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{Episcopal}National Cathedral Invites Muslims, but Not Evangelicals to 9-11 service
Fox News ^ | 6 Sep 2011 | Ted Starnes

Posted on 09/07/2011 1:11:27 AM PDT by Cronos

A weekend of religious-themed observances at Washington National Cathedral marking the tenth anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks will include a Buddhist nun and an Imam, but not an evangelical Christian, leading the head of the Southern Baptist Convention to ask President Obama to reconsider attending the event.

“A Call to Compassion” will include an interfaith prayer vigil on Sept. 11th. It will feature the dean of the Cathedral, the Bishop of Washington, a rabbi, Buddhist nun and incarnate lama, a Hindu priest, the president of the Islamic Society of North America and a Muslim musician.

However, Southern Baptists, representing the nation’s largest Protestant denomination, were not invited to participate – and neither were leaders from any evangelical Christian organization.

“It’s not surprising,” said Frank Page, president of the Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee. “There is a tragic intolerance toward Protestants and particularly toward evangelicals and I wish the president would refuse to speak unless it was more representative.”

(Excerpt) Read more at nation.foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Current Events; Mainline Protestant
KEYWORDS: baptist; episcopagan
Note -- the Washington National Cathedral is an Episcopal

The cathedral is the seat of both the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Katharine Jefferts Schori as of 2011; and the Bishop of the Diocese of Washington, John Bryson Chane as of 2011.

1 posted on 09/07/2011 1:11:32 AM PDT by Cronos
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To: Cronos
“There is a tragic intolerance toward Protestants and particularly toward evangelicals and I wish the president would refuse to speak unless it was more representative.”

Why would a Moslem care how Christians of any kind are treated?

2 posted on 09/07/2011 1:13:33 AM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (I'll raise $2million for Gov. Sarah Palin. What'll you do?)
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To: Cronos

Leave it to the very gay church of america to be useful idiots for the antichrist crowd.


3 posted on 09/07/2011 1:16:27 AM PDT by x_plus_one (Obama: Brainwashing the masses to believe that racism is a greater danger than radical Islam)
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To: Cronos

Frank Page needs to tell the Episcopals that he is a closet gay preparing to come out. He would immediately be invited.


4 posted on 09/07/2011 1:32:14 AM PDT by iowamark
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To: Cronos

It’s not surprising when heretics embrace heresy. It seems to me the Anti-Christ might very well come from something like the Episcopal Church. Yeah. He’ll break down all those hateful walls that divide the faiths and use all the right sounding words, like peace, love, hope, etc., to bring people together.


5 posted on 09/07/2011 1:38:57 AM PDT by CitizenUSA (What's special about bad? Bad is easy. Anyone can do bad. I prefer good!)
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To: Cronos

Doesn’t sound like any Catholics are invited either!! What the HELL is going on?


6 posted on 09/07/2011 2:17:08 AM PDT by Ann Archy (Abortion is the Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
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To: Ann Archy
Doesn't sound like any Catholics are invited either

True -- the article says . It will feature the dean of the Cathedral, the Bishop of Washington, a rabbi, Buddhist nun and incarnate lama, a Hindu priest, the president of the Islamic Society of North America and a Muslim musician.

I'm going to bet this was a "Reformed Jewish" rabbi who performs gayo marriages. The Buddhist nun -- really? Or just some New-age poser?

7 posted on 09/07/2011 2:22:41 AM PDT by Cronos (www.forfiter.com)
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To: Cronos

For SURE it will be a Reformed Rabbi...probably a lesbian.


8 posted on 09/07/2011 2:37:32 AM PDT by Ann Archy (Abortion is the Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
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To: Cronos

The Episcopal church was ONCE as fine as one could get.
I guess that is why the Marxist decided to eviscerate it.

I was senior warden of the oldest Episcopal church in west Tennessee.
This was just prior to the influx of radical leftist and gays
into the church.

Since I left the USA, for good, in 2004 I have had only the Catholic church, central Europe, and now in the Philippines.


9 posted on 09/07/2011 2:51:09 AM PDT by AlexW
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To: Cronos

Looks to me like they’ve got protestant representation from the host church. If anything the next invitee on the list should be a Catholic priest, not a Baptist minister.


10 posted on 09/07/2011 3:00:07 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Cronos
Why would the Christian Southern Baptists want to attend this precursor to a pogrom against Christianity? How apropos this is taking place in Washington at, what has become in recent years, the most anti-Christian cathedral in the United States, but, what still holds the designation of National House Of Prayer. It is so apropos, because the United States as a matter of policy is now anti-Christian.
11 posted on 09/07/2011 3:59:30 AM PDT by jacknhoo (Luke 12:51. Think ye, that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, no; but separation.)
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To: jacknhoo
the United States as a matter of policy is now anti-Christian.

until Jan 2013, unless we are fools to allow Obambi to be re-elected...

