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To: All

You Aren’t Struggling Alone

September 7th, 2011 by Monsignor Dennis Clark, Ph.D.

Col 3:1-11 / Lk 6:20-26

In the 19th and 20th centuries, a common feature of parish life in the United States was the parish mission, a week-long retreat in which gifted visiting preachers would come in and try to scare people into repentance and confession. Subsequent studies have discovered that the scare tactics were quite successful in the short term, but before too many months had passed things were back to normal for most of the participants.

Real conversion, real change that keeps on going, isn’t all that easy. That’s why St. Paul is administering something of a booster shot to his converts in today’s epistle. Note that he doesn’t try to scare his converts to death; instead, he tries to encourage them. In essence, he says that, whoever we are and wherever we come from, we’re all in the same boat, struggling against the current to build lives that are right and true. And best of all, we’re not struggling alone, because “Christ is everything in all of you.”

When your road gets rougher than usual or when you know you’ve made some bad choices, remember that God’s whole family is struggling along the same road with you, and that God’s own son, our brother Jesus, is right there in the midst of it all.


33 posted on 09/07/2011 9:31:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Wednesday, September 7, 2011 >> Saint of the Day
 
Colossians 3:1-11
View Readings
Psalm 145:2-3, 10-13 Luke 6:20-26
 

LUKE TO MATTHEW TO JESUS

 
"Then, raising His eyes to His disciples, [Jesus] said: 'Blest are you poor.' " —Luke 6:20
 

In Matthew's Gospel, the Beatitudes are addressed to Jesus' disciples in the third person (Mt 5:3-10). In Luke's Gospel, they are in the second person. Therefore, in Luke, it's harder to assume that the Beatitudes are meant for someone else.

In Matthew, it is implied that if we don't live the Beatitudes, we will merely miss out on the blessings. But in Luke, those who don't live the Beatitudes put themselves under several curses (Lk 6:24-26). Luke doesn't mention "poor in spirit" or "hunger and thirst for holiness". He simply says "you poor" and "you who hunger" (Lk 6:20). Luke's Beatitudes more clearly require practical changes in our lifestyle.

Of course, both Matthew's and Luke's Beatitudes are divinely inspired, but Luke's especially challenge us to obey Jesus. Luke's four Beatitudes and four Woes motivate us to obey Matthew's eight Beatitudes. This leads us to obey Jesus' Sermon on the Mount and then all the Lord's commands.

 
Prayer: Father, by repenting, may my woes give way to blessings.
Promise: "Since you have been raised up in company with Christ, set your heart on what pertains to higher realms where Christ is seated at God's right hand. Be intent on things above rather than on things of earth." —Col 3:1-2
Praise: Frequent Confession has profoundly changed Larry's life.

34 posted on 09/07/2011 9:34:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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