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Breaking Bad Liturgical Habits (Catholic Caucus)
Crisis Magazine ^ | November 4, 2011 | George WEIGEL

Posted on 11/05/2011 11:56:52 AM PDT by NYer

 

The long-awaited introduction of the new translation of the Roman Missal on November 27, the First Sunday of Advent, offers the Church in the Anglophere an opportunity to reflect on the riches of the liturgy, its biblical vocabulary, and its virtually inexhaustible storehouse of images. Much of that vocabulary, and a great many of those images, were lost under the “dynamic equivalence” theory of translation; they have now been restored under the “formal equivalence” method of translating. Over the next years and decades, the Catholic Church will be reminded of just what a treasure-house of wonders the liturgy is.

At the same time, the “changes in the words” offer the Church a golden opportunity to confront, and then break, some bad liturgical habits that have accumulated, like unlovely barnacles on the barque of Peter, over the past several decades.

For example:

1. Holy Mass should never begin with a greeting or an injunction that is not in the Roman Missal. The first words the congregation hears from the celebrant should be the liturgical words of greeting prescribed in the Sacramentary. At Masses where there is no sung entrance hymn, the admonition “please stand” should never be heard; if the priest-celebrant (or lector) recites the Entrance Antiphon in an audible voice before processing to the altar, everyone will get the message that Mass has begun, and will stand without being told to do so.

2. Far too many lectors, including many of the best, begin the responsorial psalm inappropriately, saying, “The responsorial psalm is….” – and then reciting the antiphon to the psalm, which is not “the responsorial psalm” but its antiphon. The phrase “The responsorial psalm is….” should thus be put under the ban. Forty-plus years into the liturgical renewal, there is no need to do anything except intone or recite the antiphon that begins the responsorial psalm: by now, the congregation surely knows that their next task is to repeat the antiphon, either in song or by recitation.

3. Fully aware that I shall be accused by some of crankiness bordering on misanthropy, let me repeat a point made in this space before: the exchange of peace is not meant to be the occasion for a chat with the neighbors, but for the greetings of those closest to us in church with a simple, evangelical salutation: “the peace of the Lord be with you;” “peace be with you;” “the peace of Christ.” The longer conversations can be saved for the narthex or vestibule (not “gathering space”).

4. The Communion antiphon, typically linked to the Gospel of the day, is just as typically AWOL at Mass. If it is not sung by the choir, it should be recited prior to the distribution of Holy Communion, not afterwards, as if it were some sort of afterthought.

5. Then there is silence. The rubrics prescribe various periods of silent reflection at Mass, particularly after the reception of Holy Communion, so that the “still, small voice” of 1 Kings 19.12 (butchered by the New American Bible into “tiny whispering sound”) might be heard. This is not a matter of doing something differently just to do something differently; it is a recognition that, in the liturgy, God speaks to us through silence as well as through vocal prayer and Scripture. Reintroducing periods of silence into the liturgy will require explanation from the pulpit; but while priests and deacons are explaining the “new words,” why not explain why the Church chooses silence over words at some points in its worship?

The re-sacralization of the English used in the liturgy affords all of us an opportunity to ponder just what it is we are doing at Holy Mass: we are participating, here and now, in the liturgy of angels and saints that goes on constantly around the Throne of Grace where the Holy Trinity lives in a communion of radical self-gift and receptivity. This is, in short, serious business, even as it is joyful business. We should do it well, as the grace of God has empowered us to do it well.


TOPICS: Catholic; Current Events; Ministry/Outreach; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; icel; liturgy; mass; missal; novusordo; romanmissal; usccb; vatican
George Weigel’s column is distributed by the Denver Catholic Register, the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Denver.
1 posted on 11/05/2011 11:56:53 AM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; SumProVita; ...

Ping!


2 posted on 11/05/2011 11:57:32 AM PDT by NYer ("Be kind to every person you meet. For every person is fighting a great battle." St. Ephraim)
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To: NYer

I thought this was going to be a thread about Heisenberg....


3 posted on 11/05/2011 12:14:40 PM PDT by Donkey Odious (I can explain it to you. I can't understand it for you.)
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To: Donkey Odious

IMO, the “sign of peace” should be eliminated completely. This “sixties Kumbya” moment is what turned Mass into a social event. Combine this elimination with kneeling at the altar rail for Communion and perhaps people will realize that Mass is something different and will stop talking. Reverance and solemnity are sorely missing from today’s Mass. It has always been my contention that attendance at Mass has dropped because, as the Church modified it and tried to make it “current”, it took away the uniqueness and mystery. Its not supposed to be “current”.