12 posted on 09/07/2011 4:25:49 AM PDT by Cronos (www.forfiter.com)
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To: 9YearLurker

True - I think the Catholic Church told them to take a hike or just didn’t bother, the ECUSA is irrelevant in any case.


13 posted on 09/07/2011 4:26:29 AM PDT by Cronos (www.forfiter.com)
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To: AlexW; HushTX; BenKenobi; jacknhoo

the Episcopal Church is a stark warning to every other Church out there of the pitfalls of “going liberal”. It’s a death spiral — they haven’t been able to make up their numbers with gay and lesb folks.


14 posted on 09/07/2011 4:29:25 AM PDT by Cronos (www.forfiter.com)
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To: Ann Archy; blasater1960

Maybe blasater could find out — blasater, some “rabbi” attended this meet and both Ann and I are sure it could only be a Reformed Rabbi, definitely not an Orthodox Rabbi. Would you know?


15 posted on 09/07/2011 4:33:43 AM PDT by Cronos (www.forfiter.com)
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To: Ann Archy

Isn’t the “Bishop of Washington; Dean of Cathedral” Catholic? I’m not sure, but it sounds Catholic.


16 posted on 09/07/2011 4:39:03 AM PDT by MayflowerMadam ("I know that God's tomorrow will be better than today!" A. H. Ackley)
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To: jacknhoo

“Why would the Christian Southern Baptists want to attend this precursor to a pogrom against Christianity?”

Why wouldn’t they? The SBC has become very “inclusive” recently at the expense of traditional evangelical principles — the reason we’re no longer SBC members.


17 posted on 09/07/2011 4:41:53 AM PDT by MayflowerMadam ("I know that God's tomorrow will be better than today!" A. H. Ackley)
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To: Cronos

Well, the message here is obvious. If evangelicals want a seat at the table, they need to start blowing up stuff. Get with the program, people!


18 posted on 09/07/2011 4:45:56 AM PDT by Antoninus (Nothing that offends God can possibly be a legitimate right.)
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To: MayflowerMadam

No, Episcopalian.


19 posted on 09/07/2011 4:51:14 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: MayflowerMadam; Ann Archy; 9YearLurker

I gave the hint in the title of this article {Episcopal} and a link in the first post to the Episcopal National Cathedral in Washington — they are definitely not Catholic.


20 posted on 09/07/2011 5:09:50 AM PDT by Cronos (www.forfiter.com)
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To: Cronos

Oh’ thanks. Sounds Catholic. (A guy a dated was Episcopal. He referred to himself as “J.V. Catholic”.)


21 posted on 09/07/2011 5:17:08 AM PDT by MayflowerMadam ("I know that God's tomorrow will be better than today!" A. H. Ackley)
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To: MayflowerMadam

No.


22 posted on 09/07/2011 5:21:05 AM PDT by Ann Archy (Abortion is the Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
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To: Cronos
Just for a saner perspective I post this short article in full. Of course, I, being Catholic, apply virtually all Orthodox teaching to myself.

Prayer With the Non-Orthodox

The Church forbids us to pray with non-Orthodox. When invited to a meal in a Protestant household, what do we do when they say "grace," e.g., the "Our Father" before a meal? (K.L., IL)

In this age of ecumenism, one is hard-pressed to argue with the "givens" of the religious world: "We all have the same God," or "All religions are good and are equal." If we apply these notions to science, it is immediately apparent that they are absurd: "All observations are valid and equal," or "Alchemy and chemistry are both sciences and are equal." Quite obviously, even within a given religious tradition, there are those who understand its precepts well and those who hardly grasp them. And so, a simple Orthodox believer would not claim to understand God with the same insight and perception that, say, a great Saint or Teacher of the Church understood Him; in a sense, in terms of their understanding of Him, these individuals have different experiences of God. How, then, since we consider Orthodoxy to be a correct statement about the nature of God, man, and the universe, can we actually have the same God as those whom we consider erroneous in their beliefs? Nor can any rational individual argue that all religions are equal. Even among modern religious traditions, some teach the ascendency of peace and love, while others advocate violence and even elevate it to the level of a "holy pursuit." The problem is, of course, that ecumenism is based on simple-minded or trendy notions of religion and the Truth. It thus forces us to confront complex philosophical and theological questions at a very low level, leaving little room for subtlety. In this context, praying with others takes on a special significance. Prayer is an expression of our Orthodox understanding of, and relationship to, God; therefore, we cannot engage in joint prayer with the non-Orthodox as an expression of a "commonality" with them which we in fact do not have. This fact is reinforced by Church Canons that prohibit prayer with (though assuredly not for) the non-Orthodox.

