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(Dr. Scott) Hahn Family spends its first Holy Week in Rome
cna ^ | April 5, 2012 | David Kerr

Posted on 04/05/2012 5:17:05 AM PDT by NYer

Scott and Kimberly Hahn with their son David in Rome on April 3, 2012.

Rome, Italy, Apr 4, 2012 / 05:08 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Scott and Kimberly Hahn have been Catholic for over two decades, but this is the first Holy Week they have ever spent in Rome.

“This experience has been for us overwhelming, and yet the best is yet to come – Holy Thursday, Good Friday and the Easter Vigil. I mean, we’re just standing on tip-toes feeling like kids in a candy store. Like how good can it get?” Scott said to CNA on April 3.

The Hahns are in Rome this week with their three youngest sons, 20-year-old Jeremiah, 17-year-old Joseph and 12-year-old David. This morning they attended Pope Benedict XVI’s general audience in St. Peter’s Square.

“It is always amazing to be here in Rome; to hear all of the languages and see all of the peoples that the Gospel has gone to and realize that this is not an American thing, it’s not even a European thing …God has been at work over the centuries calling all kinds of people to him.”
 
Kimberly said she is always particularly moved “to hear old Italian men and young German children all singing to the Holy Father with the same sort of love I have for him.”

Since being received into the Church in 1986, Dr. Scott Hahn has become one of the most popular Catholic speakers and teachers worldwide. His wife Kimberly became a Catholic four years later. The Hahns later recounted their conversions in the co-authored international best-seller “Rome Sweet Home.” The couple has been married for 33 years and has six children and, very soon, six grandchildren.

The Hahns first visited Rome 20 years ago and had the chance to meet Pope John Paul II.

But the visit occurred at a hard time for the family as it came only one month after the death of Scott’s father.

“To be able to share from my heart the sorrow that I felt for my natural father but to look into the eyes of my spiritual father,” said Scott in reference to Pope John Paul, “and to hear him say ‘I’m sorry, I will pray for him’” was a bittersweet experience.

The encounter made Scott realize that as a Catholic he now enjoyed “the spiritual fatherhood of God through Christ to Peter and to all of his successors down through the ages which unites us worldwide as this Catholic, as this international, universal family of God.”
 
This is why, he explained, “Rome sweet home is not just the title of a book but the description of my own life experience.”

Kimberly said that the family enjoyed the chance to pray at the tomb of Blessed John Paul in St. Peter’s Basilica and “to be in St. Peters Square where the Holy Father was shot,” which is “a place I love to touch and be close to him there.”

Scott said that other favorite Roman sites for the family include the catacombs where the martyrs of the early Church were buried and “where you find out about how people paid a price a long time ago.” He suggested that “we too may end up having to pay a price” as we “may end up in a post-Christian pagan environment that is as resistant or hostile as theirs.”
 
Kimberly also loves Rome’s churches since “you just go a short distance and you find another magnificent church” where “even the little side chapels are more beautiful than most American churches.” She hopes that Americans visiting Rome will “catch a vision as to what a Catholic church should look like physically.”
 
Any opportunity to visit the Pontifical North American College seminary is also “very special” to Kimberly because “these are young men in training who will come back to the States as priests.”

“That experience of the Universal Church has been so powerful,” Kimberly said, summing up their Rome visit so far. “I really can hardly imagine what the Easter Triduum is going to be like, but I’m also really looking forward to that.”


TOPICS: Catholic; Worship
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1 posted on 04/05/2012 5:17:12 AM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; SumProVita; ...

Holy Week in Rome ... I’m jealous, ping.


2 posted on 04/05/2012 5:17:56 AM PDT by NYer (He who hides in his heart the remembrance of wrongs is like a man who feeds a snake on his chest. St)
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To: NYer

Instrumental in my reversion to the Church.


3 posted on 04/05/2012 5:24:15 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand
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To: NYer

Instrumental in my reversion to the Church.


4 posted on 04/05/2012 5:28:24 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand
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To: the invisib1e hand

same here....scott and kimberly’s writings, etc, have been a Godsend.....


5 posted on 04/05/2012 5:36:34 AM PDT by raygunfan
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To: NYer

Glad to hear he is well enough to travel, following his recent illness.

Prayers up!


