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HAVE YOU NOTICED THIS ABOUT MORMONS?
Various | April 17, 2011 | Vanity

Posted on 04/17/2011 2:58:04 PM PDT by greyfoxx39

HAVE YOU NOTICED THIS ABOUT MORMONS?
 
If you were to desire to enter the exclusive LDS-Mormon club, you would have to be agree to the church doctrine including this:
 
First Presidency Doctrinal Statements
It is not only his discourses that form the basis of Joseph F. Smith's doctrinal legacy. During his presidency, several important documents signed by the First Presidency and/or the Twelve were issued that still serve as a touch stone of Latter-day Saint belief. One such document, The Origin of Man: By the First Presidency, was issued in 1909 during a time when evolution was gaining attention in the academic world.

They wrote:

"In presenting the statement that follows we are not conscious of putting forth anything essentially new; neither is it our desire so to do. Truth is what we wish to present, and truth--eternal truth--is fundamentally old. A restatement of the original attitude of the Church relative to this matter is all that will be attempted here. To tell the truth as God has revealed it, and commend it to the acceptance of those who need to conform their opinions thereto, is the sole purpose of this presentation. 'God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.' In these plain and pointed words the inspired author of the book of Genesis made known to the world the truth concerning the origin of the human family."

They added:

"The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, basing its belief on divine revelation, ancient and modern, proclaims man to be the direct and lineal offspring of Deity. God Himself is an exalted man, perfected, enthroned, and supreme. By His almighty power He organized the earth, and all that it contains, from spirit and element, which exist co-eternally with Himself. He formed every plant that grows, and every animal that breathes, each after its own kind, spiritually and temporally--'that which is spiritual being in the likeness of that which is temporal, and that which is temporal in the likeness of that which is spiritual.' He made the tadpole and the ape, the lion and the elephant but He did not make them in His own image, nor endow them with Godlike reason and intelligence. Nevertheless, the whole animal creation will be perfected and perpetuated in the Hereafter, each class in its 'distinct order or sphere,' and will enjoy 'eternal felicity.' . . . Man is the child of God, formed in the divine image and endowed with divine attributes, and even as the infant son of an earthly father and mother is capable in due time of becoming a man, so the undeveloped offspring of celestial parentage is capable, by experience through ages and aeons, of evolving into a God."

http://www.meridianmagazine.com/biography/000128jfsdoctrinelegacy.html 

AND THIS: The non-creedal creed of the LDS church

 
 
The Articles of Faith
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
 

  1. We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost.
  2. We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam's transgression.
  3. We believe that through the Atonement of Christ, all mankind may be saved, by obedience to the laws and ordinances of the Gospel.
  4. We believe that the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel are: first, Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; second, Repentance; third, Baptism by immersion for the remission of sins; fourth, Laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost.
  5. We believe that a man must be called of God, by prophecy, and by the laying on of hands by those who are in authority, to preach the Gospel and administer in the ordinances thereof.
  6. We believe in the same organization that existed in the Primitive Church, namely, apostles, prophets, pastors, teachers, evangelists, and so forth.
  7. We believe in the gift of tongues, prophecy, revelation, visions, healing, interpretation of tongues, and so forth.
  8. We believe the Bible to be the word of God as far as it is translated correctly; we also believe the Book of Mormon to be the word of God.
  9. We believe all that God has revealed, all that He does now reveal, and we believe that He will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God.
  10. We believe in the literal gathering of Israel and in the restoration of the Ten Tribes; that Zion (the New Jerusalem) will be built upon the American continent; that Christ will reign personally upon the earth; and, that the earth will be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory.
  11. We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may.
  12. We believe in being subject to kings, presidents, rulers, and magistrates, in obeying, honoring, and sustaining the law.
  13. We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.

Joseph Smith

http://lds.org/scriptures/pgp/a-of-f/1.1-13?lang=eng#1

You would be required to: Become baptized, because the mormon church does not recognize Christian baptism as do many Christian denominations;  then become confirmed a member ot the mormon church; then become worthy to be "ordained" into the two "priesthoods"; (IF you are male.)
May 15, 1829, while Joseph translated passages of the Book of Mormon about the necessity of baptism, he and Oliver Cowdery had asked the Lord who had to baptize in His name. "The voice of the Redeemer spake peace to us," Oliver later wrote, and a heavenly messenger, John the Baptist, "came down clothed with glory." He conferred upon the two men the , which holds the "of the gospel of repentance, and of for the remission of sins."

John the Baptist directed the two men to baptize each other, and they soon also baptized others converted to the restored gospel. Through priesthood ordination they authorized others to perform baptism by immersion. From that small beginning, many millions of people worldwide have been baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Weeks later, Peter, James, and John, who possess "the keys of the kingdom, and of the dispensation of the fulness of times," appeared to Joseph and Oliver and conferred upon them the . Now the fulness of the gospel could be restored, the Church of Jesus Christ could be organized to "roll forth," and all the necessary for the salvation of God's children could be performed—including bestowing the gift of the Holy Ghost.

Because were restored to Joseph Smith, all of God's children can receive the ordinances of salvation such as baptism administered by those called of God to act and speak in His name.   D&C 13:1.2. D&C 128:20.3. D&C 65:2. 

priesthood keys

Keys are the rights of presidency, or the power given to man by God to direct, control, and govern God's priesthood on earth. Priesthood holders called to positions of presidency receive keys from those in authority over them. Priesthood holders use the priesthood only within the limits outlined by those who hold the keys. The President of the Church holds all priesthood keys (see D&C 107:65–67, 91–92; 132:7; The Guide to the Scriptures, "Keys of the Priesthood," 141).  Note: Women are not eligible to become "Priesthood Holders".

Then, if you become "worthy" according to mormon requirements, which include among other things, obeying the Word of Wisdom;

Doctrine and Covenants Section 89 

Revelation given through Joseph Smith the Prophet, at Kirtland, Ohio, 27 February 1833 (see History of the Church, 1:327–29). As a consequence of the early brethren using tobacco in their meetings, the Prophet was led to ponder upon the matter; consequently, he inquired of the Lord concerning it. This revelation, known as the Word of Wisdom, was the result. The first three verses were originally written as an inspired introduction and description by the Prophet.

1–9, The use of wine, strong drinks, tobacco, and hot drinks is proscribed; 10–17, Herbs, fruits, flesh, and grain are ordained for the use of man and of animals; 18–21, Obedience to gospel law, including the Word of Wisdom, brings temporal and spiritual blessings.

You may then appear before your "spiritual leader" or Ward Bishop, to answer these questions:

Temple Recommend Questions:

 1 Do you have faith in and a testimony of God the Eternal Father, His Son Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost?

 2 Do you have a testimony of the Atonement of Christ and of His role as Savior and Redeemer?

 3 Do you have a testimony of the restoration of the gospel in these the latter days?

 4 Do you sustain the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as the Prophet, Seer, and Revelator and as the only person on the earth who possesses and is authorized to exercise all priesthood keys? Do you sustain members of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as prophets, seers, and revelators? Do you sustain the other General Authorities and local authorities of the Church?

