Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 06-17-12, Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 06-17-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 06/16/2012 7:50:40 PM PDT by Salvation

June 17, 2012

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Ez 17:22-24

Thus says the Lord GOD:
I, too, will take from the crest of the cedar,
from its topmost branches tear off a tender shoot,
and plant it on a high and lofty mountain;
on the mountain heights of Israel I will plant it.
It shall put forth branches and bear fruit,
and become a majestic cedar.
Birds of every kind shall dwell beneath it,
every winged thing in the shade of its boughs.
And all the trees of the field shall know
that I, the LORD,
bring low the high tree,
lift high the lowly tree,
wither up the green tree,
and make the withered tree bloom.
As I, the LORD, have spoken, so will I do.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 92:2-3, 13-14, 15-16

R. (cf. 2a) Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.
It is good to give thanks to the LORD,
to sing praise to your name, Most High,
To proclaim your kindness at dawn
and your faithfulness throughout the night.
R. Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.
The just one shall flourish like the palm tree,
like a cedar of Lebanon shall he grow.
They that are planted in the house of the LORD
shall flourish in the courts of our God.
R. Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.
They shall bear fruit even in old age;
vigorous and sturdy shall they be,
Declaring how just is the LORD,
my rock, in whom there is no wrong.
R. Lord, it is good to give thanks to you.

Reading 2 2 Cor 5:6-10

Brothers and sisters:
We are always courageous,
although we know that while we are at home in the body
we are away from the Lord,
for we walk by faith, not by sight.
Yet we are courageous,
and we would rather leave the body and go home to the Lord.
Therefore, we aspire to please him,
whether we are at home or away.
For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ,
so that each may receive recompense,
according to what he did in the body, whether good or evil.

Gospel Mk 4:26-34

Jesus said to the crowds:
"This is how it is with the kingdom of God;
it is as if a man were to scatter seed on the land
and would sleep and rise night and day
and through it all the seed would sprout and grow,
he knows not how.
Of its own accord the land yields fruit,
first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear.
And when the grain is ripe, he wields the sickle at once,
for the harvest has come."

He said,
"To what shall we compare the kingdom of God,
or what parable can we use for it?
It is like a mustard seed that, when it is sown in the ground,
is the smallest of all the seeds on the earth.
But once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants
and puts forth large branches,
so that the birds of the sky can dwell in its shade."
With many such parables
he spoke the word to them as they were able to understand it.
Without parables he did not speak to them,
but to his own disciples he explained everything in private.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 06/16/2012 7:50:57 PM PDT by Salvation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 06/16/2012 7:55:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

From: Ezekiel 17:22-24

The allegory come true (continued)


[22] Thus says the Lord GOD: “I myself will take a sprig from the lofty top of the
cedar, and will set it out; I will break off from the topmost of its young twigs a
tender one, and I myself will plant it upon a high and lofty mountain; [23] on the
mountain height of Israel will I plant it, that it may bring forth boughs and bear
fruit, and become a noble cedar; and under it will dwell all kinds of beasts; in the
shade of its branches birds of every sort will nest. [24] And all the trees of the
field shall know that I the LORD bring low the high tree, and make high the low
tree, dry up the green tree, and make the dry tree flourish. I the LORD have spo-
ken, and I will do it.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

17:22-24. Chapters 15-17 contain a number of allegories. The special feature of
the cedar tree allegory describing the eventual restoration is the way it puts the
stress on God’s action by explicitly repeating the first person singular: “I myself”,
“I the Lord will bring low”, “I the Lord have spoken”. Some commentators think
that these verses might have been inserted in the text later, but the style and
content of the oracle are perfectly in line with Ezekiel’s thinking.

“In the shade of its branches birds of every sort will rest” (v. 23): the same words
are used in the account of the flood about all sorts of birds entering Noah’s ark.
It points therefore to the eschatological nature of the oracle: after the exile, just
as after the flood, everything will be completely new, although it will derive from

something that already existed. Also, the reference to “birds of every sort” points
to the catholic nature of the new Israel. It is no surprise therefore that our Lord
should use similar imagery to describe the Kingdom of God: it is like a grain of
mustard seed that grows and “becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come
and make nests in its branches” (Mt 13:32).

“I the Lord bring low the high tree” (v. 24): here again we see the Lord as the pro-
tagonist in the history of the chosen people. He is the author of life, which makes
what is dry flourish, and of death, which withers the green tree. He has set his
might against those who, in their arrogance, do not accept him (cf. 31:10-14).
The New Testament will have much to say about the value of humility; for exam-
ple: “whoever exalts himself will be humbled, and whoever humbles himself will
be exalted” (Mt 23:12).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 06/16/2012 8:09:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All

From: 2 Corinthians 5:6-10

He is sustained by hope of heaven


[6] So we are always of good courage; we know that while we are at home in the
body we are away from the Lord, [7] for we walk by faith, not by sight. [8] We are
of good courage, and we would rather be away from the body and at home with
the Lord. [9] So whether we are at home or away, we make it our aim to please
him. [10] For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each
one may receive good or evil, according to what he has done in the body.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

6. St Alphonsus says apropos of this verse: “This is not our fatherland; we are
here, as it were, passing through, like pilgrims [. . .]. Our fatherland is heaven,
which we have to merit by God’s grace and our own good actions. Our home is
not the one we live in at present, which serves only as a temporary dwelling; our
home is eternity” (Shorter Sermons, XVI).

However, as St Paul himself shows elsewhere (cf. Acts 16:16-40; 22:22-29; Rom
13:1-7; 2 Thess 3:6:13), this “being away” from the Lord does not mean that a
Christian should not concern himself with the building up of the earthly city. On
the contrary, he should do everything he can to build a world which is more and
more like what God wants it to be. Vatican II, for example, exhorts “Christians,
as citizens of both cities, to perform their duties faithfully in the spirit of the Gos-
pel. It is a mistake to think that, because we have here no lasting city, but seek
the city which is to come (cf. Heb 13:14), we are entitled to shirk our responsibi-
lities; this is to forget that, by our faith, we are bound all the more to fulfil these
responsibilities according to the vocation of each one (cf. 2 Thess 3:6-13; Eph 4:
28) [.. .]. The Christian who shirks his temporal duties shirks his duties towards
his neighbour, neglects God himself and endangers his eternal salvation. Let
Christians follow the example of Christ who worked as a craftsman; let them be
proud of the opportunity to carry out their earthly activity in such a way as to inte-
grate human, domestic, professional, scientific and technical enterprises with reli-
gious values, under whose supreme direction all things are ordered to the glory
of God” (Gaudium et spes, 43).

7. St Paul here speaks of faith as light which shows us the way as we progress
towards eternal life. However, when we reach our home in heaven we will no long-
er need the light of faith, because God himself and Christ will be our light (cf. Rev
21:23).

8-10. Here we can see the Apostle’s firm conviction that he will meet the Lord the
moment he dies. In other passages of Sacred Scripture the same truth is stated
(cf. Lk 16:22-23; 23:43), and the Magisterium of the Church has defined that souls
will receive their eternal reward or punishment immediately after death — or after
they pass through purgatory, if they have to do so (cf. Benedict XII, “Benedictus
Deus, Dz-Sch”, 1000).

This sentence of reward or punishment — given at the particular judgment and ra-
tified at the general judgment at the end of time — is based on the person’s merits
gained during his life on earth, for once he has died he can no longer merit. In
view of this judgment St Paul exhorts us to do everything we can in this life to
please the Lord. “Does your soul not burn with the desire to make your Father-
God happy when he has to judge you?” (St J. Escrivá, “The Way”, 746).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 06/16/2012 8:11:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: All

From: Mark 4:26-34

Parables of the Seed and of the Mustard Seed


[26] And He (Jesus) said, “The Kingdom of God is as if a man should scatter
seed upon the ground, [27] and should sleep and rise night and day, and the
seed should sprout and grow, he knows not how. [28] The earth produces of it-
self, first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. [29] But when the
grain is ripe, at once he puts in the sickle, because the harvest is come.”

[30] And He said, “With what can we compare the Kingdom of God, or what para-
ble shall we use for it? [31] It is like a grain of mustard seed, which, when sown
upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; [32] yet when it is sown
it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches,
so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”

The End of the Parables Discourse


[33] With many such parables He spoke the word to them, as they were able to
hear it; [34] He did not speak to them without a parable, but privately to His own
disciples He explained everything.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

26-29. Farmers spare no effort to prepare the ground for the sowing; but once the
grain is sown there is nothing more they can do until the harvest; the grain deve-
lops by itself. Our Lord uses this comparison to describe the inner strength that
causes the Kingdom of God on earth to grow up to the day of harvest (cf. Joel 3:
13 and Revelation 14:15), that is, the day of the Last Judgment.

Jesus is telling His disciples about the Church: the preaching of the Gospel, the
generously sown seed, will unfailingly yield its fruit, independently of who sows or
who reaps: it is God who gives the growth (cf. 1 Corinthians 3:5-9). It will all hap-
pen “he knows not how”, without men being fully aware of it.

The Kingdom of God also refers to the action of grace in each soul: God silently
works a transformation in us, whether we sleep or watch, causing resolutions to
take shape in our soul—resolutions to be faithful, to surrender ourselves, to res-
pond to grace—until we reach “mature manhood” (cf. Ephesians 4:13). Even
though it is necessary for man to make this effort, the real initiative lies with God,
“because it is the Holy Spirit who, with His inspirations, gives a supernatural tone
to our thoughts, desires and actions. It is He who leads us to receive Christ’s tea-
ching and to assimilate it in a profound way. It is He who gives us the light by
which we perceive our personal calling and the strength to carry out all that God
expects of us. If we are docile to the Holy Spirit, the image of Christ will be found
more and more fully in us, and we will be brought closer every day to God the
Father. ‘For whoever are led by the Spirit of God, they are the children of God’
(Romans 8:14)” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing By”, 135).

30-32. The main meaning of this parable has to do with the contrast between the
great and the small. The seed of the Kingdom of God on earth is something very
tiny to begin with (Luke 12:32; Acts 1:15); but it will grow to be a big tree. Thus
we see how the small initial group of disciples grows in the early years of the
Church (cf Acts 2:47; 6:7; 12:24), and spreads down the centuries and becomes
a great multitude “which no man could number” (Revelation 7:9). This mysterious
growth which our Lord refers to also occurs in each soul: “the Kingdom of God is
in the midst of you” (Luke 17:21); we can see a prediction of this in the words of
Psalm 92:12: “The righteous grow like a cedar in Lebanon.” To allow the mercy
of God to exalt us, to make us grow, we must make ourselves small, humble
(Ezekiel 17:22-24; Luke 18:9-14).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 06/16/2012 8:12:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Mass Readings


First reading Ezekiel 17:22-24 ©
The Lord says this:
‘From the top of the cedar,
from the highest branch I will take a shoot
and plant it myself on a very high mountain.
I will plant it on the high mountain of Israel.
It will sprout branches and bear fruit,
and become a noble cedar.
Every kind of bird will live beneath it,
every winged creature rest in the shade of its branches.
And every tree of the field will learn that I, the Lord, am the one
who stunts tall trees and makes the low ones grow,
who withers green trees and makes the withered green.
I, the Lord, have spoken, and I will do it.’

Psalm Psalm 91:2-3,13-16 ©
It is good to give you thanks, O Lord.
It is good to give thanks to the Lord,
  to make music to your name, O Most High,
to proclaim your love in the morning
  and your truth in the watches of the night.
It is good to give you thanks, O Lord.
The just will flourish like the palm tree
  and grow like a Lebanon cedar.
It is good to give you thanks, O Lord.
Planted in the house of the Lord
  they will flourish in the courts of our God,
still bearing fruit when they are old,
  still full of sap, still green,
to proclaim that the Lord is just.
  In him, my rock, there is no wrong.
It is good to give you thanks, O Lord.

Second reading 2 Corinthians 5:6-10 ©
We are always full of confidence when we remember that to live in the body means to be exiled from the Lord, going as we do by faith and not by sight – we are full of confidence, I say, and actually want to be exiled from the body and make our home with the Lord. Whether we are living in the body or exiled from it, we are intent on pleasing him. For all the truth about us will be brought out in the law court of Christ, and each of us will get what he deserves for the things he did in the body, good or bad.

Gospel Acclamation Jn15:15
Alleluia, alleluia!
I call you friends, says the Lord,
because I have made known to you
everything I have learnt from my Father.
Alleluia!
Or
Alleluia, alleluia!
The seed is the word of God, Christ the sower;
whoever finds this seed will remain for ever.
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 4:26-34 ©
Jesus said to the crowds, ‘This is what the kingdom of God is like. A man throws seed on the land. Night and day, while he sleeps, when he is awake, the seed is sprouting and growing; how, he does not know. Of its own accord the land produces first the shoot, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. And when the crop is ready, he loses no time: he starts to reap because the harvest has come.’
  He also said, ‘What can we say the kingdom of God is like? What parable can we find for it? It is like a mustard seed which at the time of its sowing in the soil is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet once it is sown it grows into the biggest shrub of them all and puts out big branches so that the birds of the air can shelter in its shade.’
  Using many parables like these, he spoke the word to them, so far as they were capable of understanding it. He would not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything to his disciples when they were alone.

6 posted on 06/16/2012 8:17:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
7 posted on 06/16/2012 8:19:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: All
Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
8 posted on 06/16/2012 8:20:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: All
Image Detail
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


9 posted on 06/16/2012 8:21:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


10 posted on 06/16/2012 8:25:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

11 posted on 06/16/2012 8:26:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: All
A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


12 posted on 06/16/2012 8:27:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: All

June Devotion: The Sacred Heart

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of June is set apart for devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. "From among all the proofs of the infinite goodness of our Savior none stands out more prominently than the fact that, as the love of the faithful grew cold, He, Divine Love Itself, gave Himself to us to be honored by a very special devotion and that the rich treasury of the Church was thrown wide open in the interests of that devotion." These words of Pope Pius XI refer to the Sacred Heart Devotion, which in its present form dates from the revelations given to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in 1673-75.

The devotion consists in the divine worship of the human heart of Christ, which is united to His divinity and which is a symbol of His love for us. The aim of the devotion is to make our Lord king over our hearts by prompting them to return love to Him (especially through an act of consecration by which we offer to the Heart of Jesus both ourselves and all that belongs to us) and to make reparation for our ingratitude to God.

INVOCATION

O Heart of love, I put all my trust in Thee; for I fear all things from my own weakness, but I hope for all things from Thy goodness.
Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque

PRAYER TO THE SACRED HEART

Devotion to the Sacred Heart was the characteristic note of the piety of Saint Gertrude the Great (1256-1302), Benedictine nun and renowned mystic. She was, in fact, the first great exponent of devotion to the Sacred Heart. In our efforts to honor the Heart of Jesus we have this prayer as a model for our own:
Hail! O Sacred Heart of Jesus, living and quickening source of eternal life, infinite treasure of the Divinity, and burning furnace of divine love. Thou art my refuge and my sanctuary, 0 my amiable Savior. Consume my heart with that burning fire with which Thine is ever inflamed. Pour down on my soul those graces which flow from Thy love, and let my heart be so united with Thine, that our wills may be one, and mine in all things be conformed to Thine. May Thy divine will be equally the standard and rule of all my desires and of all my actions. Amen.
Saint Gertrude

FOR THE CHURCH

O most holy Heart of Jesus, shower Thy blessings in abundant measure upon Thy holy Church, upon the Supreme Pontiff and upon all the clergy; to the just grant perseverance; convert sinners; enlighten unbelievers; bless our relations, friends and benefactors; assist the dying; deliver the holy souls in purgatory; and extend over all hearts the sweet empire of Thy love. Amen.

