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Was Easter Borrowed from a Pagan Holiday?
Christian History (of Christianity Today) ^ | 4/2/2009 | Anthony McRoy

Posted on 04/21/2011 3:45:20 PM PDT by AnalogReigns

The historical evidence contradicts this popular notion.

Anyone encountering anti-Christian polemics will quickly come up against the accusation that a major festival practiced by Christians across the globe, namely, Easter, was actually borrowed or rather usurped from a pagan celebration. I often encounter this idea among Muslims who claim that later Christians compromised with paganism to dilute the original faith of Jesus.

(Excerpt) Read more at christianitytoday.com ...


TOPICS: Apologetics; Ecumenism; Mainline Protestant; Skeptics/Seekers
KEYWORDS: anglican; catholic; easter; pagan
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Had to do a severe excerpt, due to the rules. Please read the whole article here.

I'm posting this as an ANGLICAN CAUCUS, to avoid the typical vitriol, from those who disagree....

1 posted on 04/21/2011 3:45:25 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: AnalogReigns

Y’know, it’s almost like me saying my birthday is the same as Ralph’s . . . what a coincidence! Who cares? This idiocy always pops up its ugly head every Christian holyday . . . Easter, Christmas, St. Valentine’s Day, etc.

The day itself might have been borrowed or coincidental, but then who cares?


2 posted on 04/21/2011 3:55:37 PM PDT by laweeks
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To: AnalogReigns

Anglican FReeper

Confirmed at age 14


3 posted on 04/21/2011 4:00:18 PM PDT by Tennessee Nana
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To: AnalogReigns

It’s a silly argument -— so clearly linked to Passsover in so many ways I can’t even begin to get it.

Now Christmas, with Yule logs, etc . . . OK, pretty good arguments can be made that this was pretty much co-opted from pagans.

Easter? PFfft.


4 posted on 04/21/2011 4:10:17 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (Nothing to see here. Move along.)
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To: AnalogReigns

Anglican caucus, has there ever been one before this one?

Anglican all my life from family who have been for centuries.


5 posted on 04/21/2011 4:18:41 PM PDT by kalee (The offences we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: AnalogReigns

All we need to do is drop “Easter” and call it Resurrection day. That’s what we are celebrating. Who knows where “Easter” came from. Christmas is a whole nuther ball of wax. It actually should be Rosh Hashanah. It’s pretty obvious we got that date wrong.


6 posted on 04/21/2011 4:24:42 PM PDT by chuckles
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To: AnalogReigns

How come people never ask where the pagans borrow their holidays from?


7 posted on 04/21/2011 4:30:36 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (Markets don't lie. People do.)
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To: AnalogReigns

You might want to ping the mod to get the caucus into the thread title.

Freegards


8 posted on 04/21/2011 4:33:37 PM PDT by Ransomed
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To: AnalogReigns

bkmk


9 posted on 04/21/2011 5:12:54 PM PDT by Sergio (An object at rest cannot be stopped! - The Evil Midnight Bomber What Bombs at Midnight)
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To: AnalogReigns
It is Resurrection day - that is what informed Christians who know the source of the word "easter". Resurrection day is exactly what happened and why all Christians celebrate "Easter". Is there harm in dropping the word “easter” and simply calling it appropriately Resurrection day. Why do people like Easter when so many in the world confuse "eggs" with "easter" and celebrate with rabbits, eggs, egg hunts, baskets of candy, hot cross buns, Lent, Good Friday, and sadly and rarely understand or proclaim that this Sunday is Resurrection day - the day Christ Jesus rose from the dead and forgave ALL sins past, present, and future.

Easter is a description of an ancient Babylonian family—2,000 years before Christ—honoring the resurrection of their god, Tammuz, who was brought back from the underworld by his mother/wife, Ishtar (after whom the festival was named). As Ishtar was actually pronounced “Easter” in most Semitic dialects.

The vast majority of ecclesiastical and secular historians agree that the name of Easter and the traditions surrounding it are deeply rooted in pagan religion.

“Since Bede the Venerable (De ratione temporum 1:5) the origin of the term for the feast of Christ’s Resurrection has been popularly considered to be from the Anglo-Saxon Eastre, a goddess of spring…the Old High German plural for dawn, eostarun; whence has come the German Ostern, and our English Easter” (The New Catholic Encyclopedia, 1967, Vol. 5, p. 6).