 5 Do you live the law of chastity?

 6 Is there anything in your conduct relating to members of your family that is not in harmony with the teachings of the Church?

 7 Do you support, affiliate with, or agree with any group or individual whose teachings or practices are contrary to or oppose those accepted by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

 8 Do you strive to keep the covenants you have made, to attend your sacrament and other meetings, and to keep your life in harmony with the laws and commandments of the gospel?

 9 Are you honest in your dealings with your fellowmen?

10 Are you a full-tithe payer?

11 Do your keep the Word of Wisdom?

12 Do you have financial or other oblgations to a former spouse or children? If yes, are you current in meeting those obligations?

13 If you have previously received your temple endowment:

     Do you keep the covenants that you made in the temple?

     Do you wear the garment both night and day as instructed in the endowment and in accordance with the covenant you made in the temple?

14 Have there been any sins or misdeeds in your life that should have been resolved with priesthood authorities but have not been?

15 Do you consider yourself worthy to enter the Lord's house and participate in temple ordinances?
 
If you pass the Recommend test, you will be issued a piece of paper with a bar code on it that will allow you to enter the temple,  No one may enter except those with "recommends"  You will then take part in arcane rituals and are described as "Covenants"...covenants that are said to bind YOU and also to bind GOD.  In this "temple session",  you will be required to take this oath:

You and each of you covenant and promise before God, angels, and these witnesses at this altar, that you do accept the Law of Consecration as contained in the Doctrine and Covenants, in that you do consecrate yourselves, your time, talents, and everything with which the Lord has blessed you, or with which he may bless you, to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for the building up of the Kingdom of God on the earth and for the establishment of Zion .

NOTE:  This vow has been taken by Mitt Romney, Jon Huntsman, Harry Reid, Orrin Hatch and ALL others who have a position in the US Federal Government who are "worthy" members of the mormon church including FBI, CIA, Secret Service, etc. and by "worthy" members of the mormon church in your city, state, on your school board...wherever a position of authority is available.

After you take part in the temple rites, you are required to wear a specific underwear garment for the rest of your life.

Those baptized members including girls and women, who are too young to take part in the temple rituals will be required to take part in "proxy" Baptism for the Dead after they also acquire their own "temple recommend".

There are several religions larger than most Christian denominations, and together they are larger than all of them combined. Their adherents for centuries have lived and died and never heard the word baptism. What is the answer for them?

That is a most disturbing question. What power would establish one Lord and one baptism, and then allow it to be that most of the human family never comes within its influence? With that question unanswered, the vast majority of the human family must be admitted to be lost, and against any reasonable application of the law of justice or of mercy, either. How could Christianity itself be sustained?

When you find the true church you will find the answer to that disturbing question.

If a church has no answer for that, how can it lay claim to be His Church? He is not willing to write off the majority of the human family who were never baptized.

Those who admit in puzzled frustration that they have no answer to this cannot lay claim to authority to administer to the affairs of the Lord on the earth, or to oversee the work by which all mankind must be saved.

Since they had no answer concerning the fate of those who had not been baptized, Christians came to believe that baptism itself was not critical in importance, and that the name of Christ may not be all that essential. There must, they supposed, be other names whereby man could be saved.

The answer to that puzzling challenge could not be invented by men, but was revealed. I underline the word revealed. Revelation too is an essential characteristic of His Church. Communication with Him through revelation was established when the Church was established. It has not ceased and it is constant in the Church today.

As I address myself to the question of those who died without baptism, I do so with the deepest reverence, for it touches on a sacred work. Little known to the world, we move obediently forward in a work that is so marvelous in its prospects, transcendent above what man might have dreamed of, supernal, inspired, and true. In it lies the answer.

In the earliest days of the Church the Prophet was given direction through revelation that work should commence on the building of a temple, akin to the temples that had been constructed anciently. There was revealed ordinance work to be performed there for the salvation of mankind.

Then another ancient scripture, ignored or overlooked by the Christian world in general, was understood and moved into significant prominence: “Else what shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all? why are they then baptized for the dead?” (1 Cor. 15:29.)

Here then, was the answer. With proper authority an individual could be baptized for and in behalf of someone who had never had the opportunity. That individual would then accept or reject the baptism, according to his own desire.

This work came as a great reaffirmation of something very basic that the Christian world now only partly believes: and that is that there is life after death. Mortal death is no more an ending than birth was a beginning. The great work of redemption goes on beyond the veil as well as here in mortality."

“The Redemption of the Dead,” Ensign, Nov. 1975, 97

Now,  this is just a part of what is required to call yourself "Mormon".  Even sects that adhere more closely to the teachings of Joseph Smith, such as the FLDS have been excommunicated for practicing polygamy which is STILL part of mormon "scripture"

Revelation given through Joseph Smith the Prophet, at Nauvoo, Illinois, recorded July 12, 1843, relating to the new and everlasting covenant, including the eternity of the marriage covenant, as also plurality of wives. HC 5: 501–507. Although the revelation was recorded in 1843, it is evident from the historical records that the doctrines and principles involved in this revelation had been known by the Prophet since 1831.

, Exaltation is gained through the new and everlasting covenant; , The terms and conditions of that covenant are set forth; , Celestial marriage and a continuation of the family unit enable men to become gods; , The strait and narrow way that leads to eternal lives; , Law given relative to blasphemy against the Holy Ghost; , Promises of eternal increase and exaltation made to prophets and saints in all ages; , Joseph Smith is given the power to bind and seal on earth and in heaven; , The Lord seals upon him his exaltation; , Emma Smith is counseled to be faithful and true; , Laws governing the plurality of wives are set forth.

  1 Verily, thus saith the Lord unto you my servant Joseph, that inasmuch as you have inquired of my hand to know and understand wherein I, the Lord, justified my servants Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, as also Moses, David and Solomon, my servants, as touching the principle and doctrine of their having many a and b

  2 Behold, and lo, I am the Lord thy God, and will answer thee as touching this matter.

  3 Therefore, a thy heart to receive and b the instructions which I am about to give unto you; for all those who have this law revealed unto them must obey the same.

  4 For behold, I reveal unto you a new and an everlasting a; and if ye abide not that covenant, then are ye b; for no one can c this covenant and be permitted to enter into my glory.

Now, to those of you who are reading this I have ONE question:

If ANY OF US cannot be called "mormon" unless WE adhere to all the requirements (and more) listed above.......WHY IS IT THAT MORMONS BELIEVE THAT ALL THEY HAVE TO DO IS INSIST THAT THEY BE CALLED "CHRISTIAN" AND THE CHRISTIAN WORLD IS REQUIRED TO BOW TO ITS DEMAND?


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Disclaimer: I am former LDS and Pro-Christian. I post articles from official mormon sources among others, that often relate to current discussions taking place on the forum to provide a means for open discussion in the Religion forum.
 
This is in response to this thread:

Lent celebrated locally as Easter nears this month [Lent through eyes of Lds journalist]

 
FROM THE RELIGION FORUM MODERATOR:

Open threads are a town square. Antagonism though not encouraged, should be expected

Posters may argue for or against beliefs of any kind. They may tear down other’s beliefs. They may ridicule.