And Amen to the point about the celebrant saying “Good Morning” and then the congregation replying in their best third grade tone “Good Morning Father”. I used to say to my sons, sarcastically, “That’s not in the Missal”. They used to tell me to lighten up. I obviously haven’t.


4 posted on 11/05/2011 12:40:33 PM PDT by cumbo78
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To: cumbo78
None of this is as off-putting as our visiting priest's giddy announcement during Mass that he is thrilled to be one of the few married priests. I was so disconcerted that during Mass I pulled out my iphone and googled "married Catholic priests". Turns out you can have a bunch of minor children (he has 8) and a wife and, if you are ordained by the Episcopal church, you can become a Catholic priest. Lucky us!! I couldn't even receive Communion, I was so upset. It wasn't even so much that he's married with family distractions, but he gloated about it and purposely disrupted Mass with his announcement because he thought it was funny. At the end of Mass this poser explained the glories of John Paul for kindly opening the priesthood to men of other ordinations.

The mostholyfamily website was right. The last six popes are anti-popes and are part of the apostasy that is destroying the Catholic church.

I'm just sayin'. : ]

5 posted on 11/05/2011 12:48:46 PM PDT by LoveUSA (You don't notice the night light until it gets dark.)
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To: Donkey Odious

Jesus just trolled me too. I also came looking for Hisenburg.

(ps nothing wrong with that. the Lord works in mysterious ways.)


6 posted on 11/05/2011 12:53:46 PM PDT by Ueriah
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To: cumbo78

Sign of Peace(shaking hands) is a faux social event. If there is no name exchange(and there isnt’) then I dont do it. I’m the oddball bowing with hands clasped. Its get even more awkward when someone occasionally walks from a different aisle and wants a a handshake. Unless they are a black Catholic(exceedingly rare) its not happening.

Additionally, I prefer communion on the hand, and shaking some adults hand whose kids or them either has or is getting over the flu is not my idea of what I do before I eat or touch my hands to my facial area. Cold and flu exposure in the name of ‘community’(hand shaking) should not be part of the liturgy before receiving communion. I much prefer to receive in the hand, I will suck it up though if and when the church changes it to everyone will receive on the tongue. But living in a big metropolitan area this is a disease spreader too, as everyone directly breathes on the priests hand. As St. Jerome in his time said ‘avoid like the plague’. ...Sorry to have bothered you.


7 posted on 11/05/2011 1:29:10 PM PDT by RBIEL2
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To: LoveUSA

You are aware that Eastern Catholics have always had married Priests? There is nothing wrong with it. Now violating the sanctity of the mass is another thing entirely!


8 posted on 11/05/2011 1:34:23 PM PDT by TexConfederate1861 (Surrender means that the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy.)
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To: LoveUSA

You are aware that Eastern Catholics have always had married Priests? There is nothing wrong with it. Now violating the sanctity of the mass is another thing entirely!


9 posted on 11/05/2011 1:34:33 PM PDT by TexConfederate1861 (Surrender means that the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy.)
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To: LoveUSA

>>I couldn’t even receive Communion, I was so upset<<

I’m sorry but I really am glad to take these men into the Priesthood. You do understand that widowers can join the Priesthood and that Eastern Rite has married Priests as well, right?


10 posted on 11/05/2011 1:34:49 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
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To: cumbo78

The Sign of Peace is completely optional for each priest. Talk to your priest about not interrupting the concentration on the Eucharist that should be going on at that time.


11 posted on 11/05/2011 1:38:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #12 Removed by Moderator

To: NYer

Is this it?
Where is the Handholding? How about the Orans position of the laity? How about all responses by the duet in the front without letting the congregation answer at all? Or Using “God” instead of “Father” to avoid gender? How about the Game Show music that stands in for the responses? How about needing to use “Jesus” like we’re on a first name basis (i.e. Jesus, Lamb of God you take away the sins of the world)? And while we’re at it, how about we ditch singing ANY showtunes. NONE allowed!!!


13 posted on 11/05/2011 1:40:19 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
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To: netmilsmom
How about the Game Show music that stands in for the responses?