6 posted on 04/05/2012 5:53:24 AM PDT by G Larry (We are NOT obliged to carry the snake in our pocket and then dismiss the bites as natural behavior.)
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To: NYer
I spent Holy Week there in 2009 and while it is overwhelming for Good Friday, the masses that are held IN St. Peter's are underwhelming as quite frankly you can't see or experience anything beyond crowds.

The open air masses are incredible, with the joy and enthusiasm of people from all over the world, chatting in their native language.

The way of the cross at the Colosseum is also overwhelming.

Ok, ok, it is nice, but sometimes it could be too many people in the Basilica and you prefer going to one of the many Cathedrals...

7 posted on 04/05/2012 5:56:23 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: NYer

Actually it’s not all that great unless you are lucky enough to score some passes to the special events that get you a decent view. We got passes to the Good Friday mass at St. Peters, which was wonderful, but the actual outside Easter Sunday mass was so crowded we couldn’t see a thing. Dittos for the Via Crusis, the crowds are huge.

If you are in Rome for an extended holiday around that time see if you can get into the Vatican office (the one with the Swiss Guard in front) and tell the Pope’s secretary that this is your first visit to Rome as newlyweds. Even if you’ve been married for 20 years, if it’s your first visit to Rome as a married couple that counts. You will get some souvenirs and a pass for an audience with the Pope. No, you won’t get to go into some small room and have a conversation with His Holiness but it will get you in the same row that he uses to walk up to the altar after the Popemobile drives him up and down the rows that they make so he can greet the thousands who will be in the square. Then, if you are very lucky, you may get to be one of the people he speaks to, pats on the head or blesses.

When the Pope is walking down the aisle there will be a group of men in black suits that look like Secret Service agents surrounding him. Some of them are actual bodyguards but most are photographers, snapping pictures of everything in sight. Get a business card from one of them if you can. It will give you the address of a studio that will have pictures by the thousands posted in the windows. If you find one with you in it order prints of your special event. We have pictures of John Paul II patting us on the heads and blessing a handful of Rosary beads that she was holding out to him. A beautiful moment from our visit to Rome.


8 posted on 04/05/2012 6:04:59 AM PDT by Oshkalaboomboom
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To: NYer
Rome is a great walking town. Around every corner is a building or monument you know from either movies, paintings or art books, history class, etc. It's all oddly familiar.

If you aren't fussy about where you stay, you can find good value around Termini Station where each floor of a building is run as a separate hotel. We think entrepreneurship is dead or at least discouraged in Europe. I was always surprised to find little, shops, bars, restaurants tucked into tiny spaces doing fierce business. It gladdened my heart.

9 posted on 04/05/2012 6:10:12 AM PDT by Oratam
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To: G Larry

Sorry to hear Scott had been ill and I do pray it is not chronic. Scott is a giant among our apologists.

Journey Home, and Scott and Steve Ray brought me into the Church in ‘01 from a non-denominational.


10 posted on 04/05/2012 6:15:42 AM PDT by RitaOK (LET 'ER RIP, NEWT.)
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To: NYer

Love the Hahn’s


11 posted on 04/05/2012 6:32:48 AM PDT by badpacifist (stupid people are dangerous)
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To: NYer

If I had any opportunity to travel, I’d spend the Holy Week is the Holy place, Israel...I don’t think Jesus was ever in Rome...


12 posted on 04/05/2012 7:05:45 AM PDT by Iscool (You mess with me, you mess with the WHOLE trailerpark...)
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To: NYer

Google “White House Easter” message. You won’t get any hits except for GWB and Clinton.


13 posted on 04/05/2012 7:09:53 AM PDT by anoldafvet
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To: badpacifist

What are they, like, celebrities?


14 posted on 04/05/2012 7:10:48 AM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: NYer

I’m happy for the Hahns. I hope they have an absolutely lovely time.

And now, back to planning Easter music. I wish we were doing it in Spanish!


15 posted on 04/05/2012 7:14:23 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: NYer
The Vatican.
I always wondered WHY the center of the Roman Catholic Church was called that. I found out why.
Peter was martyred on "Vatican Hill." That was the name of the exact "hill" where Peter was martyred.

