC and PCA (Orthodo Presbyterian C and Presbyterian C in America) think of Methodists:
Do you agree with this OPC/PCA view on Wesleyans?
14 posted on 03/28/2011 5:34:16 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Notwithstanding
Shame on you for highlighting the few bad apples and denigrating the vast majority of Catholic chaplains who are heroic servants of Christ and His Church.

There might be far more rotten apples than just a few...

As Catholic literature tells us, most Catholic priests are groomed from childhood...They are then sent to Seminaries...So obviously, every thing they learned about the queer lifestyle, they learned from your religion...

There might be far more disgustingly rotten fruit than you know about...And since your religion attempts to cover the tracks of the know pedos, how many of the perverts have escaped detection by the outside world and climbed the ladder all the way to the top???

15 posted on 03/28/2011 5:35:52 AM PDT by Iscool (I don't understand all that I know...)
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To: Dr. Scarpetta

http://www.catholicmil.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1648:the-2scr-chaplains-corps&catid=34:chaplain-testimonies&Itemid=70

2SCR Chaplains Corps

Written by Sgt Gerald Wilson

Friday, 07 January 2011 04:41

ZABUL, Afghanistan - The spiritual welfare of each Trooper of the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment rest squarely on the shoulders of the Regimental Chaplain’s Corps. During their current deployment to Afghanistan, there are six chaplains to service over 4,000 Dragoons stretched over an area of operation the size of Texas.

“There is one chaplain for each Squadron,” explains 2SCR’s Regimental Chaplain Maj. Leau. “Take 2nd Squadron for example. He has more than nine locations that are attached to Forward Operating Base Apache and all the outside FOBS he has to cover.”

The Chaplain’s Corps has been around since 1775. Following the creation of the infantry as a branch of the Army, the Continental Congress acting on orders from Gen. George Washington, established the Chaplains Corps making it the second oldest branch in the U.S. Army. It was Washington’s concern for the morale and moral character of his soldiers that prompted the belief that the military needed paid religious leaders to care for spiritual needs. Since then wherever there are soldiers deployed, there has been a chaplain in their midst helping them.

Many Army chaplains spend a large part of their deployments traveling from outpost to outpost offering religious services and counseling to the soldiers in the field. One such traveler is Capt. Mario Rosario, a Catholic priest from the 96st ASB 101st Combat Aviation Brigade. In addition to supporting the soldiers of his unit, Father Rosario spends much of his time providing for the needs of the Catholic Troopers of 2SCR.

“There are Catholic soldiers all over,” Rosario said. “Even if there is just one or two on a COP they need to be provided with religious support.” Rosario spends about 20 days a month traveling throughout RC-South providing services wherever needed. He credits his commander who values religious support and understands the need to travel. The dedication to serving our military service members has become ingrained in the chaplain’s job description.

For many of our Dragoon men of the cloth, being a chaplain is more than just a job; it is a calling to nurture their fellow soldiers. That was one call that took Capt. Doug Hogsten, Chaplain for FIRES Squadron, 2SCR, more than 22 years to answer.

“I was enlisted for 3 years,” Hogsten said, “from 1984 to 1987, I was a mortar man.”

“My company commander told me he was going to get me to reenlist,” he explained. “I told him that when the bush by my barracks window burned and was not consumed, and the voice of God came out of it and told me to reenlist. Then, we would talk.”

Little did Hogsten know that in 2006, he would feel that pull back to the military and join the Chaplain Corps.

For more than 234 years, chaplains have been caring for soldiers. From Valley Forge to Afghanistan, they have provided counseling and spiritual nourishment for our military service members faced with the rigorous demands of deployments. When the death of a Soldier occurs, they comfort and they provide special religious services giving soldiers a little taste of home during the holidays. Whether they are preaching from the pulpit on Sunday morning or providing a sympathetic ear to a soldier in need, military chaplains have been and continue to be an important part of the U.S military.


16 posted on 03/28/2011 5:36:33 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

http://www.catholicmil.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1645:chaplain-piontkowski&catid=34:chaplain-testimonies&Itemid=70

CH Piontkowski in Iraq

Written by Spc. Zane Craig

Sunday, 02 January 2011 23:20

JOINT BASE BALAD, Iraq - With the candles lighted on the altar, making the gold crucifix nearby shine, a transformation took place as a soldier in the Army Combat Uniform dons his vestments; first the white alb, then the stole, and finally the purple chasuble, becoming a priest of the Roman Catholic Church.
Lt. Col. Richard Piontkowski, deputy command chaplain with the 103rd Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), and a Grand Island, Neb., native, is one of nine Roman Catholic chaplains in Iraq ministering to the spiritual needs of more than 10,000 Catholic service members in Iraq.