On all threads, but particularly “open” threads, posters must never “make it personal.” Reading minds and attributing motives are forms of “making it personal.” Making a thread “about” another Freeper is “making it personal.”

When in doubt, review your use of the pronoun “you” before hitting “enter.”

Like the Smoky Backroom, the conversation may be offensive to some.

Thin-skinned posters will be booted from “open” threads because in the town square, they are the disrupters.

http://www.freerepublic.com/~religionmoderator/

 Thin-skinned (emotional, whiney or mercurial temper) posters are the disruptors on open threads.

 

1 posted on 04/17/2011 2:58:09 PM PDT by greyfoxx39
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To: greyfoxx39

Have you ever noticed this about anti-Mormons?

http://www.jefflindsay.com/LDSFAQ/FQ_antis.shtml


2 posted on 04/17/2011 3:04:28 PM PDT by skyman
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To: skyman

When Christians start demending to be called “mormon” then there I will consider your link.


3 posted on 04/17/2011 3:06:33 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: greyfoxx39

This is the most objective, scholarly, and definitive treatise on the subject. It requires a careful and dispassionate read: I wish all Mormons would read this. They would immediately ditch this “religion” as a fraud.

Is Mormonism Christian? A Respected Advocate for Interreligious Cooperation Responds

Copyright © 2000 Richard John Neuhaus.
All rights reserved. Used with permission..

That is not the only interesting question, but it is probably the most important. Most non-Mormons have little occasion to think about Mormonism, and those who do tend toward distinctly negative thoughts. Although there is this curious thing of recent years that many conservative Christians warmly welcome Mormons as allies in various cultural tasks. To cite but one recent instance, it was an alliance of Catholics, evangelicals, and Mormons that was instrumental in persuading the people of Hawaii to reject same-sex marriage. Yet a few issues ago we published an article by a Mormon doctor presenting the case for Natural Family Planning and received blistering letters of protest.

We thought that the fact that the argument was not being advanced by a Catholic might make it more persuasive to some. But at least some readers did not see it that way. Didn’t we know that Mormons are the enemies of Christ and his Church? Such views are stronger in the Northwest and, increasingly, in the Southwest where the Mormon presence is a force to be reckoned with.

“For missionary and public relations purposes, the LDS may present Mormonism as an ‘add-on,’ a kind of Christianity-plus, but that is not the official narrative and doctrine.”

Ours is an interreligious enterprise, basically but not exclusively Jewish and Christian. Dr. Bruce Hafen is on our Editorial Advisory Board. He has held prominent positions in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), including that of provost and dean of the law school at Brigham Young University. I can’t say that many of my friends are Mormons, but some are.

We are obliged to respect human dignity across the board, and to affirm common discernments of the truth wherever we find them. Where we disagree we should try to put the best possible construction on the position of the other, while never trimming the truth. That will become more important as Mormons become more of a presence, both in this country and the world.

There are about ten million of them now, with about one-half of the membership in the U.S. Sociologist Rodney Stark — a non-Mormon with strong personal connections to the LDS — predicts that, on the basis of present growth patterns, there will be more than 265 million Mormons by the end of this century, making it the most important new religion in world history since Islam. For reasons I will come to, I think that is improbable. Put differently, if that happens, Mormonism will be something dramatically different from what it has been over the last century and a half.

Some while back we were sent for review the Encyclopedia of Mormonism: The History, Scripture, Doctrine, and Procedures of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It’s a big five-volume set, written largely by professors at Brigham Young; we weren’t sure what to do with it, but I’ve been reading in it with great benefit. Then comes a big new book by Richard N. Ostling, Mormon America: The Power and the Promise, published by HarperSanFrancisco (454 pp., $26). It is a remarkable piece of work and likely to be the best general introduction to Mormonism for years to come.

The Ostlings are evangelical Protestants. Dick was for many years religion editor at Time and now covers religion for the Associated Press. I have had frequent occasion to say that he is one of the two or three best religion reporters in the country. Joan is a freelance writer with a background in the practice and teaching of journalism. What they have achieved with this assiduously researched and very readable book puts us all in their debt. Apparently the powers that be in Salt Lake City are ambivalent about the book, but it is probably as thorough and fair a treatment of the LDS by outsiders as they are likely to get.

Much to Admire

The Ostlings find much to admire. Mormonism gives a whole new meaning to being “pro-family.” In Mormon belief, families are, quite literally, forever. Proxies are baptized on behalf of the dead, and families and relatives hope to go on living together and procreating in a celestial eternity. All children are baptized at age eight, and at twelve boys (no girls allowed) take their place of responsibility and status by entering the first level of the priesthood — the priesthood, according to Joseph Smith, having been restored by John the Baptist in upstate New York in 1829.

While bar mitzvah among Jews and confirmation among Christians too often means that young people graduate from their religious responsibilities, Mormon youth at that point in life graduate into intense and clearly defined responsibilities within the community. Also widely and justly admired is the LDS welfare system, whereby the community takes care of its own when they get into economic or other difficulty. At present, in a time of economic prosperity, only about 5 percent require help from the welfare system. (A figure, interestingly, about parallel with Edward Banfield’s famous claim about the percentage of people in any society who will never be able to make it on their own.)

There is no denying that the prohibition of alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine has a payoff. Mormons live; on average, eight to eleven years longer than other Americans, and death rates from cancer and cardiovascular diseases are about half those of the general population. Of course, it is fair to note, they do die of other things, and one may do one’s own calculation about the risk worth taking for a scotch before dinner and a cigar afterward, never mind one’s morning coffee. (The most recent Harvard longitudinal study found that the strongest positive correlation between health and habits is the daily consumption of about three ounces of wine or liquor. Go figure.)

In addition, a strong emphasis on chastity sharply reduces sexually transmitted diseases, while a tightly knit and supportive community makes homicide and suicide rare. Put it all together, and one concludes that Mormonism is good for your physical health. Whether it is good for your spiritual health is a disputed question. (It should also be noted that medical data on the strongly committed in other religious communities are comparable to the Mormon findings.)

There are other things to admire. Brigham Young University, for instance, where, because of church subsidies, young Mormons get the entire package (tuition, room, board, etc.) for less than $10,000 a year. The ticket is slightly more for non-Mormons, but there are very few takers. There is also the Church Educational System, which involves hundreds of thousands in continuing education programs here and around the world. Nor can the most severe critics deny the energy, enthusiasm, and organization of the LDS in its missionary zeal, and in its dramatic presentation of its colorful history, whether through the Mormon Tabernacle Choir or annual pageants reenacting the key episodes of its sacred stories.

In a world that seems to be largely adrift, it is no little thing to be part of an organized crusade in which you and those who are closest to you view your life as crucial to the unfolding of the cosmic drama.

Restoring the Church

The LDS is, among other things, a very big business tightly controlled from the top down. If one believes that the entire enterprise is based on revelation that is authoritatively interpreted by divinely appointed officers, it makes sense that control should be from the top down. The LDS claims that God chose Joseph Smith to reestablish the Church of Jesus Christ after it had disappeared some 1,700 years earlier following the death of the first apostles. To complicate the picture somewhat, God’s biblical work was extended to the Americas somewhere around 2000 B.C. and continued here until A.D. 421. This is according to the Book of Mormon, the scriptures given to Joseph Smith on golden tablets by the Angel Moroni. American Indians are called Lamanites and are part of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel.