I always wondered why Peter left Israel and went to Rome. I found out why. Paul had gone to Rome...the center of the Gentile community at the time, the POWER of the world.
He wasn't doing very well in evangelizeing as he had never known or met Jesus, aside from his amazing vision. The Romans weren't buying Paul's evangelization so he got Peter to join him there. That obviously did the trick.
The Romans were going to crucify him as they did Jesus and Peter asked to crucified upside down as to be crucified JUST like Jesus was not acceptable for him. He thought that he didn't deserve the honor of dying JUST like Jesus.
THIS kind of history is part of the Apostolic Tradition that sola scripture Protestants decline.

Scott Hahn is a WONderful speaker. He has been inspirational to ME, a cradle Catholic. How blessed we Catholics are to have him in the fold.

16 posted on 04/05/2012 7:26:26 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Iscool
If I had any opportunity to travel, I’d spend the Holy Week is the Holy place, Israel...I don’t think Jesus was ever in Rome...

Read my post, #16. It explains why Peter ended up in Rome.

In the end the Apostles scattered as they were made totally unwelcome in Jewish Israel. Doublting Thomas went as far east as India. When the Portuguese landed in India there they were amazed to find so many men named THOMAS. They weren't prepared, I guess, for finding ANY Christianity that far east from Israel.

A 1st century tomb in China, a wealthy man, had a SMALL stone carving of the nativity scene in his elaborate tomb.

The Apostles were instructed by Jesus to go forth and teach all nations. They sure did their jobdidn't they? Rhetoical.

17 posted on 04/05/2012 7:31:21 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Larry Lucido
What are they, like, celebrities?

For Catholics the pope and cardinals are minor "celebrities" and the bishops are SORT OF celebs. Priests are respected and liked according to what kind of priests they are. Great priests inspire us; ho-hum priests bore us with their homilies and personalities. Most priests are somewhere in between those two extremes.

Jesus is The Celebrity of all time and space.

I'm speaking for Catholics from my OWN very humble point of view...ONLY.

18 posted on 04/05/2012 7:37:05 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain

St. Peter could be crucified because he was not a Roman citizen. St. Paul was a citizen, so he was beheaded.

When we’re discussing the Bible in my prayer group or in Sunday School class, I’ll often begin a statement with “Scott Hahn suggests ...,” or “According to Scott Hahn ...”.


19 posted on 04/05/2012 7:43:32 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: Tax-chick
1. St. Peter could be crucified because he was not a Roman citizen. St. Paul was a citizen, so he was beheaded.
2. When we’re discussing the Bible in my prayer group or in Sunday School class, I’ll often begin a statement with “Scott Hahn suggests ...,” or “According to Scott Hahn ...”.

1. Yes, I know. Paul had the "privilege" of choosing, even though he was Jewish too. The citizenship of Rome could be purchased. Paul was smart to do so. It might have had to do with his trade...tent maker.

2. Now that Scott Hahn has "crossed the Tiber" is he still quoted by you or others...or just ignored? Just curious.

20 posted on 04/05/2012 8:06:43 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain; Iscool
Was Jesus in Rome? While not in the canon of Scripture, the Acts of Peter is a source of much of the history of Peter and Paul in Rome:

"Then both Peter and Paul were led away from the presence of Nero. And Paul was beheaded on the Ostesian road.

And Peter, having come to the cross, said: Since my Lord Jesus Christ, who came down from the heaven upon the earth, was raised upon the cross upright, and He has deigned to call to heaven me, who am of the earth, my cross ought to be fixed head down most, so as to direct my feet towards heaven; for I am not worthy to be crucified like my Lord. Then, having reversed the cross, they nailed his feet up.

And the multitude was assembled reviling Cæsar, and wishing to kill him. But Peter restrained them, saying: A few days ago, being exhorted by the brethren, I was going away; and my Lord Jesus Christ met me, and having adored Him, I said, Lord, whither are You going? And He said to me, I am going to Rome to be crucified.

And I said to Him, Lord, were You not crucified once for all? And the Lord answering, said, I saw you fleeing from death, and I wish to be crucified instead of you. And I said, Lord, I go; I fulfil Your command. And He said to me, Fear not, for I am with you. On this account, then, children, do not hinder my going; for already my feet are going on the road to heaven. Do not grieve, therefore, but rather rejoice with me, for today I receive the fruit of my labours. And thus speaking, he said: I thank You, good Shepherd, that the sheep which You have entrusted to me, sympathize with me; I ask, then, that with me they may have a part in Your kingdom. And having thus spoken, he gave up the ghost."

Besides, we all know that where the Church (the Body of Christ) is, there is Christ!