Wow ... where is this happening? Perhaps it is time to repost an old favorite.

Is Your Mass Valid? Liturgical Abuse

14 posted on 11/05/2011 1:51:22 PM PDT by NYer ("Be kind to every person you meet. For every person is fighting a great battle." St. Ephraim)
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To: netmilsmom

I’m with you. No one will learn all the words of the Gloria because we are relegated to singing the chorus.

It’s time for the laity to say no to all the hoopla going on up on the altar. Singers belong in the back of the church where they can distract us as little as possible. I ask them to labor anonymously for the love of God!

And the petitions are getting to be a liberal litany! Enough!


15 posted on 11/05/2011 2:30:21 PM PDT by Melian ("Where will wants not, a way opens.")
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To: NYer

>>Wow ... where is this happening? Perhaps it is time to repost an old favorite.<<

I wish I could post that on the door of every parish in MI.


16 posted on 11/05/2011 2:30:36 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
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To: Melian

One VERY liberal parish in my area has a duet. The laity basically sit and listen to the concert going on.

My other bugaboos are, using the piano when there is an organ AND the “raising up” of the cantor because it is assumed that the congregation is too stupid to know when to sing.

Get the musicians to the back where they belong and let’s pay attention to The Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity instead.


17 posted on 11/05/2011 2:38:51 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
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To: TexConfederate1861

However, a married priest cannot be named as a Bishop.


18 posted on 11/05/2011 2:40:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: LoveUSA

I’d like to see that source on the last Popes. I really can’t believe it.

Our Archdiocese has had several married priests. In fact, one was ordained last year — grown children and wife were also in attendance.

For what it’s worth — one of our married priests died while at a Convocation of Priests. All the priest grieved his death. No partiality was shown at all.


19 posted on 11/05/2011 2:44:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: LoveUSA

PS. I think it would have been the gloating that would turn me off too.


20 posted on 11/05/2011 2:44:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: NYer

I attended a private Mass for our Serra Club this morning said by our chaplain. We responded and he said the Mass with the new translation.....which has been approved by the Archbishop in our Archdiocese.

It was beautiful!


21 posted on 11/05/2011 2:46:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: netmilsmom
One VERY liberal parish in my area has a duet. The laity basically sit and listen to the concert going on.

:-) Reminds me of my former RC parish, one of the largest in this area. (Recall this is Bishop Hubbard territory where anything goes!) This one Sunday, the 'light in the loafers' pastor brought in a pianist to play background music during the quiet moments of the mass, like the Consecration Nothing like watching a priest elevate the host to background music.

Our bishop reaches mandatory retirement age in 2013. For decades now, many catholics in the diocese have been praying that his successor will be appointed by a conservative minded pope. It will take decades to turn this diocese around.

Please check out the link I posted above. Finding parishioners in liberal parishes (or dioceses) amenable to its message is the greatest challenge, especially when they have been told their methods of worship are normal and desirable.

22 posted on 11/05/2011 2:52:44 PM PDT by NYer ("Be kind to every person you meet. For every person is fighting a great battle." St. Ephraim)
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To: LoveUSA

Report this man to the bishop so that he may be issued some needed fraternal correction.


23 posted on 11/05/2011 2:53:39 PM PDT by pbear8 (the Lord is my light and my salvation)
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To: netmilsmom

I, too, am thrilled to have faithful convert priest but not their huge egos which they are welcome to leave in their former places of worship. This man should never point to himself because Holy Mass is all about God Almighty.


24 posted on 11/05/2011 2:57:33 PM PDT by pbear8 (the Lord is my light and my salvation)
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To: Salvation

Absolutely true!


25 posted on 11/05/2011 3:58:05 PM PDT by TexConfederate1861 (Surrender means that the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy.)
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To: Salvation

In the earliest centuries of the Church it was called the kiss of peace.

Peace be with you?

Question: One thing at Mass that I find really difficult is the “Sign of Peace”. How come we do this?

Dear Inquirer,

There is no better way to describe the custom of exchanging the greeting of peace at Mass than the words of St. Augustine in the 4th century: “After the Lord’s Prayer, say ‘Peace be with you.’ Christians then embrace one another with a holy kiss. This is the sign of peace.”