In addition to the dual role of soldier and priest, Piontkowski serves in two roles as deputy command chaplain: as an administrative role that can be filled by any chaplain of his rank, and as pastor to all the Catholics in his sector, a spiritual role that can only be filled by an ordained priest.

“Part of being the deputy command chaplain is that you’re pastor to all the soldiers, no matter what their belief system is,” said Piontkowski. “Whoever comes in, for whatever reason, that’s your soldier.”

Piontkowski said that his main concern as a Catholic pastor is for the soldiers in his care to receive the sacraments.

There are two other priests stationed at Joint Base Balad, Iraq: one in the Air Force and one in the Army, equaling approximately one third of all the priests in Iraq. This concentration allows them to take turns traveling to remote bases that lack a full-time priest to say mass and administer the sacraments.

Piontkowski and Master Sgt. Kevin Zavala, master chaplain assistant with the 103rd ESC, and a Necedah, Wis., native, traveled to Contingency Operating Base Speicher, which has a large population of active Catholics but no resident priest, to lead the Christmas celebration.

“It’s good for all of us to be able to go to Mass because even if we can’t be with our families this year, we can celebrate with our military family here,” said Sgt. 1st Class. Willy Anderson, support operations non-commissioned officer-in-charge with the 394th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 103rd ESC, and a Dodge, Neb., native.

Piontkowski said attending Mass to celebrate Christmas during a deployment is like a little bit of home, something familiar and comforting. Approximately 100 service members and civilian contractors attended Mass at Liberty Chapel on Christmas Eve.

“It really helps to keep things in perspective; it’s a very calming influence,” he said. “It reminds them of times they were home with their families. Even if this year they can’t be with their families bodily, spiritually they can be.”

At home in the civilian world, Piontkowski is rector of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Cathedral in Grand Island, Neb. Flexibility is the most important lesson he learned at the Cathedral that has helped him on his deployment so far, he said. Although this is his first overseas deployment, he was activated in 2004-2005 with the 89thRegional Readinees Command of Wichita, Kan., to deal with pre and post mobilization issues.

“I’m enjoying the deployment,” said Piontkowski. “It’s a good opportunity for me to help people and to learn a lot. “

He added that his judgment of an area is by people, never by place, and that the people he has met here, service members and locals, mostly interpreters and religious leaders have been great people.

“I’ve learned how I react to explosions, for one, and I’ve learned how this culture, which is so related to biblical times, how they look at history, including historical events occurring now, in such a non-Western way,” he said.

In addition to other duties, chaplains receive referrals from unit leadership of soldiers dealing with combat stress and other mental health challenges.

“I want someone dealing with suicidal ideation to see a mental health professional,” said Piontkowski. “I think as chaplains, we are more like first aid in these situations, but we are a bit more ubiquitous than combat stress specialists,” he said.

Nevertheless, as an experienced priest, there are few personal problems here Piontkowski hasn’t dealt with in his parishioners back home.

“My advice to soldiers here is, while you’re brushing up on your battle skills, it’s not a bad idea to brush up on your spiritual skills as well,” he said.

Despite the challenges of ministering to a congregation of thousands spread over an area as large as California, Piontkowski maintains an upbeat, jovial attitude and balances his many roles to effectively serve the soldiers entrusted to his care.


17 posted on 03/28/2011 5:37:25 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

http://www.catholicmil.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1621:1st-cavalry-greets-new-chaplain-fr-eric-albertson&catid=34:chaplain-testimonies&Itemid=70

1st Cavalry Greets New Chaplain, Fr Eric Albertson

Written by Amanda Kim Stairrett

Tuesday, 06 July 2010 00:00

A change of the stole ceremony is a sacred tradition and unique ceremony, the 1st Cavalry Division’s commander said last week at Fort Hood. Change of command ceremonies are common in the Army, and Maj. Gen. Daniel Allyn said a change of stole was far more important than a change of command because it marked the passing of responsibility for the spiritual sustenance of the division’s soldiers and families. Lt. Col. (promotable) Barbara Sherer passed the mantle of leadership from one shepherd to another June 29 during a change of stole ceremony at the 1st Cavalry Division Memorial Chapel.

Sherer, who is an ordained Presbyterian minister, served as the division’s chaplain, a duty she passed to Lt. Col. Eric Albertson, a Roman Catholic priest.

By accepting the stole, Albertson accepted the role as a servant of God in the capacity of the division’s spiritual leader, said Col. Michael Tarvin, U.S. Forces Command chaplain.

He led Albertson through his inquiry of personal commitment before Allyn transferred the stole from Sherer to Albertson.

In the commitment, Tarvin asked Albertson if he would acknowledge God’s guiding hand and with God’s help, accept his duties.

Sherer accepted the 1st Cavalry chaplain’s stole in May 2008.