21 posted on 04/05/2012 10:12:54 AM PDT by shurwouldluv_a_smallergov
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To: cloudmountain
St. Paul was born a Roman citizen. In Acts he says this to a Roman official who had purchased citizenship.

Scott Hahn joined the Catholic Church a few years before my husband and I did. (We have more children, though.) His interpretations are always interesting, although sometimes I prefer another way of looking at a passage.

22 posted on 04/05/2012 10:25:29 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: Tax-chick
St Paul's father was a Roman citizen, therefore Paul was.

From Catholic Answers:
Saul of Tarsus was born a Jew, "circumcised on the eight day, of the race of Israel, or the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrew parentage, in observance of the law a Pharisee" (Phil 3:5). The Hebrew name given him by his parents was Saul, but, because his father was a Roman citizen (and therefore Saul inherited Roman citizenship), Saul also had the Latin name Paul (Acts 16:37, 22:25-28), the custom of dual names being common in those days. Since he grew up in a strict Pharisee environment, the name Saul was by far the more appropriate name to go by. But after his conversion Saul determined to bring the gospel to the Gentiles, so he dusted off his Roman name and became known as Paul, a name Gentiles were accustomed to.

23 posted on 04/05/2012 10:41:01 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: the invisib1e hand

For me too.

“The Lamb’s Supper” moved my heart to understand the Mass and the Eucharist in a way I had never done before.

They are a great gift to the Church from the Lord, who sends us what we need when we need it.

Praise God.


24 posted on 04/05/2012 10:45:43 AM PDT by Jvette
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To: cloudmountain

I wonder if he was named Saul after King Saul, the standout success (practically the only one!) of the tribe of Benjamin. Were boys in the tribe of Judah ever named “Saul,” in that time period?

A Salvadoran family in our congregation recently named their son “Saulo.” Family name, attachment to King Saul (I think he got an undeserved bad press), thinking of St. Paul but already had a “Pablo”? I didn’t ask ;-).


25 posted on 04/05/2012 10:47:07 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: NYer

-—She hopes that Americans visiting Rome will “catch a vision as to what a Catholic church should look like physically.”-—

Amen! Fortunately, the tide appears to be turning.

It’s best that we forget modern churches, and speak of them no longer.


26 posted on 04/05/2012 10:52:39 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey!)
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To: Tax-chick
I wonder if he was named Saul after King Saul, the standout success (practically the only one!) of the tribe of Benjamin. Were boys in the tribe of Judah ever named “Saul,” in that time period?

I found this about King Saul and Saul of Tarsus Compared
Published Date:
May 11, 2006
While doing a study on the life of the apostle Paul, I began to wonder if he was actually named Saul after the 1st king of Israel. I began to make comparisons between the two and found several things that they had in common. The name Saul means "desired" while the name Paul means "little".
It's interesting to think that Paul started off as Saul, or the one to be desired, but when God got a hold of him, he became Paul the little one. Sounds like the words of John the Baptist when he said of Christ, "He must increase, but I must decrease." John 3:30 Andrew Ray
http://www.learnthebible.org/king-saul-and-saul-of-tarsus-compared.html

27 posted on 04/05/2012 11:01:25 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Cronos

My church does the Stations in English and Spanish every week since we have such a mixture of the two languages. The responses of the people in the two languages can seem like cacophonous at times.

Some of the people don’t mind the two together and some don’t like it wishing that we could hold separate services for each language.

I am one who really likes the bi-lingual because it I think of the Tower of Babel when language became a barrier to people wishing to exalt themselves rather than God.

But, when we are together in this prayer, though our languages are different, we are in fact speaking in one voice our love of Jesus. There is no barrier because of the languages, in fact we are united in the way Christ wished us to be.


28 posted on 04/05/2012 11:08:50 AM PDT by Jvette
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To: cloudmountain

How interesting! Thank you for finding and posting that.


29 posted on 04/05/2012 11:35:43 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: cloudmountain
THIS kind of history is part of the Apostolic Tradition that sola scripture Protestants decline.

1Co 15:6 After that, he was seen of above five hundred brethren at once; of whom the greater part remain unto this present, but some are fallen asleep.
1Co 15:7 After that, he was seen of James; then of all the apostles.
1Co 15:8 And last of all he was seen of me also, as of one born out of due time.