In the primitive church at Rome and in the Eastern Church, the kiss of peace was offered after the first part of the Mass and before the Eucharistic Prayer. Early baptismal documents also indicate that the exchange of peace was reserved only for the ‘faithful,’ and so catechumens were dismissed before the Prayer of the Faithful, which was followed by the Kiss of Peace.

In the Western Church the sign of peace was moved quite early to where it is as Augustine described it and where it is today. The Western Church saw a close link between peace and communion—peace with one another before receiving the Prince of Peace.

In the Middle Ages the laity were excluded from the sign of peace and it was then dropped altogether from the Mass; the only remnant of the rite was the action of the priest kissing the altar. Vatican II restored the ancient rite of peace to all who participate at mass.

Custom dictates how the kiss of peace is exchanged in each country: a handshake, an embrace, words of peace, or other actions. In Japan, for example, the celebrant bows deeply to the congregation who in turn bow towards him and then bow respectfully to one another. It is a sign that works well in their culture. How the sign of peace is given will vary, but its meaning remains the same.

http://www.cptryon.org/ask/ask/signpeace.html


26 posted on 11/05/2011 4:33:20 PM PDT by Not gonna take it anymore (Member of the First Church of Christ, I am Catholic)
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To: NYer

Actually, when you posted it a while ago, I brought it to my (then) parish.

It was disregarded, to say the least.


27 posted on 11/05/2011 6:58:22 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice)
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To: NYer
"3. Fully aware that I shall be accused by some of crankiness bordering on misanthropy, let me repeat a point made in this space before: the exchange of peace is not meant to be the occasion for a chat with the neighbors, but for the greetings of those closest to us in church with a simple, evangelical salutation: “the peace of the Lord be with you;” “peace be with you;” “the peace of Christ.” The longer conversations can be saved for the narthex or vestibule (not “gathering space”)."

In Minnesota, we had a pastor (Oh, how I MISS him!) who said, "Before we prepare to celebrate the Sacred Mysteries, let us offer each other a sign of peace." The greeting would proceed, and during the prayers around the Consecration, there was no disruptive hand-shaking, chitchat, or other distraction AFTER the Words of Institution had been recited. It was VERY reverent, and much more appropriate than what we have today.

28 posted on 11/05/2011 7:45:01 PM PDT by redhead (Don't START with me...you know how I get.)
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To: NYer

Thanks, NYer. I saved that link. Excellent information and guidance.


29 posted on 11/05/2011 7:52:25 PM PDT by redhead (Don't START with me...you know how I get.)
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To: Donkey Odious

The next step needs to be the abolition of Mass facing the people.


30 posted on 11/05/2011 9:05:27 PM PDT by rzman21
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To: Salvation

Unless he happens to be a reconciled schismatic Old Catholic bishop.

It happened before. One Salomao Barbosa Ferraz.

Salomão Barbosa Ferraz (Jau, Brazil, 18 February 1880-11 May 1969) was a Brazilian priest and bishop whose career took him through membership of several Christian denominations from the Presbyterian Church through to the Roman Catholic Church.
Originally a Presbyterian Minister, Barbosa Ferraz was ordained an Anglican Priest in 1917. He founded an ecumenical society, the “Order of Saint Andrew”, in 1928, and was instrumental in organising a ‘Free Catholic Congress’ in 1936. At the close of this event he established a “Free Catholic Church” and was elected as the church’s first Bishop. The Second World War halted plans to be consecrated Bishop by European Old Catholics, but Salomão Barbosa Ferraz was eventually consecrated Bishop by Carlos Duarte Costa following this Bishop’s excommunication by the Vatican in 1945.
Salomão Barbosa Ferraz in turn consecrated Manoel Ceia Laranjeira for the Free Catholic Church of Brazil in 1951, but sought reception into the Roman Catholic Church, which he achieved under Pope John XXIII, leaving Manoel Ceia Laranjeira at the head of the Free Catholic Church, then renamed Independent Catholic Apostolic Church of Brazil.
In 1963, Bishop Ferraz was received in the Roman Catholic Church as the Titular Bishop of Eleutherna and took part of sessions of the Second Vatican Council under that office. He was also appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Rio de Janeiro by Pope John XXIII. Bishop Ferraz died in 1969, leaving his wife and seven children.
Bishop Salomão Barbosa Ferraz was a rare instace of legally accepted married bishop in modern Roman Catholic history.


31 posted on 11/05/2011 9:12:21 PM PDT by rzman21
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