Jesus came to preach to these Indians and for a long time there was a flourishing church here until it fell into apostasy, only to be restored, as the golden tablets foretold, by Joseph Smith. In addition to giving new scriptures, God commissioned Smith to revise the Bible, the text of which had been corrupted over the centuries by Jews and Christians.

Today’s Quorum of the Twelve Apostles is, allegedly, in direct succession to Smith, and the First Presidency claims powers that would have made St. Peter, never mind most of his successors, blush. The top leadership is composed, with few exceptions, of men experienced in business and with no formal training in theology or related disciplines.

The President (who is also a prophet, seer, and revelator) is the oldest apostle, which means he is sometimes very old indeed and far beyond his prime. Decisions are made in the tightest secrecy, inevitably giving rise to suspicions and conspiracy theories among outsiders and a substantial number of members. Revenues from tithes, investments, and Mormon enterprises have built what the Ostlings say “might be the most efficient churchly money machine on earth.” They back up with carefully detailed research their “conservative” estimate that LDS assets are in the range of $25-30 billion.

Protecting the Stories

But, of course, the most important control is over the sacred stories, and attendant truth claims, upon which the entire enterprise rests. Of the telling of history, Orwell wrote, “He who controls the past controls the future and he who controls the present controls the past.” The Ostlings devote a great deal of attention to “dissenters and exiles” who have tried to tell the sacred stories honestly, and in a manner that might bring them into conversation with other stories of the world. Some may think the Ostlings devote too much attention to these “troublemakers,” but I think not.

In my limited experience with, for instance, people associated with the publication Sunstone, these are devout Mormons who are seized by the correct intuition that truth that must be protected within the circle of true believers, that cannot intelligently engage critical examination by outsiders, is in some fundamental sense doubtfully true. Some of the “dissenters and exiles” may be dismissable as troublemakers — a species all too familiar in other religious communities as well. I expect, however, that what most of these people are trying to do is much more important to the possible futures of the LDS than all the billions in assets, massive building programs, and ambitiously organized missionary campaigns combined.

To give a credible account of the sacred stories and truth claims is no easy task. Not to put too fine a point on it, the founding stories and doctrines of Mormonism appear to the outsider as a bizarre phantasmagoria of fevered religious imagination not untouched by perverse genius. Germinated in the “burnt-over district” of upstate New York in the early nineteenth century, where new religions and spiritualities produced a veritable rainforest of novel revelations, the claims of Joseph Smith represent a particularly startling twist of the kaleidoscope of religious possibilities.

In 1831, Alexander Campbell, cofounder of the Disciples of Christ, said that Smith pasted together “every error and almost every truth discussed in New York for the last ten years.” Much of the teaching reflects the liberal Protestantism of the time, even the Transcendental and Gnostic fevers that were in the air: e.g., a God in process of becoming, progressive revelation, the denial of original sin, and an unbridled optimism about the perfectibility of man. Mix that in with the discovery of golden tablets written in a mysterious language, the bodily appearance of God the Father and Son, angelic apparitions, and a liberal dose of Masonic ritual and jargon, and the result is, quite simply, fantastic. The question, of course, is whether it is true.

In what sense true? It is true in the sense that it is meaningful for those who believe it uncritically, and even for more critical souls who embrace the community whose fabulous founding, they contend, points to higher truths. In the conventional version controlled by LDS authorities, it is true if you believe it is true. Thus is the back door shut against potentially subversive reason. One possible response is to say that all religion is finally based on faith and is incapable of rational demonstration. Did not St. Paul say that the gospel of Christ is “foolishness” according to the wisdom of the world? Of course he did.

But every part of the traditional Christian story has been and is subjected to critical examination, by believers and nonbelievers alike — and that examination, with its attending disagreements, will go on to the end of time. Over two thousand years, from Origen and Augustine through Anselm, Aquinas, Newman, Barth, and Balthasar, the truth claims of Christianity have engaged, with utmost intensity and sophistication, alternative and opposing construals of reality. In short, there is a very long Christian intellectual tradition. There is not, or at least not until very recently, such a Mormon tradition. And those who are interested in encouraging such inquiry typically find themselves in the company of “dissenters and exiles.” Keep in mind, however, that Mormonism is not yet two centuries old. A youngish Mormon intellectual today is in relation of time to Joseph Smith roughly comparable to Origen in relation to the apostles.

But his task is ever so much more difficult than that of Irenaeus, Origen, and the many other early Christian thinkers. There is, for instance, the surpassingly awkward fact that not a single person, place, or event that is unique to the Book of Mormon has ever been proven to exist.

Outside the fanum of true believers, these tales cannot help but appear to be the product of fantasy and fabrication. There is, moreover, a corrosive tradition of make-believe in the LDS, such as the claim that Joseph Smith translated the Book of Abraham — a book he said was written by Abraham — from Egyptian papyri that were later proven to be nothing but conventional funerary inscriptions.

The sanitized story of Mormonism promoted by the LDS tries to hide so much that cannot be hidden. The Ostlings are to be commended for resisting sensationalism in relating the sensational history of polygamy in the LDS, including Joseph Smith’s coercive use of threats of eternal damnation in order to procure young women he desired as additional wives. (On this score, the quasi-official Encyclopedia is also considerably more candid than the usual LDS presentations.)

And how, except by a practiced schizophrenia, can LDS biblical scholars engage with other scholars if they are required to give credence to the normative status of Smith’s “translation” (i.e., rewriting) of the King James Bible? There is a long list of particulars in the formidable obstacles to be overcome if anything like a credible intellectual tradition is to be secured, and not least among the obstacles is the history of LDS leadership in backstopping secretiveness with mendacity. Taking note of these realities is not to deny the frequent moral courage, indeed heroism, of the early leadership, or the continuing devotion and talent of their successors.

Missionary Zeal

The LDS is much given to boosterism, and it is no surprise that its leaders relish the projections of almost exponential growth offered by such as Rodney Stark. Nobody can help but be impressed by the thousands of clean-cut Mormon young men who go on mission, two by two, knocking on the doors of the world, but the Ostlings helpfully put this missionary enterprise into perspective by comparing it with the many times larger enterprise of various Christian groups, noting as well that, unlike the Mormons, these missionaries do not limit themselves to winning converts but minister to the illiterate, the poor, and others in need.

Moreover, these Christian efforts result in large and thriving indigenous churches that engage and transform local cultures, whereas the Mormon mission, totally controlled and directed from Salt Lake City, is about as pure an instance of American cultural imperialism as can be imagined, albeit a benevolently intended imperialism.

It appears also that the figures of Mormon growth are considerably inflated, not taking into account the massive defections through the back door, especially in developing countries. The Ostlings observe, “Mormonism succeeds by building on a preexisting Christian culture and by being seen as an add-on, drawing converts through a form of syncretism. Mormonism flourishes best in settings with some prior Christianization.” There is, in this view, a parasitic dynamic in Mormon growth.