And we decline/reject your so called Tradition because the scriptures alone contradict it so often...Scripture says Paul saw Jesus...

So Paul was failing as an evangelist and Peter had to rescue him??? Where is a face palm picture when I need one???

So when did this 'tradition' start??? And who passed it on to your religion??? Which one of the earliest church fathers wrote about it???

30 posted on 04/05/2012 12:16:35 PM PDT by Iscool (You mess with me, you mess with the WHOLE trailerpark...)
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To: cloudmountain

I totally agree with you.

The inordinate regard all to often given to other people is, in my opinion, a serious error.

Father Corapi, Father Euteneuer and others illustrate this all too painfully.

FReepers who give disproportionate attention to the Hahns and others are recklessly setting them up for a fall. It’s shameful.


31 posted on 04/05/2012 12:32:01 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: badpacifist; NYer

Ping to 31.

Those who TRUELY love the Hahns just might take heed.


32 posted on 04/05/2012 12:34:19 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: shurwouldluv_a_smallergov
So Peter was pretty chatty while hanging there with spikes pounded thru the bones of his feet and hands...Far more so than Jesus was...And what book of the bible is this in??? Ooooh, it's not in the bible...

But it was pretty nice of those Romans to let Peter (who incidentally headed out of town like the Road Runner when Jesus was crucifide) decide how he was to be killed...

33 posted on 04/05/2012 12:35:11 PM PDT by Iscool (You mess with me, you mess with the WHOLE trailerpark...)
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Comment #34 Removed by Moderator

To: Iscool
Iscool, I know you don't accept anything having to do with Christianity unless you can find your interpretation of your beliefs in your bible. With the obvious exception of where in the bible it says not to accept anything unless it's in the bible...

But that's a discussion for another day. Suffice to say that it is the major difference between Catholics and Bible Christians. Scripture was closed with the death of the Apostle John; I believe we agree on that.

The Church continues in history, and others have written; what else has been written may not carry the same weight as scripture, but that does not mean it's untrue or that it did not happen.

35 posted on 04/05/2012 1:08:34 PM PDT by shurwouldluv_a_smallergov
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To: Iscool; shurwouldluv_a_smallergov

I’m having trouble finding shurdwould’s Scriptural account in my Bible. If you find it, please let me know, Iscool. It could be epic. or not...


36 posted on 04/05/2012 1:29:42 PM PDT by smvoice (Better Buck up, Buttercup. The wailing and gnashing are for an eternity..)
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To: smvoice

uh, what scriptural account are you referring to?


37 posted on 04/05/2012 1:33:20 PM PDT by shurwouldluv_a_smallergov
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To: shurwouldluv_a_smallergov; Iscool

I’m talking about your post 21. Sorry I didn’t reference it.


38 posted on 04/05/2012 1:35:15 PM PDT by smvoice (Better Buck up, Buttercup. The wailing and gnashing are for an eternity..)
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To: smvoice
Did you read it?

The first line clearly says:

While not in the canon of Scripture, the Acts of Peter is a source of much of the history of Peter and Paul in Rome.

In other words, it's not in your bible.

39 posted on 04/05/2012 1:38:58 PM PDT by shurwouldluv_a_smallergov
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To: NYer

Thanks for posting this story...


40 posted on 04/05/2012 1:44:50 PM PDT by Chesterbelloc
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To: shurwouldluv_a_smallergov; Iscool

Yes, yes I did read it. But I still wanted to make absolutely CERTAIN that I had read it correctly. Just what is the “Acts of Peter”?


41 posted on 04/05/2012 1:46:02 PM PDT by smvoice (Better Buck up, Buttercup. The wailing and gnashing are for an eternity..)
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To: cloudmountain; Iscool
Post 16. Incredible. "The Romans weren't buying Paul's evalgelization so he got Peter to join him there. That obviously did the trick."

"Hey, Peter, it's Paul. We're getting the band back together...meet me in Rome.... We'll petros this city...".

Yes, it all makes sense now.

42 posted on 04/05/2012 1:54:12 PM PDT by smvoice (Better Buck up, Buttercup. The wailing and gnashing are for an eternity..)
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To: smvoice
The Acts of Peter are one of the many Apocryphal writings of the early Christian era. Google it if you are interested.
43 posted on 04/05/2012 2:10:56 PM PDT by shurwouldluv_a_smallergov
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To: Larry Lucido

Good gravy. The Hahns are nice people - I’ve exchanged handshakes and “Nice to meet you” with both Scott and Kimberly - who have produced a body of scholarly and popular writing and engaged in public speaking that has positively influenced many people.