Army numbers from June of that year indicated that of its 1,525 active-duty chaplains, just 60 of them were women.

Those statistics were never an issue for Sherer, though. While assigned at Fort Lee, Va., in 2003, she was assigned to serve as the chaplain for the 3rd Infantry Division’s 603rd Aviation Support Battalion. She deployed with those soldiers to Iraq during the first months of the war there, according to information from the division.

Sherer has served in Mogadishu, Somalia; Kuwait; and three deployments to Iraq.

A division chaplain’s role is to direct, mentor and train those chaplains who will have constant, direct contact with the soldiers, and Allyn said Sherer handled it all with ease and seamlessly synchronized support across the 1st Cavalry.

Prayer provides power, poise, peace and purpose, Allyn said, adding he raises prayers daily.

The idea of taking upon the stole and its responsibilities goes back to the Old Testament, Allyn said. The prophet Elijah was given the mantle that identified him as the new prophetic voice of Israel. Today, that mantle is replaced by a stole, a reminder of God’s constant presence, Allyn said.

The stole is one of the heaviest pieces of cloth because it bears the weight of responsibility, the general said. Chaplains understand, embrace and relish this responsibility and they answer the call to minister to soldiers in peace and war, and they are compassionate and convicted in their calling, Allyn said.

Albertson grew up in Virginia and attended Mount Saint Mary’s Seminary in Maryland. He was ordained in 1986 and became an active-duty chaplain in 1993, according to information from the division. He was first assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division, where he completed the Army Ranger Course and Advanced Airborne Training.

Albertson served with the 1st Cavalry in Bosnia, and also served tours in Haiti, Kuwait, Korea, Italy, Afghanistan and two deployments to Iraq. He is a Purple Heart recipient, Allyn said.

The two served together in the 82nd Airborne, and Albertson has dedicated himself to bringing light to a world full of darkness, Allyn said.

Albertson last served as garrison chaplain for Camp Eggers, Kabul, and deputy command chaplain for the NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan. He helped the Afghan National Army create its chaplain corps, which is called the Religious and Cultural Affairs Directorate, according to information from the division.

Sherer will next attend the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa.


Article first appeared online Killeen Daily Herald at KDHNews.com and is used with permission.


18 posted on 03/28/2011 5:38:49 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: G Larry

http://www.catholicmil.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1573:staff-sgt-christina-turnipseed&catid=34:chaplain-testimonies&Itemid=70

Priest Makes FOB Calls

Written by Staff Sgt. Christina Turnipseed

Saturday, 13 February 2010 15:55

FOB WARRIOR, KIRKUK, Iraq- “Let’s continue praising God!” This was the inspirational instruction given by the Catholic priest which preceded the mellow sounds of an acoustic guitar and the sound of more than a dozen reverent, joyful voices at Mass at Forward Operating Base (FOB) Warrior, Feb. 3.
Chaplain (Capt.) Patrick Van Durme of 1st Battalion, 9th Field Artillery, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, whose hometown is Dansville, N.Y., flew in from FOB Marez near Mosul to FOB Warrior to conduct services.

Van Durme will also travel to five other FOBs in northern Iraq servicing Sykes, Tal Afar, Doria, Marez/Diamondback and McHenry.

Van Durme said he plans to come to FOB Warrior every week.

“We’re gonna be here next week as long as the helicopters fly,” said Van Durme.

After Mass, Sgt. 1st Class James Burkley, a 1st Brigade Combat Team Soldier, said “I feel like it gives me the freedom to practice my faith. This way, I get to practice the traditions I grew up with.”

Maj. John Tran of 506 Expeditionary Combat Support from Los Angeles, Calif., read the scripture while Master Sgt. Mike McCarthy from a boarder transition team, and a native of Cochecton, N.Y., who happened to be here from Erbil, assisted Van Durme with conducting the service.

“We don’t have religious services at all [in Erbil],” McCarthy said. “To get religious services is essential.”
Mass was held Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. and Feb. 4 at 11:30 a.m. in the Air Force Freedom Chapel for 35 to 45 minutes.

Parishioners were invited, by Van Durme, to come back next week for Mass and to see him after service for confessions, to join the church, wedding preparations, conformations, etc.

Van Durme said he joined the Army for the opportunity to help Soldiers.

“I’ve been a priest for a long time,” Van Durme said. “I’ve only been in the Army for two years. My nephew was in the service and went 18 months without service.”

“I saw a need,” he added. “It’s hard work getting moved all around the battlefield, but it’s what I need to do for the Soldiers.


19 posted on 03/28/2011 5:40:59 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Gamecock; All

Another Catholic-bashing thread by Gamecock. Same crap, different day.

This is a Catholic bashing party, not an honest debate or exchange of ideas.


20 posted on 03/28/2011 5:41:47 AM PDT by surroundedbyblue
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To: Notwithstanding

Nice article...


