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How the GOP got “Catholicized”
Deacon's Bench ^ | March 23, 2012 | Deacon Greg Kandra

Posted on 03/23/2012 2:22:38 PM PDT by NYer

An interesting perspective, from a writer from across the pond:

There was a time when the Republican Party was strictly for White Anglo Saxon Protestants. It was an alliance between Country Club Episcopalians and twice born followers of the Old Time Gospel, all firmly opposed to mass Catholic immigration from Europe. The nativism of the GOP drove Catholics into the welcoming arms of Al Smith, Jack Kennedy, Tip O’Neill and the Democratic Party.

But this year’s GOP front-runners are a Mormon and two Catholics — Rick Santorum (a cradle of Italian descent) and Newt Gingrich (a convert). Roughly one-quarter of Republican primary voters are Catholic. Notable Catholic GOP leaders include John Boehner, Paul Ryan, Christine O’Donnell, Marco Rubio and Jeb Bush. Six out of nine justices of the Supreme Court are Catholics, and five of them are Republicans.

The GOP is undergoing a quiet process of Catholicization. It’s one of the reasons why this year’s race has focused so much on social issues — and sex.

Republican outreach to Catholics began in the early 1970s, when Richard Nixon tried to entice blue-collar “white ethnics” to the GOP by taking a tough stand on abortion. Nixon told members of his staff he was tempted to convert to Catholicism himself, but was worried it would be seen as cheap politics: “They would say there goes Tricky Dick Nixon trying to win the Catholic vote. …

Nixon genuinely admired the Catholic intellectual tradition and its ability to provide reasonable arguments to defend conservative values at a time when they were undergoing widespread reappraisal. That certainly made the Church an invaluable partner during the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s.

When the Moral Majority was established in 1979 to oppose things like abortion and homosexual rights, its evangelical founders did their best to include Catholics. Despite the organization’s reputation for being the political voice box of televangelists and peddlers of the apocalypse, by the mid ’80s it drew a third of its funding from Catholic donors. Leaders like Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson consciously used the Moral Majority (and, later, the Christian Coalition) as an exercise in ecumenical coalition building.

Falwell and Robertson were fans of Pope John Paul II and his resilient anti-communism. But they also recognized, like Nixon, that the Catholic Church had a vast intellectual heritage that could be drawn upon when fighting the liberals. For example, when debating abortion, evangelicals had hitherto tended to rely on Scripture to make their case. Catholics, on the other hand, had been integrating the concept of “human rights” into their theology since the 1890s.

Under Catholic influence, the pro-life movement evolved from a zealous, theology-heavy rationale to one more couched in the language of human dignity and personhood.

Read more.


TOPICS: Catholic; History; Mainline Protestant; Religion & Politics
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 03/23/2012 2:22:40 PM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; SumProVita; ...

Interesting perspective, ping!


2 posted on 03/23/2012 2:23:24 PM PDT by NYer (He who hides in his heart the remembrance of wrongs is like a man who feeds a snake on his chest. St)
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To: NYer

The KKK act was written to protect:

“Catholics, Republicans and Negroes” in the Reconstruction South.

The writer is not completely accurate.


3 posted on 03/23/2012 2:28:30 PM PDT by Kansas58
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To: Kansas58

If the Catholics want to take credit for the mess we call the Grand Old Party, more power to them.


4 posted on 03/23/2012 2:36:40 PM PDT by WestwardHo
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To: WestwardHo
If the Catholics want to take credit for the mess we call the Grand Old Party, more power to them.

That is quite a stretch.

5 posted on 03/23/2012 2:41:02 PM PDT by NYer (He who hides in his heart the remembrance of wrongs is like a man who feeds a snake on his chest. St)
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To: NYer

Actually, the DNC is pushing catholics out.

For a believing catholic, the Democratic Party is an increasingly hostile place.


6 posted on 03/23/2012 2:48:36 PM PDT by marron
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To: marron
For a believing catholic, the Democratic Party is an increasingly hostile place.

Agreed. I trend towards Conservative. However, the GOP is far better than the Democratic party to which far too many catholics still subscribe.

7 posted on 03/23/2012 3:06:12 PM PDT by NYer (He who hides in his heart the remembrance of wrongs is like a man who feeds a snake on his chest. St)
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To: Kansas58
The KKK act was written to protect: “Catholics, Republicans and Negroes” in the Reconstruction South.