Yet the Ostlings suggest that, despite doctrinal and demographic problems, Mormonism may continue to thrive. “Ours is a relational era,” they write, “not a conceptual one. Members are more likely to be attracted by networking and community than by truth claims. The adherents appear to be contented or docile in their discontent, except for some thousands of intellectuals.” I am not so sure, and that brings us to the opening question of whether

Mormonism is Christian or a new religion tenuously founded on fables and sustained by authoritarian management. Maybe ours is a time in which truth does not matter that much in terms of institutional flourishing, a time in which communities can get along with useful, if not particularly noble, lies. But we should not too easily resign ourselves to that conclusion.

An Insulting Question

Asking whether Mormonism is Christian or Mormons are Christians (a slightly different question) is thought to be insulting. “How can you ask that,” protests a Mormon friend, “when we clearly love the Lord Jesus as much as we do?” It is true that St. Paul says that nobody can say “Jesus is Lord” except by the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:3). But that only indicates that aspects of Mormon faith are touched by the Holy Spirit, as is every element of truth no matter where it is found.

A Mormon academic declares that asking our question “is a bit like asking if African Americans are human.” No, it is not even a bit like that. “Christian” in this context is not honorific but descriptive. Nobody questions whether Mormons are human. To say that Jews, Muslims, or Buddhists are not Christians is no insult. It is a statement of fact, indeed of respect for their difference. The question is whether that is a fact and a difference that applies also to Mormonism.

The question as asked by Mormons is turned around: are non-Mormons who claim to be Christians in fact so? The emphatic and repeated answer of the Mormon scriptures and the official teaching of the LDS is that we are not. We are members of “the great and abominable church” that was built by frauds and imposters after the death of the first apostles.

The true church and true Christianity simply went out of existence, except for its American Indian interlude, until it was rediscovered and reestablished by Joseph Smith in upstate New York, and its claims will be vindicated when Jesus returns, sooner rather than later, at a prophetically specified intersection in Jackson County, Missouri.

The Ostlings, in a manner common among evangelical Protestants, address the question of whether Mormons are Christians exclusively in terms of doctrine. Mormonism claims that God is an exalted man, not different in kind as Creator is different in kind from creature. The Mormon claim is, “What God was, we are. What God is, we will become.” Related to this is the teaching that the world was not created ex nihilo but organized into its present form, and that the trespass in the Garden of Eden, far from being the source of original sin, was a step toward becoming what God is.

Further, Mormonism teaches that there is a plurality of gods. Mormons dislike the term “polytheism,” preferring “henotheism,” meaning that there is a head God who is worshiped as supreme. If Christian doctrine is summarized in, for instance, the Apostles’ Creed as understood by historic Christianity, official LDS teaching adds to the creed, deviates from it, or starkly opposes it almost article by article.

LDS teaching that believers are on the way to becoming gods has, of course, interesting connections with early church fathers and their teaching on “theosis” or “deification,” a teaching traditionally accented more in the Christianity of the East than of the West, but theologically affirmed by both. Some Mormon thinkers have picked up on those connections and have even recruited, not very convincingly, C. S. Lewis in support of LDS doctrine. (Lewis simply offers rhetorical riffs on classical Christian teaching and in no way suggests an ontological equivalence between Creator and creature.)

Christianity and the History of Christians

Beyond these doctrinal matters, as inestimably important as they are, one must ask what it means to be Christian if one rejects the two thousand year history of what in fact is Christianity. Christianity is inescapably doctrinal but it is more than doctrines. Were it only a set of doctrines, Christianity would have become another school of philosophy, much like other philosophical schools of the Greco-Roman world. Christianity is the past and present reality of the society composed of the Christian people. As is said in the Nicene Creed, “We believe in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church.” That reality encompasses doctrine, ministry, liturgy, and a rule of life. Christians disagree about precisely where that Church is to be located historically and at present, but almost all agree that it is to be identified with the Great Tradition defined by the apostolic era through at least the first four ecumenical councils, and continuing in diverse forms to
the present day. That is the Christianity that LDS teaching rejects and condemns as an abomination and fraud.

Yet Mormonism is inexplicable apart from Christianity and the peculiar permutations of Protestant Christianity in nineteenth-century America. It may in this sense be viewed as a Christian derivative. It might be called a Christian heresy, except heresy is typically a deviation within the story of the Great Tradition that Mormonism rejects tout court. Or Mormonism may be viewed as a Christian apostasy.

Before his death in 1844, Joseph Smith was faced with many apostasies within the Mormon ranks, and since then there have been more than a hundred schisms among those who claim to be his true heirs. Still today LDS leaders quote Smith when censuring or excommunicating critics. For instance, this from Smith: “That man who rises up to condemn others, finding fault with the Church, saying that they are out of the way, while he himself is righteous, then know assuredly, that man is in the high road to apostasy.”

With respect to the real existing Christianity that is the Church, the words apply in spades to Joseph Smith. He knew, of course, that he was rejecting the Christianity of normative tradition, and he had an explanation. On the creation ex nihilo question, for instance, he declared only weeks before his death: “If you tell [critics] that God made the world out of something, they will call you a fool. But I am learned, and know more than all the world put together. The Holy Ghost does, anyhow; and he is within me, and comprehends more than all the world; and I will associate myself with him.”

By definition, he could not be apostate because he spoke for God. It is an answer, of sorts.

The history of Christianity, notably since the sixteenth-century Reformation, is littered with prophets and seers who have reestablished “the true church,” usually in opposition to the allegedly false church of Rome, and then, later, in opposition to their own previously true churches. There are many thousands of such Christian groups today. Most of them claim to represent the true interpretation of the Bible. A smaller number lay claim to additional revelations by which the biblical witness must be “corrected.” One thinks, for instance, of the Unification Church of Rev. Sun Myung Moon.

There are other similarities between Mormonism and the Unification Church, such as the emphasis on the celestial significance of marriage and family. According to the Encyclopedia of Mormonism, “Gods and humans are the same species of being, but at different stages of development in a divine continuum, and the heavenly Father and Mother are the heavenly pattern, model, and example of what mortals can become through obedience to the gospel.”

Another Religion

Some have suggested that the LDS is a Christian derivative much as Christianity is a Jewish derivative, but that is surely wrong. The claim of Christianity is that its gospel of Jesus Christ is in thorough continuity with the Old Testament and historic Israel, that the Church is the New Israel, which means that it is the fulfillment of the promise that Israel would be “a light to the nations.” The Church condemned Marcion’s rejection of the Old Testament, and she never presumed to rewrite or correct the Hebrew Scriptures on the basis of a new revelation.

On the contrary, she insisted that the entirety of the old covenant bears witness to the new. While it is a Christian derivative, the LDS is, by way of sharpest contrast, in radical discontinuity with historical Christianity. The sacred stories and official teachings of the LDS could hardly be clearer about that. For missionary and public relations purposes, the LDS may present Mormonism as an “add-on,” a kind of Christianity-plus, but that is not the official narrative and doctrine.

