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The Christian Origin of Easter Eggs.
Vanity | 4-5-12 | Dangus

Posted on 04/05/2012 9:17:44 AM PDT by dangus

In past years, I've debunked all sorts of nonsense about supposedly pagan origins of various Easter traditions, and Easter itself. However, since the Western Church has lost some of its ancient traditions, I was unaware of the Christian origins of Easter eggs. Since attending Eastern rites, occasionally, I have learned the truth:

Traditionally, Christians have fasted from not only meat on Friday, but from all meat, fish, and dairy, all week long. Thus, just before Lent, great Feasts are held to consume all the spoilable foods that are abstained from during Lent. One can wait until after Lent is over to slaughter the cattle. But you can't tell the chickens to hold off on laying their eggs.

By the end of Lent, therefore, it was quite natural for medieval and ancient Christians to have accumulated a *lot* of eggs. And they're more likely to stay fresh if they are boiled ahead of time. And as they gathered in the house, they naturally became a symbol of anticipating Easter. In turn, they became greatly decorated.

Today, children are less apt to get excited over eggs, since they no longer say to themselves, "Yay! We can finally eat something besides Hummus!" So to represent the anticipation for Easter, the eggs are made of chocolate. Of course, it is sad that in our secular time, the meaning of Easter itself is being lost, but don't blame the eggs, but rather blame a culture which has come to associate abstinence with nothing other than deprivation.


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; History; Humor; Orthodox Christian; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: easter; lent

1 posted on 04/05/2012 9:17:45 AM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus

works for me.....


2 posted on 04/05/2012 9:19:20 AM PDT by raygunfan
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To: dangus

You mean ...there....is...no... Easter Bunny?


3 posted on 04/05/2012 9:27:37 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: dangus
This is totally incorrect. I can't believe you actually buy this tripe.

Easter eggs come from the Easter bunny. Duh! Everyone knows that.

4 posted on 04/05/2012 9:31:18 AM PDT by Thane_Banquo (Support hate crime laws: Because some victims are more equal than others.)
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To: dangus

Do you have a source or is this all your speculation?


5 posted on 04/05/2012 9:33:57 AM PDT by mnehring
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Comment #6 Removed by Moderator

To: Thane_Banquo

The Easter bunny merely distributes the easter eggs. He lays those little chocolate candies. (It’s true! I’ve seen my own bunnies lay them! I imagine that since the Easter bunny is special, the ones my own bunnies laid probably wouldn’t taste as good.)


7 posted on 04/05/2012 9:40:19 AM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus

..and if you are just speculating, it would probably be more accurate to reference the boiled egg eaten during Passover as a symbol of korban chagigah (festival sacrifice) that was given in the temple.

The challenge with the speculation above is that I’m aware of, only the Eastern Orthodox church bans eating eggs during Lent, the Catholic church doesn’t.


8 posted on 04/05/2012 9:41:17 AM PDT by mnehring
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To: mnehring

I’m definitely a believer in the notion that various traditions (an even etymologies) support each other, so that many traditions are not “this OR that” but “this AND that.” Therefore, the notion seems quite plausible, that paschal egg contributed the degree of seriousness with which Eastern Christians treasure their Easter eggs.

But yes, dairy, fish, and meat were abstained from traditionally in the Western Church, as well.


9 posted on 04/05/2012 9:52:15 AM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus; mnehring

On the “Black Fast” of Lent:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Fast
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02590c.htm


10 posted on 04/05/2012 9:54:35 AM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus

Lent itself is pagan in origin.


11 posted on 04/05/2012 9:55:24 AM PDT by RoadTest (There is one god, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.)
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To: dangus

Before there was a Western Church and an Eastern Church, before the bishop of Rome had any supremacy over other sees, there was the Christian Church.


12 posted on 04/05/2012 9:57:43 AM PDT by RoadTest (There is one god, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.)
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To: dangus
Easter eggs Spring spheres

More better.