21 posted on 03/28/2011 5:43:13 AM PDT by Dr. Scarpetta
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To: Notwithstanding

22 posted on 03/28/2011 5:45:05 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Dr. Scarpetta
you do realise that you are talking to members of the OPC/PCA who believe this about Methodists:

OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Pentecostals and Methodists: From the opc doctrinal website:
. Are Arminian (Methodists, Pentecostals, Baptist etc) preachers heretics? yes
. Is Arminianism (Methodism, Pentecostalism, Baptists) a damnable heresy? Yes.
. the teachings of Arminianism are contrary to Scripture, they are manifestly false. They are serious perversions of the gospel of Jesus Christ
"we see the inherent Satanism of Free-Will Arminianism" (accusing Methodists, Pentecostals, etc. who disagree with Calvin of preaching a gospel of Satan
OPC/PCA preaching hatred against Methodists "John Wesley preached Universal Infant Damnation for unbaptized infants -- which is unsurprising, because Wesley preached the Gospel of Satan" by a PCA poster

And who hate Christians martyred at the hands of Moslems This man followed the wrong teachings of Rome and we know what happens to such people. Heaven is for the elect. --> question: do you agree with these people?

23 posted on 03/28/2011 5:45:44 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Cronos

Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Because These Catholic Chaplains Were Awarded the Medal of Honor

This photograph is for all of you who get really persnickety about the altar, vestments, and such ancillary things like that. This is Major Charles Watters, U.S. Army, celebrating Mass out in the field for the troops. The altar is a couple of ammo boxes sitting on top of two water cans.

Though there are no relics of saints embedded in this altar, what matters most, Our Lord and Savior, will be there with His men soon. I attended services just like this one, even when I wasn't a Catholic. Because beggars can't be choosers, see?

The beauty of the Mass isn't skin deep. Even if the surroundings aren't pleasant to the eye, God doesn't see as man sees. And these Catholic Chaplains bring Our Lord out to His troops just as surely as King David would have been at the front leading his.

Donald R. McClarey over at American Catholic wrote a blog post recently about Catholic Chaplains as observed by Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller, a legendary Marine who is revered by all Marines. I enjoyed his post and shared it with our readers via our Facebook page. Last January, I ran across a book at a friend's house about a Catholic chaplain who was awarded the Medal of Honor. Donald's post prompted me to do a little digging into this interesting and surprising finding.

What follows are the citations of the three chaplains from the Vietnam War who received our nations highest award for gallantry in combat—the Medal of Honor. There are only three of them and all three of them are Catholics. One has a cause for beatification in process, and one lived to receive his award and it seems he renounced it (the only person known to have ever done so), left the priesthood, and married a former nun and is an anti-war activist.

All chaplains are special and provide a much needed service to the soldiers, airmen, sailors and Marines whom they serve. As a Marine, and a non-Catholic Christian while I served, I had a huge amount of respect for the Catholic chaplains. They just seemed more gung-ho to me. Here are stories of three of the best who ever served.

Vincent R. Cappodano, Servant of God
Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, Chaplain Corps
3d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division (Rein)

Place and date:
Quang Tin Province, Republic of Vietnam, 4 September 1967
Killed in Action

Citation:


For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Chaplain of the 3d Battalion, in connection with operations against enemy forces. In response to reports that the 2d Platoon of M Company was in danger of being overrun by a massed enemy assaulting force, Lt. Capodanno left the relative safety of the company command post and ran through an open area raked with fire, directly to the beleaguered platoon. Disregarding the intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and mortar fire, he moved about the battlefield administering last rites to the dying and giving medical aid to the wounded. When an exploding mortar round inflicted painful multiple wounds to his arms and legs, and severed a portion of his right hand, he steadfastly refused all medical aid. Instead, he directed the corpsmen to help their wounded comrades and, with calm vigor, continued to move about the battlefield as he provided encouragement by voice and example to the valiant Marines. Upon encountering a wounded corpsman in the direct line of fire of an enemy machine gunner positioned approximately 15 yards away, Lt. Capodanno rushed in a daring attempt to aid and assist the mortally wounded corpsman. At that instant, only inches from his goal, he was struck down by a burst of machinegun fire. By his heroic conduct on the battlefield, and his inspiring example, Lt. Capodanno upheld the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.