10 posted on 04/21/2011 5:23:06 PM PDT by bibletruth
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To: AnalogReigns

I think it should be approached from a different angle.

It’s not fair to call the seasons “pagan” holidays, when in truth, they are “natural” holidays, that all people had to deal with if they lived in the temperate or colder latitudes, no matter their religion.

Even ancient, primitive cultures were obsessed with calendars, because knowing when to plant and when to harvest literally meant life or death. Holidays truly meant things.

The one exception in the world was Egypt, notwithstanding its equatorial location, because its annual flood of the Nile was so dominant, and the resulting crops so plentiful, that no other time of the year truly mattered once that crop was out of the way, until the next flood and planting season.

Now compare this with the monotheistic religious holidays, based on events, not the seasons.

To make matters worse, the leaders of the dominant cultures wanted to manipulate the calendar to their own ends, as well as the obvious problem that neither the solar nor lunar calendar was stable, and tended to drift over time. So what happens when it is supposed to be harvest time, but it is the middle of winter?

Likewise, when people migrated across the latitudes and at different elevations, everything got loopy.

Which explains why, over time, religious people started assigning their holidays to the natural cycle times, because it was the only way they could be *about* right, in the absence of any other means of knowing.

So their intent had nothing to do with what the pagans did, only in sharing the same time of the calendar with them.


11 posted on 04/21/2011 5:27:54 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: AnalogReigns; mamelukesabre; Trillian; agrace; 1010RD; calex59; TheOldLady; killermosquito; ...
The date maybe. As far as I am aware of, there is no pagan religion which includes anything like the story of Jesus' resurrection or of any spirit-world deity assuming a mortal body for 33 years or anything like that.

Pagan religions were basically astral. They included idolatry and the use of oracles, which were similar to the Jewish prophets in the way they operated, but the things they worshiped were basically things they saw in the sky, mainly the gas giant planets Jupiter and Saturn.

Jewish and Christian religion includes several stories about people being seen after their deaths, including the story of Jesus himself, Lazasrus, and the prophet Samuel. All of those tales are similar; the person was seen for some period of time, the senses of the people who saw them were totally fooled in that the experience was utterly indistinguishable from their having returned in real human bodies, but they did not stick around for years or marry and have kids or start businesses. Those stories involve paranormal things, but not magical or supernatural things nor anything violating physical or mathematical laws. Again to my knowledge, pagan religions never included anything like that.

If you want violations of physical, mathematical, and probabilistic and statistical laws in wholesale lots, you need to be talking to the evolutionites, they specialize in that sort of thing. Evolution requires an infinite sequence of probabilistic miracles. The Bible includes a finite number of "miracles" which is probably about 20 - 50, and none of those stories involve any violations of basic laws.

12 posted on 04/21/2011 5:51:51 PM PDT by wendy1946
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To: wendy1946
The Bible includes a finite number of "miracles" which is probably about 20 - 50, and none of those stories involve any violations of basic laws.

First off, your 20-50 is entirely inaccurate from the Bible Scriptures, if you care to study the entire Old Testament and New Testament and all the Old Testament prophecies regarding Christ / Messiah, just the dating alone regarding Messiah call for divine intervention / control of human events to accurately meet such dates.

No violation of basic laws : take one, the virgin birth of Christ...no violation of basic laws you say. False presupposition. And there are many more in the Bible that defy basic laws.

13 posted on 04/21/2011 6:12:10 PM PDT by bibletruth
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To: chuckles
Who knows where “Easter” came from.

Old Anglo-Saxon etymology for that time of the year that is, indeed, named after a pagan goddess. Supposedly that's where the hare and eggs came from.
14 posted on 04/21/2011 6:15:11 PM PDT by BJClinton ("Worse" technically is "change".)
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To: wendy1946

the easter bunny, easter eggs, and easter baskets have nothing to do with christianity. Christmas trees, reindeer, snowmen, mistletoe, christmas wreaths, holly, eggnog, christmas stockings, and christmas presents have nothing to do with christianity either. Even snow has nothing to do with christianity. Don’t even get me started on halloween.


15 posted on 04/21/2011 6:18:13 PM PDT by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: chuckles

Easter comes from Ishtar and Astarte. But it is only called ‘Easter’ in English (and I have no idea why - God’s sense of humor?). I believe other languages use a variation of the Hebrew term ‘pessach’ (passover).


