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Thompson Valley High School student's rosary beads taken away
KMGH TV ^ | 9/13/2012

Posted on 09/14/2012 7:11:42 AM PDT by Alex Murphy

LOVELAND, Colo. - A Thompson Valley High School student had his rosary beads taken away twice in three weeks after school officials said they were gang-related.

The Loveland Reporter-Herald reported the story of Manuel Vigil, a junior at the high school. He is also Catholic and his mother told the newspaper that the beads had been especially important to him in dealing with the recent slaying of an uncle.

School officials said the beads themselves are not prohibited, but they way they are worn could be gang-related and violate the school's dress code.

Loveland Police Sgt. David Murphy, who heads the school resource officers in the Thompson School District, Vigil's rosary had a red-flagging 13 beads in a row instead of a traditional rosary with 10 beads. The number 13 is sometimes associated with the Sureños gang, Murphy told the newspaper.


TOPICS: Catholic; Religion & Culture; Religion & Politics; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; gangs; rosary
A Thompson Valley High School student had his rosary beads taken away twice in three weeks after school officials said they were gang-related....

....Loveland Police Sgt. David Murphy, who heads the school resource officers in the Thompson School District, Vigil's rosary had a red-flagging 13 beads in a row instead of a traditional rosary with 10 beads. The number 13 is sometimes associated with the Sureños gang, Murphy told the newspaper.

1 posted on 09/14/2012 7:11:45 AM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: Alex Murphy

Rosary beads are not to be worn. They are not a necklace.


2 posted on 09/14/2012 7:13:16 AM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: Alex Murphy
If he wants to wear a rosary he should become a nun.

A rosary is not jewelry. Wearing a rosary as jewelry is a sacrilege.

Dominican nuns taught me that.

3 posted on 09/14/2012 7:14:05 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Government is the religion of the sociopath.)
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To: Alex Murphy
The thirteen beads instead of the 10 is, I think, a dead-set give away that there is something wrong here. I am not a Catholic, but I used to work for a company that catered to Catholic clientele. Each set of 10 beads is called a decade, not A Thirteen.
4 posted on 09/14/2012 7:15:48 AM PDT by righttackle44 (I may not be much, but I raised a United States Marine.)
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To: Alex Murphy

As someone who is not Catholic, what is a typical Rosary bead supposed to look like or are there typical ones at all?

We have become a country where every citizen is looked on with suspicion because jthey ust might be a gang member or terrorist.


5 posted on 09/14/2012 7:16:12 AM PDT by svcw (If one living cell on another planet is life, why isn't it life in the womb?)
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To: Alex Murphy

A quick search mentions the 13 bead “decade” is used for the St. Philomena Chaplet. That’s the first I’ve heard of that.


6 posted on 09/14/2012 7:18:30 AM PDT by Carpe Cerevisi
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To: Alex Murphy

If you want to wear your rosary around your neck do so UNDER your shirt. Then it will be touching you personally and will not be seen as a fad.

I think that even if the “intention” is good, for example as a sign of your faith, the current fad has degraded the practice to a fad, and it could be mistaken as one.


7 posted on 09/14/2012 7:22:32 AM PDT by Jimmy4Toes (this tagline space is available.)
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To: svcw

http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=AjzXukzCJT_D.f0u4JVQqd6bvZx4?p=catholic+rosary+beads&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8&fr=yfp-t-701

///
i don’t see any with 13 beads...
in this case, it seems to be a legitimate suspicion...


8 posted on 09/14/2012 7:28:29 AM PDT by Elendur (It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. - Thomas Jefferson)
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To: SampleMan

tell that to the Nuns. I sure ain’t.


9 posted on 09/14/2012 7:31:41 AM PDT by stylin19a (Obama -> Ransom "Rance" Stoddard)
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To: Elendur
Chaplet of St. Philomena

ST. PHILOMENA CHAPLET

This chaplet consists of three white beads and
thirteen red beads. On the medal say the Apostles'
Creed to ask for the grace of faith.

On each of the white beads say an Our Father in
honor of the three Divine Persons of the Blessed
Trinity in thanksgiving for all favors obtained
through her intercession.