A PRAYER OF TRUST

O God, who didst in wondrous manner reveal to the virgin, Margaret Mary, the unsearchable riches of Thy Heart, grant that loving Thee, after her example, in all things and above all things, we may in Thy Heart find our abiding home.
Roman Missal

ACT OF LOVE

Reveal Thy Sacred Heart to me, O Jesus, and show me Its attractions. Unite me to It for ever. Grant that all my aspirations and all the beats of my heart, which cease not even while I sleep, may be a testimonial to Thee of my love for Thee and may say to Thee: Yes, Lord, I am all Thine;
pledge of my allegiance to Thee rests ever in my heart will never cease to be there. Do Thou accept the slight amount of good that I do and be graciously pleased to repair all m] wrong-doing; so that I may be able to bless Thee in time and in eternity. Amen.
Cardinal Merry del Val

MEMORARE TO THE SACRED HEART
Remember, O most sweet Jesus, that no one who has had recourse to Thy Sacred Heart, implored its help, or sought it mercy was ever abandoned. Encouraged with confidence, O tenderest of hearts, we present ourselves before Thee, crushes beneath the weight of our sins. In our misery, O Sacred Hear. of Jesus, despise not our simple prayers, but mercifully grant our requests.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Only for Love: The Sacred Heart and the Priesthood [Catholic Caucus]

Catholic Word of the Day: LITANY OF THE SACRED HEART, 10-19-09
Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Devotion to the Sacred Heart Today
The Biblical Foundation of Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [Ecumenical]
Heart to Heart (Sacred Heart of Jesus Devotion) [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
(June) The Month of the Sacred Heart {Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
First Friday Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
The Heart of the World (On the Sacred Heart of Jesus) (Catholic Caucus)
The Sacred Heart Is The Holy Eucharist(Catholic Caucus)
The Origin of the Sacred Heart Badge

Importance of Devotion to the Sacred Heart
An Awesome Homily on the Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus by Father Edmond Kline
Catholic Prayer and Devotion: June the Month of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Devotions: Sacred Heart of Jesus
Pope Urges Jesuits to Spread Sacred Heart Devotion
Homilies preached by Father Altier on the Feast of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Meditation and Devotion: The Sacred Heart of Jesus
Daily Recomendation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus powerful prayer!
The Sacred Heart and the Eucharist
The Love of the Sacred Heart

On the Sacred Heart - "We Adore God's Love of Humanity"
HAURIETIS AQUAS (On Devotion To The Sacred Heart) - Encyclical by Pope Pius XII
Solemnity Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary
Sacred Heart a Feast of God's Love, Says John Paul II
The Sacred Heart of Jesus: Symbol of Combativity and the Restoration of Christendom
Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus-The Early Church, Middle Ages up to St. Margaret Mary
See this Heart
‘God Will Act and Will Reign’
About Devotion To The Sacred Heart:The Story Of Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque
Rediscover Feast of Sacred Heart, John Paul II Tells Youth

 
 

"Behold this Heart which has loved men so much, and yet men do not want to love Me in return. Through you My divine Heart wishes to spread its love everywhere on earth."

- Jesus to Saint Margaret Mary

Our Lord also made 12 promises to St. Margaret Mary for those that are devoted to His Sacred Heart.

  1. I will give them all the graces necessary for their state in life.
  2. I will give peace in their families.
  3. I will console them in all their troubles.
  4. They shall find in My Heart an assured refuge during life and especially at the hour of death.
  5. I will pour abundant blessings on all their undertakings.
  6. Sinners shall find in My Heart the source and infinite ocean of mercy.
  7. Tepid souls shall become fervent.
  8. Fervent souls shall speedily rise to great perfection.
  9. I will bless the homes in which the image of My Sacred Heart shall be exposed and honoured.
  10. I will give to priests the power to touch the most hardened hearts.
  11. Those who propagate this devotion shall have their name written in My Heart, and it shall never be effaced.
  12. The all-powerful love of My Heart will grant to all those who shall receive Communion on the First Friday of nine consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they shall not die under My displeasure, nor without receiving their Sacraments; My Heart shall be their assured refuge at the last hour.


13 posted on 06/16/2012 8:28:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: All

June 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: Christ, Present in the Eucharist. That believers may recognize in the Eucharist the living presence of the Risen One who accompanies them in daily life.

Missionary Intention: European Christians. That Christians in Europe may rediscover their true identity and participate with greater enthusiasm in the proclamation of the Gospel.


14 posted on 06/16/2012 8:29:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: All

Fortnight for Freedom
June 21-July 4

 

fortnight-for-freedom-montage

15 posted on 06/16/2012 8:30:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: All
Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY MK 4:26-34
He taught in parables
By Fr. Jerome Magat

In this week’s Gospel account from the fourth chapter of Mark, we read in Verse 33, “With many such parables he spoke the word to them as they were able to understand it. Without parables he did not speak to them, but to his own disciples he explained everything in private.” In addition to offering his hearers and readers a straightforward account of the actual parables of Jesus, Mark deliberately includes an insight into Christ’s pedagogy and reasons why Jesus chose to teach in parables.

It should be noted that the aforementioned verse describing St. Mark’s insight into the manner in which Jesus taught was not an isolated mention of this concept. In Mark 4:10-14, we find an additional description of Jesus’ deliberate use of parables. It reads, “And when he was alone, those who were about him with the twelve asked him concerning the parables. And He said to them, ‘To you has been given the secret of the kingdom of God, but for those outside everything is in parables, so that they may indeed see but not perceive, and may indeed hear but not understand; lest they should turn again, and be forgiven. And he said to them, ‘Do you not understand this parable? How then will you understand all the parables?’”

The parables of Jesus employed elements of common life and daily living from which hearers could cull spiritual truths. Parables bridged the gap between earthly realities and heavenly ones. However, the parables were not meant to exhaust the insights into the kingdom of God that Jesus wanted His hearers to know. Thus, the parables were not merely allegories. In an allegory, every element of the image presented contains an inner meaning. Since parables were intended to be heard and not read, they were designed to produce an immediate reaction in the hearers’ minds. Parables could be understood at once without a detailed study. In order to give the deeper levels of understanding, Mark tells us that Jesus taught His disciples the meaning of the parables in more detail. In turn, these first disciples — the first leaders of the Church — have handed on this deposit of faith down through the ages in what constitutes the tradition of the Church.

Similarly, Jesus used parables to help His new followers better understand the kingdom of God, as they were able. By this, St. Mark reminds us that not everyone perceived the meaning of the parables with the same acumen. The hearer of the parable could only respond to the parable according to his disposition toward Jesus Christ and his capacity to understand the parable’s meaning. In order to avoid any semblance that the parables contained secret knowledge that was only accessible to some but not others, Mark infers that Jesus desired each person to understand that which he could understand about the kingdom and react accordingly. Not everyone would have the theological insights of a St. Paul or a St. Thomas Aquinas — some understood Jesus and others did not.

For ourselves, we are expected to bear fruit for the kingdom according to our capacity. We will be judged according to how much fruit we have produced vis-a-vis the talents we were given for production. As for parables, we may hear a parable many times and each time, it may mean something different to us, according to our life circumstances. The parables remain evergreen sources of insight into the kingdom and should inspire us to advance it.

Fr. Magat is parochial vicar of St. William of York Parish in Stafford.


16 posted on 06/16/2012 8:48:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

The readings today speak of God’s providence often displayed in humble, hidden and mysterious ways. While it is true that God and does work in overpowering ways, yet, his more common method would seem to be using the humbler and even unlikely things of the created order to accomplish his goals.

For we who are disciples, there are three related teachings given us that speak of how God will make use of us and others. It will also be good to link these teaching to Father’s Day which occurs this weekend in the US. In a word, each of these three teachings are described as: Adaptability, Awe-Ability, and Accountability.

I. ADAPTABILITY. We hear in both the first reading and the Gospel how God can take what is very humble, and adapt it to be something very mighty and powerful.

Perhaps it is the tender shoot of the first reading that becomes a mighty oak: I, [the Lord], will take from the crest of the cedar…a tender shoot, and plant it on a high and lofty mountain;…It shall put forth branches and bear fruit, and become a majestic cedar. (Ezekiel 17:22-23)

Perhaps it is the mustard seed of the first reading which becomes a great shade tree: The…kingdom of God…is like a mustard seed that, when it is sown in the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on the earth. But once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the sky can dwell in its shade (Mk 4:32-33).

Yes, God adapts us for his purposes and no one should say, I cannot be used. An old song says, “If you can use anything Lord, you can use me.”And old litany says,

The next time you think God can’t use you, remember:

Noah was a drunk
Abraham was too old
Isaac was a daydreamer
Jacob was a liar
Leah was ugly
Joseph was abused
Moses was murderer had a stuttering problem
Gideon was afraid
Samson had long hair and was a womanizer
Rahab was a prostitute
Jeremiah and Timothy were too young
David had an affair and was a murderer
Elijah was suicidal
Isaiah preached naked
Jonah ran from God
Naomi was a widow
Job went bankrupt and depressed
Peter denied Christ
The Disciples fell asleep while praying
Martha worried about everything
The Samaritan woman was divorced, more than once
Zaccheus was too small
Paul was too religious
Timothy had an ulcer.
Lazarus was dead!

No excuses then, God chooses the weak and makes them strong

In fact, it is often our very weakness that is the open door for God. In our strength we are usually too proud to be of any use to God. Moses was too strong at age forty when he pridefully murdered a man, and thought he was doing both the Jews and God a favor. Only forty years later, at age 80, was Moses weak and humble enough to depend on God. Only then could God use him.

Yes, God often uses the humble things, and the humble people of this earth to do his greatest work. St Paul says,

Brothers, think of what you were when you were called. Not many of you were wise by human standards; not many were influential; not many were of noble birth. But God chose the foolish things of the world to shame the wise; God chose the weak things of the world to shame the strong. He chose the lowly things of this world and the despised things—and the things that are not—to nullify the things that are, so that no one may boast before him. (1 Cor 1:25-29).

Therefore, we are invited in this principle to consider that it is not merely the biggie-wow things that we do, where God can work. It is also in the humble and imperfect things about us, the mustard seed faith, the tiny shoots and humble growth, that God can magnify his power.

When I think of my father, I do not remember all the wise sayings he bestowed, but I do remember who he was: a man passionate about what was right, a man who did what was right, often a great personal sacrifice. I remember how he fought for my mentally ill sister when the insurance company wanted to forsake her. I remember how strong and manly my father was. I remember that I always had food, clothing and shelter. I remember that I had a college education, all paid for. I remember his love for learning and his capacity to speak and write with persuasive power. I remember how he cared for my mother in the struggle of her final fifteen years and how he almost never left her side.

In all these things, great and small, but especially in the small, daily duties, that God worked through my father to sustain his family and give us the most lasting example of what it means to be a man, a father and a disciple.

My Father was not perfect. Among other things he struggled with anger, but it was also that anger that made him passionate about what was right and which pointed to his integrity. Yes, even in the humblest things, our shortcomings, God can work and bring forth mighty things.

So the first principle is adaptability, that God can take and adapt even the humblest, ordinary and lowly things and bring forth might and lasting fruit. Never despair of what is most humble about you, or that you are of little account on the world stage. It is precisely our humble state which God will most often use to bring forth his greatest and most lasting works.

II. AWE-ABILITY, the capacity to reverence mystery and to have wonder and awe at what God does. In the Gospel Jesus emphasizes that, though a man plants seeds he does not really know the deeper mysteries of life and growth:

This is how it is with the kingdom of God; it is as if a man were to scatter seed on the land and would sleep and rise night and day and through it all the seed would sprout and grow, he knows not how. (Mk 4:26-27)

Despite our often self-congratulatory celebration of our sciences, and of how much we think we know, there is much more we do not know or understand. We do well to maintain a reverential awe of the deeper mysteries of God’s works, and his ways. We are also rather poor at assessing whether, and how effective, our methods may be. We may come away from a project and consider it to have been very effective, and little comes of it in the long run. And then too, some of what we consider a poor effort, and ineffective, may often bear great fruit. God works in his own ways and we do well to remember that God may well surprise us and remind us he is able and is in charge.

Some years ago, a friend of mine had at her desk a “God can.” In was a metal cookie box, and on the cover was the saying, He worketh in strange and mysterious ways, his wonders to perform. Into this box she would place slips of papers on which were written the challenges, struggles and failures of her life. These were the things where, when she met the limits of her strengths and abilities, she would say, “I can’t…..but God can.” And into this metal “God can” went the slips of paper, placed there in hope that God could make a way out of no way. And, quite often He did.

We do well to cultivate a sense of wonder and awe and who God is and what and how he works. Not only does this bring us joy, but is also opens us to hope, and to the possibilities that God can work in hidden ways to exult what is humble and to bring great transformation to those who are cast down and troubled, including ourselves and our culture. As we saw in point one, it is often in the humblest things that God does his mightiest works.

III. ACCOUNTABILITY. If it is true that we can’t, but God can; if it is true that God can use us mightily despite our humble state, our weakness, and even our sin; if all this is true, then there can be no excuses for not bearing fruit in our life. And, to one extent or another, all of us are accountable to the Lord as to how we let him use us and work through us, to further his Kingdom,

The second reading reminds us For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each may receive recompense, according to what he did in the body, whether good or evil (2 Cor 5:9-10)

For, as we have seen God is able to adapt,  and to work in wondrous and hidden ways to lift us up, even if we are humble and struggle. Given this capacity of God, we must one-day render an account to how we have responded to God’s grace and his invitation to be exulted.

On that day of judgment the expression “I couldn’t” will ring hollow, because as we have seen: “God CAN” Today’s readings remind us to be open to what God can do, often in mysterious ways, and even with the most humble things in our lives.

On this Father’s Day’s, all men who are fathers are asked to stand up and be counted; to stand up and receive a blessing. Fathers, of course, have great obligations. But as we have seen, God can do mighty things even in our imperfections and struggles.

The first thing every Father must do is turn to God and say, “If you can use anything, Lord, you can use me.” He then has the obligation to let God go to work through him and to realize that he will be held accountable if he blocks God’s grace or refuses to let God work.

My father, in his later years became something of a penitent. He had been away from the Church for more than twenty years, and returned in 1989, the year I was ordained. I know my mother and Grandmother had surely prayed for his return.

But my father never did anything halfway. When he returned he went to weekday Mass (never missed a day, even on vacation), daily rosary, daily Stations of the Cross, daily Chaplet of Divine Mercy. One day I said to him, “Wowsa Dad, that’s really high octane!” He said, “Listen son, I did a lot of sinning early on, and I’ve got some serious ground to make up!”

Yes, for all the prayers he had not said and all the masses he missed, he surely made up lost ground, and then some. And while one may argue as to the theology of grace operative in his thinking, he surely had his judgment in mind and knew that, whereas once he had blocked God’s grace from flowing through him, now he would open the floodgates and let God’s work flow through like him a mighty stream.

I know his family and this world benefited enormously from his largely hidden hours in Church and at other hours of the day. I have little doubt that I am in great debt to him for his many prayers for me, and now I render some of the debt by praying often masses for the repose of his soul and that of my mother.

In my own parish, I am calling the men to account in this year. I am summoning them to spend a year preparing, with prayer, Bible study and fellowship to make the following pledge:

I DO solemnly resolve before God to take full responsibility for myself, my wife, and my children.

I WILL love them, protect them, serve them, and teach them the Word of God as the spiritual leader of my home.

I WILL be faithful to my wife, to love and honor her, and be willing to lay down my life for her as Jesus Christ did for me.