That is incorrect

. Catholicism wasn't a target of the KKK until the second resurrection of the KKK(and it's peak stength) in the 1900's when it's ranks swelled with anti Catholic recriuts from northern states. Anti Catholicism was a largely Northern disease as large emmigration from the southern European(Catholic) countries that began in the mid to late 1880's, well after the passage of the KKK Act in 1871. These immigrants began swelling in the industrial cities of the North, competeing with the naive population for work.

Virtual no Catholics or anyone else imigrated to the post Civil War South as it's economy collapsed.

Anti Judaism began an target of the KKK when Eastern European populations emigrated into the U.S.
8 posted on 03/23/2012 3:21:48 PM PDT by RedMonqey (A politician's integrity is usually only as strong as his poll numbers.)
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To: NYer

The key, mentioned in the article, is that Catholic social and political conservativism is rooted in human rights and Natural Law. This is not exclusively the property of Castholics, of course; quite the contrary. It is exactly a Natural Law perspective that emphasizes that moral law makes “natural sense” and thus makes it politically defensible in secular terms.


9 posted on 03/23/2012 3:23:44 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o ("Without justice, what else is the State but a great band of robbers?" - Augustine of Hippo)
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To: marron

“Actually, the DNC is pushing catholics out.”

The notion that the GOP is being Catholicized is hokum. Catholics have been a reliable Democrat constituency for decades, despite the justices and candidates cited by the author. Exceptions are not the rule.


10 posted on 03/23/2012 3:42:56 PM PDT by Owl558 ("Those who remember George Satayana are doomed to repeat him")
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To: NYer; WmShirerAdmirer; lilycicero; MaryLou1; glock rocks; JPG; Monkey Face; RIghtwardHo; ...
+

Freep-mail me to get on or off my pro-life and Catholic List:

Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of general interest.


11 posted on 03/23/2012 4:41:01 PM PDT by narses
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To: NYer

I would say, not so much that the conservatives are being “Catholicized”, but rather that the post-Vatican II mess was an aberration in the life of the Church. The Catholic Church is a naturally conservative institution, — think what you will of its theology, the Church’s sole objective is the preservation of the Deposit of Faith given the Apostles 2000 years ago. The reason American Catholics lurched to the left with J.F. Kennedy was transient and now we observe an almost instinctive correction. In one generation from now the Church might be smaller, possibly even driven underground, but she will be considerably more conservative.


12 posted on 03/23/2012 5:41:52 PM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: Owl558

You should try reading the article.


13 posted on 03/23/2012 6:29:54 PM PDT by pgkdan (Rick Santorum 2012. Conservative's last, best chance!)
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To: RedMonqey

There weren’t a lot of Catholics in the antebellum South but there were some, especially in Maryland, Kentucky, and Louisiana. The one Catholic among the Signers of the Declaration of Independence and the one Catholic among the Signers of the Constitution were Marylanders. Chief Justice Roger Taney (from Maryland) was a Catholic. Jefferson Davis got some of his education from Catholic educators. There is a street in Macon, GA, named in honor of Pope Pius IX (Pio Nono). There is a Catholic Church in Edgefield, SC, that dates back to 1856.


14 posted on 03/23/2012 8:07:51 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: NYer

**Six out of nine justices of the Supreme Court are Catholics, and five of them are Republicans.**

A lot of people don’t realize this!


15 posted on 03/23/2012 9:21:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Verginius Rufus; RedMonqey

Well, and Scarlett O’Hara was Catholic. ;-) “Fiddle-dee-dee! Obama and his HHS mandate! It’s ruined every party this spring!”


16 posted on 03/24/2012 6:17:28 AM PDT by Campion ("It is in the religion of ignorance that tyranny begins." -- Franklin)
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To: RedMonqey
You are wrong.
I actually was involved in a KKK Act, case, which was tossed out by SCOTUS in a similar case, though I won my case at that 10th Circuit level.
The preamble of the KKK Act clearly states its purpose, as to protect CATHOLICS, REPUBLICANS AND NEGROES in the Reconstruction South!
Strange that opposing counsel never told me I was wrong, as I made the preamble part of my case.
17 posted on 03/24/2012 9:11:04 AM PDT by Kansas58
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To: Kansas58
Civil Rights Act of 1871. aka "The Ku Klux Klan Act"

Be it enacted…, That any person who, under color of any law, statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or usage of any State, shall subject, or cause to be subjected any person within the jurisdiction of the United States to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the Constitution of the United States, shall, any such law, statute, ordinance, regulation, custom or usage of the State to the contrary notwithstanding, be liable to the party injured in any action at law, suit in equity, or other proper proceeding for redress; such proceeding to be prosecuted in the several district or circuit courts of the United States, with and subject to the same rights of appeal, review upon error, and other remedies provided in like cases in such courts, under the provisions of the [Civil Right Act of 1866], and the other remedial laws of the United States which are in their nature applicable in such cases.