Even if they turned out to be complete turkeys, that wouldn’t change the validity of their work, which stands or falls on its own merit.


44 posted on 04/05/2012 2:36:55 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: Tax-chick

Listen to what I’m saying. If you build someone up too high, you set them up for a fall.

It’s already happened at least twice.

Or ignore me. Then we can all talk about how we never expected it, and move on to the next “rock star.”


45 posted on 04/05/2012 2:42:17 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: Larry Lucido

I’m reading what you’re typing. Saying, “This person’s books (or live presentations) have been valuable to me,” is not “building them up.” You seem to want to tear people down, with no evidence, for their own good, of course.

St. Paul says, “Do nothing from selfishness or conceit, but in humility consider others as better than yourself.” If I think I’m a nice person with a Christian testimony that might be useful to someone else, then why shouldn’t I think at least as well of the Hahns, lacking evidence that this is a false assumption?


46 posted on 04/05/2012 2:49:02 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Read "Radical Son" by David Horowitz to understand the Left.)
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To: smvoice
Post 16. Incredible. "The Romans weren't buying Paul's evalgelization so he got Peter to join him there. That obviously did the trick." "Hey, Peter, it's Paul. We're getting the band back together...meet me in Rome.... We'll petros this city...". Yes, it all makes sense now.

I wonder if Mary had a good voice.
We'd have to ask John about that, wouldn't we?

47 posted on 04/05/2012 4:47:08 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Iscool
Is that all there is to Christianity for you, a book? No history, no tradition, just the one book that the 2000- year-old CATHOLIC CHURCH collated?
I guess you believe in the people who came 1500 years later, the Protestant Reformers? The Church of their fathers, for 1500+ years, wasn't worth reforming, so they ditched it all for what THEY thought was right...not what was RIGHT for the PREVIOUS 1500+ YEARS.

I guess so.

48 posted on 04/05/2012 4:52:43 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Larry Lucido
I totally agree with you. The inordinate regard all to often given to other people is, in my opinion, a serious error.
Father Corapi, Father Euteneuer and others illustrate this all too painfully.
FReepers who give disproportionate attention to the Hahns and others are recklessly setting them up for a fall. It’s shameful.

Well, Father Corapi is gone and no one seems to know where he is. He WAS inspirational. I don't know of Father Euteneuer. I guess he was made a celeb.
I always thought Father Corapi was humble enough, but his T.V. personna didn't show us what his real life was like, obviously.
I wish him well.

I have also thought that Scott Hahn was humble enough too. He ALWAYS speaks about his former faith with love and understanding. But I know what you mean.

People set themselves up for disappointment. I don't think this is new or original. People look for heroes; always have; always will. We don't ever get better ourselves unless we have someone to look up to. Jesus SHOULD be the only one, but, I guess we just won't give up on heroes.

49 posted on 04/05/2012 4:58:31 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Iscool
I am now reading a new book by Rod Bennet called FOUR WITNESSES the Early Church in Her Own Words.

The four witnesses are
Clement of Rome (50-60 A.D.),
Ignatius of Antioch (Bishop of Antioch from 70-108 A.D., then taken to Rome for martyrdom),
Justin Martyr (100-165 A.D.) and
Irenaeus of Lyons (around 202 A.D.).

The answers to your questions are there. I'm no apologist, truly, and just quote early Church fathers.
There is SO much to learn about the early Church, those first few hundred years after Christ when there WAS no "New Testament" but only scattered scroll collections of gospels and epistles. Most people couldn't read anyway and few, if any, could afford to buy a real book. Only the wealthy could, as I have read.
So those first early Church fathers HAD to have traditions for people to follow. They traveled the known world.

Sidenote: My husband and I visited Turkey in 2008. There were enormous amounts of underground "churches" where the first Christians were forced to worship. They were tanatmount to underground cities. I didn't like seeing them--WAY, WAY too sad and depressing. The early Church was persecuted for several hundred years but...persisted, thanks to the early church fathers who traveled and preached all over the known world, no books, only words and their own Christian (Read that as Catholic) deeds.

50 posted on 04/05/2012 5:20:19 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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