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† True Mass Propers : Dominica Secunda post Pascha ~ Paschaltide: Second Sunday after Easter †
Robert Drobot | Anno Dómini 22 April 2012 | Most Holy Trinity

Posted on 04/22/2012 11:54:45 PM PDT by Robert Drobot

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SOLDIERS OF CHRIST

O Lord Most High, help me to dwell in your secret place and abide under Your shadow.
Help me to believe and say out loud for everyone to hear that You are my refuge and my fortress; that You are my God; and that in You I put my truSaint
O Lord God Almighty, please deliver me from hidden traps and diseases.
Father God, cover me with Your camouflage; hide me under Your wings; and let Your truth be my shield and buckler against the fiery darts—the lies—of the enemy.
Lord Jesus Christ
, help me not to be afraid of terrorists' attacks in the night; or weapons that fly by day; or sicknesses that walk in darkness; or destruction that wastes at noonday.
O Holy God, though a thousand fall at my side, and ten thousand fall at my right hand; please let it not come close to me and my companions.
O Lord Most High, let me live to see the reward of the wicked, because You are my refuge and my home. Let no evil conquer me and let no plague come into my house or near my family.
O Lord, my Strength and my Redeemer, please set angels over me to keep me in all Your ways, to bear me up in their hands and to keep my feet from stumbling.
Father God, help me to tread upon the lion and adder and trample the young lion and the dragon under my feet.
Lord Jesus Christ, I love you with all my heart and I know Your name. Deliver me and lift me on high to soar with the eagles. I call upon you to be with me in times of trouble to deliver and honor me because I know Your name. Please show me Your salvation and satisfy me with a long life.
I ask this prayer in the name of Jesus Christ Christ
Amen.
At what point can we stand up and say we were soldiers for the gospel?
Is it because we are sitting in the pew every time the doors of the church are open?
Is it when we are so active in ministry and doing for those in the church that we have no time for anything else?
Do we not become soldiers for Christ when we step onto the battle field which is to confront sin and Satan in defending Holy Mother Church from those evil hordes and enmities who plot to destroy true believers who openly inhabit and praise Jesus Christ Christ in every corner of this world?
Christ calls us to convert those who are blind to His Love and Forgiveness; especially those who have strayed from Him through worldly temptations and heretical teachings.
He calls upon us to actually do this each and everyday of our lives is the day we can honestly say we are soldiers for ChriSaint
Upon my arrival in Heaven I pray I can say to my heavenly Father, I was a soldier for You all the days of my walk with You on earth.
Are you a soldier today or just someone who wants to stand on the sidelines and let everyone think you are a soldier?
Do you reach out to those who do not know Christ Jesus Christ, so that He can touch their lives in a way only He can?
Or do you stand there and tell yourself you have nothing to offer non-Catholics and false god believers dying in a world of sin?
Become a soldier today and touch those who need your touch.
Start with your on family and friends; bless them with a gift of His Holy Word - the Bible - during the time of His birth. Let this be a time of conversion; a time for giving the Little Child of Bethlehem the most precious thing you have - yourself.

In war there are no unwounded soldiers. ~ José Narosky


51 posted on 04/23/2012 3:15:28 AM PDT by Robert Drobot (Fiat voluntas tua)
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Ecclesia Militans

We are in a spiritual and physical war against the army of Satan. Put on the armor of Faith.

Consecrate yourselves totally to the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

Wear the Brown Scapular. Pray the Rosary everyday.


52 posted on 04/23/2012 3:16:27 AM PDT by Robert Drobot (Fiat voluntas tua)
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How to Address Priests and Religious :
Titles and Signs of Respect
Marian Therese Horvat, Ph.D.

Addressing priests and religious

Today, some serious Catholics are doing more than reminiscing about those "good old days." Aware of the importance of not only exterior demeanor and symbols, but also the ways of treatment and address that were accorded to religious as their just due, they would like to return to the basic courtesies. It is a very positive step.

Let me turn, then, to the first question:

1. Should we call a priest by his first name or last name? I can remember in elementary school all the priests went by their last names, but now they seem to want to be called by their firSaint

The answer is simple. Father William Walters should be addressed as Father Walters or as Father, not as Father Bill, and certainly not as Bill. In the really old times, to which I would like to return, you would address him as Your Reverence.

In addressing an envelope to a priest you would write The Reverend Father William Walters, or The Reverend William Walters. Don't forget the The. If you want to be more polite you could use His Reverence.

If the letter is formal, the salutation would be The Reverend Father Walter; for a personal letter, the salutation would be Father Walters, or if you know him better, Dear Father Walters .

If you are writing to priest who is a member of a religious order, you would add the initials of his community after his name, e.g. The Reverend Philip Amato, O.F.M., or The Reverend Father Philip Amato, O.F.M. (1) A brother, one who has taken the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience in an order but has not received the Sacrament of Holy Orders, should always be called Brother, not Father. In written address, his initials would also follow his name, e.g., Brother Francis Marie, O.F.M.

(1) Abbreviations for some of the more familiar religious institutes for men and women are listed for your reference at the end of the article. A full listing can be found in a Catholic Almanac.

It is my first choice to maintain the address Father William Walters or The Reverend Father William Walters in preference to simply The Reverend in the formal or written address. Since most Protestant ministers are addressed as "the reverend," this puts a healthy distinction between the Catholic priest and the Protestant preacher, and does not place the priest on the same level as men who are not Catholic.

For the same reason, it is inconvenient for a Catholic to call a Protestant preacher "reverend," because this is to indirectly confer legitimacy to his heretical confession. It is much better to call a Lutheran Mr. Jones instead of reverend Jones, or use the title Doctor or Professor, if it is applicable. In writing, it is sometimes necessary to refer to a Protestant as bishop, but the title should be lower case, e.g. bishop Philip Robinson, or Protestant bishop Robinson, as a sign of differentiation from the Roman Catholic Bishop.

We Americans have the duty to be especially vigilant regarding tolerance toward Protestantism. It was such tolerance that produced the heresy of Americanism, which in final analysis, is to adapt Catholic doctrine and practices to Protestantism. Unfortunately that same penchant that induced Leo XIII to write against Americanism is still alive today not only among progressivist Catholics, but even among conservative or traditionalist American Catholics.

The same general rule regarding Protestants - that is, to avoid the religious title in direct address - would apply to the hierarchy in other heretical or schismatic confessions. If a title is used in writing, it should be lower case, e.g. rabbi Jacob Levinsky, or for an "orthodox" bishop, bishop Michael Baldwin, etc.

The rules simply stated

Going up the Catholic hierarchical ladder, these are the basic rules to serve you in day-to-day circumstances:

Deacons


Direct address: Deacon Morris

Written address: Reverend Deacon Michael Morris

Formal introduction: The Reverend Deacon Michael Morris

[Note: Deacons, from the Greek diakonos meaning servant, are those who received the lowest of the major orders of priesthood: deacon, priest and Bishop. The minor orders are: porter, lector, exorcist and acolyte.

The role of deacons has varied through the History of Church. In the early period, they were numerous and exercised many different functions, either as assistants in the celebration of the Mass or for various practical services of the Church. Later, in the Latin Rite, their role diminished and almost disappeared, and the deacon became just an intermediary step for the priesthood.

The Council of Trent considered restoring permanent deacons, but did not do so. After the Second Vatican Council, given the shortage of priests, permanent deacons were restored to help maintain the flock.

Brothers

Direct address: Brother Elias.

Written address: Brother Elias, O.F.M.

Formal introduction: Brother Elias of the Order of Friars Minor.

Religious Priest

Direct address: Father McKenzie, or Father.

Written address: The Reverend Father Leo F. McKenzie, S.J.

Formal introduction: The Reverend Father Leo McKenzie of The Society of Jesus Christ.

Diocesan Priest

Direct address: Father Butler, or Father.

Written address: The Reverend Father John W. Butler.

Formal introduction: The Reverend Father John Butler. Protocol: Stand when a Priest enters the room, and remain standing until he invites you to sit. Men should remove their hats in his presence. A good custom at greeting the Priest is to kiss his hand, to honor the fact that they consecrate the Holy EuchariSaint The same signs of respect should be given sheen leaving his presence.


Monsignor

Direct address: Monsignor Smith, or Monsignor.

Written address: The Right Reverend Monsignor Thomas R. Smith, or The Very Reverend Monsignor Thomas R. Smith.

Formal introduction: The Very Reverend Monsignor Thomas Smith. Protocol: the same as for Priests.

Bishop (2)


Direct address: Your Excellency, or Bishop McNeil.

Written address: His Excellency, The Right Reverend William A. Scully, D.D. Bishop of Baltimore. or His Excellency, The Right Reverend Bishop William Scully of Baltimore.

Formal closing: Kissing the Sacred Ring.

Formal introduction: His Excellency, the Bishop of Baltimore.

Protocol: Stand when a Bishop enters the room, and remain standing until he invites you to sit. Men should remove their hats in his presence. For your own Bishop, you may kneel on your center knee and kiss his ring as a sign of respect for his office. If kneeling would be awkward, or if it is not your own Bishop, you may bow at the waist and kiss his ring. Do not do either if the Pope is present. The same signs of respect should be given when leaving his presence.

(2) It is common usage in Europe to address a Bishop, Archbishop or Cardinal as Monsignor (Msgr. or Msg.). This can be confusing to Americans, who commonly reserve the title strictly for the Monsignor, who is ranked below the Bishop.

Archbishop

Direct address: Your Grace, or Archbishop Kovak.

Written address: His Grace, The Most Reverend Michael T. Kovak, S.T.D. Archbishop of New York, or His Grace, The Most Reverend Archbishop Michael T. Kovak, of New York.

Formal closing: Kissing the Sacred Ring.

Formal introduction: His Grace, the Archbishop of Baltimore.

Protocol: The same as for a Bishop.


Patriarch

Direct address: Your Beatitude.

Written address: His Beatitude, the Most Reverend Michael Cardinal Sabbah, Patriarch of Jerusalem.

Formal introduction: His Beatitude, The Patriarch of Jerusalem.

Protocol: The same as for a Bishop.

Cardinal

Direct address: Your Eminence, or Cardinal Hand. Written address: His Eminence, Thomas Cardinal Hand, Archbishop of Los Angeles, or, His Eminence, The Most Reverend Cardinal Thomas J. Hand, of Los Angeles.

Formal closing: Kissing the Sacred Purple.

Formal introduction: His Eminence, Cardinal of Los Angeles.

Protocol: The same as for a Bishop.

Pope

Direct address: Your Holiness, or Holy Father.

Written address: His Holiness, Pope Pius XII, or better, The Sovereign Pontiff, His Holiness Pius XII.

Formal closing: Kissing the Sacred Foot.

Formal introduction: His Holiness, the Pope.

Protocol: After being introduced, kneel on your center knee and kiss his ring as a sign of respect for his office. Stand when the Pope enters the room, and remain standing unless he invites you to sit. Men should be wearing a suit coat and tie and remove their hats in his presence. Women should wear black dresses and have their heads and arms covered. The same signs of respect should be given when leaving his presence.

If you bring a new white zucchetto with you at a scheduled meeting with the Pope, a customary gesture of amiability is for His Holiness to trade the one he is wearing for the one you offer.

How should religious women be addressed?


Bridgettine nuns in their beautiful traditional habits pray
before the Blessed Sacrament in a Roman Catholic Church in Sweden.

Inside the Vatican, February 1996

Great respect used to be accorded to every religious woman, whose life, one knew, was one of constant self-sacrifice. Her habit was a sign of her vow of poverty and renunciation of normal vanities and pleasures as well as her perfect chastity. It also was a symbol of her life of obedience, which demanded a constant renunciation of her self-will.

While the terms nun and sister are interchangeable in the United States, Catholics should always address a religious woman as Sister: Sister Angela Marie. Like the simple brothers, the sisters are not distinguished by any special titles.

Often the superior of a religious house is called Mother. The titles can vary: Mother Superior, Mother Prioress, Mother Abbess, or for all of them you can simply say Reverend Mother or Your Reverence. The written address would be The Reverend Mother Catherine Marie of the Incarnation, O.C.D., or The Mother Abbess Margaret of the Sacred Heart. O.S.B., with the initials of the community added after the name.

Above, I gave some examples using the beautiful religious names sisters used to receive with the hope that there will be a return to the inspiring practice of leaving aside the name one had in the world to assume another as the spouse of ChriSaint Unfortunately, after Vatican II an increasing number of convents and monasteries have abandoned this practice and no longer assign their novices a new name in Christ as a sign of their renunciation of the world.

The rules simply stated

Sister

Direct address: Sister Anthony Christine, or Sister.

Written address: Sister Anthony Christine, D.S.P. Formal introduction: Sister Anthony Christine of the Daughters of Saint Paul.

Mother Superior

Direct address: Reverend Mother Francis Louise, Reverend Mother, or Your Reverence.

Written address: The Reverend Mother Francis Louise, D.C.

Formal introduction: The Reverend Mother Francis Louise of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul.


53 posted on 04/23/2012 3:17:46 AM PDT by Robert Drobot (Fiat voluntas tua)
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