13 posted on 04/05/2012 10:00:56 AM PDT by Ken H (Austerity is the irresistible force. Entitlements are the immovable object.)
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To: RoadTest

Ah, yes... If the Catholic Church says it’s so, to so many Protestants, that enough is reason to believe it’s pagan. Here’s the deal: The obligation to fast is biblical. The time and manner of fasting is chosen by the office to which he granted the power to declare what is bound and what is loosed in Heaven and on Earth:

“And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.” — Matthew 16:19.

The Keys of the Kingdom is a reference to the office of Regent, who serves until the return of the King. The office cannot logically pass away until the King returns, so Peter certainly has successors.

So when do you fast?

“And when [Jesus] had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungered.” — Matthew 4:2.

“As they ministered to the Lord, and fasted, the Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them. And when they had fasted and prayed, and laid [their] hands on them, they sent [them] away.” — Acts 13:2-3

“And he said unto them, This kind [of demon] can come forth by nothing, but by prayer and fasting.” — Mark 9:29


14 posted on 04/05/2012 10:05:28 AM PDT by dangus
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To: RoadTest

And the Eastern Churches persist in the fasts as well, so what’s your point?


15 posted on 04/05/2012 10:07:08 AM PDT by dangus
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To: RoadTest

And the Eastern Churches persist in the fasts as well (moreseo, by far, in fact), so what’s your point?


16 posted on 04/05/2012 10:07:26 AM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus

Thank you. Sent to all my email friends.

Have a wonderful Resurrection Day!!


17 posted on 04/05/2012 10:09:46 AM PDT by wizr (Keep the Faith!)
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To: wizr

Thank you. Amidst all the quarreling, it’s nice to get such a note.

Have a great Resurrection Day, too! (Or, as we Catholics say, when being formal, Happy Paschal Sunday!)


18 posted on 04/05/2012 10:11:57 AM PDT by dangus
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To: RoadTest; dangus
"Lent itself is pagan in origin."

How right you are! And I am happy every time pagan imagery gets cleaned up and reclaimed by Christ and Christians.

I like innocent originally-pagan things like

•Easter eggs; and the very word “Easter”
•Christmas trees and holly wreaths
•parades and pageants and processions
•cakes for birthdays (and candles on cakes)
•brides with wedding rings,
•wearing white, carrying bouquets and
•Wedding ceremonies themselves, which were also a pagan custom, and are not commanded in Scripture

I don’t mind using names of days that originate from pagan gods

•Sun (god)-day
•Moon(god)-day
•Tiwaz’-day
•Wodin's-day
•Thor's-day
•Freya's-day
•Saturn's-day

Or the names of months

•January, from Janus
•February, from Februa
•March, from Mars
•April, from Apru/Aphro, short for Aphrodite
•May, from Maia
•June, from Juno

I boldly approve:

•putting flowers on graves
•making statues and paintings of people we admire
•all theater arts and drama
•children's toys like jacks and dice and dolls
•all ball-sports like soccer
•all athletic competitions
•the Olympics, of course

Had enough? Not me! I love them all, and more.

I love the genius of Catholicism in appreciating, adapting and purifying so much that was harmless and even good in pagan cultures. Read what Tolkien has to say about Anglo-Saxon and Icelandic myths and their significance, sometimes, as a kind of pre-evangelium to Christianity.

http://www.catholiceducation.org/articles/arts/al0161.html

Outstanding Protestants have also seen the value in pre-Christian cultures. Read some of Milton's poetry --- a Puritan of all Puritans in the very Age of Puritanism--- and see how many extended and positive references there are to the paganism of classical Greek and Roman antiquity.

http://tinyurl.com/John-Milton-paganism

Even better, read C.S. Lewis

http://www.ignatiusinsight.com/features2005/print2005/morhan_cslewis_nov05.html

Blessed Lent! Happy Easter! In Christ's Name, Amen!