Charles Joseph Watters
Major, U.S. Army, Chaplain Corps
Company A, 173d Support Bn, 173d Airborne Brigade

Place and Date:
Nov 19, 1967 - Hill 875, Dak To, Vietnam
Killed in Action


Citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Chaplain Watters distinguished himself during an assault in the vicinity of Dak To. Chaplain Watters was moving with one of the companies when it engaged a heavily armed enemy battalion. As the battle raged and the casualties mounted, Chaplain Watters, with complete disregard for his safety, rushed forward to the line of contact. Unarmed and completely exposed, he moved among, as well as in front of the advancing troops, giving aid to the wounded, assisting in their evacuation, giving words of encouragement, and administering the last rites to the dying. When a wounded paratrooper was standing in shock in front of the assaulting forces, Chaplain Watters ran forward, picked the man up on his shoulders and carried him to safety. As the troopers battled to the first enemy entrenchment, Chaplain Watters ran through the intense enemy fire to the front of the entrenchment to aid a fallen comrade. A short time later, the paratroopers pulled back in preparation for a second assault. Chaplain Watters exposed himself to both friendly and enemy fire between the 2 forces in order to recover 2 wounded soldiers. Later, when the battalion was forced to pull back into a perimeter, Chaplain Watters noticed that several wounded soldiers were Lying outside the newly formed perimeter. Without hesitation and ignoring attempts to restrain him, Chaplain Watters left the perimeter three times in the face of small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire to carry and to assist the injured troopers to safety. Satisfied that all of the wounded were inside the perimeter, he began aiding the medics--applying field bandages to open wounds, obtaining and serving food and water, giving spiritual and mental strength and comfort. During his ministering, he moved out to the perimeter from position to position redistributing food and water, and tending to the needs of his men. Chaplain Watters was giving aid to the wounded when he himself was mortally wounded. Chaplain Watters' unyielding perseverance and selfless devotion to his comrades was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army.

Charles James Angelo Liteky
Captain, US Army, Chaplain Corps
HHC, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light)

Place and Date:
Dec. 06, 1967 - Phuoc-Lac, Bien Hoa Province, RVN
Presented At the White House by President Lyndon B. Johnson on November 19, 1968

Citation:


Chaplain Liteky distinguished himself by exceptional heroism while serving with Company A, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry, 199th Light Infantry Brigade. He was participating in a search and destroy operation when Company A came under intense fire from a battalion size enemy force. Momentarily stunned from the immediate encounter that ensued, the men hugged the ground for cover. Observing 2 wounded men, Chaplain Liteky moved to within 15 meters of an enemy machinegun position to reach them, placing himself between the enemy and the wounded men. When there was a brief respite in the fighting, he managed to drag them to the relative safety of the landing zone. Inspired by his courageous actions, the company rallied and began placing a heavy volume of fire upon the enemy's positions. In a magnificent display of courage and leadership, Chaplain Liteky began moving upright through the enemy fire, administering last rites to the dying and evacuating the wounded. Noticing another trapped and seriously wounded man, Chaplain Liteky crawled to his aid. Realizing that the wounded man was too heavy to carry, he rolled on his back, placed the man on his chest and through sheer determination and fortitude crawled back to the landing zone using his elbows and heels to push himself along. Pausing for breath momentarily, he returned to the action and came upon a man entangled in the dense, thorny underbrush. Once more intense enemy fire was directed at him, but Chaplain Liteky stood his ground and calmly broke the vines and carried the man to the landing zone for evacuation. On several occasions when the landing zone was under small arms and rocket fire, Chaplain Liteky stood up in the face of hostile fire and personally directed the medivac helicopters into and out of the area. With the wounded safely evacuated, Chaplain Liteky returned to the perimeter, constantly encouraging and inspiring the men. Upon the unit's relief on the morning of 7 December 1967, it was discovered that despite painful wounds in the neck and foot, Chaplain Liteky had personally carried over 20 men to the landing zone for evacuation during the savage fighting. Through his indomitable inspiration and heroic actions, Chaplain Liteky saved the lives of a number of his comrades and enabled the company to repulse the enemy. Chaplain Liteky's actions reflect great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army.

There is one other Catholic priest that was awarded the Medal of Honor while serving as a chaplain in World War II. His name is Father Joseph T. O'Callahan, USNR. And there have been many others who served and died serving the sheep of Our Lord's flock. There is also cause for the beatification of Father Emil Kapaun, a chaplain who served during the Korean War. May the Lord bless them and keep them and have mercy on their souls.

Semper Fidelis.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

I feel compelled to mention Fr. Timothy Vakoc. He died recently from injuries sustained from a IED blast in Iraq, returning from celebrating Mass for the troops on the 12th anniversary of his ordination. He was making significant progress in his recovery, but finally succumbed to his extensive injuries. I knew him personally and miss him dearly. As far as I know, he's the only clergy to have been injured in the course of this particular campaign.

Here are some links to his story:
http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/183757/fr-vakoc/kathryn-jean-lopez
http://www.catholicmil.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=40&Itemid=183&limitstart=5

taad said...

"This photograph is for all of you who get really persnickety about the altar, vestments, and such ancillary things like that."