16 posted on 04/21/2011 6:43:11 PM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: jjotto

You wrote:

“Easter comes from Ishtar and Astarte.”

Nope. The Germans did not worship Mesopotamian gods or goddesses.


17 posted on 04/21/2011 8:15:35 PM PDT by vladimir998 (Copts, Nazis, Franks and Beans - what a public school education puts in your head.)
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To: bibletruth

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not claiming that God was not involved in those stories, just that God, unlike evolutionites, works within the laws of physics and mathematics. The main point however which would hold good even if I were wrong, is that the Bible only contains a certain number of such stories which is almost certainly under 100, while evolution requires an infinite number of probabilistic miracles.


18 posted on 04/21/2011 8:31:55 PM PDT by wendy1946
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To: AnalogReigns

The Scottish Mason Hislop family book continues to influence conspirators on the net...however they never seem to remember that Ralph Woodrow pulled his book for many good reasons-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Hislop
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Woodrow

Here’s the Scottish Mason’s book -
http://philologos.org/__eb-ttb/
Ralph Woodrow -
http://www.ralphwoodrow.org/books/pages/babylon-mystery.html

There always appears to be a perfectly timed manifesto, book, movie, documentary...favoring a secularist mini-me-god/ess culture which unfortunately and perhaps deliberately leads people away from the real Word -

[I AM] The Way, The Truth and The Life.

[...]In the original language of the gospels, the Greek word “pascha” is used for the Aramaic form of the Hebrew word “pesach”, which means Passover. During the first three centuries of the Church, “Pasch” referred specifically to the celebration of Christ’s passion and death; by the end of the fourth century, it also included the Easter Vigil; and by the end of the fifth century, it referred to Easter itself.

In all, the term signified Christ as the new Passover Lamb.

Together -

the mystery of the Last Supper,

the sacrifice of Good Friday and

the resurrection of Easter form the new Passover -

The New Pasch.[...]
http://www.ewtn.com/library/ANSWERS/EASTPAG.htm

In Spain and Italy they call it Paschua.


19 posted on 04/21/2011 9:34:16 PM PDT by bronxville (Sarah will be the first American female president.)
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To: bibletruth
The vast majority of ecclesiastical and secular historians agree that the name of Easter and the traditions surrounding it are deeply rooted in pagan religion.

Semantics, tis all.

Kind of like the word "God" (or Gott) is old German for a pagan deity....

20 posted on 04/21/2011 10:32:56 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: bibletruth; All

I really wish you, and others, would actually read the article before commenting on it. Would help quite a bit in the quality of discussion.

The writer pretty well proves Bede’s speculations were simply wrong—and conform with no one else.

The Angles and Saxons, and other Germans, never worshiped Middle Eastern gods (way too far away).....

Osten (or Oster, as in Österreich, the word for Austria, the “east Kingdom”) by the way, is still the German word for East...that’s all.


21 posted on 04/21/2011 10:44:18 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: mamelukesabre

Actually ALL of those things have had quite a bit to do with Christianity...for the last few hundred years or so and more.

They certainly have not—since Europe became (culturally) Christian, over 1,000 years ago—had anything at all to do with paganism.

Ancient pagan religions, as with current day animistic religions, as found in Africa, New Guinea, and other places, spiritualized (demonized) virtually everything, meaning no created thing can be used that didn’t, at one time or place or another, have some pagan/occultic association with it. The important thing is, does it have a pagan association in how it is recognized and used now—or has God’s power in our culture overcome pagan associations and redeemed things in creation, once used by powers of darkness?

Last I checked, eggs, rabbits, trees, reindeer, snowmen, mistletoe, Christmas wreaths, holly, eggnog, Christmas stockings, and Christmas presents....and even pumpkins....are God’s creation and dominion, and not demonically controlled things.


22 posted on 04/21/2011 11:03:25 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: bibletruth

Laws? Who is the law-maker? Scientific laws are just a more precise measuring and description of the regularities we see. More to the point is the regularity and predictability of events. And the surprises as well. Since the Greeks we see less caprice in nature, and even when we are surpised, we manage to explain to our own satisfaction what happened. Somehow, though, we can never, totally put the pieces of the puzzle together again. Always the gaps. So who/what frustrates us with puzzles?


23 posted on 04/21/2011 11:03:55 PM PDT by RobbyS (Pray with the suffering souls.)
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To: RobbyS

This is a discussion about Easter, not miracles....