I WILL bless my children and teach them to love God with all of their hearts, all of their minds, and all of their strength.

I WILL train them to honor authority and live responsibly.

I WILL confront evil, pursue justice, and love mercy.

I WILL pray for others and treat them with kindness, respect, and compassion.

I WILL work diligently to provide for the needs of my family.

I WILL forgive those who have wronged me and reconcile with those I have wronged.

I WILL learn from my mistakes, repent of my sins, and walk with integrity as a man answerable to God.

I WILL seek to honor God, be faithful to His church, obey His Word, and do His will.

I WILL courageously work with the strength God provides to fulfill this resolution for the rest of my life and for His glory.

As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord. —Joshua 24:15

This resolution comes from the movie Courageous, which I strongly recommend you see, if you have not already done so. We will gather with men from, I pray, five other parishes, study, pray and prepare, so that the men can knowingly, and with reflection. make this resolution.

Indeed, all of us, men and women will be held accountable. For even if we can’t, God can. And even if we feel too humble and insignificant, God does his greatest work with humble things and people. For us it is simply to say that we have an adaptability that God can use, and this should inspire in us an Awe-ability that joyfully acknowledges God’s often secretive and hidden power. If that be the case, then, knowing our accountability, it simply remains for us to say, “If you can use anything, Lord, you can use me!”


17 posted on 06/16/2012 9:11:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

11th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gospel

Mark 4:26-34

26 And he said: "The kingdom of God is as if a man should scatter seed upon the ground,
27 and should sleep and rise night and day, and the seed should sprout and grow, he knows not how.
28 The earth produces of itself, first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear.
29 But when the grain is ripe, at once he puts in the sickle, because the harvest has come."
30 And he said, "With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable shall we use for it?
31 It is like a grain of mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth;
32 yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade."
33 With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it;
34 he did not speak to them without a parable, but privately to his own disciples he explained everything.


Interesting Details
  • A parable is "a metaphor or simile drawn from nature or common life, arresting the hearer by its vividness or strangeness, and leaving the mind in sufficient doubt about its precise application to tease it into active thought" (C. H. Dodd). With parables, Jesus uses what is familiar to describe what is unfamiliar to us: the kingdom of God. The reader is asked to look at his familiar world in a new way--God's way.
  • "The kingdom of God" is not a place; it really means "the reign of God." "The kingdom of God is like..." illustrates what happens when God's will is done on earth as perfectly as it is done in heaven. The seed is God's word. Both parables emphasize the mysterious growth of the seed.
  • (vv.26-28) The first parable contrasts the helplessness of man with the power of God. The farmer sows, and then waits. He waits, because the seed grows of its own accord, and he "knows not how." As the seed inevitably grows to fruitfulness, so does God's word grow inevitably to achieve the end for which it was sent. The lesson for us is to be not anxious, be not proud. God's word grows not primarily from our efforts, and grows out of proportion to our efforts.
  • (v.29) The first parable concludes with an allusion to Joel 4:13; the harvest is the day of judgment.
  • (vv.30-32) In Palestine, a grain of mustard seed stands for the smallest possible thing. For example, a person of little faith would be said to have "faith as a grain of mustard seed." A mustard plant crowded with birds is a common sight, since the plant has many black seeds which birds feed on. The parable of the mustard seed contrasts a beginning with an end--the smallness of the beginning and the greatness of the end. The Church started with but a small band of uneducated fishermen.
  • (v.34) Jesus used parables to teach the public, but "explained everything" to his disciples. The difference between the public and his disciples is a matter of commitment.

One Main Point

The reign of God will grow to its fullness, despite all obstacles.


Reflections
  1. Recall a small beginning that has blossomed into fruit--a change in someone close to me that I did not expect, a change in my own attitude or outlook of life. How patient am I with myself? with others? How easily do I give up?
  2. How do I view the church today? Disappointed, anxious, frustrated? How should I view the church?

18 posted on 06/16/2012 9:24:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: akk
Sunday, June 17, 2012
Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Ezekiel 17:22-24
Psalm 92:2-3, 13-16
2 Corinthians 5:6-10
Mark 4:26-34

God will not hear our prayers unless we acknowledge ourselves to be sinners. We do this when we ponder on our own sins alone, and not on those of our neighbor.

-- St. Moses the Ethiopian


19 posted on 06/16/2012 9:34:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


20 posted on 06/16/2012 9:35:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Office of Readings

INVITATORY


The Invitatory may be said for the first ëhourí recited in the day

Lord, + open my lips.
ñ And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord, and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us, alleluia.

Psalm 95
A call to praise God


Encourage each other while it is still today (Hebrews 3:13).

Come, let us sing to the Lord *
  and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving *
  and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord, and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us, alleluia.

The Lord is God, the mighty God, *
  the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth *
  and the highest mountains as well.
He made the sea; it belongs to him, *
  the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord, and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us, alleluia.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship *
  bending the knee before the Lord, our maker.
For he is our God and we are his people, *
  the flock he shepherds.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord, and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us, alleluia.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord: Ü
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did
  in the wilderness, *
when at Meriba and Massah
  they challenged me and provoked me, *
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant.
Come, let us sing to the Lord, and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us, alleluia.

Forty years I endured that generation. *
I said, ìThey are a people whose hearts go astray
  and they do not know my ways.î
So I swore in my anger, *
  ìThey shall not enter into my rest.î

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord, and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord, and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us, alleluia.

If the Invitatory is not said, then the following is used:

God, + come to my assistance.
ñ Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
ñ as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN


On this day, the first of days,
God the Fatherís name we praise;
Who, creationís Lord and spring,
Did the world from darkness bring.

On this day the eternal Son
Over death His triumph won;
On this day the Spirit came
With His gifts of living flame.

Father, who didst fashion man
Godlike in thy loving plan,
Fill us with that love divine,
And conform our wills to thine.

Word made flesh, all hail to thee!
Thou from sin hast set us free;
And with thee we die and rise
Unto God in sacrifice.

Holy Spirit, you impart
Gifts of love to every heart;
Give us light and grace, we pray,
Fill our hearts this holy day.

God, the blessed Three in One,
May thy holy will be done;
In thy word our souls are free.
And we rest this day with thee.

Melody: Gott Sei Dank 77.77
Music: Freylinghausenís Gesangbuch, 1704
Text: Le Mans Breviary, 1748
Translation: Henry W. Baker, 1821-1877

PSALMODY


Ant. 1 Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Psalm 145
Praise of Godís majesty


Lord, you are the Just One, who was and who is (Revelation 16:5).

I

I will give you glory, O God my King, *
I will bless your name forever.

I will bless you day after day *
and praise your name for ever.
The Lord is great, highly to be praised, *
his greatness cannot be measured.

Age to age shall proclaim your works, *
shall declare your mighty deeds,
shall speak of your splendor and glory, *
tell the tale of your wonderful works.

They will speak of your terrible deeds, *
recount your greatness and might.
They will recall your abundant goodness; *
age to age shall ring out your justice.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion, *
slow to anger, abounding in love.
How good is the Lord to all, *
compassionate to all his creatures.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Your kingdom, Lord, is an everlasting kingdom, alleluia.

II

All your creatures shall thank you, O Lord, *
and your friends shall repeat their blessing.
They shall speak of the glory of your reign *
and declare your might, O God,

to make known to men your mighty deeds *
and the glorious splendor of your reign.
Yours is an everlasting kingdom; *
your rule lasts from age to age.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Your kingdom, Lord, is an everlasting kingdom, alleluia.

Ant. 3 The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

III

The Lord is faithful in all his words *
and loving in all his deeds.
The Lord supports all who fall *
and raises all who are bowed down.

The eyes of all creatures look to you *
and you give them their food in due time.
You open wide your hand, *
grant the desires of all who live.

The Lord is just in all his ways *
and loving in all his deeds.
He is close to all who call him, *
who call on him from their hearts.

He grants the desires of those who fear him, *
he hears their cry and he saves them.
The Lord protects all who love him; *
but the wicked he will utterly destroy.

Let me speak the praise of the Lord, Ü
let all mankind bless his holy name *
for ever, for ages unending.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm Prayer

Lord, be near to all who call upon you in truth and increase the dedication of those who revere you. Hear their prayers and save them, that we may always love and praise your holy name.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

Listen to my words.
ñ Give ear to my precepts.

READINGS


FIRST READING

From the Book of Judges
2:6-3:4

Israel in the time of Judges

When Joshua dismissed the people, each Israelite went to take possession of his own hereditary land. The people served the Lord during the entire lifetime of Joshua, and of those elders who outlived Joshua and who had seen all the great work which the Lord had done for Israel.

Joshua, son of Nun, the servant of the Lord, was a hundred and ten years old when he died; and they buried him within the borders of his heritage at Timnath-heres in the mountain region of Ephraim north of Mount Gaash. But once the rest of that generation were gathered to their fathers, and a later generation arose that did not know the Lord, or what he had done for Israel,  the Israelites offended the Lord by serving the Baals. Abandoning the Lord, the God of their fathers, who had led them out of the land of Egypt, they followed the other gods of the various nations around them, and by their worship of these gods provoked the Lord.  

Because they had thus abandoned him and served Baal and the Ashtaroth, the anger of the Lord flared up against Israel, and he delivered them over to plunderers who despoiled them. He allowed them to fall into the power of their enemies round about whom they were no longer able to withstand. Whatever they undertook, the Lord turned into disaster for them, as in his warning he had sworn he would do, till they were in great distress.

Even when the Lord raised up judges to deliver them from the power of their despoilers, they did not listen to their judges, but abandoned themselves to the worship of other gods. They were quick to stray from the way their fathers had taken, and did not follow their example of obedience to the commandments of the Lord. Whenever the Lord raised up judges for them, he would be with the judge and save them from the power of their enemies as long as the judge lived; it was thus the Lord took pity on their distressful cries of affliction under their oppressors. But when the judge died, they would relapse and do worse than their fathers, following other gods in service and worship, relinquishing none of their evil practices or stubborn conduct.

In his anger toward Israel the Lord said, ìInasmuch as this nation has violated my covenant which I enjoined on their fathers, and has disobeyed me, I for my part will not clear away for them any more of the nations which Joshua left when he died.î Through these nations the Israelites were to be made to prove whether or not they would keep to the way of the Lord and continue in it as their fathers had done; therefore the Lord allowed them to remain instead of expelling them immediately, or delivering them into the power of Israel.
 
The following are the nations which the Lord allowed to remain, so that through them he might try all those Israelites who had no experience of the battles with Canaan training them in battle, those generations only of the Israelites who would not have had that previous experience):  the five lords of the Philistines; and all the Canaanites, the Sidonians, and the Hivites who dwell in the mountain region of Lebanon between Baal-hermon and the entrance to Hamath. These served to put Israel to the test, to determine whether they would obey the commandments the Lord had enjoined on their fathers through Moses.

RESPONSORY
Psalm 106:40, 41, 44; Judges 2:16

The Lord grew angry with his people,
and he delivered them into the hands of the nations;
ñ Yet when he heard them cry, he looked with pity on their distress.

The Lord raised up judges, who rescued them from their plunderers.
ñ Yet when he heard them cry, he looked with pity on their distress.

SECOND READING

From a Treatise on the Lordís Prayer by Saint Cyprian, bishop and martyr
(Nn. 4-6: CSEL 3, 268-270)

Let your prayer come from a humble heart

When we pray, our words should be calm, modest and disciplined. Let us reflect that we are standing before God. We should please him both by our bodily posture and the manner of our speech. It is characteristic of the vulgar to shout and make a noise, not those who are modest. On the contrary, they should employ a quiet tone in their prayer.

Moreover, in the course of his teaching, the Lord instructed us to pray in secret. Hidden and secluded places, even our own rooms, give witness to our belief that God is present everywhere; that he sees and hears all; that in the fullness of his majesty, he penetrates hidden and secret places. This is the teaching of Jeremiah: Am I God when I am near, and not God when I am far away? Can anyone hide in a dark corner without my seeing him? Do I not fill heaven and earth? Another passage of Scripture says: The eyes of the Lord are everywhere, observing both good and wicked men.

The same modesty and discipline should characterize our liturgical prayer as well. When we gather to celebrate the divine mysteries with ëGodís priest, we should not express our prayer in unruly words; the petition that should be made to God with moderation is not to be shouted out noisily and verbosely. For God hears our heart not our voice. He sees our thoughts; he is not to be shouted at. The Lord showed us this when he asked: Why do you think evil in your hearts? The book of Revelation testifies to this also: And all the churches shall know that I am the one who searches the heart and the desires.

Anna maintained this rule; in her observance of it she is an image of the Church. In the First Book of Kings we are told that she prayed quietly and modestly to God in the recesses of her heart. Her prayer was secret but her faith was evident. She did not pray with her voice, but with her heart, for she knew that in this way the Lord would hear her. She prayed with faith and obtained what she sought. Scripture makes this clear in the words: She was speaking in her heart; her lips were moving but her voice could not be heard; and the Lord heard her prayer. The psalmist also reminds us: Commune within your own hearts, and in the privacy of your room express your remorse. This is the teaching of the Holy Spirit. Through Jeremiah he suggests this: Say in your hearts: Lord, it is you that we have to worship.

My friends, anyone who worships should remember the way in which the tax-collector prayed in the temple alongside the Pharisee. He did not raise his eyes immodestly to heaven or lift up his hands arrogantly. Instead he struck his breast and confessing the sins hidden within his heart he implored the assistance of Godís mercy. While the Pharisee was pleased with himself, the tax-collector deserved to be cleansed much more because of the manner in which he prayed. For he did not place his hope of salvation in the certainty of his own innocence; indeed, no one is innocent. Rather he prayed humbly, confessing his sins. And the Lord who forgives the lowly heard his prayer.

RESPONSORY

Let us consider how we should live in the presence of God and his angels;
ñ And so let us stand singing psalms in such a way
that mind and voice are in harmony.

Let us recall that God does not delight in how much we pray,
but in our purity of heart and sorrow for sin.
ñ And so let us stand singing psalms in such a way
that mind and voice are in harmony.

If the Optional Vigil is not celebrated, the Office continues with the Te Deum.


OPTIONAL VIGIL


CANTICLES


Ant. We hope in you, Lord; be a source of strength for us today and our salvation in times of trial.

Canticle I:Isaiah 33:2-10
Prayer of trust in need


In Christ are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge (Colossians 2:3).

O Lord, have pity on us, for you we wait. Ü
Be our strength every morning, *
our salvation in time of trouble!

At the roaring sound, peoples flee; *
when you rise in your majesty, nations are scattered.
Men gather spoil as caterpillars are gathered up; *
they rush upon it like the onrush of locusts.

The Lord is exalted, enthroned on high; *
he fills Zion with right and justice.
That which makes her seasons lasting, Ü
the riches that save her, are wisdom and knowledge; *
the fear of the Lord is her treasure.

See, the men of Ariel cry out in the streets, *
the messengers of Shalem weep bitterly.
The highways are desolate, *
travelers have quit the paths,
covenants are broken, their terms are spurned; *
yet no man gives it a thought.

The country languishes in mourning, *
Lebanon withers with shame;
Sharon is like the steppe, *
Bashan and Carmel are stripped bare.
Now will I rise up, says the Lord, *
now will I be exalted, now be lifted up.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Canticle II: Isaiah 33:13-16
God will judge with justice


It is promised to you and your children and to all who are far away (Acts 2:39).

Hear, you who are far off, *
what I have done;
you who are near, *
acknowledge my might.

On Zion sinners are in dread, *
trembling grips the impious:
"Who of us can live with the consuming fire? *
Who of us can live with the everlasting flames?"