This is straw man arguement. Of course a priest can celebrate mass without an altar, and all the bells and whistles. No one is saying that. A surgeon can perform surgery in the street too. Does that mean you never need to worry about having an operating room. Your comment is flawed from the start. Sort of like the devil saying to Adam and Eve, surley God didn't mean..." Come on you can do better than this or use these men's bravery to attack the beauty of the Mass. Should the pope destroy St. Peters and have mass in the woods?

Frank said...

taad: Thanks for your comment. "Battle field expedient" is what my introductory remarks are meant to bring your attention to. They are not an argument to dismantle St. Peters,or make light of the divine beauty of the Mass, etc.

Frank said...

@Anon 9:05, thanks for that information on Fr. Timothy Vakoc.

Daniel Latinus said...

"Though there are no relics of saints embedded in this altar, what matters most, Our Lord and Savior, will be there with His men soon."

But the chaplain is probably using an antimension, an altar cloth used in the Eastern Rites, which contains the relics of the saints. During World War II, an indult was issued for Latin Rite chaplains to use the antimension for the celebration of Mass.

Aside from this persnickety quibble, the sacrifices and heroism of Catholic chaplains deserve to be better known. Thanks for telling their stories.

Fr. Emil Kapaun died as a result of intentional neglect in a Chinese prison camp during the Korean War. Historian T.R. Fahrenbacher, author of This Kind of War, reports not a single military chaplain survived Chinese or North Korean imprisonment.

Anonymous said...

As retired Army, I have a enjoyed a few "field expedient" Masses during my career. Having the opportunity to experience more important things while doing important things was always uplifting and humbling.
Recently in the process of doing an important thing, helping build young men of character on a Cub Scout camp-out, our scouts and their families were given a flavor of Mass in the field. One of our parish priests (a recently ordained one; a "second lieutenant priest" as my father affectionately refers to them) came out to the camp site to celebrate Mass on a Saturday night. Since most were not "hardened vets" like myself, the impact of Mass by a campfire (with scouts as servers at the "altar" and as lectors) on some of the adults was pretty significant. My prayer was/is that the young men will remember that Mass, to take time for the more important things while doing other things, and will remember the example of the young priest and his love for the Eucharist, to seek out the Body of Christ wherever he can be found - at any nearby church, around a campfire, or on a battlefield.
I like to think these events can be small parts in the formation of true heroes, men like those noted above- ordinary people doing extraordinary things.
Thanks for your blog post, Frank.

Donald Sensing said...

Came here from The Anchoress. Great piece! I am a retired Army artillery officer now serving as an ordained minister, so this post was very meaningful to me.

One word, however: Military people just hate it when someone is said to have "won" the Medal of Honor. It isn't obtained in a contest or a drawing. One earns or is awarded the Medal, and is thereby a "recipient," but never a "winner." Thanks, and keep up the good work.

Frank said...

Thanks for your comment Daniel and for the information on the antimension, which I was unaware of.

Frank said...

@Anon 10:50, your description of "experience(ing) more important things while doing important things" hits the mark. I think those young men will always remember the holiness of the Mass that you describe. My young Cub Scout experienced also the Flag Retirement ceremony on a campout as well, and I wished I had experienced that when I was his age too. Thanks for your comment.

@Donald: Yes! You are so right about these awards, and this ol' Marine plumb forgot that signal truth. Edited to reflect that and thanks again. Also, as an artilleryman, you will appreciate this post on St. Barbara.

Anonymous said...

Semper Fidelis! There is a reason the Roman Collar is a military collar.

William a sinner. Most unlearned. The Least of all the faithful… said...

Hurrah!!!

emwenz said...

I appreciate your viewpoint..there was link on this site to a blog, pointing out all the errors in ritual observed during the celebration of the mass at different venues. Initially amusing, I was struck that the blogger was completely focused on "spot the error" where ever she searched..the mass and all it had to offer was secondary to her eagle eyed drive to bring to light any deviation in the ritual of the mass. The battlefield is a unique place and needs must in that circumstance only; but sometimes, as a Catholic of certain age, I'm disheartened by the spirit evidenced, I believe, by that
blogger of errors, it's all around me. I'm looking for so much more. Know what I'm talkin'about?

Allison said...

Thanks for commenting, emwenz. I have had similar feelings. I in no way at all endorse a "clown mass," or any such obvious perversion of a Mass. Those kind of gross distortions of the Mass aside, said, but I also believe that sometimes we can err too much in obsessing over very small liturgical details and miss the purpose of a reverent Mass celebrated by a priest with a good, faith-filled heart.

I have been in parishes where ALL the pastor talked about in homilies was the need for absolute liturgical purity and I found that emphasis to be stifling to my spirituality. In other words, there are so many aspects to being a faithful Catholic and if we emphasize just one aspect, no matter how correct it might be, we can miss other equally important parts to our faith life.