24 posted on 04/21/2011 11:14:22 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: vladimir998

You need to review history. Specifically Indo-Aryan culture.


25 posted on 04/22/2011 6:10:08 AM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: AnalogReigns

wow, you are delusional.

all those things are pure paganism.


26 posted on 04/22/2011 7:01:48 AM PDT by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: jjotto

You wrote:

“You need to review history. Specifically Indo-Aryan culture.”

No, I don’t. What you’re suggesting is just a nutty theory that no reputable scholar can produce any evidence for. What happens is that idiots, not knowing how to think or not knowing how to handle evidence, make the mistake of concluding that two things with slightly similar sounding names or traits or both must be related. This is why George Armstrong could actually delude people into believing there was some relationship between “Isaac” and “Saxon”: “Isaac”, “Isaac’s son”, “’saac’s son” = “Saxon”. Clear as mud.


27 posted on 04/22/2011 7:06:36 AM PDT by vladimir998 (Copts, Nazis, Franks and Beans - what a public school education puts in your head.)
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To: AnalogReigns

Easter is a miracle, a specific event in time, but also a mystery. Not, as the neo-pagans would have it, a myth.


28 posted on 04/22/2011 7:22:35 AM PDT by RobbyS (Pray with the suffering souls.)
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To: jjotto
"Indo-Aryan culture"?

The Babylonians weren't Indo-Aryans; they were Semites.

As you correctly point out, only English, Dutch, Norwegian, and some dialects of German refer to Easter by a cognate of "Eostre". Everyone else in the West calls it by a name derived from pesach. In Slavic languages, it's called "Bright Night". The official name of the day in the Roman Missal translates to "Sunday of the Passover Feast of the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ"

The western Germanic tribes didn't get their pagan religion or their language from Babylon.

29 posted on 04/22/2011 7:52:07 AM PDT by Campion ("Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies when they become fashions." -- GKC)
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To: vladimir998

Not only is the existence of a proto-Indo-European culture generally accepted in academia, it also is consistent with Biblical accounts.

Using the term ‘Easter’ for Resurection Day is limited to English I think, with most languages using a cognate of the Hebrew ‘Pesach’ (Passover) for the day.


30 posted on 04/22/2011 7:55:35 AM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: mamelukesabre
all those things are pure paganism.

Did pagan gods create them?

If not, then they belong to YVWH, and are -- like everything else that isn't sinful in itself -- to be used in his service.

Pagans are squatters on territory that belongs 100% to the King and his kids. (We call that territory, "earth".) Don't give them a free pass to continue with their theft.

31 posted on 04/22/2011 7:55:40 AM PDT by Campion ("Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies when they become fashions." -- GKC)
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To: jjotto

You wrote:

“Not only is the existence of a proto-Indo-European culture generally accepted in academia, it also is consistent with Biblical accounts.”

It is not accepted in academic circles - nor is it Biblically supported - that there was even a cursory connection or influence between ANCIENT inhabitants of Mesopotamia and Germanic peoples.

“Using the term ‘Easter’ for Resurection Day is limited to English I think, with most languages using a cognate of the Hebrew ‘Pesach’ (Passover) for the day.”

The word “Easter” is used in various forms by all Germanic language speaking peoples: English, Germans, Swedes, etc. The word was adopted because it was used to name a season, not because of the goddess originally connected to that season. Also, there is no known connection or evidence of a connection between that goddess and any Mesopotamian goddess. The nutty theory you posted was put forward by the sciolist Hislop and numerous people have come to believe in it since.


32 posted on 04/22/2011 8:39:34 AM PDT by vladimir998 (Copts, Nazis, Franks and Beans - what a public school education puts in your head.)
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To: Campion

spoken like a true quack.

tell me, are “burning man”, and wicker man concepts that belong to YVWH too?


33 posted on 04/22/2011 9:26:40 AM PDT by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: wendy1946
The holiday is a merging of pagan and Christian stuff. The name comes from Ishtar, the Babylonian Mother of Heaven and nature/fertility goddess. In ancient mythology she had a son (or lover, in some versions) named Tamuz, who was the sun god. One day Tamuz was out hunting and was killed by a wild boar. Ishtar then went down to the underworld to try to get him back. The ruler of the underworld said he could go back to the upper realms for half the year, but he must return to the underworld for the other half. Thus, the ancient peoples believed that spring and summer marked the time when Ishtar and Tammuz were out (longer days, nature flourishing), and fall and winter marked the time that Tammuz had to go back to the underworld and Ishtar went to get him (short days). That is why in the winter women would mourn for Tammuz. We see this in Ezekiel 8:14:

Then he brought me to the entrance of the north gate of the house of the LORD, and I saw women sitting there, mourning the god Tammuz.