On each of the red beads, which are thirteen in
number to commerate the thirteen years that St.
Philomena spent on earth, say the following prayer:

Hail, O holy St. Philomena, whom I ac-
knowledge, after Mary, as my advocate with
the Divine Spouse, intercede for me now and
at the hour of my death.

St, Philomena, beloved daughter of Jesus
and Mary, pray for us who have recourse to
thee. Amen.

In conclusion say:
Hail, O illustrious St. Philomena, who shed
so courageously your blood for Christ! I bless
the Lord for all the graces He has bestowed
upon thee during thy life, and especially at
thy death. I praise and glorify Him for the
honor and power with which He has crowned
thee, and I beg thee to obtain for me from God
the graces I ask through thy intercession.


10 posted on 09/14/2012 7:55:55 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Elendur

By these images there does not seem to be a typical Rosary bead set.

I am just becoming greatly annoyed by the lost of freedom because people live in fear of gangs and terrorists.


11 posted on 09/14/2012 7:57:45 AM PDT by svcw (If one living cell on another planet is life, why isn't it life in the womb?)
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To: Alex Murphy
If rosary beads are a gang symbol, here's a gang we could stand to have in the world again:

12 posted on 09/14/2012 8:04:08 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: righttackle44

See post #10. San Philomena Rosaries do exist.

I do not, however, believe this incident is related, personally, and agree that Rosaries are not to be worn.


13 posted on 09/14/2012 8:11:20 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: svcw

Rosary beads can be made from plastic, metal, wood, whatever material that can be molded, really.

My Rosary was handed down through 3 generations of my family and is made with crushed rose petals and hand-linked silver ringlets. It’s really a matter of preference, but I want to say that there are some requirements held by the church. What they are, I am unsure.


14 posted on 09/14/2012 8:14:16 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

“Rosaries are not to be worn.”

*sigh*

English speaking Catholics vs Spanish speaking Catholics.


15 posted on 09/14/2012 10:16:31 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: JCBreckenridge

What’d I miss?


16 posted on 09/14/2012 10:19:50 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

Culture differences. :)

English speaking Catholics have a very different position on this than Spanish speaking Catholics.


17 posted on 09/14/2012 10:24:07 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: JCBreckenridge

You are correct. My catechism teachers, Italian and Irish priests and nuns, reprimanded us for “wearing” the Holy Rosary except when wrapped around the wrist or hand. I’ve seen Puerto Rican and Cuban Catholics here in the Tampa area who wear them like jewelry.


18 posted on 09/14/2012 10:27:56 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

My parish where I teach at is about 50/50. I personally would never wear one, (being of English extraction myself).


19 posted on 09/14/2012 10:34:27 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: Alex Murphy
While it might be true that this particular student is a gang member and co-opting the wearing of a rosary for an unGodly purpose, I can personally attest that faithful, God-loving Catholics of Hispanic descent do wear the rosary in honor of their religion.

This may seem odd to many Anglo-Catholics, yet it is not done out of disrespect, but reverence. I do not believe there is an "official" Catholic doctrine on this matter, other than if worn as a genuine statement of faith, it is not deemed profane.

Hispanic Catholics are very much accustomed to iconography, which may be seem sacrilegious or "Pagan" to certain Christian sects. Public prayer, use of religious symbols, and constant references to God, Jesus and his mother Mary in everyday speech (not done in vain), are a part of the earthly lives of many ardent Latin American Catholics. I've witnessed this among my own family members and Catholic church attendees: young and old alike.

It is not the veneration of the object--be it a statue of the Virgin Mary in a garden, rosary beads around the neck or pictures of saints in a wallet--but a physical token of their belief in God.

If this young man and others wear rosaries as a statement of pride in gang membership, certainly, that is disrespectful and should be addressed, however most of the people who openly wear them, do so as an honest religious declaration with no nefarious purpose.

20 posted on 09/14/2012 10:46:24 AM PDT by two134711 (I am Conservative, no longer a Republican.)
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To: JCBreckenridge

Bingo! Thank you!