Now, admittedly, if we refuse to pray with the non-Orthodox, we appear—again because we are unable to address religious issues, today, with any depth—rude, if not downright sectarian. In view of this, probably the most prudent thing to do, when you are invited to a meal in a non-Orthodox household, is to stand (or sit) respectfully while your hosts pray as they see fit. Afterwards, before you eat, you can Cross yourself and silently recite the appropriate Orthodox prayer. Whatever you do, you must keep in mind that the canonical guidelines that prohibit us from praying with the non-Orthodox, based solely on the precepts discussed above, must never become an occasion for showing disrespect or disdain for others or for their religious traditions. The Holy Canons are designed to protect our Faith, as the criterion of Truth, from any vitiation by what is foreign to that fullness of Christianity that Orthodoxy is. But this desire to protect our traditions is not selfish; it is motivated by love for those outside Orthodoxy, the pristine Faith—preserved among us alone—to which we hope that they will one day turn, if they are truly searching for God. Just as a good chemist would be remiss, were he to endorse some superstitious procedure from the false science of alchemy, so we Orthodox must not endorse the spiritual practices of those outside the Church. However, just as a chemist need not ridicule an alchemist, but should try to bring him to a knowledge of the real science of chemistry, so we must not show disrespect for the heterodox, but attempt to educate them by our good example and civility.

There are, of course, Orthodox who, zealous without knowledge, would use the Holy Canons—which are not laws, but principles which should guide us in making decisions regarding delicate matters of Christian comportment—to justify their un-Christian hatred for the heterodox and for heretics. They would thus argue that we should not sit at the same table with heretics or non-Orthodox, forgetting that this canonical prescription is aimed at insuring that, by eating in public with unbelievers, we do not somehow give the impression that we endorse their error and thus bring scandal on others. In modern America, this is hardly a risk while having dinner with non-Orthodox friends. Unthinking people might also say that by listening to the prayers of non-Orthodox, we are technically praying with them. We must simply ignore such irrational rubbish for what it is. An advocate of such thinking once told us that, following the agape meal in his parish on Sundays, all left-over food was thrown away, rather than given to the poor, since it had been blessed by an Orthodox Priest. To do otherwise, in his view, would have meant throwing what was blessed to the dogs. One can only imagine what Christ, Who calls us to feed the poor (St. Luke 14:13), or St. Paul, who tells us to feed even our enemies (Romans 12:20), would have said of such a thought. Prudence and true zeal should lead us in our relationships to the heterodox at all times. Otherwise, our wisdom becomes foolish and anti-Christian.

Orthodox Christian Information Center


23 posted on 09/07/2011 5:24:31 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: MayflowerMadam
JV probably stood for Junior Version ;-P

But seriously, the Church of England as you know, started off as a compromise -- to keep both those leaning towards Catholicism and those leaning towards Calvinism from ripping each other's throats out, Queen Bess came up with a compromise where the CoE was divided into High Church and Low Church

High Church was basically Catholic in theology, in worship and in doctrine, while Low Church was basically Calvinistic (but not Presbyterian -- they still had to have curates and vicars). They were united by the person of the Monarch (just as Scotland and England were united in 1707)

Now, High Church Anglicanism in England developed into Anglo-Catholicism and High Anglicanism. Low Church Anglicanism basically died out due to apathy recently.

But sticking to the US. In the US, the tendency was mostly low Church, but there were High Church Anglicans (like George Washington for much of his life).

They have the same terms, etc. that Catholics use, but since the 1930 Lambeth conference the ECUSA has been heading in the wrong direction. This pace accelerated in the 1960s and 70s and it went past the point of no return in the 90s.

They may use the same terminology but JV Catholics are not Catholic in their beliefs -- especially now when many of the High Church Anglicans are becoming Catholic and the remaining ECUSA Anglicans in the US are really just a gay bunch.

24 posted on 09/07/2011 5:34:28 AM PDT by Cronos (www.forfiter.com)
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To: Cronos

And my friends asked me why I could walk away from such a fine, religious, inspiring organization. Actually it was a no-brainer.


25 posted on 09/07/2011 5:34:32 AM PDT by ThePatriotsFlag
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To: Cronos; Ann Archy
some “rabbi” attended this meet and both Ann and I are sure it could only be a Reformed Rabbi, definitely not an Orthodox Rabbi. Would you know?

Your instinct are correct. It was a Reformed "Rabbi", Bruce Lustig. I did a little search on him. He specializes in interfaith dialogue, emphasis on Muslims.

He also had Sean Penn at his "temple" to discuss Haiti and when a reporter asked a tough question, mr Lustig tried to take the reporters recordering equipment away and then kicked the reporter out. So, yes, he is a lefty. He has a couple of women "rabbi's" on staff, one is married and the other doesnt say but doesnt "look" butch.

26 posted on 09/07/2011 10:03:42 AM PDT by blasater1960 (Deut 30, Psalm 111...the Torah and the Law, is attainable past, present and forever.)
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To: Cronos

Soon to be a Mosque.


27 posted on 09/10/2011 8:08:27 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (We kneel to no prince but the Prince of Peace)
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