A closer parallel might be with Islam. Islam is a derivative of Judaism, and Christianity. Like Joseph Smith, Muhammad in the seventh century claimed new revelations and produced in the Qur’an a “corrected” version of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, presumably by divine dictation. Few dispute that Islam is a new and another religion, and Muslims do not claim to be Christian, although they profess a deep devotion to Jesus. Like Joseph Smith and his followers, they do claim to be the true children of Abraham.

Christians in dialogue with Islam understand it to be an interreligious, not an ecumenical, dialogue. Ecumenical dialogue is dialogue between Christians. Dialogue with Mormons who represent official LDS teaching is interreligious dialogue.

One must again keep in mind that Mormonism is still very young. It is only now beginning to develop an intellectually serious theological tradition. Over the next century and more, those who are now the “dissidents and exiles” may become the leaders in the forging, despite the formidable obstacles, a rapprochement with historic Christianity, at which point the dialogue could become ecumenical. As noted earlier, there is the interesting phenomenon of Mormon thinkers appealing to the Christian tradition, from Irenaeus through C. S. Lewis, in support of aspects of their doctrine.

And there is the poignant and persistent insistence of Mormons, “We really are Christians!” Sometimes that claim means that they really are Christians and the rest of us are not. Increasingly, at least among some Mormons, the claim is that they are Christians in substantively the same way that others are Christians.

It is a claim we should question but not scorn. Such a claim contains, just possibly, the seed of promise that over time, probably a very long time, there could be within Mormonism a development of doctrine that would make it recognizable as a peculiar but definite Christian communion. Such attempted development, however, could produce a major schism between Mormons who are determined to be Christian, on the one hand, and the new religion taught by the LDS on the other.

Meanwhile, Mormonism and the impressive empire of the LDS will likely be with us for a long time. They are no longer an exotic minority that is, by virtue of minority status, exempt from critical examination and challenge. Such examination and challenge, always fair-minded and sympathetic, is exemplified by the Ostlings’ very helpful book, Mormon America. I am skeptical about the more dramatic projections of Mormon growth in the future. That depends in part on the degree to which the Ostlings are right in thinking our era is “relational” rather than “conceptual.”

It depends in larger part on developments internal to the LDS and transformations in its self-understanding and self-presentation to the world. The leadership of the LDS will have to decide whether its growth potential is enhanced or hampered by presenting Mormonism as a new religion or as, so to speak, another Christian denomination. Sometimes they seem to want to have it both ways, but that will become increasingly difficult. And, of course, for Mormons whose controlling concern is spiritual, intellectual, and moral integrity, questions of marketing and growth, as well as questions of institutional vitality and communal belonging, must be clearly subordinated to the question of truth.

As for the rest of us, we owe to Mormon Americans respect for their human dignity, protection of their religious freedom, readiness for friendship, openness to honest dialogue, and an eagerness to join hands in social and cultural tasks that advance the common good. That, perhaps, is work enough, at least for the time being.


4 posted on 04/17/2011 3:06:48 PM PDT by Steelfish (ui)
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To: greyfoxx39
Thin-skinned (emotional, whinny or mercurial temper) posters are the disruptor's on open threads.

Pretty much eliminates all mormons.

5 posted on 04/17/2011 3:09:53 PM PDT by svcw (Non forgiveness is like holding a hot coal thinking the other person will be blistered)
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To: greyfoxx39

Here is what I’ve noticed about the Mormons that I’ve known through the years:

They are:

Unfailingly nice.
Loyal friends, even to non-Mormons like me.
Quick to forgive.
Trustworthy.
Honest as the day is long.
Fallible like us all.

I guess I haven’t paid much attention to the other stuff you mentioned.


6 posted on 04/17/2011 3:10:28 PM PDT by poindexter
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To: greyfoxx39
6. Is there anything in your conduct relating to members of your family that is not in harmony with the teachings of the Church?

I find this interesting.

As we all (or mostly) have experienced a kind of shunning from lds family if we do not go along with their mormonISM.

7 posted on 04/17/2011 3:13:45 PM PDT by svcw (Non forgiveness is like holding a hot coal thinking the other person will be blistered)
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To: Steelfish
That is an interesting article, however it does NOT answer my question.

Why should the Christian world bow to the demand of the mormon church that they can truthfully claim the name "Christian" when there is no way on this earth that anyone can claim the name "mormon" without adhering to all the requirements? Especially after more than 160 years of mormon leaders demeaning Christianity and all Christians?

Are Christians to be swayed by slick PR campaigns on TV, radio and the internet? Or should mormons adhere to the teachings of Jesus Christ..and GIVE UP the idolatry and polytheism?

8 posted on 04/17/2011 3:16:56 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: poindexter
I guess I haven’t paid much attention to the other stuff you mentioned.

Sounds to me like you have better things to do with your time than worrying about the dire threat posed by Mormons. LOL
9 posted on 04/17/2011 3:17:48 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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Comment #10 Removed by Moderator

To: poindexter
I guess I haven’t paid much attention to the other stuff you mentioned.

God has.

11 posted on 04/17/2011 3:18:13 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: greyfoxx39
I've been around here a long time and I've never seen a thread that was not "an open thread" unless it was closed by the mods for ALL posts.

There is a forum for religion, which is where your vanity post should be and as far as I can recall "vanity posts" have always been frowned upon.

Some of you clowns living in fear of other religions really need to get a life and grow up.

12 posted on 04/17/2011 3:21:20 PM PDT by lewislynn ( What does the global warming movement and the Fairtax movement have in commom? Misinformation)
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To: lewislynn
This WAS posted in the Religion Forum. Check it out.

Can you answer the question I asked?

13 posted on 04/17/2011 3:26:37 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: greyfoxx39
God has.

LOL....none are so weak when they invoke God to justify their own weakness by bashing someone elses faith.

You need to re examine you own beliefs, FRiend.

14 posted on 04/17/2011 3:28:54 PM PDT by Las Vegas Ron (The Tree of Liberty did not grow from an ACORN!)
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To: Las Vegas Ron
Don't like the message...make it all about the messenger...can YOU answer the question I asked?
15 posted on 04/17/2011 3:30:32 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: greyfoxx39

I do not know much about the theological issues, but, in case you’re interested, I have worked with many Mormons in my career and found them to be wonderful people...professionally and personally. The number of individuals is around 10...FWIW.


16 posted on 04/17/2011 3:34:03 PM PDT by Pharmboy (What always made the state a hell has been that man tried to make it heaven-Hoelderlin)
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To: greyfoxx39
I wonder what the transition was for a Mormon to go from a saint to a christian, was it dumbing down, or dumbing up?

17 posted on 04/17/2011 3:34:46 PM PDT by SouthDixie (The secret to staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly and lie about your age.)
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To: greyfoxx39
Don't care, I am secure enough in my belief that I don't have to...you?
18 posted on 04/17/2011 3:35:17 PM PDT by Las Vegas Ron (The Tree of Liberty did not grow from an ACORN!)
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To: Pharmboy
I do not know much about the theological issues

This is the Religion Forum...it's what we do.

I was born mormon and have known them to be no better nor worse than any other group of people. I have found that Jehovah's Witnesses are by far the most honorable group I have had dealings with. I don't see them demanding to be called Christian. If they were, I would be objecting.