Nowhere does it specifically mentions CATHOLICS, REPUBLICANS AND NEGROES in the Reconstruction South!


18 posted on 03/24/2012 3:57:30 PM PDT by RedMonqey (A politician's integrity is usually only as strong as his poll numbers.)
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To: Verginius Rufus
Yes and there were many Catholics(mostly if not all) that were Irish that fought in the Confederacy. And a few that were in the original KKK.

Where I live in Tennessee, whih is not a large city. There is an relatively impressive(at least by local standards) antibellum Catholic Churh downtown, nearby an Methodist and Presbyterian church of of the same period and size. so there was and continues to be an active Catholic presence then as is now.

The original KKK was virulently anti-negro rights, scalawags and northern carpetbaggers. If anyone who happened to be Catholics were confronted by the KKK, it was because they were in favor of the aforementioned. Their religious beliefs were inconsequential at this period of time.

19 posted on 03/24/2012 4:19:36 PM PDT by RedMonqey (A politician's integrity is usually only as strong as his poll numbers.)
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To: RedMonqey
You did not reprint the PREAMBLE.
There was an explanation as to why the Act was written.
I quoted from that explanation, which was written into the Congressional record but not part of the law, itself.

I know what it says, and it can be found in any of the OLDER legal books.

But, of course, Lincoln, the first REPUBLICAN President, had this to say:

“Many of Lincoln's public anti-slavery sentiments were shown in the seven Lincoln-Douglas debates of 1858 between Lincoln and Stephen Douglas, his opponent who defeated him in the Senate race. Douglas criticized him as being inconsistent, saying he altered his message and position on slavery and on the political rights of freed blacks in order to appeal to the audience before him, as northern Illinois was more hostile to slavery than southern Illinois.

Lincoln wrote to Joshua Speed in 1855:

How can any one who abhors the oppression of negroes, be in favor of degrading classes of white people? Our progress in degeneracy appears to me to be pretty rapid. As a nation, we began by declaring that “all men are created equal.” We now practically read it “all men are created equal, except negroes.” When the Know-Nothings get control, it will read “all men are created equal, except negroes, and foreigners, and catholics.” When it comes to this I should prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretence of loving liberty — to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be take pure, and without the base alloy of hypocracy [sic].[

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln_and_slavery

If you insist that I locate the Preamble to the KKK Act, I can find it in print form at the local law library.

Many pieces of legislation have floor debate or written preambles attached to them, in older law books, as some form of guidance as to intent.

My point, of course, is that Lincoln and Grand BOTH were defenders of Catholics as well as Blacks.

20 posted on 03/24/2012 7:53:25 PM PDT by Kansas58
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To: RedMonqey
I don't live in Edgefield, S.C., but I visited the place once and was surprised at the large well-built Catholic Church, and that it dated from before the War, in an area where you wouldn't expect to find many Catholics.

Father Abram J. Ryan (1839-1886), a native of Maryland, is sometimes called the Poet Laureate of the Confederacy. His best-known poem is perhaps "The Conquered Banner." There is a high school named for him in Nashville, TN.

There is a town called Erin, TN, which I think reflects pre-Civil War Irish immigration.

There was a good deal of antebellum German immigration in Southern states--Missouri, Arkansas, Texas. Probably some of them were Catholics.

21 posted on 03/24/2012 8:04:24 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: RedMonqey

I remember reading about some Italians, maybe 5 in number, who were lynched in Louisiana in the late 19th century for being too friendly to the local black people. Or at least that is how it was reported.


22 posted on 03/24/2012 8:06:55 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: NYer

Conservative Catholics like the late Bill Buckley of National Review and Father Neuhaus of First Things provided a lot of the intellectual firepower for the modern conservative and pro-life movements.


23 posted on 03/24/2012 8:23:43 PM PDT by oilwatcher
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To: Kansas58

I meant that Lincoln and Grant, as well as Johnson, were Republican defenders of Catholics, Republicans and Negroes in the Reconstruction South.


24 posted on 03/24/2012 9:38:25 PM PDT by Kansas58
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To: Kansas58
You did not reprint the PREAMBLE.

I searched the Internet, which included several conditional law sites and this is what was stated. There was nothing even coming close to any "preamble" you mentioned.