He who practices virtue and speaks honestly, *
who spurns what is gained by oppression,
brushing his hands *
free of contact with a bribe,
stopping his ears lest he hear of bloodshed, *
closing his eyes lest he look on evil.

He shall dwell on the heights, *
his stronghold shall be the rocky fastness,
his food and drink *
in steady supply.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Canticle III: Sirach 36:11-17
Prayer for the people of God


This is eternal life: to know you, the one true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent (John 17:3).

Show mercy to the people called by your name; *
Israel, whom you named your first-born.
Take pity on your holy city, *
Jerusalem, your dwelling place.
Fill Zion with your majesty, *
your temple with your glory.

Give evidence of your deeds of old; *
fulfill the prophecies spoken in your name,
Reward those who have hoped in you, *
and let your prophets be proved true.
Hear the prayer of your servants, *
for you are ever gracious to your people;
Thus it will be known to the very ends of the earth *
that you are the eternal God.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. We hope in you, Lord; be a source of strength for us today and our salvation in times of trial.

THE HOLY GOSPEL


+ A reading from the holy Gospel according to Luke
24:1-12

Why do you seek the living among the dead?

On the first day of the week, at dawn, the women came to the tomb bringing the spices they had prepared. They found the stone rolled back from the tomb; but when they entered the tomb, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus. While they were still at a loss over what to think of this, two men in dazzling garments stood beside them.

Terrified, the women bowed to the ground. The men said to them: ìWhy do you search for the Living One among the dead? He is not here; he has been raised up. Remember what he said to you while he was still in Galileeóthat the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.î With this reminder, his words came back to them.

On their return from the tomb, they told all these things to the Eleven and the others. The women were Mary of Magdala, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James. The other women with them also told the apostles, but the story seemed like nonsense and they refused to believe them.

Peter, however, got up and ran to the tomb. He stooped down but could see nothing but the wrappings. So he went away full of amazement at what had occurred.

A homily on the Gospel may be given.

TE DEUM


You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
   Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of power and might,
   heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
   Father, of majesty unbounded,
   your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
   and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the king of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not shun the Virginís womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at Godís right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

V. Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
R. Govern and uphold them now and always.
V. Day by day we bless you.
R. We praise your name for ever.
V. Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
R. Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.
V. Lord, show us your love and mercy;
R. for we put our trust in you.
V. In you, Lord, is our hope:
R. and we shall never hope in vain.

The concluding part of the hymn may be omitted

CONCLUDING PRAYER


Let us pray.

Almighty God,
our hope and our strength,
without you we falter.
Help us to follow Christ
and to live according to your will.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit
one God, for ever and ever.
ñ Amen.

Or:

O God, strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas,
and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands
we may please you by our resolve and our deeds.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
ñ Amen.

ACCLAMATION


Let us praise the Lord.
ñ And give him thanks.
21 posted on 06/16/2012 10:07:53 PM PDT by sayuncledave (et Verbum caro factum est (And the Word was made flesh))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: sayuncledave
Lauds

INVITATORY


The Invitatory may be said for the first ëhourí recited in the day.

Lord, + open my lips.
ñ And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.

Psalm 95
A call to praise God


Encourage each other while it is still today (Hebrews 3:13).

Come, let us sing to the Lord *
  and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving *
  and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.

The Lord is God, the mighty God, *
  the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth *
  and the highest mountains as well.
He made the sea; it belongs to him, *
  the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship *
  bending the knee before the Lord, our maker.
For he is our God and we are his people, *
  the flock he shepherds.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord: Ü
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did
  in the wilderness, *
when at Meriba and Massah
  they challenged me and provoked me, *
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.

Forty years I endured that generation. *
I said, ìThey are a people whose hearts go astray
  and they do not know my ways.î
So I swore in my anger, *
  ìThey shall not enter into my rest.î

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.

If the Invitatory is not said, then the following is used:

God, + come to my assistance.
ñ Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
ñ as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN


Eternal Maker of the world,
The sovíreign Lord of night and day:
You give the seasons of the year
To take timeís heaviness away.

In deepest night you never sleep,
A Lamp for travílers on the way;
A Light dividing night from night,
The rooster crows announcing day.

See, at the sound, the daystar wakes
And drives the darkness from the sky;
All those who strayed on deadly roads
Now take the path to life on high.

The ocean hears; the waves die down;
The sailor overcomes his fears.
Saint Peter hears; the Churchís Rock
Removes denialís stain with tears.

O Jesus, save us, for we fall;
Look down and set us right, we pray,
For at your glance our failings fail,
And sorrow washes sins away.

O Light, upon our senses shine,
Dispel the sleepiness within;
Let our first words be words of you;
With faithful praise our day begin.

To you, O Christ, most kindly King,
And to the Father, glory be;
Praise to the Spirit Paraclete,
In evíry age, eternally. Amen.

Melody: ∆tÈrne rerum cÛnditor L.M.
Melody: Mode I
Text: ∆tÈrne rerum cÛnditor, Saint Ambose of Milan, 337?-397
Translation: W J. Copeland, 1804-1885

PSALMODY


Ant. 1 Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

Psalm 93
Splendor of God the Creator


The Lord our mighty God now reigns supreme; let us rejoice and be glad and give him praise (Revelation 19:6-7).

The Lord is king, with majesty enrobed; Ü
the Lord has robed himself with might, *
he has girded himself with power.

The world you made firm, not to be moved; Ü
your throne has stood firm from of old. *
From all eternity, O Lord, you are.

The waters have lifted up, O Lord, Ü
the waters have lifted up their voice, *
the waters have lifted up their thunder.

Greater than the roar of mighty waters Ü
more glorious than the surgings of the sea, *
the Lord is glorious on high.

Truly your decrees are to be trusted. Ü
Holiness is fitting to your house, *
O Lord, until the end of time.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm Prayer

All power and all authority in heaven and earth have been given to you, Lord Jesus; you rule with decrees that are firm and trustworthy. Be with us always so that we may make disciples whose holiness will be worthy of your house.

Ant. Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

Ant. 2 To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

Canticle: Daniel 3:57-88, 56
Let all creatures praise the Lord


All you servants of the Lord, sing praise to him (Revelation 19:5).

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord. *
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord. *
You heavens, bless the Lord,
All you waters above the heavens, bless the Lord. *
All you hosts of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Sun and moon, bless the Lord. *
Stars of heaven, bless the Lord.

Every shower and dew, bless the Lord. *
All you winds, bless the Lord.
Fire and heat, bless the Lord. *
Cold and chill, bless the Lord.
Dew and rain, bless the Lord. *
Frost and chill, bless the Lord.
Ice and snow, bless the Lord. *
Nights and days, bless the Lord.
Light and darkness, bless the Lord. *
Lightnings and clouds, bless the Lord.

Let the earth bless the Lord. *
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Mountains and hills, bless the Lord. *
Everything growing from the earth, bless the Lord.
You springs, bless the Lord. *
Seas and rivers, bless the Lord.
You dolphins and all water creatures, bless the Lord. *
All you birds of the air, bless the Lord.
All you beasts, wild and tame, bless the Lord. *
You sons of men, bless the Lord.

O Israel, bless the Lord. *
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Priests of the Lord, bless the Lord. *
Servants of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Spirits and souls of the just, bless the Lord. *
Holy men of humble heart, bless the Lord.
Hananiah, Azariah, Mishael, bless the Lord. *
Praise and exalt him above all forever.

Let us bless the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit. *
Let us praise and exalt him above all forever.
Blessed are you, Lord, in the firmament of heaven. *
Praiseworthy and glorious and exalted above all for ever.

Ant. To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

Psalm 148
Praise to the Lord, the Creator


Praise and honor, glory and power for ever to him who sits upon the throne and to the Lamb (Revelation 5:13).

Praise the Lord from the heavens, *
praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all his angels, *
praise him, all his host.

Praise him, sun and moon, *
praise him, shining stars.
Praise him, highest heavens *
and the waters above the heavens.

Let them praise the name of the Lord. *
He commanded: they were made.
He fixed them for ever, *
gave a law which shall not pass away.

Praise the Lord from the earth, *
sea creatures and all oceans,
fire and hail, snow and mist, *
stormy winds that obey his word;

all mountains and hills, *
all fruit trees and cedars,
beasts, wild and tame, *
reptiles and birds on the wing;

all earthís kings and peoples, *
earthís princes and rulers,
young men and maidens, *
old men together with children.

Let them praise the name of the Lord *
for he alone is exalted.
The splendor of his name *
reaches beyond heaven and earth.

He exalts the strength of his people. *
He is the praise of all his saints,
of the sons of Israel, *
of the people to whom he comes close.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm Prayer

Lord, extolled in the heights by angelic powers, you are also praised by all earthís creatures, each in its own way. With all the splendor of heavenly worship, you still delight in such tokens of love as earth can offer. May heaven and earth together acclaim you as king; may the praise that is sung in heaven resound in the heart of every creature on earth.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

READING

Ezekiel 37:12b-14

Thus says the Lord God: O my people, I will open your graves and have you rise from them, and bring you back to the land of Israel. Then you shall know that I am the Lord, when I open your graves and have you rise from them, O my people! I will put my spirit in you that you may live, and I will settle you upon your land; thus you shall know that I am the Lord. I have promised, and I will do it, says the Lord.

RESPONSORY


Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.
ñ Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.

You are seated at the right hand of the Father,
ñ have mercy on us.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.
ñ Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH


Ant. The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, the smallest of all seeds; yet when full-grown it is the largest of shrubs.

Luke 1:68-79
The Messiah and his forerunner


Blessed + be the Lord, the God of Israel; *
he has come to his people and set them free.

He has raised up for us a mighty savior, *
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old Ü
  that he would save us from our enemies, *
  from the hands of all who hate us.

He promised to show mercy to our fathers *
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham: *
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear, *
holy and righteous in his sight
   all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High; *
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation *
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God *
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death, *
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, the smallest of all seeds; yet when full-grown it is the largest of shrubs.

INTERCESSIONS


Father, you sent the Holy Spirit to enlighten the hearts of men; hear us as we pray:
Enlighten your people, Lord.

Blessed are you, O God, our light,
ñ you have given us a new day resplendent with your glory.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

You enlightened the world through the resurrection of your Son,
ñ through your Church shed this light on all men.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

You gave the disciples of your only-begotten Son the Spiritís gift of understanding,
ñ through the same Spirit keep the Church faithful to you.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

Light of nations, remember those who remain in darkness,
ñ open their eyes and let them recognize you, the only true God.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

THE LORDíS PRAYER


(Gathering our prayer and praises into one, let us offer the prayer Christ himself taught us:)

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name;
thy kingdom come;
thy will be done on earth
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
and forgive us our trespasses
as we forgive those who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

CONCLUDING PRAYER


Almighty God,
our hope and our strength,
without you we falter.
Help us to follow Christ
and to live according to your will.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit
one God, for ever and ever.
ñAmen.

Or:

O God, strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas,
and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands
we may please you by our resolve and our deeds.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
ñ Amen.

DISMISSAL


May the Lord bless + us,
protect us from all evil
and bring us to everlasting life.
ñ Amen.
22 posted on 06/16/2012 10:08:58 PM PDT by sayuncledave (et Verbum caro factum est (And the Word was made flesh))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: sayuncledave
Daytime Prayer

INTRODUCTION


God, + come to my assistance.
ñ Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
ñ as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN


At Midmorning

Breathe on me, breath of God,
Fill me with life anew,
That I may love the things you love,
And do what you would do.

Breathe on me, breath of God,
Until my heart is pure,
Until with you I have one will,
To live and to endure.

Breathe on me, breath of God,
My soul with grace refine,
Until this earthly part of me
Glows with your fire divine.

Breathe on me, breath of God,
So I shall never die,
But live with you the perfect life
In your eternity.

Melody: Yattendon 64.66.86
Music: H. E. Woodbridge, 1845-1917
Text: Edwin Hatch, 1835-1889, adapted by Anthony G. Petti

At Midday

Almighty Ruler, God of truth,
Who guide and master all,
The rays with which you gild the dawn
With noonday heat now fall.

O quench the fires of hatred, Lord,
Of anger and of strife;
Bring health to every mind and heart
That peace may enter life.

Most holy Father, grant our prayer
Through Christ your only Son,
That in your Spirit we may live
And praise you ever one.

Melody: Ballerma C.M.
Music: F. Barthelemon, 1774-1808
Text: Ralph Wright, O.S.B.

At Midafternoon

Lord God and Maker of all things,
Creation is upheld by you.
While all must change and know decay,
You are unchanging, always new.

You are manís solace and his shield
His rock secure on which to build;
You are the spiritís tranquil home;
In you alone is hope fulfilled.

To God the Father, and the Son
And Holy Spirit render praise,
Blest Trinity, from age to age
The strength of all our living days.

Melody: Auctoritate Saeculi L.M.
Music: Poitiers Antiphoner, 1746
Text: © Stanbrook Abbey, used with permission.

PSALMODY


Ant. 1 In my distress, I called on the Lord, and he heard my cry, alleluia.

Psalm 118
Song of joy for salvation


This Jesus is the stone which, rejected by you builders, has become the chief stone supporting all the rest (Acts 4:11).

I

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good, *
for his love endures for ever.

Let the sons of Israel say: *
ìHis love endures for ever.î
Let the sons of Aaron say: *
ìHis love endures for everî
Let those who fear the Lord say: *
ìHis love endures for ever.î

I called to the Lord in my distress; *
he answered and freed me.
The Lord is at my side; I do not fear. *
What can man do against me?
The Lord is at my side as my helper: *
I shall look down on my foes.

It is better to take refuge in the Lord *
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord *
than to trust in princes.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. In my distress, I called on the Lord, and he heard my cry, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lordís right hand has raised me up, alleluia.

II

The nations all encompassed me; *
in the Lordís name I crushed them.
They compassed me, compassed me about; *
in the Lordís name I crushed them.
They compassed me about like bees; Ü
they blazed like a fire among thorns. *
In the Lordís name I crushed them.

I was hard-pressed and was falling *
but the Lord came to help me.
The Lord is my strength and my song; *
he is my savior.
There are shouts of joy and victory *
in the tents of the just.

The Lordís right hand has triumphed; *
his right hand raised me up.
The Lordís right hand has triumphed;
I shall not die, I shall live *
and recount his deeds.
I was punished, I was punished by the Lord, *
but not doomed to die.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lordís right hand has raised me up, alleluia.

Ant. 3 The Lord our God has let his light shine upon us, alleluia.

III

Open to me the gates of holiness: *
I will enter and give thanks.
This is the Lordís own gate *
where the just may enter.
I will thank you for you have answered *
and you are my savior.

The stone which the builders rejected *
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord, *
a marvel in our eyes.
This day was made by the Lord; *
we rejoice and are glad.

O Lord, grant us salvation; *
O Lord, grant success.
Blessed in the name of the Lord *
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord; *
the Lord God is our light.

Go forward in procession with branches *
even to the altar.
You are my God, I thank you. *
My God, I praise you.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good; *
for his love endures for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm Prayer

Lord God, you have given us the great day of rejoicing: Jesus Christ, the stone rejected by the builders, has become the cornerstone of the Church, our spiritual home. Shed upon your Church the rays of your glory, that it may be seen as the gate of salvation open to all nations. Let cries of joy and exultation ring out from its tents to celebrate the wonder of Christís resurrection.

Ant. The Lord our God has let his light shine upon us, alleluia.

At the other hours, the complementary psalmody is used.

MIDMORNING


READING
Romans 8:15-16


You did not receive a spirit of slavery leading you back into fear, but a spirit of adoption, through which we cry out, ìAbba!î (that is ìFather!î) The Spirit himself gives witness with our spirit that we are children of God.