And in spring, people would celebrate the return of Ishtar and Tammuz around the time of the Spring equinox. That is why the celebration of Easter is based on the timing of the equinox and not based on when Passover happens. Also, many things associated with Easter have very pagan roots. The eggs and bunnies were fertility symbols associated with Ishtar, and ham is traditionally eaten at Easter to remember the boar that had killed Tammuz. God does not like religious syncretism, the mixing of pagan stuff with His worship.

In Deuteronomy 12 He says:

The LORD your God will cut off before you the nations you are about to invade and dispossess. But when you have driven them out and settled in their land, 30 and after they have been destroyed before you, be careful not to be ensnared by inquiring about their gods, saying, “How do these nations serve their gods? We will do the same.” 31 You must not worship the LORD your God in their way, because in worshiping their gods, they do all kinds of detestable things the LORD hates.

34 posted on 04/22/2011 10:15:32 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis (Want to make $$$? It's easy! Use FR as a platform to pimp your blog for hits!!!)
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To: wendy1946

Also, I forgot to mention, that is also where the observance of sunrise services on Easter came from. It was to memorialize the return of the sun god Tammuz from the underworld.


35 posted on 04/22/2011 10:17:10 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis (Want to make $$$? It's easy! Use FR as a platform to pimp your blog for hits!!!)
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To: AnalogReigns

Not Anglican but there is no Caucus designation at the top of the page ...

So I would like to put in my 2 cents.. .The timing of the Resurrection celebration is clearly based on the passover which historically is the correct time frame for the crucification and the resurrection,BUT.......

In order to draw in the pagan population many terms and practices were incorporated into the Holy days

We see pagan images and practices today that overshadow the risen Christ.. even from the mouths of “confessing” Christians we hear of the importance of the easter bunnies, colored eggs , etc.. previous symbols of spring holiday of the pagans...even the name Easter is drawn from pagan sources..

But I draw on the words of Paul here
1Cr 6:12 All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any.


36 posted on 04/22/2011 1:24:14 PM PDT by RnMomof7 ( "But your iniquities have separated you from your God; your sins have hidden His face from you,)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
It’s not fair to call the seasons “pagan” holidays, when in truth, they are “natural” holidays, that all people had to deal with if they lived in the temperate or colder latitudes, no matter their religion.

The only problem with this take is the natural man and his works are not God pleasing

37 posted on 04/22/2011 1:28:03 PM PDT by RnMomof7 ( "But your iniquities have separated you from your God; your sins have hidden His face from you,)
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To: RnMomof7

I tried to come up with a better word than “natural”, because of its unfortunate connotations. But in this situation, it is accurate. No need for a “natural” man living in “the state of nature”.

The temperate and higher latitudes have seasonal weather that has affected agriculture since before there were written records, to this very day.

When the harvests came in, everyone feasted both because they could, and because they knew that winter was on the way. Then, at the very bottom of winter, there was intense interest for “when the sun is coming back”, which was also a feast. And finally, when the new crops came out in spring, their was a third celebration, because stores were getting slim from the previous harvest.

This is why, around the world, the equivalent of harvest, then just after winter solstice when the sun could be seen returning, and just after spring solstice are almost universal holidays. Other holidays are less important because they are often commemorative.

Since, in the early Christian church, they didn’t have a real fix on the genuine commemorative days, it was very easy to ascribe these days to existing “natural” days of that character.


38 posted on 04/22/2011 4:27:06 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: TheThirdRuffian

“It’s a silly argument -— so clearly linked to Passsover in so many ways I can’t even begin to get it. Now Christmas, with Yule logs, etc . . . OK, pretty good arguments can be made that this was pretty much co-opted from pagans.”

Good point about the Passover link - next we’ll hear that was from pagans, too. As far as Christmas, the timing was related to the new year (since Joseph & Mary were traveling to Bethlehem as instructed to comply with the Roman census).