So yes, please provide it.

My point, of course, is that Lincoln and Grand BOTH were defenders of Catholics as well as Blacks.

The point of the arguments was if the KKK Act specifically mentioned Negroes, Catholic, and Republicans, not what Lincoln said who was of course long time dead at the passage of this law. No one(at least not me)denies that Lincoln was a respecter of ALL peoples rights.

I quoted from that explanation, which was written into the Congressional record but not part of the law, itself.

That is not the argument but thank you for admitting you were wrong

As part of my research I came across the congressional record as background material and no where was "Republicans", or "Catholics" was specifically mentioned in connection with the KKK Act at it's creation, only in general terms as in the rights of all men.

What I think you are confusing is later civil rights cases involving Republicans, Catholics, etc. that the Supreme ruled upon under KKK Act the cases
25 posted on 03/26/2012 8:26:33 AM PDT by RedMonqey (A politician's integrity is usually only as strong as his poll numbers.)
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To: Verginius Rufus
I remember reading about some Italians, maybe 5 in number, who were lynched in Louisiana in the late 19th century for being too friendly to the local black people.

Yes, I have no doubt many were lynched for their "association" with blacks but not just for being Catholic in the pre KKK Act. At least it was not a widespread problem in the South that demanded the attention of the national government.
26 posted on 03/26/2012 8:31:47 AM PDT by RedMonqey (A politician's integrity is usually only as strong as his poll numbers.)
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To: Verginius Rufus
There is a town called Erin, TN, which I think reflects pre-Civil War Irish immigration.

Yes I know it well. It is just "a hop, skip and a jump" south of where I live. It's high school team's name is the "Fighting Irish." Not original but then not many are...
27 posted on 03/26/2012 8:37:07 AM PDT by RedMonqey (A politician's integrity is usually only as strong as his poll numbers.)
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To: NYer

——Catholics, on the other hand, had been integrating the concept of “human rights” into their theology since the 1890s.——

Or Francisco Suarez, give or take 300 years.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Su%C3%A1rez

See the section on “Philosophy of Law.”


28 posted on 03/26/2012 8:40:03 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey)
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To: RedMonqey
Not everything is online.

I KNOW what the explanation said, in the law books, (very old edition) that I used.

In my particular case, where I represented MYSELF, I did receive help from Jay Sekulow and other Operation Rescue attorneys, as to some points I should make.

I was not really a member of Operation Rescue, directly, so it made sense to handle my case separately. I was TOLD by attorneys in related cases, all of which were handled by the 10th Circuit at the time, to look up a particular reference to “Republicans, Catholics and Negroes” in a legal reference book.

I studied the “Force Acts” the “Civil Rights Acts” and the “KKK Act” extensively.

I know what I saw, I know what I read.

Perhaps this particular point was overstated, in the legal reference books I used, but I was pointed in that direction since I am a Catholic Republican.

You are a bit too sure of yourself, to the point of obsession.

I would remind you that I WON my case, on several different grounds.

I would suggest to you that I AM THE EXPERT as I represented myself, in the 10th Circuit, using the references I cited here, as well as other very valid legal and historical points.

There exists a legal reference book which CLEARLY mentions the “Republicans, Catholics and Negroes” phrase, in regards to the KKK act.

Your issue is with that legal reference book, not with me.

And? I last read this stuff shortly after the “Summer of Mercy” in Wichita, and I have to dig through my huge box of Court paperwork to locate the name of the reference book I cited.

29 posted on 03/26/2012 8:45:44 AM PDT by Kansas58
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To: Owl558

It’s true in terms of intellectual firepower. See the SCOTUS, the presidential candidates, and Buckley/National Review.

The reason is the 400+ year natural law tradition. Sadly, as the beneficial effects of Catholic higher ed are being felt, Catholic universities have almost completely collapsed.

This does not bode well for the future.


30 posted on 03/26/2012 8:48:50 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey)
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To: NYer
Good piece. Personally I'm very glad to have that Catholic intellectual firepower coming onboard the GOP.
31 posted on 03/26/2012 8:57:46 AM PDT by Yardstick
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To: Kansas58
I studied the “Force Acts” the “Civil Rights Acts” and the “KKK Act” extensively.

I know what I saw, I know what I read.

So provide the "facts you know"

Not a very high bar to meet for someone who "won his case"
32 posted on 03/27/2012 4:28:29 PM PDT by RedMonqey (A politician's integrity is usually only as strong as his poll numbers.)
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