Lord, you are the well-spring of life.
ñ In your light, we see light itself.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Let us pray.

Almighty God,
our hope and our strength,
without you we falter.
Help us to follow Christ
and to live according to your will.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
ñ Amen.

Or:

O God, strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas,
and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands
we may please you by our resolve and our deeds.
Through Christ our Lord.
ñ Amen.

ACCLAMATION

Let us praise the Lord.
ñ And give him thanks.

MIDDAY

READING
Romans 8:22-23


We know that all creation groans and is in agony even until now. Not only that, but we ourselves, although we have the Spirit as first fruits, groan inwardly while we await the redemption of our bodies.

Bless the Lord, my soul,
ñ he has rescued your life from destruction.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Let us pray.

Almighty God,
our hope and our strength,
without you we falter.
Help us to follow Christ
and to live according to your will.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
ñ Amen.

Or:

O God, strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas,
and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands
we may please you by our resolve and our deeds.
Through Christ our Lord.
ñ Amen.

ACCLAMATION

Let us praise the Lord.
ñ And give him thanks.

MIDAFTERNOON


READING
2 Timothy 1:9


God has saved us and called us to a holy life, not according because of any merit of ours but according to his own designóthe grace held out to us in Christ Jesus before the world began.

Confiding in the Lordís guidance, they feared nothing.
ñ He led them into his holy land.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Let us pray.

Almighty God,
our hope and our strength,
without you we falter.
Help us to follow Christ
and to live according to your will.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
ñ Amen.

Or:

O God, strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas,
and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands
we may please you by our resolve and our deeds.
Through Christ our Lord.
ñ Amen.

ACCLAMATION

Let us praise the Lord.
ñ And give him thanks.

23 posted on 06/16/2012 10:09:45 PM PDT by sayuncledave (et Verbum caro factum est (And the Word was made flesh))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: sayuncledave
Vespers

INTRODUCTION


God, + come to my assistance.
ñ Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
ñ As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN


O blest Creator of the light,
Who makíst the day with radiance bright,
And oíer the forming world didst call
The light from chaos first of all;

Whose wisdom joined in meet array
The morn and eve, and named them Day:
Night comes with all its darkling fears;
Regard thy peopleís prayers and tears.

Lest, sunk in sin, and whelmíd with strife,
They lose the gift of endless life;
While thinking but the thoughts of time,
They weave new chains of woe and crime.

But grant them grace that they may strain
The heavínly gate and prize to gain:
Each harmful lure aside to cast,
And purge away each error past.

O Father, that we ask be done,
Through Jesus Christ, thine only Son;
Who, with the Holy Ghost and thee,
Doth live and reign eternally. Amen.

Melody: Bromley L.M.
Music: Jeremiah Clarke, 1700
Text: Lucis cre·tor Ûptime, attributed to Gregory the Great, 540-604
Translation: John M. Neale, 1818-1866

PSALMODY


Ant. 1 The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

Psalm 110:1-5, 7
The Messiah, king and priest


Christís reign will last until all his enemies are made subject to him (1 Corinthians 15:25).

The Lordís revelation to my Master: Ü
ìSit on my right: *
your foes I will put beneath your feet.î

The Lord will wield from Zion Ü
your scepter of power: *
rule in the midst of all your foes.

A prince from the day of your birth Ü
on the holy mountains; *
from the womb before the dawn I begot you.

The Lord has sworn an oath he will not change. Ü
ìYou are a priest for ever, *
a priest like Melchizedeck of old.î

The Master standing at your right hand *
will shatter kings in the day of his wrath.

He shall drink from the stream by the wayside *
and therefore he shall lift up his head.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm Prayer

Father, we ask you to give us victory and peace. In Jesus Christ, our Lord and King, we are already seated at your right hand. We look forward to praising you in the fellowship of all your saints in our heavenly homeland.

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Psalm 111
Godís marvelous works


We are lost in wonder at all you have done for us, our Lord and mighty God (Revelation 15:3).

I will thank the Lord with all my heart *
in the meeting of the just and their assembly.
Great are the works of the Lord, *
to be pondered by all who love them.

Majestic and glorious his work, *
his justice stands firm for ever.
He makes us remember his wonders. *
The Lord is compassion and love.

He gives food to those who fear him; *
keeps his covenant ever in mind.
He has shown his might to his people *
by giving them the lands of the nations.

His works are justice and truth, *
his precepts are all of them sure,
standing firm for ever and ever; *
they are made in uprightness and truth.

He has sent deliverance to his people Ü
and established his covenant for ever. *
Holy his name, to be feared.

To fear the Lord is the first stage of wisdom; Ü
all who do so prove themselves wise. *
His praise shall last for ever!

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm Prayer

Merciful and gentle Lord, you are the crowning glory of all the saints. Give us, your children, the gift of obedience which is the beginning of wisdom, so that we may do what you command and be filled with your mercy.

Ant.
Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Ant. 3 All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Canticle: See Revelation 19:1-7
The wedding of the Lamb

The following canticle is said with the Alleluia when Evening Prayer is sung; when the Office if recited, the Alleluia may be said at the beginning and end of each strophe.

Alleluia.
Salvation, glory, and power to our God: *
(Alleluia.)
his judgments are honest and true. *
Alleluia (alleluia).

Alleluia.
Sing praise to our God, all you his servants, *
(Alleluia.)
all who worship him reverently, great and small. *
Alleluia (alleluia).

Alleluia.
The Lord our all-powerful God is King; *
(Alleluia.)
Let us rejoice, sing praise, and give him glory. *
Alleluia (alleluia).

Alleluia.
The wedding feast of the Lamb has begun, *
(Alleluia.)
and his bride is prepared to welcome him. *
Alleluia (alleluia).

Alleluia.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
(Alleluia.)
and to the Holy Spirit: *
Alleluia (alleluia).

Alleluia.
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
(Alleluia.)
and will be for ever. Amen. *
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

READING

1 Peter 1:3-5

Praised be the God and Father
of our Lord Jesus Christ,
he who in his great mercy
gave us new birth;
a birth unto hope which draws its life
from the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead;
a birth to an imperishable inheritance,
incapable of fading or defilement,
which is kept in heaven for you
who are guarded with Godís power through faith;
a birth to a salvation which stands ready
to be revealed in the last days.

RESPONSORY


The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.
ñ The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

Eternal ages praise
ñ the greatness of your glory.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.
ñ The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

CANTICLE OF MARY


Ant. Jesus said to the woman: your faith has saved you, go in peace.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord


My + soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, Ü
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior *
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed: Ü
the Almighty has done great things for me, *
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him *
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm, *
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, *
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things, *
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel *
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers, *
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Jesus said to the woman: your faith has saved you, go in peace.

INTERCESSIONS


The world was created by the Word of God, re-created by his redemption, and it is continually renewed by his love. Rejoicing in him we call out:
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

We give thanks to God whose power is revealed in nature,
ñ and whose providence is revealed in history.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Through your Son, the herald of reconciliation, the victor of the cross,
ñ free us from empty fear and hopelessness.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

May all those who love and pursue justice,
ñ work together without deceit to build a world of true peace.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Be with the oppressed, free the captives, console the sorrowing, feed the hungry, strengthen the weak,
ñ in all people reveal the victory of your cross.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

After your Sonís death and burial you raised him up again in glory,
ñ grant that the faithful departed may live with him.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

THE LORDíS PRAYER


(Gathering our prayer and praises into one, let us offer the prayer Christ himself taught us:)

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name;
thy kingdom come;
thy will be done on earth
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
and forgive us our trespasses
as we forgive those who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Almighty God,
our hope and our strength,
without you we falter.
Help us to follow Christ
and to live according to your will.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit
one God, for ever and ever.
ñAmen.

Or:

O God, strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas,
and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands
we may please you by our resolve and our deeds.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
ñ Amen.

DISMISSAL


May the Lord bless + us,
protect us from all evil
and bring us to everlasting life.
ñ Amen.
24 posted on 06/16/2012 10:10:26 PM PDT by sayuncledave (et Verbum caro factum est (And the Word was made flesh))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: sayuncledave
Compline

INTRODUCTION


God, + come to my assistance.
ñ Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
ñ as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of Conscience

A brief examination of conscience may be made. In the communal celebration of the Office, a Penitential Rite using the formulas of the Mass may be inserted here.

[I confess to almighty God
and to you, my brothers and sisters,
that I have greatly sinned,
in my thoughts and in my words,
in what I have done and in what I have failed to do,

And, striking their breast, they say:

through my fault, through my fault,
through my most grievous fault;

Then they continue:

therefore I ask blessed Mary ever-Virgin,
all the Angels and Saints,
and you, my brothers and sisters,
to pray for me to the Lord our God.

The absolution by the Priest follows:

May almighty God have mercy on us,
forgive us our sins,
and bring us to everlasting life.
ñ Amen.]

HYMN


God who made the earth and heaven,
    Darkness and light;
You the day for work have givín
    For rest the night.
May your angel guards defend us,
Slumber sweet your mercy send us,
Holy dreams and hope attend us,
    All through the night.

And when morn again shall call us
    To run lifeís way,
May we still whateíer befall us,
    Your will obey.
From the powír of evil hide us,
In the narrow pathway guide us,
Never be your smile denied us
    All through the day.

Guard us waking, guard us sleeping,
    And, when we die,
May we in your mighty keeping
    All peaceful lie.
When the last dread call shall wake us,
Then O Lord, do not forsake us,
But to reign in glory take us
  With you on high.

Melody: Ar Hyd Y Nos 84.84.88.84
Music: Welsh Carol
Text: st 1 Reginald Heber, 1783-1826; st. 2 William Mercer, 1811-1876; st. 3 Richard Whately, 1787-1863

PSALMODY


Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under Godís wings.

Psalm 91
Safe in Godís sheltering care


I have given you the power to tread upon serpents and scorpions (Luke 10:19).

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High *
and abides in the shade of the Almighty
says to the Lord: ìMy refuge, *
my stronghold, my God in whom I trust!î

It is he who will free you from the snare *
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions *
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night *
nor the arrow that flies by day,
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness *
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon.

A thousand may fall at your side, *
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach; *
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.

Your eyes have only to look *
to see how the wicked are repaid,
you who have said: ìLord, my refuge!î *
and have made the Most High your dwelling.

Upon you no evil shall fall, *
no plague approach where you dwell.
For you has he commanded his angels, *
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you upon their hands *
lest you strike your foot against a stone.
On the lion and the viper you will tread *
and trample the young lion and the dragon.

Since he clings to me in love, I will free him; *
protect him for he knows my name.
When he calls I shall answer: ìI am with you,î *
I will save him in distress and give him glory.

With length of life I will content him; *
I shall let him see my saving power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under Godís wings.

READING

Revelation 22:4-5

They shall see the Lord face to face and bear his name on their foreheads. The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever.

RESPONSORY


Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
ñ Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
ñ I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.
ñ Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

GOSPEL CANTICLE


Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel


Lord, + now you let your servant go in peace; *
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation *
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations *
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, *
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, *
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Let us pray.

Lord,
we have celebrated today
the mystery of the rising of Christ to new life.
May we now rest in your peace,
safe from all that could harm us,
and rise refreshed and joyful,
to praise you throughout another day.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
ñ Amen.

BLESSING


May the all-powerful Lord
grant us a restful night
and a peaceful death.
ñ Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Hail, holy Queen, mother of mercy,
our life, our sweetness, and our hope.
To you do we cry,
poor banished children of Eve.
To you do we send up our sighs
mourning and weeping in this vale of tears.
Turn then, most gracious advocate,
your eyes of mercy toward us,
and after this exile
show us the blessed fruit of your womb, Jesus.
O clement, O loving,
O sweet Virgin Mary.

Or:

Hail Mary, full of grace,
the Lord is with you!
Blessed are you among women,
and blessed is the fruit of your womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
pray for us sinners,
now and at the hour of our death.

Or:

Salve, Regina, mater misericordiae;
 vita, dulcedo et spes nostra, salve,
Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae.
Ad te suspiramus, gementes et flentes
 in hac lacrimarum valle.

Eia ergo, advocata nostra,
 illos tuos misericordes occulos
 ad nos converte.
Et Iesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui,
 nobis post hoc exilium ostende.
O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria.

Or:

Loving mother of the Redeemer,
gate of heaven, star of the sea,
assist your people who have fallen yet strive to rise again.
To the wonderment of nature you bore your Creator,
yet remained a virgin after as before.
You who received Gabrielís joyful greeting,
have pity on us poor sinners.

25 posted on 06/16/2012 10:11:10 PM PDT by sayuncledave (et Verbum caro factum est (And the Word was made flesh))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: All


Information:
St. Avitus
 
Feast Day: June 17
Died: 530

26 posted on 06/17/2012 7:39:06 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: All
Interactive Saints for KidsP>

St. Emily De Vialar

Feast Day: June 17
Born: 1797 :: Died: 1856

Anne Marguerite Adelaide Emily de Vialar was born at Gaillace, Albi in southern France. She was the only daughter of Baron James Augustine de Vialar and Antoinette. Her wealthy parents sent her to school in Paris but at the age of fifteen, she returned to her small town of Gaillac when her mother died.

Fifteen-year-old Emily would be good company for her father. Mr. de Vialar was interested in finding a suitable husband for his daughter. He became very angry when Emily flatly refused to marry because she wanted to be a religious sister and give her life to God.

When Emily was twenty-one, a new priest, Father Mercier, arrived in Gaillac. Emily went to him for direction as she wanted to help the poor and the sick. Father Mercier helped her set up an out-patient service right on the terrace of the de Vialar home.

Emily's father was upset by all the bother and this tense situation between Emily and her father existed for fifteen years. Then Emily's grandfather, the Baron de Portal, died leaving Emily a large fortune. At last she could have the independence she needed to begin her great work for God.

With the help of Father Mercier, Emily bought a large house in her hometown. She and three other women began a religious order. They designed a habit and chose the name “Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition”.

The archbishop blessed their congregation and ministry. These sisters would be care for the sick and poor, and educate children. Twelve young women joined the group within three months. Sister Emily pronounced her vows in 1835 along with seventeen other sisters.

The Sisters of St. Joseph started branch convents. In 1847, the sisters went to Burma and in 1854, to Australia. In forty years, Mother Emily saw her congregation grow from the patio of her home in Gaillac, France, to some forty convents around the world.

Mother Emily wrote many letters which showed her great love for God, for his Church and for people. She saw in her heart people everywhere who needed the truth of the Gospel and the love that Christ brings. She asked Jesus for the strength she needed to continue her mission. Mother Emily's died on August 24, 1856.