19 posted on 04/17/2011 3:37:58 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: poindexter

ditto


20 posted on 04/17/2011 3:41:02 PM PDT by hawgwalker
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Comment #21 Removed by Moderator

To: lewislynn; greyfoxx39
Fear of other religions? I think not. Concern for the eternal soul of those involved or exposed to a false religion would be more like it.

Here is what Mormons believe.

“Man is the child of God, formed in the divine image and endowed with divine attributes, and even as the infant son of an earthly father and mother is capable in due time of becoming a man, so the undeveloped offspring of celestial parentage is capable, by experience through ages and aeons, of evolving into a God.”

Here is what Satan told Eve.

Genesis 3:4 And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall not surely die: 5 For God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil.

The meme of “you will be as God” goes back to the beginning and the results are not good.

Why would a true follower of Christ not be concerned and get involved? Scriptures tell us that if we see someone who is at risk of losing their soul and don’t say something we are culpable.

22 posted on 04/17/2011 3:42:08 PM PDT by CynicalBear
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To: greyfoxx39; poindexter; cripplecreek
"God has."

So, I guess it should be left to God and the Mormons to decide then.

I agree with poindexter...the Mormons I've had the pleasure of knowing here in Idaho are some of the nicest, most giving people around. They worship God in their own way, which doesn't affect the way I worship God.

Scouts Out! Cavalry Ho!

23 posted on 04/17/2011 3:42:38 PM PDT by wku man (Who says conservatives don't rock? www.myspace.com/10poundtest)
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To: SouthDixie
I wonder what the transition was for a Mormon to go from a saint to a christian, was it dumbing down, or dumbing up?

dumbing down, or dumbing up....cashing in?

24 posted on 04/17/2011 3:42:51 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: greyfoxx39

You really should read the Bible! Sounds to me Like Joseph F. Smith was just paraphrasing the bible:

Acts 17:28 ...For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.

....possibly you don’t believe in the Bible?


25 posted on 04/17/2011 3:52:15 PM PDT by teppe (... for my God ... for my Family ... for my Country)
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To: Pharmboy; greyfoxx39; teppe
I do not know much about the theological issues, but, in case you’re interested, I have worked with many Mormons in my career and found them to be wonderful people...professionally and personally. The number of individuals is around 10...FWIW.

(Hey, when you're auditioning to become a god, ya better be on your best behavior)

Tell us, what's your opinion of people-who-think-they-can- become-full-grown-gods generally anyway?

26 posted on 04/17/2011 3:57:08 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: greyfoxx39

I like Mormons. They are honest, hardworking people. Last I checked, this is America.....you know, freedom of religion. Perhaps you should roll on the floor, speak in tongues, and ask your lord why you are so special but the Mormons are not.


27 posted on 04/17/2011 3:58:15 PM PDT by ScreamingFist (Quiet the Idiot)
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To: greyfoxx39

I thought Lent was that time of year when the FReepers traditionally gave up Mormon bashing in favor of Catholic bashing.


28 posted on 04/17/2011 4:01:27 PM PDT by sportutegrl
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To: teppe
Do YOU believe in all fairness, that anyone who desires to can claim to be a mormon without going through all the requirements listed above? Doubtful, IMO.

So why, when your own leader has told mormons NOT have a "personal relationship with Jesus" would Christians be expected to bow to mormon demands? Are the FLDS equal in mormon belief to the Salt Lake mormons?

"Some ("holier-than- thou" students) begin to pray directly to Christ because of some special friendship they feel has been developed. In this conception a current and unwise book, which advocates gaining a special relationship with Jesus, contains this sentence - quote: "Because the Saviour is our mediator, our prayers go through Christ to the Father, and the Father answers our prayers through his son. " Unquote. This is plain sectarian nonsense. Our prayers are addressed to the Father, and to him only. They do not go through Christ...You have never heard the First Presidency or the Twelve...advocate this excessive zeal that calls for gaining a so called special and personal relationship with Christ...never, never at any time have they taught or endorsed the inordinate and intemperate zeal that encourages endless, sometimes day-long prayers, in order to gain a personal relationship with the Saviour...I wonder if it is not part of Lucifer's system to make people feel they are special friends of Jesus when in fact they are not following the normal and usual pattern of worship found in the true Church." (Bruce McConkie, Speech at BYU on March 2 1982).

29 posted on 04/17/2011 4:04:17 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: teppe; greyfoxx39; All
Acts 17:28 ...For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring. ....possibly you don’t believe in the Bible?

Sorry...but you neglect the multi-verse thrust of not only the Bible to stretch your interpretation, but you also badly ignore even the Book of Mormon! [As is usual for Mormons]

Q. How do Mormons neglect their own Book of Mormon on this topic?

A. Several verses talk about "becoming" children of God (on earth -- not on Kolob)...Mosiah 5 and Mosiah 27, for example, plus others. [Tell us Teppe...go on...I dare you ... tell us...How do you "become" a son of God on earth when you've supposedly already been one somewhere else???

What? You don't know?

Now to the Bible: You, Teppe, and other Mormons also badly neglect both John 1:12-13 which also teaches we "become" children of God...and that the Pharisees were regarded by Jesus as being children of the devil (John 8:44-47).

Tell us Teppe...how could the Pharisees be simultaneous "offspring of God" and "children of the devil."

What? Don't know or won't answer? Won't be the first time a Mormon falls into silence on this one...I've yet to see a Mormon even attempt to answer this one...

Too many Lds are big on their one-verse "I gotchas" -- only to strangely fall silent in the face of overwhelming counter-evidence!

Also, the apostle Paul emphasized several times that our "children" status is one as "adopted" children -- not born as children. [Book of Romans; Ephesians, etc.]

Besides, Teppe, if you're a Mormon who believes in the pre-existence, that also means that you think your "elder brother" is Lucifer...you were just further down in the spirit-birth order.

ALL: I'd like to introduce you to Teppe...a guy who if he's a traditional Mormon thinks that Satan's his "elder bro."

So, tell ya, Teppe, are you a "traditional" Mormon on that Q???

30 posted on 04/17/2011 4:08:51 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: sportutegrl
I thought Lent was that time of year when the FReepers traditionally gave up Mormon bashing in favor of Catholic bashing.

That's sort of funny. Thanks.

31 posted on 04/17/2011 4:10:31 PM PDT by BipolarBob (I fell asleep during my air traffic controller interview and still got hired. Cool!)
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To: sportutegrl

Can YOU answer the question? Why should Christians bow to the mormon demands?


32 posted on 04/17/2011 4:13:16 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: sportutegrl; greyfoxx39
I thought Lent was that time of year when the FReepers traditionally gave up Mormon bashing in favor of Catholic bashing.

(Of course when you bash religious others as "bashers" -- that makes you one of the "bashers"...you mean you didn't give that up for Lent?)

33 posted on 04/17/2011 4:13:16 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: Colofornian

What, Oh wise one, IS the mormon stance on Holy Week, Lent, Good Friday? Will the Cross be seen in any of their services?


34 posted on 04/17/2011 4:16:10 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: BipolarBob

Thanks for getting that’s its meant as humor. Many won’t on this thread.