19 posted on 04/05/2012 10:23:34 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Jesus, my Lord, my God, my All.)
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To: Mrs. Don-o

Informative post! Only..... everyone knows that `Easter’ is an evolved spelling of Ishtar, the Babylonian deity./s

;^)


20 posted on 04/05/2012 10:33:25 AM PDT by elcid1970 ("Deport all Muslims. Nuke Mecca now. Death to Islam means freedom for all mankind.")
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To: dangus
Inever met a chocolate egg I didn't love like and eat A.S.A.P.
21 posted on 04/05/2012 10:34:48 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: dangus

I have also read and was told by one priest that all the eggs were died red — for the blood shed during the Passion.

On the inside the white of the egg represents the purity of Christ.

And the yolk of yellow represents the sunrise of the Resurrection of the Lord.

I was not ever able to verify this, but it seems to have some legend legs.


22 posted on 04/05/2012 10:49:00 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: RoadTest

**Lent itself is pagan in origin.**

Do you have a Bible? Open it to the Temptation in the Desert,

Christ fasted for 40 days — this is very Christian, not pagan.

Where did you get that idea anyway?


23 posted on 04/05/2012 10:51:40 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: elcid1970; Mrs. Don-o; dangus

That’s why, in the new translations, you dod not find the word, Easter. Instead you find the original words, Pasch and paschal.

I love the return to Pasch and Paschal. How about you?


24 posted on 04/05/2012 10:55:27 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

do not find


25 posted on 04/05/2012 10:57:52 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Mrs. Don-o

I appreciate your style, but:

The word, “Easter” is not pagan. There is no evidence to support Bede’s presumption that Eostremonath refered to a god named “Eostre.” Besides, “Easter” is called “Pascal Sunday,” formally in the English Catholic world, and some variation on “Paschach” throughout the rest of the world. “Easter” means, simply, the turning towards East, so that the Roman world was facing the Temple of Jerusalem. If, in fact, “East” is related to a goddess, “Eostre,” it’s most likely secondarily.


26 posted on 04/05/2012 11:18:30 AM PDT by dangus
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To: Salvation

I have definitely heard that one before.


27 posted on 04/05/2012 11:21:30 AM PDT by dangus
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To: Mrs. Don-o

Peter Boyles of KHOW in Denver had someone on talking about this very sorta subject this morning.

Very interesting.


28 posted on 04/05/2012 11:58:26 AM PDT by GraceG
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To: Salvation

I do indeed, and I recently learned that the Spanish word for Easter is “Pascua”.


29 posted on 04/05/2012 11:59:05 AM PDT by elcid1970 ("Deport all Muslims. Nuke Mecca now. Death to Islam means freedom for all mankind.")
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To: Salvation; dangus
I like "Pascha" because it reminds me of the years when I was going to Eastern liturgies, and Pascha is very, very big amongst the Eastern brethren 'n' sistren; the whole Triduum is much bigger. Enchanting: as in "three hours or more in chanting." :o)

As far as I know, it's O.E. Easterdæg, from Eastre (Northumbrian Eostre, goddess of "east" and dawn and spring.)(Root word of "estrogen," too.) Bede says Anglo-Saxon Christians adopted her name and many of the celebratory practices for their Mass of Christ's resurrection.

Almost all languages use a variant of "Pascha": Pashkët; Pask; Pasqua; Påske; Pasen; Pâques; Pascuas; Paskah; etc. etc. etc.

But it doesn't matter to me, really, whether you use the word from Old English or Koine Greek or Church Slavonic. As long as the reality is the same.

Myh favorite Easter, uh, Paschal greetings:

Danish – Kristus er opstanden! Sandelig Han er Opstanden!

Rastafarian – Krestos a uprisin! Seen, him a uprisin fe tru!

30 posted on 04/05/2012 12:02:27 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Resurrexit sicut dixit!)
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To: elcid1970

Indeed, but in Spanish “Pascua” also refers to Christmas. A common Christmas greeting is “felices Pascuas”. When referring to Easter/Pasch... it is customary to call it “Pascua de Resurreccion” (to avoid misunderstandings, I reckon). However, I was taught that the word “Pascua” comes from the Hebrew “Pessach” (Passover).


31 posted on 04/05/2012 8:21:45 PM PDT by Former Fetus (Saved by grace through faith)
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