39 posted on 04/22/2011 5:30:34 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: wendy1946

http://www.uncouth.net/2008/07/08/of-history-resurrection-and-the-number-three/


40 posted on 04/22/2011 5:34:53 PM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: AnalogReigns
Was Easter Borrowed from a Pagan Holiday?

I think that people who use this line of reasoning do so because, ultimately, they couldn't be bothered to celebrate Christ's Resurrection by going to church. They're too lazy and they use this "pagan holiday" argument to justify staying home and watching TV instead.

41 posted on 04/22/2011 10:23:13 PM PDT by Ethan Clive Osgoode (<<== Click here to learn about Evolution!)
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To: kearnyirish2
Interestingly enough, there's actually astronomical reasons to think the first Christmas really was sometime around Dec. 25-Jan. 6. Check out this website: bethlehemstar.net.

A very well researched look at what the Magi probably followed--and the signs in the sky 33 years later...

42 posted on 04/22/2011 10:26:22 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: Ethan Clive Osgoode

Typically its a skeptic’s/athiest’s/neo-pagan’s/cultist’s argument that is picked up, oddly enough, by some Christian fundamentalists who like to think all of the rest of Christianity is out of step but them....


43 posted on 04/22/2011 10:30:50 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: RnMomof7

I think the R. Mod must of removed the “caucas” in the title...(I must not of submitted it right?)

Actually, RnMomof7 there is only once source to link word Easter to pagan sources, which is the venerable Bede—and the article gives a very good argument why Bede was likely speculating at that point, and just plain wrong.

I know for a fact, that even in modern German the word for “East” (Osten, or Öster) sounds a lot like the English “Easter,” so the etymology is likely there and not some far flung (5000 mile away)Ishtar connection. Churches have always been pointed East too...in honor of the Resurrection (and anticipating the 2nd Coming, and last resurrection).

Read the article, it will encourage your heart.

Shalom sister,


44 posted on 04/22/2011 10:44:39 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: sionnsar

Anglican ping....

Tried to make this an “Anglican Caucus” thread to avoid the usual wrangling—and, in honor of the fact we Anglicans abide by the Christian calender and have never questioned the holidays... (I must of not followed procedure though, as my “caucus” designation was removed.)

A well done little article none-the-less, on why Easter is excellent.


45 posted on 04/22/2011 11:23:41 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: AnalogReigns

Interesting; thanks for the info!


46 posted on 04/23/2011 3:18:47 AM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: ahadams2; Madeleine; MWS; x_plus_one; bastantebueno55; Needham; sc70; jpr_fire2gold; ...
Thanks to AnalogReigns for the ping.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Traditional Anglican ping, continued in memory of its founder Arlin Adams.

FReepmail sionnsar if you want on or off this low-volume ping list.
This list is pinged by sionnsar.

Resource for Traditional Anglicans: http://trad-anglican.faithweb.com
Humor: The Anglican Blue

Speak the truth in love. Eph 4:15

47 posted on 04/23/2011 6:55:45 AM PDT by sionnsar (IranAzadi|5yst3m 0wn3d-it's N0t Y0ur5:SONY|http://pure-gas.org|Must be a day for changing taglines)
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To: ahadams2; Madeleine; MWS; x_plus_one; bastantebueno55; Needham; sc70; jpr_fire2gold; ...
Thanks to AnalogReigns for the ping.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Traditional Anglican ping, continued in memory of its founder Arlin Adams.

FReepmail sionnsar if you want on or off this low-volume ping list.
This list is pinged by sionnsar.

Resource for Traditional Anglicans: http://trad-anglican.faithweb.com
Humor: The Anglican Blue

Speak the truth in love. Eph 4:15

48 posted on 04/23/2011 7:03:21 AM PDT by sionnsar (IranAzadi|5yst3m 0wn3d-it's N0t Y0ur5:SONY|http://pure-gas.org|Must be a day for changing taglines)
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To: AnalogReigns; Religion Moderator
Dear AnalogReigns,

I'm pinging the Religion Moderator so that he can add a caucus label to the title of the thread.

You may consider, however, that the caucus could be somewhat broader and you'd still avoid a lot of nastiness.

Not sure too many Catholics or Orthodox would go along with the idea that Easter is just a warmed-over pagan holiday. ;-)


sitetest

49 posted on 04/23/2011 9:30:28 AM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
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To: AnalogReigns

Never mind. Apparently you put a caucus label on and it was removed? * sigh *


50 posted on 04/23/2011 9:36:02 AM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
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