27 posted on 06/17/2012 7:42:53 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 4
26 And he said: So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the earth, Et dicebat : Sic est regnum Dei, quemadmodum si homo jaciat sementem in terram, και ελεγεν ουτως εστιν η βασιλεια του θεου ως εαν ανθρωπος βαλη τον σπορον επι της γης
27 And should sleep, and rise, night and day, and the seed should spring, and grow up whilst he knoweth not. et dormiat, et exsurgat nocte et die, et semen germinet, et increscat dum nescit ille. και καθευδη και εγειρηται νυκτα και ημεραν και ο σπορος βλαστανη και μηκυνηται ως ουκ οιδεν αυτος
28 For the earth of itself bringeth forth fruit, first the blade, then the ear, afterwards the full corn in the ear. Ultro enim terra fructificat, primum herbam, deinde spicam, deinde plenum frumentum in spica. αυτοματη γαρ η γη καρποφορει πρωτον χορτον ειτα σταχυν ειτα πληρη σιτον εν τω σταχυι
29 And when the fruit is brought forth, immediately he putteth in the sickle, because the harvest is come. Et cum producerit fructus, statim mittit falcem, quoniam adsit messis. οταν δε παραδω ο καρπος ευθεως αποστελλει το δρεπανον οτι παρεστηκεν ο θερισμος
30 And he said: To what shall we liken the kingdom of God? or to what parable shall we compare it? Et dicebat : Cui assimilabimus regnum Dei ? aut cui parabolæ comparabimus illud ? και ελεγεν τινι ομοιωσωμεν την βασιλειαν του θεου η εν ποια παραβολη παραβαλωμεν αυτην
31 It is as a grain of mustard seed: which when it is sown in the earth, is less than all the seeds that are in the earth: Sicut granum sinapis, quod cum seminatum fuerit in terra, minus est omnibus seminibus, quæ sunt in terra : ως κοκκον σιναπεως ος οταν σπαρη επι της γης μικροτερος παντων των σπερματων εστιν των επι της γης
32 And when it is sown, it groweth up, and becometh greater than all herbs, and shooteth out great branches, so that the birds of the air may dwell under the shadow thereof. et cum seminatum fuerit, ascendit, et fit majus omnibus oleribus, et facit ramos magnos, ita ut possint sub umbra ejus aves cæli habitare. και οταν σπαρη αναβαινει και γινεται παντων των λαχανων μειζων και ποιει κλαδους μεγαλους ωστε δυνασθαι υπο την σκιαν αυτου τα πετεινα του ουρανου κατασκηνουν
33 And with many such parables, he spoke to them the word, according as they were able to hear. Et talibus multis parabolis loquebatur eis verbum, prout poterant audire : και τοιαυταις παραβολαις πολλαις ελαλει αυτοις τον λογον καθως εδυναντο ακουειν
34 And without parable he did not speak unto them; but apart, he explained all things to his disciples. sine parabola autem non loquebatur eis : seorsum autem discipulis suis disserebat omnia. χωρις δε παραβολης ουκ ελαλει αυτοις κατ ιδιαν δε τοις μαθηταις αυτου επελυεν παντα

28 posted on 06/17/2012 8:28:54 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex
26. And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the ground;
27. And should sleep, and rise night and day, and the seed should spring and grow up, he knows not how.
28. For the earth brings forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear.
29. But when the fruit is brought forth, immediately he puts in the sickle, because the harvest is come.

PSEUD-CHRYS. A parable occurred, a little above, about the three seeds which perished in various ways, and the one which was saved; in which last He also shows three differences, according to the proportion of faith and practice Here however, He puts forth a parable concerning those only who are saved. Wherefore it is said, And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the ground, &c.

PSEUDO-JEROME; The kingdom of God is the Church which is ruled by God, and herself rules over men, amid treads down the powers which are contrary to her, and all wickedness.

PSEUD-CHRYS. Or else He calls by the name of kingdom of God, faith in Him, and in the economy of His Incarnation; which kingdom indeed is as if a man should throw seed. For He Himself being God and the Son of God, having without change been made man, has cast seed upon time earth, that is, He has enlightened the whole world by the word of divine knowledge.

PSEUDO-JEROME; For the seed is the word of life, the ground is the human heart, and the sleep of the man means the death of the Savior. The seed springs up night and day, because after the sleep of Christ, the number of Christians, through calamity and prosperity, continued to flourish more and more in faith, and to wax greater in deed.

PSEUD-CHRYS. Or Christ himself is the man who rises, for He sat waiting with patience, that they who received seed should bear fruit. He rises, that is, by, the word of His love, He makes us grow to the bringing forth fruit, by the armor of righteousness on the right hand, by which is meant the day, and on the left, by which is meant the night of persecution; for by these the seed springs up and does not wither.

THEOPHYL. Or else Christ sleeps, that is, ascends into heaven, where, though He seem to sleep, yet He rises by night, when through temptations He raises us up to the knowledge of Himself; and in the day time, when on account of our prayers, He sets in order our salvation.

PSEUDO-JEROME; But when He says, He knows not how, He is speaking in a figure; that is, He does not make known to us, who amongst us will produce fruit to the end.

PSEUD-CHRYS. Or else He says, He knows not, that He may show free-will of those who receive the word, for He commits a work to our will, and does not work the whole Himself alone, lest the good should seem involuntary. For the earth brings forth fruits of its own accord, that is, she is brought to hear fruit without being compelled by a necessity contrary to inner will. First the blade.

PSEUDO-JEROME; That is, fear. For the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom. Then the full corn in the ear; that is, charity, for charity is the fulfilling of the Law.

PSEUD-CHRYS. Or, first it produces the blade, in the law of nature, by degrees growing up to advancement; afterwards it brings forth the ears, which are to be collected into a bundle, and to be offered on an altar to the Lord, that is, in the law of Moses; afterwards the full-fruit, in the Gospel. Or because we must not only put forth leaves by obedience, but also learn prudence, and, like the stalk of corn, remain upright without minding the winds which blow us about. We must also take heed to our soul by a diligent recollection, that, like the ears, we may bear fruit, that is, show forth the perfect operation of virtue.

THEOPHYL. For we put forth the blade, when we show a principle of good; then the ear, when we can resist temptations; then comes the fruit, when a man works something perfect. It goes on: and when it has brought forth the fruit, immediately he sends the sickle, because the harvest is come.

PSEUDO-JEROME; The sickle is death or the judgment, which cuts down all things; the harvest is the end of the world.

GREGORY; Or else; Man casts seed to the ground, when he places a good intention in his heart; and he sleeps, when he already rests in the hope which attends on a good work. But he rises night and day because he advances amidst prosperity and adversity, though he knows it not for he is as yet unable to measure his increase, and yet virtue, once conceived, goes on increasing. When therefore we conceive good desires, we put seed into the ground; when we begin to work rightly, we are the blade. When we increase to the perfection of good works, we arrive at the ear; when we are firmly fixed in the perfection of the same working, we already put forth the full corn in the ear.

30. And he said, Whereto shall we liken the kingdom of God? or with what comparison shall we compare it?
31. It is like a grain of mustard seed, which, when it is sown in the earth, is less than all the seeds that be in the earth:
32. But when it is sown, it grows up, and becomes greater than all herbs, and shoots out great branches; so that the fowls of the air may lodge under the shadow of it.
33. And with many such parables spoke he the word to them, as they were able to hear it.
34. But without a parable spoke he not to them: and when they were alone, he expounded all things to his disciples.

GLOSS. After having narrated the parable concerning the coming forth of the fruit from the seed of the Gospel, he here subjoins another parable, to show the excellence of the doctrine of the Gospel before all other doctrines. Wherefore it is said, And he said, Whereto shall life liken the kingdom of God?

THEOPHYL. Most brief indeed is the word of faith; Believe in God, and you shall he saved. But the preaching of it has been spread far and wide over the earth, and increased so, that time birds of heaven, that is, contemplative men, sublime in understanding and knowledge, dwell under it. For how many wise men among the Gentiles, quitting their wisdom, have found rest in the preaching of the Gospel! Its preaching then is greater than all.

CHRYS. And also because the wisdom spoken amongst the perfect expands, to a extent greater than all other sayings, that which was told to men in short discourses, for there is nothing greater than this truth.

THEOPHYL. Again, it put forth great boughs, for the Apostles were divided off as the boughs of a tree, some to Rome, some to India, some to other parts of the world

PSEUDO-JEROME; Or else, that seed is very, small in fear, but great when it has grown into charity, which is greater than all herbs; for God is love, whilst all flesh is grass. But the boughs which it puts forth are those of mercy and compassion, since under its shade the poor of Christ, who are meant by the living creatures of the heavens, delight to dwell.

BEDE; Again, the man who sows is by many taken to mean the Savior Himself, by others, man himself sowing in his own heart.

CHRYS. Then after this, Mark, who delights in brevity, to show the nature of the parables, subjoins, And with many such parables spoke he the word to them as they could hear him.

THEOPHYL. For since the multitude was unlearned, he instructs them from objects of food and familiar names, and for this reason he adds, But without a parable spoke he not to them, that is, in order that they might be induced to approach and to ask Him. It goes on And when they were alone, he expounded all things to his disciples, that is, all things about which they were ignorant and asked Him, not simply all, whether obscure or not.

PSEUDO-JEROME; For they were worthy to hear mysteries apart, in the most secret haunt of wisdom, for they were men, who, removed from the crowds of evil thoughts, remained in the solitude of virtue; and wisdom is received in a time of quiet.

Catena Aurea Mark 4
29 posted on 06/17/2012 8:29:38 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: annalex


Communion of Saints

Greek icon

30 posted on 06/17/2012 8:30:33 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, June 17

Liturgical Color: Green


Today the Church honors St. Albert Chmielowski. He came from a wealthy family and had a promising career as an artist, but he gave it all up to work with the homeless, whom he felt were ignored by society. St. Albert died in 1916.


31 posted on 06/17/2012 1:22:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: June 17, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: O God, strength of those who hope in you, graciously hear our pleas, and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing, grant us always the help of your grace, that in following your commands we may please you by our resolve and our deeds. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: June 17th

Eleventh Sunday of Ordinary Time; Father's Day (USA)

Old Calendar: Third Sunday after Pentecost

"To what shall we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable can we use for it? It is like a mustard seed that, when it is sown in the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on the earth.
But once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants and puts forth large branches,
so that the birds of the sky can dwell in its shade."

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from Ez 17:22-24. In this reading the prophet Ezekiel spoke about the better days that were to come for the Chosen People when Yahweh would take back His people once more, and dwell in their midst forever. Today's extract is a messianic prophecy in which God says that he will raise up a descendant–a sprig from the lofty cedar David, who will yet be the glory of Israel.

The second reading is from 2 Corinthians 5:6-10. St Paul tells his Corinthians that his constant desire and motive in life is to please God. In this he wants them to imitate him. While on earth this is his aim and when he goes to God in heaven this will be his purpose and his delight.

The Gospel is from St. Mark 4:26-34. One of the proofs of the divine origin of the Church of Christ is its growth from very humble beginnings. Christ could have come on earth in the prime of manhood, without the cooperation of any human ancestry. He could have preached his gospel to the whole world himself without any help from men. By extraordinary miracles he could have astounded the world into believing. If he wished to have the assistance of men he could have chosen the outstanding philosophers and orators of Greece and Rome. Instead, he chose to come into this world as a baby, the son of a poor mother and of a carpenter foster-father. He was born in a stable; was forced into pagan Egypt before he was a year old; he lived thirty or so years in Nazareth in poverty, earning his meager daily bread by the sweat of his brow. Then for three years he trudged the highways and by-ways of Palestine, often weary, hungry and footsore, preaching the good news of redemption. For assistants he chose fishermen, shepherds and tax-gatherers, twelve of the most ordinary of the ordinary people of his day.

When the time came for him to lay down his life for the world as prearranged by his Father, he allowed his enemies to capture him and to condemn him to the death of the cross. These were surely humble beginnings for a kingdom which was to span the earth and the ages. The mustard seed in comparison was large. Yet, this was God's plan and therefore it succeeded as he said it would. The story of his humble origins among us, of his equality with us in all things, sin alone excepted, and of his self-immolation for us, touched human hearts wherever it was told and the grace of God did the rest.

It was not the eloquence of the Apostles, nor their gift of persuasion, nor their fame for learning that moved the pagan world to forsake its idols and its vices. No, nothing but the moving grace of the Holy Spirit and the objective truth of the gospel story can explain the conversion of the Roman empire.

Therefore, the spread of the Church is a proof of its divine origin—it is from God and God is with it. Knowing this, how grateful should we not be to him who has made us members of his kingdom on earth, with the assurance of a place in his eternal kingdom in heaven, if we remain his loyal subjects here below. How good God has been to us! To what lengths of humiliation did he not go to in order to open heaven for us! When we think of Bethlehem, Nazareth, Calvary, can we dare complain because he sends us a few crosses to help us to atone for our own past sins? When we wipe the sweat of honest labor from our brow, we will think of the carpenter of Nazareth. When we feel the pinch of poverty, hunger, debt, we will think of Bethlehem and its stable and of the poor home of Nazareth. If or when the injustice of others should drive us from our home and fatherland, as is the lot of so many today, we will think of the exile in Egypt. If we are saved this humiliation we will do all in our power to help "displaced" persons wherever they may be.

The tiny mustard seed has grown into a tree but it has yet to gather many more under the shelter of its branches. Christ asks every one of his followers to help him to bring all men into the safety of his kingdom on earth, so that they may be enabled to enjoy happiness forever in his heavenly kingdom. Realizing all that God and his divine Son have done for us, would we be so mean and ungrateful as to refuse to lend a helping hand? God forbid! God has already put us on the right road to heaven; we will help him to get in the stragglers, the lazy, the "couldn't-care-less" ones on that same road, by every means available to us.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


32 posted on 06/17/2012 1:42:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Mark 4:26-34

“The seed would sprout and grow, he knows not how.” (Mark 4:27)

When you were a child, you may have been given a model for a present—perhaps a model airplane or boat. Can you remember looking at the picture on the box and getting excited to see that model in its fin­ished state? However, you found that if you didn’t follow the directions and assemble the pieces in the right order, your model didn’t come out quite right.

This is a useful analogy for think­ing about Jesus’ parables of the kingdom of God. It’s more exciting to think about the “finished prod­uct,” isn’t it? We look at people like Mother Teresa and John Paul II, and marvel. They were living mod­els of the life Jesus portrayed in his parables—the full grain of wheat ripe and mature and ready for the har­vest. Still, as inspiring as they are, we need to understand that they didn’t become such beautiful models of the kingdom overnight. No one does.

Holiness happens one step at a time, not all at once—and we are not fully in charge of the process. It is God who molds, shapes, and glues all the pieces of our lives, making us into living examples of a life lived in his love and power. And even more amazing, it is God who supplies us with the desire and the ability to ful­fill his purposes. Our part is simply to follow God’s directions, step by step, and not worry about the end result.

If you think the Lord is calling you in a certain direction, go there—even if you can’t see how it contributes to the final product. If you’re trying your best and nothing’s working out, be patient. God is still at work, bringing his plan to completion. Let go of any stress, anxiety, and fear you may feel, and allow yourself to smile. For God, the Master Builder, is working everything together for your good!

“Lord, today I’m going to let you be in charge. I trust that you are at work in me, building me and shaping me in ways I can’t even imagine!”


Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

(Mark 4;26-34; Ezekiel 17:22-24; Psalm 92:2-3,13-16 2; Corinthians 5:6-10; Mark 4:26-34)

1. The first reading ends with these words: “Every tree of the field will know that I am the LORD. I bring low the high tree, lift high the lowly tree, Wither up the green tree, and make the dry tree bloom. As I, the LORD, have spoken, so will I do!” What do you think these verses mean? How do they apply to how we are to live our lives? How are you doing?

2. The Responsorial Psalm begins with these words: “It is good to give thanks to the LORD, to sing praise to your name, Most High, to proclaim your kindness at dawn, and your faithfulness throughout the night.” How would you describe the “kindness” and “faithfulness” of the Lord in your life? How often do you “give thanks” and “sing praise” to the Lord for this kindness and faithfulness? How can you increase this time?

3. The second reading contains the very familiar verse: “we walk by faith, not by sight.” In what areas of your life do you tend to walk by sight, not by faith? What steps can you take to change this?

4. The Gospel reading presents two parables about the Kingdom of God. Unlike the early disciples, we do not have the Lord with us in person to “explain everything in private (Mark 4:34).” However, we do have the Holy Spirit and Jesus told us that “he will guide you into all the truth” (John 16;13). How would you describe the meaning of these parables?