(Likewise, I would not feel comfortable attending a parish where ALL that was spoken of was the need for social justice actions...)

I am not sure if I am being clear, but did want to add my personal views.

Post a Comment


24 posted on 03/28/2011 5:47:40 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

25 posted on 03/28/2011 5:48:35 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Dr. Scarpetta; Notwithstanding; Gamecock
Yes, nice -- talking about brave Americans who walk into battlefield zones with no weapons, just the Bible.

These brave men who go to the most dangerous of all places with no defense except their beliefs

And the PCA guys here want to trash ALL of them for the sins of some. Why give in to these folks?

The bible refers to the OrthodoPresbyterian and Presbyterian C in America (OPC/PCA) when we read:

Proverbs 6:12-14
A worthless person, a wicked man (OPC/PCA),
Walks with a perverse mouth;
He winks with his eyes,
He shuffles his feet,
He points with his fingers;
Perversity is in his heart,
He devises evil continually,
He sows discord.

26 posted on 03/28/2011 5:49:35 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Cronos

27 posted on 03/28/2011 5:50:40 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

I’m not familiar with Arminian.


28 posted on 03/28/2011 5:51:16 AM PDT by Dr. Scarpetta
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To: Cronos

29 posted on 03/28/2011 5:52:05 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: surroundedbyblue; Gamecock
The problem is that Gamecock's group, the PCA is based on hatred, and the PCA is now motivated by it's master to spread hatred especially at a time of prayer and reflection and contemplation on Our Lord Jesus Christ

What do these folks hope to gain? The OPC/PCA folks want to drive away people from Christ. This is obvious in all of their statements where they spread hatred against every Christian group. They don't talk about what they believe, because if they do, then all would condemn them as non-Christian.

And, the PCA is now, as many say, heading down the road of the PCUSA to become the

The Pinko C of America (PCA)

with PCA pastors to soon be in homosexual partnerships

30 posted on 03/28/2011 5:54:18 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Dr. Scarpetta
:) Well, neither are the guys who accuse you Methodists. But the PCA/OPC makes it clear by saying ;John Wesley preached the Gospel of Satan"
31 posted on 03/28/2011 5:56:25 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Cronos

32 posted on 03/28/2011 5:56:48 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

33 posted on 03/28/2011 5:57:47 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

34 posted on 03/28/2011 5:58:25 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

35 posted on 03/28/2011 5:59:55 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Cronos

36 posted on 03/28/2011 6:01:59 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Notwithstanding

These are amazing pictures. Thank you for posting them! I’m ashamed to say that I haven’t considered priests in uniform like that! I will pray especially for them today.


37 posted on 03/28/2011 6:02:41 AM PDT by samiam1972 ("It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish."-Mother Teresa)
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To: Cronos

38 posted on 03/28/2011 6:02:58 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: samiam1972

My pleasure. Thanks for letting me know.

I want to cry thinking about how small-minded people smear such good men (aping the NYT and other communist-atheist types who understand that if you wish to attack Christ, you must attack the Catholic Church).


39 posted on 03/28/2011 6:10:23 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Iscool; Cronos

“So obviously, every thing they learned about the queer lifestyle, they learned from your religion...”

Cronos...Here’s another funny one for your list of anti-Catholic quotes...


40 posted on 03/28/2011 6:10:31 AM PDT by WPaCon (Obama: pansy progressive, mad Mohammedan, or totalitarian tyrant? Or all three?)
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Comment #41 Removed by Moderator

To: Notwithstanding

I’ve been trying to avoid these threads during Lent but the addition of your pictures drew me in! Truly holy men are a beautiful thing. I’m raising three boys(so far) of my own and would be so proud to have them serve our country and Our Lord.


42 posted on 03/28/2011 6:13:59 AM PDT by samiam1972 ("It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish."-Mother Teresa)
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To: Cronos

Not sure why you are spamming threads that I start with PCA information. I am not a member of the PCA.


43 posted on 03/28/2011 6:38:42 AM PDT by Gamecock (I didn't reach the top of the food chain just to become a vegetarian.)
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To: G Larry

Because teachers who abuse children are sent to jail.

Priests who abuse children get dumped on unsuspecting Catholic houses of worship.


44 posted on 03/28/2011 6:40:09 AM PDT by Gamecock (I didn't reach the top of the food chain just to become a vegetarian.)
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To: Gamecock

Spamming? Spreading the word about the fact that the PCA and the OPC serve their master in spread hate is not spamming


45 posted on 03/28/2011 6:40:20 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Gamecock
As I said,

Are they spreading their message of hate?