21 posted on 09/14/2012 10:48:00 AM PDT by two134711 (I am Conservative, no longer a Republican.)
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To: two134711

I’m a-fixing to marry one of you cute Hispanic Catholic ladies. I love how your culture is so centered on children and family and is so much more expressive than my own. :)


22 posted on 09/14/2012 10:54:32 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: JCBreckenridge

Aw shucks! :)

Sadly, although my mother and three sisters are indeed lovely Catholic women, I must admit to being somewhat lapsed (and arguably the least cute). However, I would never denigrate the church or her beliefs, as it’s part of my cultural heritage. Christianity has saved the world many times over. The only Reconquista I acknowledge and admire is that on the Iberian peninsula over the invading Muslims. I wish more “Hispanics” (Catholic or not) would say the same out loud.

Anyhow, all four of us American girls of Hispanic heritage married American men of Italian, Irish, and/or German heritage, and what beautiful children that creates, as well as strong familial bonds. My sisters and I were fortunately blessed here finding decent men to share our lives. But nothing would make me happier than my daughter one day finding a good, God-believing husband out west, because New York isn’t chock full of them.


23 posted on 09/14/2012 11:53:00 AM PDT by two134711 (I am Conservative, no longer a Republican.)
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To: two134711

two,

I see that you are also a Long Islander. May I invite you to come to St. Matthew’s Church in Dix Hills? We have a traditional parish, with a Latin Mass (at 9:00am in the chapel) and a hefty crop of nice, traditional young people for your daughter.

Regards,


24 posted on 09/14/2012 12:26:30 PM PDT by VermiciousKnid (Sic narro nos totus!)
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To: two134711

PS: two, I also see that you are a homeschooler! So am I, and so are most of the other moms at our TLM parish. I think you’d like this bunch of folks. I do hope you’ll stop by!

Regards,


25 posted on 09/14/2012 12:29:16 PM PDT by VermiciousKnid (Sic narro nos totus!)
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To: two134711

Come home. :) We all miss you.

I’m a convert. Was an Anglican, left after Rowan’s accommodation for that which the bible terms an abomination.

Found my home in the Catholic church where they actually welcomed me. I’ve been stuck here ever since! Came down to Texas, had a chance to see the Spanish mission and I just sorta fell in love with the place.


26 posted on 09/14/2012 12:41:40 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: VermiciousKnid

Why thank you for such a kind invitation!

My family’s local parish is Infant Jesus in Port Jefferson where my siblings and I received the Sacraments of Initiation, where all my sisters were married, and my daughter was baptized there.

I live in Shirley, which isn’t that far from Dix Hills. On occasion I have attended mass at the Shrine of Our Lady of the Island and have found a serenity in the simple beauty of the outdoor environment.

It’s difficult being a homeschooler on Long Island. I’ve met some very nice people through LEAH organizations, but after enrolling my daughter in Catholic school for a few years, we lost touch. Now that I’m homeschooling again for High School, (she is 14) we have to make a greater effort to meet more people.

Is there a sizable group of teenagers at the church? Thanks again for your kind offer. If it’s ok, I’ll PM you later regarding this.


27 posted on 09/14/2012 1:44:46 PM PDT by two134711 (I am Conservative, no longer a Republican.)
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To: JCBreckenridge

Oh, it wouldn’t surprise me if one day I found myself fully immersed in the Catholic faith again. I’ve always followed an odd, round-about path in life, but my heart is open to Word.

The problem is my stubborn resistance to rigidity and conformity. I agree with just about everything the Catholic church declares on social matters, and do not have any qualms with the divinity of Christ. But there are other things I believe which are contrary to Catholic dogma. (I don’t want to delve into that right now.)

My mother often loves to relate the story of St Augustine and St Monica to me, although I don’t think I was ever as bad as that. :)


28 posted on 09/14/2012 2:00:36 PM PDT by two134711 (I am Conservative, no longer a Republican.)
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To: two134711

Ok, if you do want to delve into that later, send me some FReepmail. :)

It sounds like you’ve got the major bones of contention down so it surprises me you’re looking on the outside.


29 posted on 09/14/2012 2:59:01 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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