5. In the meditation, we hear these words: “Holiness happens one step at a time, not all at once—and we are not fully in charge of the process. It is God who molds, shapes, and glues all the pieces of our lives, making us into living examples of a life lived in his love and power.” How would you describe the way God is working in your life to help you grow in holiness?

6. Take some time now to pray for a greater openness to the Lord’s work in your life and the grace to continue to grow in holiness. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.


33 posted on 06/17/2012 1:49:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

A SMALL SEED THAT GOD CAN BRING TO GREAT GROWTH

(A biblical refection on THE ELEVENTH ORDINARY SUNDAY – June 17, 2012) 

Gospel Reading: Mark 4:26-34 

First Reading: Ezek 17:22-24; Psalms: Ps 92:2-3,13-16; Second Reading: 2Cor 5:6-10 

The Scripture Text

And He said, “The Kingdom of God is as if a man should scatter seed upon the ground, and should sleep and rise night and day, and the seed should sprout and grow, he knows not how. The earth produces of itself, first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. But when the grain is ripe, at once he puts in the sickle, because the harvest has come.’’

And He said, “With what can we compare the Kingdom of God, or what parable shall we use for it? It is like a grain of mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”

With many such parables He spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; He did not speak to them without a parable, but privately to His own disciples He explained everything. (Mk 4:26-34 RSV) 

In today’s Gospel we listen to Jesus teaching people about the Kingdom. There are two parables about the growth of the Kingdom: it is growing even when we do not see it; and growing from tiny beginnings to a huge expansion.

There are many pastors, teachers and parents who feel totally inadequate in the face of today’s changed societies in the whole world. The answers of yesterday seem to have no relationship with the questions of today. Many people around this globe are finding it difficult to hold onto any faith in the Kingdom. They struggle to see evidence of the Holy Spirit in our world.

Mark’s Gospel is very relevant to this stage of faith in crisis. He was writing some forty years after the time of Jesus. The Church community was under persecution from the outside. Virtually all the apostles and direct links with Jesus were gone. They now had the new phenomenon of Christians who were relapsing and falling away. And apparently there were internal problems also from self-appointed prophets and healers who were distorting the message of Jesus to their own ends. People were asking, “Is this what Jesus set up as theKingdomofGod? Where is the evidence of the Holy Spirit?”

Mark wrote his Gospel to help this community in crisis. He gathered into one section five parables which instruct us on what the Kingdom is like. Today’s Gospel has two of these. The Kingdom is like the seed which grows in the hiddenness of night as well as in the light of day. And the mustard seed holds out the promise of a huge expansion from the tiniest of beginnings.

These parables tell us of the helplessness of man. The farmer does not make the seed grow. In the last analysis he does not even understand how it grows. It has the secret of life and of growth within itself. No man has ever possessed the secret of life; no man has ever created anything in the full sense of the term. Man can discover things; he can rearrange them; he can develop them; but he cannot create them. We do not create theKingdomofGodbecause the kingdom is God’s. It is true that we can frustrate it and hinder it; or we can make a situation in the world where it is given the opportunity to come more fully and more speedily. But behind all things is God and the power and will of God.

At the end of this collection of parables, Mark has an intriguing comment to make: “He did not speak to them without a parable, but privately to His own disciples He explained everything” (Mk 4:34). Large crowds of people heard the story or parable but they stayed outside the circle of believers. However, those who are called disciples received the gift of further instruction and they got inside the story. They came to know that the parable was part of their life and that they were part of the parable’s life.

Jesus called on people to repent and believe. To believe in the Kingdom is to hear the story of Jesus and to know that we are part of that story. The Gospel involves each and every one of us, personally. These parables invite us to look at an acorn or any seed and to see how it differs from a lifeless grain of sand because of its great potential for growth. And the further marvel is in recognizing that the seed of Jesus is for the soil of “my” life.

Yet, many people today are overcome by the wide injustice practices, the extent of violence in households and/or mass-violence, vandalism and extraordinary crimes – such as corruption – in our midst. They are appalled by the ever-widening gap between the poor and the rich, amoral standards which are accepted in entertainment, etc. There must be a very strong diabolical power at work behind the destruction of life through the culture of death, among others, the fast spreading of destructive drugs. There are parents whose lives have been shattered as their off-spring casually cast off their Christian morals and expressions of faith due to hedonism, materialism, as well as consumerism, or simply due to inter-marriages in a pluralistic society such as ours. And not a few numbers of priests feel desperately inadequate in the face of questions about faith or about the relevance of Church practices.

Where is God hiding? How long is God to remain asleep? Where is the reign of God, that Kingdom, which Jesus set up? There is, however, another side to the picture of today. Not only is it the worst of times in some ways but in many ways it is the best of times. It is not difficult for you and I to see an increasing number of people deeply drawn into very close intimacy with God and who are experiencing a vibrant prayer-life. They know that they are part of the story.

There is also a growing sense of responsibility for the environment and for justice throughout the world. There is admirable goodwill and generosity in answering various appeals due to natural disasters, etc. Our modern time, for all its sins, has witnessed extraordinary advances in the elimination of injustice working conditions and standards in many parts of the world. And in the Church there is a growing body of laity who are conscious of their Confirmation and anxious to be actively involved in the cause of Christ. We do well to remember the lesson of history that the darkest periods of Church life gave us the greatest saints and the most powerful religious movements.

Today’s two parables call us to persevere in believing even if much of the outer evidence that we see is negative. We are called to believe that, even while God seems to be asleep and far away from us, His power is still here with us. We are asked to open our eyes to whatever is good … even if it is very small, insignificant and removed from the centre of influence. We must believe that here is a small seed that God can bring to great growth.

Prophet Ezekiel (First Reading) preaches a message of hope. He consoles his troubled and despairing fellow citizens with the promise of God’s Kingdom to come. It will be a kingdom of prosperity and peace, with a Messiah, an anointed king, as God’s vicegerent to rule them. Have hope!  It is still a tender shoot but it will grow. God can do whatever seems impossible: “I the LORD bring low the high tree, and make high the low tree, dry up the green tree, and make the dry tree flourish. I the LORD have spoken, and I will do it” (Ezek 17:24 RSV). In the Gospel, God’s Kingdom awaited by the Jewish people becomes the Christian reign of God with Jesus as the Christ (Messiah) and God’s vicegerent.

Thus, we are asked to wait patiently, like the farmer. For lasting growth takes time. We wait with the sort of hope which inspired a prisoner-of-war to write: “I believe in the sun even when it is not shining; I believe in love even when I feel it not; I believe in God even when He is silent.” Meanwhile let us listen to the prayer of Saint Paul: “May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit you may abound in hope” (Rom 15:13 RSV).

Short Prayer: Lord Jesus, we understand that Christian hope implies uncertainty and requires patience. You prophet Ezekiel told his people this when he referred to a Hebrew Kingdom of God to come. Saint Mark told his readers the same lesson. God’s word is like a seed in us. Through You, Lord Jesus, our heavenly Father scattered it on the ground. We sincerely want this seed to bear bountiful fruit in the Church today. Thank You, Lord Jesus. Amen.


34 posted on 06/17/2012 1:55:09 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: All
The Sacred Heart
Pastor’s Column
11th Sunday Ordinary Time
June 17, 2012
 
This past Friday we celebrated the Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Devotion to the Sacred Heart is all about love—my love for Christ, of course—but more importantly, Christ’s love for me. When we look at a picture of the Sacred Heart, we notice that this heart has a wounded side where Christ’s heart was pierced (John 19:34). When we feel perhaps God does not love us, we can look through this image to the gospel, which shows the broken heart Christ died from out of love for you.
          I suspect that most of us at some time in our lives have had our hearts broken. We cannot really love someone with taking a risk—the risk of being rejected or hurt! But the reward of risk is to be really loved! Or perhaps we have loved and have had that love betrayed or rejected. We have been hurt. Sometimes we may even feel that God has rejected us or hurt us in some way. But when we see an image of the Sacred Heart, we remember how much Christ loved us. After all, what more could he do for us than to have his human heart literally torn open by the ingratitude of the very people he had come to save? 
          From you and me, then, Jesus wants us to show him gratitude. How many times did I thank Jesus for his love today? If I have been given a cross, can I thank him that he is sharing this pain with me? The Sacred Heart tells me that no matter what pain I am in, Christ really does understand.
          So many in the world are ungrateful to God. They seldom thank God for the gift of their lives or the gifts they have received, let alone their crosses (blessings in disguise). We who wish to be his friends, at least ought to take some time each day to express our gratitude for his undying love.
          On the back of this sheet we have reprinted the Litany of the Sacred Heart, which you may wish to use for your prayers. As Christ said to Saint Margaret Mary, “I will bless every home where my image is displayed and honored.” Do you have an image of the Sacred Heart in your home in a prominent place? Then expect to be blessed! Within us, too, there can be a kind of shrine where the Sacred Heart is venerated and honored. This litany is one way to do that.
                                                                                Father Gary
 
.

35 posted on 06/17/2012 2:14:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: All
Sacred Heart of Jesus
 

The litany of the sacred heart of Jesus is a moving way to express devotion to Our Lord by making reparation through adoration for the offenses committed against His Sacred Heart. Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque, a 17th century nun, made devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus best known after He revealed His desire to her in visions that we all acknowledge His tremendous love for us.

The symbolic image of Christ’s heart burning with love for us, even while pierced with the thorns of our indifference and ingratitude, as in the painting above, is also associated with this devotion.

Faithful Catholics around the world show Jesus their love in prayers such as the Litany of the Sacred Heart. Many also visit Him in the Blessed Sacrament in this devotion and receive Communion at Mass on the First Friday of each month in a spirit of reparation for the hostility and indifference he suffers from unrepentant sinners.

The Litany of the Sacred Heart is one of six litanies approved for public use by the Church and is often prayed during First Friday services. When prayed publicly, the congregation’s lines are in italics.

Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us. Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.
God the Father of Heaven, have mercy on us. (repeat after each line) God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
God the Holy Spirit,
Holy Trinity, one God,
Heart of Jesus, Son of the Eternal Father,
Heart of Jesus, formed by the Holy Spirit in
the Virgin Mother's womb,
Heart of Jesus, substantially united to the
Word of God,
Heart of Jesus, of infinite majesty,
Heart of Jesus, holy temple of God,
Heart of Jesus, tabernacle of the Most High,
Heart of Jesus, house of God and gate of heaven,
Heart of Jesus, glowing furnace of charity,
Heart of Jesus, vessel of justice and love,
Heart of Jesus, full of goodness and love,
Heart of Jesus, abyss of all virtues,
Heart of Jesus, most worthy of all praise,
Heart of Jesus, King and center of all hearts,
Heart of Jesus, in whom are all the treasures
of wisdom and knowledge,
Heart of Jesus, in whom dwells all the fullness of the Godhead,
Heart of Jesus, in whom the Father was well pleased,
Heart of Jesus, of whose fullness we have all received,
Heart of Jesus, desire of the everlasting hills,
Heart of Jesus, patient and rich in mercy,
Heart of Jesus, rich to all who call upon You,
Heart of Jesus, fount of life and holiness,
Heart of Jesus, propitiation for our offenses,
Heart of Jesus, overwhelmed with reproaches,
Heart of Jesus, bruised for our iniquities,
Heart of Jesus, obedient even unto death,
Heart of Jesus, pierced with a lance,
Heart of Jesus, source of all consolation,
Heart of Jesus, our life and resurrection,
Heart of Jesus, our peace and reconciliation,
Heart of Jesus, victim for our sins,
Heart of Jesus, salvation of those who hope in You,
Heart of Jesus, hope of those who die in You,
Heart of Jesus, delight of all saints,
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
Spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
Graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
Have mercy on us.
Jesus, meek and humble of Heart,
Make our hearts like unto Thine.

Let us pray.
Almighty and eternal God, look upon the Heart of Thy most beloved Son and upon the praises and satisfaction which He offers Thee in the name of sinners; and to those who implore Thy mercy, in Thy great goodness, grant forgiveness in the name of the same Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who livest and reignest with Thee forever and ever. Amen


36 posted on 06/17/2012 2:16:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time  -  Cycle B

June 17, 2012

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Ezekiel 17:22-24

Psalm: 92:2-3, 13-16

Second Reading: 2 Corinthians 5:6-10

Gospel Reading: Mark 4:26-34

  • This Sunday marks our return to the liturgical season of Ordinary Time where we will mostly be hearing the Gospel Reading each Sunday from the Gospel of Mark.
  • In today’s Gospel, we find Jesus early on in his ministry. He is in Galilee in his adopted town of Capernaum (Mark 2:1) where he has been selecting his disciples, healing the sick and teaching.
  • As he teaches by the sea (Mark 4:1), he begins to instruct them using parables. A parable is a wise saying or fictitious story used by Jesus to set forth his teachings. He uses them to both conceal his message from the faithless who will only react to it with hostility and violence, and to reveal his message to those who believe and embrace that message (Mark 4:33-34).
  • The parables we hear in this Sunday’s Gospel come at the end of this discourse and contain Jesus’ teachings about the Kingdom of God. Verses 26-29 is an agricultural parable found only Mark. Jesus compares the mystery of natural, organic growth to the expansion of the Kingdom which will visibly mature like grain, but the spiritual forces behind it will remain invisible.
  • The parable of the mustard seed (verses 30-32) is based on the difference between the smallest seed and the greatest shrub and depicts how Christ’s Kingdom begins with a small band of disciples and gradually grows into a worldwide Church.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • In the 1st Reading, what similarities can you see between this reading and the parable of the mustard seed? What differences can you see (verse 24) and what do you think it means?
  • In the 2nd Reading, St. Paul says his highest desire is to be with the Lord in heaven (verse 8). How great is your love of your earthly life, and how great is your desire to be with the Lord in heaven? Which of these two loves is greater? Whom do you aim to please with the way you live your life?
  • In the Gospel reading, verses 26-29, what part (if any) do people play in the growing Kingdom? How does this parable complement the one in Mark 4:3-20?
  • In verses 30-32, what does the contrasting seed and bush teach about the Kingdom?
  • Does knowing that the growth of the Kingdom is ultimately in God’s hands cause you to rest or to work more? Why?
  • At what stage is the Kingdom in your life now: Still a seed? Sprouting? Outgrowing the weeds? Producing a harvest?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 543, 546, 764

 

In order to pray, let us believe; and for our faith not to weaken, let us pray. Faith causes prayer to grow, and when prayer grows our faith is strengthened.   –St. Augustine


37 posted on 06/17/2012 2:21:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: All
11th Sunday: To walk by faith, not by sight

It is like a mustard seed . . . (Mk 4: 31)