Despite the crowing that one may hear or read, the actual numbers show a large number leaving the Presbyterians as a whole

2009 membership 2010 membership Lost Gained
PCUSA 2,934,952 2,844,952 90,000
PCA 335,000 340,000 5,500
OPC 21,123 21,530 407
Disappearing Presbyterians 84,100
The PCA is 300,000 in membership

2011 Church Membership: Southern Baptists Decline; Jehovah Witnesses, Mormons Increase

And PCA statistics provide a blurry snapshot says that Total membership in 2009 – 346,408, an increase of 5,556 while in contrast the PCUSA has 2,000,000 members --> and dropping

If the PCA adds in 5,500 members each year, they will reach 1 million members in 118 years

Yet one can't go by the same growth percentage as growth tapers as size increases. But even taking that fallacious number, it will be 40 years. That's not counting the number of splits it will have before then.

The truth is that they shout a lot more on internet forums, giving one a wrong idea of their actual size. Why should one oppose these attackers of Christianity and America?

Because they attack the very foundations of our country by having made God into a monster who DECIDES on creating evil -- they do this when they state that God has decided it is “better to bring good out of evil, than not to permit any evil to exist.

They neglect to ask themselves How does God decide anyway since He knows the outcome?Is He NOT sure in the first place and needs to make a decision because He does not understand Himself ,thus making Him not ALL knowing?

If the OPC robot-maker god created evil than evil is part of the essence of the OPC/PCA idea of God. This is not the Christian God

The OPC/PCA believe that Christ has evil in Him as part of His essence since the second person of the Trinity is God incarnate. This is a horrendous belief that leads only to more people leaving Christ.

The OPC and the PCA (combined are 350,000) posters have one aim only -- attacking anyone who is not a member of their little groups

The OPC/PCA seems to be no more than a larger version of the Westboro Baptists -- and like them they do not serve Christ.

The bible refers to the OrthodoPresbyterian and Presbyterian C in America (OPC/PCA) when we read:

Proverbs 6:12-14

A worthless person, a wicked man (OPC/PCA),
Walks with a perverse mouth;
He winks with his eyes,
He shuffles his feet,
He points with his fingers;
Perversity is in his heart,
He devises evil continually,
He sows discord.

46 posted on 03/28/2011 6:40:54 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Gamecock
Besides, why are you spamming ME? --> where you ask if I know the differences between the OPC and the PCA.

Do you know the differences between these two?

47 posted on 03/28/2011 6:44:16 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Gamecock
Besides, why are you spamming ME? --> where you ask if I know the differences between the OPC and the PCA.

Do you know the differences between these two?

So tell us, what differentiates you PCA types from the OPC?

  1. Do you PCA types believe that Charismatic gifts (healing, talking in tongues) is still possible today?
  2. Do you PCA types have a liturgy?
  3. does the PCA have drama in its services?
  4. Does the PCA have liturgical dance in its services?
  5. Does the PCA like the OPC deal with dissent in a back-room manner?
  6. Do you allow singing with guitars, choirs etc. or just psalms?
  7. Do you hold to a literal 6 day creationism view?

What about the PCA view of Jews, Methodists, Pentecostals? Do you deny that the PCA just like the OPC considers these to be damnable heretics?

48 posted on 03/28/2011 6:47:09 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Gamecock
So, if you're not a member of the PCA or the OPC, then why the defence? Just join the rest of us Christians who have realised that the OPC/PCA preach nothing more than hatred: hatred of Methodists, Pentecostals, Catholics, Orthodox, Christian Martyrs, Adventists, Baptists, Lutherans, Jews, etc. etc.

It's only natural that the PCA and OPC members do this -- they do not believe in the God of Love, Jesus Christ.

49 posted on 03/28/2011 6:52:41 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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To: Notwithstanding; WPaCon; samiam1972; Dr. Scarpetta; MarkBsnr; Gamecock
Notwith:aping the NYT and other communist-atheist types who understand that if you wish to attack Christ, you must attack the Catholic Church

We had one sleeper type called Hank-kerchief who started all threads to set up Catholics versus Protestants. What was strange was even after it was revealed that he was a leftist writer who writes anti-Christian pieces, the familiar band of anti-Catholics (like the thread poster here) still stuck on the thread.

From that point on I began to think that many of the most rabid anti-Catholics (who keep posting threads attacking Catholicism and keep trying to incite CAtholic-Protestant fights) are just aiming to hurt Christianity as a whole

They have let the mask slip at times and I've realised that these are NOT protestants (like our friend Dr. Scarpetta who is a Protestant Christian) and just use the cover of "protestantism" to foment discord among Christians.

they will loudly shout out that they are Protestants, yet when Catholics avoid the FR to pray, these people then start threads attacking Wesleyan Methodists, Adventists, Pentecostals, Baptists, Lutherans etc. --> that reveals their true agenda.

50 posted on 03/28/2011 7:04:21 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin: 2012)
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