35 posted on 04/17/2011 4:17:59 PM PDT by sportutegrl
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To: Colofornian

Is making fun of bashing itself bashing?


36 posted on 04/17/2011 4:19:22 PM PDT by sportutegrl
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To: sportutegrl

Heh. The funny thing about those “Easter is a pagan holiday instituted by the cult of Rome gnash gnash” threads is that they seem to have a lot of nonTrinitarians who consider themselves Christain but who aren’t LDS. I wonder if there are more nonTrinitarians on FR who consider themselves Christians but who aren’t LDS or actual LDS.

Freegards


37 posted on 04/17/2011 4:20:09 PM PDT by Ransomed
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To: greyfoxx39

Unlike Obama, I bow to no one but Our Lord. That First Commandment thingy really shuts the door on that.


38 posted on 04/17/2011 4:22:15 PM PDT by sportutegrl
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To: Ransomed
I wonder if there are more nonTrinitarians on FR who consider themselves Christians but who aren’t LDS or actual LDS.

Are they claiming to be Christians? Are they polytheistic? Have their leaders spent 160 years bashing Christianity and Christians?

39 posted on 04/17/2011 4:23:14 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (Why do people try to "out-nice" Jesus?)
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To: sportutegrl; greyfoxx39
Is making fun of bashing itself bashing?

OK, you've defined one component of "bashing" here as "making fun of..." Some of the accusers of some FR posters claim their comments are being made at the expense of Mormons -- or IOW, "making fun of"...and they, like you, have accused these posters of being "bashers"...

Once you meet the definition...make fun of...accuse with a verb label...sorry, it's too late...you've engaged in self-refuting behavior...

You've essentially sent a message of "Thou shalt not bash, you basher,"...you say NOT unabashedly :)

40 posted on 04/17/2011 4:29:38 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: greyfoxx39

That’s a good question. I think a lot of them are the type who don’t write “God” or “Jesus” all the way through and sometimes have different names for them. I wish FR had the poll thing back, then we could get a handle on such questions!

“Have their leaders spent 160 years bashing Christianity and Christians?”

I’m not sure they have leaders, they just show up and start talking about Easter or how Sunday isn’t the day to worship.

Freegards


41 posted on 04/17/2011 4:32:49 PM PDT by Ransomed
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To: greyfoxx39

Mormons are to Christianity what Protestants are.


42 posted on 04/17/2011 4:36:48 PM PDT by Big Bronson
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To: Big Bronson

“Mormons are to Christianity what Protestants are.”

Nope. Protestants are Christians.

Freegards


43 posted on 04/17/2011 4:38:58 PM PDT by Ransomed
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To: ScreamingFist; greyfoxx39; Pharmboy; sportutegrl
I like Mormons.

(I like Mormons, too...can't always pick "family," ya know)

They are honest, hardworking people.

Well, relatively speaking, many Lds indeed are honest...[although not necessarily honest with themselves about goals like becoming a god.

But the white-collar crime rate for decades doesn't reinforce this claim:

Utah's White-Collar crime reputation:

(The second note below shows this problem is endemic & specific to the Mormon church):
* ”Frustrated by the wave of fraud that by one estimate took $750 million out of Utahns' pocketbooks last year, regulators, law enforcement officials and attorneys are organizing a free 'Fraud College' next month in Utah County for the public to call attention to the problem and to try to combat it.” Source: Preying on the faithful: Though Mormons often victims, LDS Church skips fraud-prevention event
* Lds members have fleeced over $1.4 billion from fellow Mormons the past few years alone! Guess what? They initially didn't regret "doing business" with them, either!!!
Source: Mormons Now Losing Billions to Affinity Fraud
* This isn't new...Utah has long been host to the most per-capita fraud in America: Salt Lake City, with a mere 170,000 residents, is by far the country’s smallest city where the scam-fighting U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission has an office. It has been there since the early 1950s. Why? “There is a lot of fraud here per capita,” says local SEC boss Kenneth Israel. “There doesn’t seem to be any shortage of work for us.” [Source url: http://www.lds-mormon.com/6303056a.shtml ]
* Utah was #1 in mortgage fraud in America by 2001 when the FBI listed Utah as No. 1 in the country for the amount of mortgage fraud cases reported. [Source url: http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,600151169,00.html ]

Last I checked, this is America.....you know, freedom of religion.

Last I checked, this is America...you know, freedom of religion...including BTW, the freedom to critique other religions.

Sorry. But like some social engineer Web cop, you've gotten out of your vehicle on a busy two-way Web street, and put up unauthorized one-way signs. (Go take your signs down...religious comments don't HAVE TO be of a "positive" nature in order to qualify for your "freedom of religion" edict)

You and sportutegrl don't have self-authorized licenses to critique others that others don't have...Specifically, I'm reference you somehow implying GF has impinged upon or violated some incomplete notion of yours about "freedom of religion"...and sportutgrl bashing others based upon her personal standard of not bashing others...go figure both of your self-defeating statements out!!!

Perhaps you should roll on the floor, speak in tongues, and ask your lord why you are so special but the Mormons are not.

Perhaps you should stay still, hold a Bible in hand, and read how Jesus and the apostle Paul didn't speak so highly of the legalistic religionists of that day -- otherwise known as the Pharisees and teachers of the law. Was Paul, an ex-Pharisee, "special" -- and they weren't?

Are you criquing by extension of your comments people like Paul and Jesus? Were they too harsh on the Pharisees?

44 posted on 04/17/2011 4:39:23 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: lewislynn; greyfoxx39
Some of you clowns living in fear of other religions really need to get a life and grow up.

(Why do you seemingly fear religious vanities of other persuasions so much?)

45 posted on 04/17/2011 4:42:03 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: greyfoxx39

Leave the Mormons, (Baptists, Unitarians, Episcopalians, Catholics, Buddhists, Atheists, Deists, Hindus, Church of Christists, etc. etc. etc.) alone. I might look at something dealing with Muslims, however.


46 posted on 04/17/2011 4:43:27 PM PDT by yetidog (/*)
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To: poindexter; greyfoxx39
They are: Unfailingly nice. Loyal friends, even to non-Mormons like me. Quick to forgive. Trustworthy. Honest as the day is long.

(I'll say it again: If you are auditioning to become a god, of course, you'll be on your best behavior!)

47 posted on 04/17/2011 4:43:37 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: wku man; poindexter; greyfoxx39; cripplecreek
I agree with poindexter...the Mormons I've had the pleasure of knowing here in Idaho are some of the nicest, most giving people around

(I'll say it a third time: If you are auditioning to become a god, of course, you'll be on your best behavior!)

48 posted on 04/17/2011 4:44:56 PM PDT by Colofornian
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To: poindexter
Apparently you haven't met my lds family.
not nice except on the service
will shun you if yo don't do what they want
not really quick to forgive, they may not forgive at all
honest? hardly
fallible - most definitely

As my lds cousin says they are perfect on the outside and rotten to the core inside for them it is all about image and money.

49 posted on 04/17/2011 4:47:16 PM PDT by svcw (Non forgiveness is like holding a hot coal thinking the other person will be blistered)
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Comment #50 Removed by Moderator


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