“Slow but sure,” so said the Tortoise to the Hare.  We likely remember the moral of the famed Aesop fable of the Tortoise and the Hare (rabbit).  Old “speedy Gonzales,” as we may refer to the rabbit, thought he had something up on the ever slow, slothful, unexciting movement of the turtle.  Challenging the tortoise to a race seemed like a no brainer to the clever rabbit.  Speed is what it’s all about after all.  So, the rabbit took his time as the turtle slowly plodded forward unconcerned about the rabbit’s challenge. “Haste makes waste,” may have thought the turtle. 
As the rabbit rested from his marathon he took a nap while the turtle moved ever forward step by step, side to side as he both pulled and waddled his large shell.  Who would have ever placed a bet on such a slow creature? But, to the astonishment of the rabbit, this seeming “push over” of a challenger won the race! It’s a great story about the value of patience and careful planning. In this age of high-speed everything there may be a good lesson here.  Our readings this Sunday take a decidedly personal turn and offer us a similar reflection on spiritual growth and the life of God’s grace.   
In the second reading (2 Cor 5: 6-10) St. Paul comments, “. . . we walk by faith, not by sight . . .” While that sounds quite beautiful, and of course is true, to “walk by faith” often implies a walk in the darkness or certainly a walk with no clear direction.  How uncertain and uncomfortable that may seem. We want to turn on the GPS, look at an old fashioned road map, check the mileage, plan the reservations, calculate the distance, check the passports, call the airlines or whatever other planning goes in to an enjoyable trip. Most of us are not comfortable with the uncertain.  Yet, to live “by faith” in the end may also be stated as to live by trust. Trust takes time to build.
In the Gospel (Mk 4: 26 -34) Jesus speaks of a slow, deliberate, mysterious power at work that is beyond our understanding.  This constant, slow like the tortoise, the careful power of God’s grace is at work both in the world around us and even more significantly in our daily spiritual life.
Like the steady pace of the tortoise, we keep our eyes fixed on our final goal, who is Christ Jesus himself and a life of holiness. But, what are we trying to “achieve” in our spiritual life? To become holy?  Of course but is that up to us or is it God’s work? If I just say my daily Rosary, attend Mass, pray the novenas, and assist my neighbor won’t that make me holy?  Well, it may make me tired or discouraged because I care more about my own efforts than to surrender my will to God’s.
It seems the parable of the farmer and the mustard seed implies that seeds of faith sown in us through our sacramental life and our life of prayer– baptism, confirmation, eucharist, reconciliation – are the seeds of God’s grace which grows within us.  Spiritual exercises are valuable, of course, but holiness is God’s work. Like the farmer, we tend the soil, “scatter the seed,” water the ground but God gives the growth.
Someone once asked the wise St. Teresa of Avila, a Doctor of the Church, how we would know when we are growing in virtue.  What would be the signs that we are increasing in holiness? 
Teresa said, “When you see the flowers in the garden growing.”  In other words, when we see ourselves increasing in the virtues of faith, charity, patience, humility, and other Christ-like virtues, we know this mysterious grace of God is at work in us.   
Better yet, rather than try to evaluate ourselves in this regard, which is always a temptation to pride for who among us would give ourselves an “F” or a “D” in such things? But, we may hear comments coming to us from others who view our behavior, our words, our insights, our lifestyle as that marked by virtue and seeming holiness. They see the mustard tree and the stalks of wheat.
The Kingdom of God is ultimately the person of Jesus Christ himself who calls us to discipleship.  If we sincerely seek to live his Gospel we live as members of his Kingdom. These parables are lessons on faith and its slow, deliberate growth that in the end calls all of us to “walk by faith, not by sight.” To walk in trust and be people of peace, reconciliation, humility, patient endurance, charity, all of which is a reflection of the King himself, demands a lesson from the tortoise.  Slow, thoughtful, keep moving, don’t give up, and believe that with the power of God’s grace, we will finish the race.    
Fr. Tim

38 posted on 06/17/2012 2:38:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for June 17, 2012:

“The kingdom of God…is like a mustard seed.” (Mk 4:30) Your love, like the mustard seed, must grow. Some days it seems to grow on its own without much effort; other days take work and water. What’s today like?  


39 posted on 06/17/2012 4:08:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: All
"Be a Dad!" (Book Review)
Divine Fatherhood is the Source of Human Fatherhood: Fathers as Gift
Priests of the Domestic Church: A Father's Day Homily (Tissue Alert)

A Prayer for Fathers
No Better Gift for Father’s Day
Gift of Fatherhood: Kneel before the Father from Whom Every Family in Heaven on Earth is named
Fathers are important
Fathers
Fatherhood and Religion
The New Catholic Manliness (about priests)
Dads: Men for All Seasons
The Father of Fathers
On The Demise of Fatherhood

Father’s Day 2009: “An End to Buffoonish Fathers”
Of Treacheries, Tykes, and the Trinity (Fatherhood, Family, Effects of Abortion)
Priests and the importance of fatherhood [Catholic Caucus]
[OPEN] The Government, Divorce, and the War on Fatherhood
Study Shows Christianity Makes Men Better Husbands and Fathers
Study Shows Christianity Makes Men Better Husbands and Fathers (Open)
Honoring Thy Fathers
Priests of the Domestic Church: A Father's Day Homily
The Blueprint for Heroic Family Life [Fathers' Day] [Ecumenical]
Honoring Thy Fathers

A Father's Tough Love
Children Who Have An Active Father Figure Have Fewer Psychological And Behavioral Problems
Where Have All the Christian Men Gone? My Conversation with John Eldredge
The Transforming Power of Prayer [Part 1] (Catholic Man)
The Transforming Power of Prayer, Part 2 (Catholic Man)
The 10 Paradoxes of Fatherhood, There is a certain immediacy about motherhood that cannot
The Story of Champions [Father's Day]
What Makes a Man a Hero? [Father's Day]
The New Catholic Manliness
Applying St. Benedict's Rule to Fatherhood and Family Life - Using 6th-Century Wisdom Today

40 posted on 06/17/2012 4:44:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: All
Regnum Christi

Living with Christ
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 4:26-34

Jesus said to the crowds, “This is how it is with the kingdom of God; it is as if a man were to scatter seed on the land and would sleep and rise night and day and the seed would sprout and grow, he knows not how. Of its own accord the land yields fruit, first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. And when the grain is ripe, he wields the sickle at once, for the harvest has come." He said, "To what shall we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable can we use for it? It is like a mustard seed that, when it is sown in the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on the earth. But once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the sky can dwell in its shade." With many such parables he spoke the word to them as they were able to understand it. Without parables he did not speak to them, but to his own disciples he explained everything in private.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe you have called me to strive tirelessly to extend your Kingdom throughout the world. I hope in you because you are the one the Father sent. I love you. Thank you for inviting me to be an apostle of your Kingdom.

Petition: Lord Jesus, make me an apostle of your Kingdom.

1. Kingdom of God: Christ returns to this theme again and again. It was the topic of his first public sermon. He gives us the image of the mustard seed which grows to be the largest of plants and in turn serves other creatures’ needs. The Kingdom of God is like this. God is king and his Kingdom, like the mustard tree, is a safe haven for us. We can dwell in its shade, rest on its branches, and find protection from evils. All we have to do is be faithful subjects of our King, following his commands and going out to spread the news of his Kingdom to all people.

2. Modest Beginnings: We should not get anxious when we do not progress in the spiritual life as fast as we would like. God moves us along little by little. The life of our relationship with Christ does not depend solely on us, but on him. We are like good farmers who do our part to make sure the conditions are good for the seed to grow, but it is the Creator who makes the growth happen. Often we do not perceive the work of God in our souls until much time has passed. However, he is constantly there, pulling out our weeds one at a time, and pushing our virtues to the surface.

3. Called to Greatness: Two thousand years ago, Christ’s Church started off like a small mustard seed. It has grown and matured to be a huge plant with many branches. I am one of those branches. Christ brings life to my branch and assigns me a specific task. He calls me to participate in the great mission of his Church. Do I realize and relish how great it is to be a Catholic, how much good the Church does, how I am called to be a link that will bring others to experience the same goodness I have experienced?

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, I am a member of your Mystical Body. I want to partake in your mission of bringing all souls to know and love you. I have found my joy in you, and now I have a burning desire to make it known to all people. Lord, I pray for the courage to keep going, never tiring from the mission you have given me.

Resolution: I will take a moment in prayer to reflect on how God has worked in my life, making me grow.


41 posted on 06/17/2012 4:58:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: All

Be Confident! The Seed Will Bloom and Grow!

First Reading: Ez 17:22-24

Psalm: Ps 92:2-3, 13-14, 15-16

Second Reading: 2 Cor 5:6-10

Gospel:  Mk 4:26-34

In the Gospel acclamation, the Church invites us with the words of the Apostle James, “Receive with docility the words that has been sown in you” (Js 1:21). We have carefully listened to the Word, now with an open heart, let us welcome it in such a way that it becomes “a light on our path” (Ps 119:105).

In Chapter 4 of the Gospel, Mark contrasts three parables: the parable of the sower, the parable of the seed that grows by itself, and the parable of the mustard seed. The three are related to each other by a common image, the seed; and they serve to illustrate the same reality, namely, that of the Kingdom of God, seen from three distinct points of view. There are other common elements among the three parables, i.e., all of them project us to the present and not toward the future. The Kingdom of God is here, though hidden (the buried seed) or is like an almost invisible presence (the mustard seed). Either way, it is in action. What today cannot be seen or is almost imperceptible, tomorrow will grow and become visible. This is exactly the message it wishes to communicate. We need to be confident of the beginnings. Already, the results can be seen in the beginnings, even if it be a seed. Hence, according to the parables, we cannot just stop at appearances

We can clearly notice that there are two protagonists in the text of today’s Gospel: the sower and the seed. The sower sows in full confidence that his work will not be unfruitful. That which gives meaning to the work of the farmer is confidence both in the strength of the seed and the goodness of the soil. After sowing, nothing can be done except to wait and keep one’s confidence alive. The seed may appear weak because it is so small; yet it is also so full of life, capable of breaking through the soil, surfacing to the light of the sun, and grow until it produces fruit. It grows so well that even the birds of the air are able to perch on its branches. Some talk about the “weakness and the strength of the seed, vulnerability and power.” Yet, I prefer to say that “weakness is the strength of the seed. Hence, vulnerability is its power.”

The sower and the seed are apparently the two only protagonists of the parables of today’s Gospel. Yet, there is another protagonist or rather, the only true protagonists, viz, the One who makes the seed grow. By using the literary genre, so typical of Biblical literature, even without naming it, the author indicates that the protagonist is God. The audience, who is listening, understands well what is being said, for they are all familiarized with rabbinic literature. In this way, both parables affirm the absolute priority of God and keep in check any religious or pastoral pretense to think that it is our own activity that makes the seed, i.e., the Kingdom of God, to grow. However, the parables move in another direction. After the fatigue of sowing, there is nothing we can do but keep our hopes up and wait. Moreover, the Lord seems to tell us to be at peace, for as he said to the people of Israel, “I am YHWE who is acting (cf. Ex 14, 14). Within this context, a known spiritual master said, “Act as though all depended on you, knowing that in reality it all depends on God.” Hence, even when we have done all that we had to do, we will still say that “we are unprofitable servants” (Lk 17, 10).

This has been excerpted from a longer homily given on 1/9/10


42 posted on 06/17/2012 5:13:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: All
Our Father's Day

Our Father’s Day

Father’s Day invites us to ask a very important question: what does it mean to call God “Father?”

Most of the great religions of the world believe in one God and teach the gist of the Ten Commandments.

But that the supreme Being is not just “King of the Universe” or  “Master” but “Father,” that he desires us to have a close, familiar relationship with Him–these ideas you don’t find anywhere outside the teaching of Jesus.

To call God “Father” does not mean to say, of course, that he is an old man with a white beard.  Only the second person of the Blessed Trinity wedded himself to a male human nature in the womb of Mary.  The Father and the Holy Spirit are pure Spirit and transcend male and female, masculine and feminine (CCC 239).  This is no new insight brought to Christianity by the feminist movement.  It has always been taught that the word “Father,” applied to God, is used by way of analogy.  Analogies tell us something very true despite being imperfect.  Until recently, the father was recognized by Western society as origin, head and provider of the family.  To call the first person of the Trinity “Father” means that he is the origin and transcendent authority of all and cares for the needs of all.

But we all instinctively know that a father who does no more than bark orders and pay the bills is leaving something out.  We expect a dad to have an intimate, affectionate relationship with his children, to spend “quality time” with them.  To call God “Father” means, then, that he is near to us, intimately concerned with us, fond of us, even crazy about us.  He is not the distant, clockmaker God of Thomas Jefferson and the Deists.   This aloof God of the philosophers created the world to run by virtue of its own natural laws so that he could withdraw and occupy himself with more interesting pursuits.

No, the God whom Jesus calls Father cares about us and knows us intimately.  “Every hair on your head is numbered (Mat 10:30).”  He loves us more than we love ourselves and knows us better than we know ourselves.

Now, this does not mean that He makes all things go smoothly for us.  He loves us so much that He made us in His image and likeness, which means He made us free.  And through the free choice of the first man, evil and death were invited into our world.  He does not shield us from all the troublesome consequences of this “original sin” which each of us, sadly, has ratified with our own personal sin.  But He sent us prophets, like Jeremiah, to wake us up and warn us of the horrible consequences of disobedience.  And finally He sent his firstborn Son to be a new Adam, to pay the price of that disobedience and give the human race an undeserved new start.

The most horrible consequence of sin, eternal death (Gehenna), has been graciously removed for all who accept the free gift of salvation that comes by way of the cross of Christ.  But evil is still at large in the world, and evil brings trials and tribulations.  Our Father will not shelter us from these anymore than He sheltered Jeremiah (Jer 20:10-13) or Jesus.  A good father doesn’t protect his children forever from the harsh realities of life, but helps them as they progress through various stages of development to face the challenges and grow through the difficulties.  Scripture says that even Jesus learned obedience through what he suffered (Heb 5:8-9).  How much more do we need to learn and mature, and some learning can only take place through suffering.

So as a true Father, he loves us too much to take us out of the fray.  But there’s one thing we can be sure of–He’ll never leave us to fight our battles alone.

 

Dr. Marcellino D’Ambrosio writes from Texas. 


43 posted on 06/17/2012 5:15:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, June 17, 2012 >> 11th Sunday Ordinary Time
Saint of the Day
 
Ezekiel 17:22-24
2 Corinthians 5:6-10

View Readings
Psalm 92:2-3, 13-16
Mark 4:26-34

 

TREES

 
"And all the trees of the field shall know that I, the Lord, bring low the high tree, lift high the lowly tree, wither up the green tree, and make the withered tree bloom." —Ezekiel 17:24
 

The Bible begins with the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil (Gn 2:9). It ends with the trees of life on the banks of the river of life-giving waters in heaven (Rv 22:1-2). Ezekiel described the Messianic kingdom as a majestic cedar tree on a high mountain (Ez 17:22-23). In contrast, Jesus described His kingdom in a much less impressive way as being like a mustard tree or shrub (Mk 4:32). Finally, the early Church referred to Jesus' cross as a tree (see Acts 13:29).

The cross is the ultimate tree of life bridging Genesis to Revelation, the beginning to the end, earth to heaven, and humanity to God. The tree of the cross is the fulfillment of the Messianic prophecies. It is the means of establishing God's kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. It is the way to enter the kingdom of heaven.

There were trees in paradise. There are trees in heaven. The Spirit called the early Church to view the cross as a tree. The poet Joyce Kilmer was right when he said he would never see anything as wondrous as a tree.

 
Prayer: Father, may the sight of a tree make me think with gratitude of Your Son's cross.
Promise: "We walk by faith, not by sight." —2 Cor 5:7
Praise: Praise You, Jesus, crucified and risen Lord of life and love. Alleluia forever!

44 posted on 06/17/2012 5:23:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: All

The Partial Birth Abortion Procedure

Guided by ultrasound, the abortionist grabs the baby's leg with forceps.

The baby's leg is pulled out into the birth canal.

The abortionist delivers the baby's entire body, except for the head.

The abortionist jams scissors into the baby's skull. The scissors are then opened to enlarge the hole...

The scissors are removed and a suction catheter is inserted. The child's brains are sucked out, causing the skull to collapse. The dead baby is then removed.


45 posted on 06/17/2012 5:24:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

They’re good with this in New Hampshire...go figure. I can’t believe this state is still here...


46 posted on 06/17/2012 5:40:24 PM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson