Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Protestants no longer the majority in U.S.
AP ^ | 10/9/2012

Posted on 10/09/2012 3:08:34 AM PDT by markomalley

For the first time in its history, the United States does not have a Protestant majority, according to a new study. One reason: The number of Americans with no religious affiliation is on the rise.

The percentage of Protestant adults in the U.S. has reached a low of 48 percent, the first time that Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life has reported with certainty that the number has fallen below 50 percent. The drop has long been anticipated and comes at a time when no Protestants are on the U.S. Supreme Court and the Republicans have their first presidential ticket with no Protestant nominees.

Among the reasons for the change are the growth in nondenominational Christians who can no longer be categorized as Protestant, and a spike in the number of American adults who say they have no religion. The Pew study, released Tuesday, found that about 20 percent of Americans say they have no religious affiliation, an increase from 15 percent in the last five years.

Scholars have long debated whether people who say they no longer belong to a religious group should be considered secular. While the category as defined by Pew researchers includes atheists, it also encompasses majorities of people who say they believe in God, and a notable minority who pray daily or consider themselves "spiritual" but not "religious." Still, Pew found overall that most of the unaffiliated aren't actively seeking another religious home, indicating that their ties with organized religion are permanently broken.

(Excerpt) Read more at bigstory.ap.org ...


TOPICS: General Discusssion; Mainline Protestant; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS:
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-200201-247 next last

1 posted on 10/09/2012 3:08:36 AM PDT by markomalley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: markomalley

Source: Pew Research Center AP

“found that about 20 percent of Americans say they have no religious affiliation, an increase from 15 percent in the last five years.”

A change of 5% over the last 5 years is suddenly of earth changing significance?

The last 5 years have been very tough financially for many and I suspect that has had an effect on what people tell pollsters.

If you noticed the Catholic trend is also slightly down.


2 posted on 10/09/2012 3:18:46 AM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

Given the historical record of majority Catholic nations, it’s now a pretty safe bet that our economic future will mirror the other examples.


3 posted on 10/09/2012 3:22:26 AM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Texas Fossil

They can probably consider 50% of the Catholics as Protestants; that would get them above 50% again. They’ve been taught Protestantism under the guise of post-Vatican II Catholicism.


4 posted on 10/09/2012 3:23:42 AM PDT by kearnyirish2 (Affirmative action is economic war against white males (and therefore white families).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: markomalley
The Protestants created America (with some Catholic allies and one or two “Deists”) and that is what counts...

If the non-protestants can't keep the America they made it ain't the Protestants' fault.

5 posted on 10/09/2012 3:24:04 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("The good news? Obama lost--the bad news? Mitt won.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kearnyirish2

Guys, get a life.

Why constantly throw rocks at other Christians who don’t view everything the way you do.

The Leftist love our division.

The Commies successfully infiltrated much of the Catholic Church in Central America. Throw rocks at them.


6 posted on 10/09/2012 3:31:56 AM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: NVDave
Given the historical record of majority Catholic nations, it’s now a pretty safe bet that our economic future will mirror the other examples.

Look at the chart. Catholics aren't trending any better than Protestants.

7 posted on 10/09/2012 3:34:07 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: NVDave

Majority Catholic?

I think of the 56 signers of the Declaration, 54 were of the various Protestant denominations, one was Quaker, and one was Catholic.


8 posted on 10/09/2012 3:36:13 AM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Texas Fossil

America thrived back when Catholics and Protestants were butchering each other by the bushel—hard not to get nostalgic for the good old days;)


9 posted on 10/09/2012 3:36:13 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("The good news? Obama lost--the bad news? Mitt won.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

The majority of the US now seems to be protesters.


10 posted on 10/09/2012 3:39:47 AM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com (I will fear no muslim))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

“Look at the chart. Catholics aren’t trending any better than Protestants.”

Trend line is flat for the Catholics and declining for the Protestants. Are you looking at a different chart than I am?

In any case, the result is clear. Ex-protestants are becoming a serious problem for America.


11 posted on 10/09/2012 3:42:47 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Texas Fossil

“The Leftist love our division.”

Precisely!


12 posted on 10/09/2012 3:43:32 AM PDT by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists, call 'em what you will, they ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: djf

And now the principles contained in the Declaration and Constitution are being “interpreted” away by a Supreme Court that has not one Protestant among it’s members.

I give you Roberts and the health care decision as the prime example of someone who has twisted themselves into an epistemological pretzel to justify that which the Founders would have laughed out of Congress.


13 posted on 10/09/2012 3:46:41 AM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: JCBreckenridge
Trend line is flat for the Catholics and declining for the Protestants. Are you looking at a different chart than I am?

I see a 1% change for Catholics and a 5% change for Protestants.

Because of the fact that Catholicism is more common than Protestantism in S. America, Asia, and Africa, than Protestantism, it is fairly apparent that if not for immigrants (legal or otherwise), I believe the change would be as dramatic, if not more, for Catholics.

In any case, the result is clear. Ex-protestants are becoming a serious problem for America.

Agreed.

14 posted on 10/09/2012 3:49:37 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

... and the country’s gone all to hell. Coincidence? I think not, lol.

But seriously, it’s an interesting gimmick, peeling off nondenominational Christians to get the crowing headline.

It’s strange, though, for such a supposedly declining group to attract so much spin. We’ve got Catholics on FR lumping Mormons into Protestantism on the one hand, so “unaffiliated” surely is as well. But, on the other hand, we’ve got the AP attempting to depict a decline.

Which is it?


15 posted on 10/09/2012 3:50:30 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

Labels and charts mean nothing in the search and practice of a spiritual life.

There are millions of Americans who do not attend church, but live moral lives - guided by the Ten Commandments of their parents and the Constitution.

I was raised Episcopalian, married a “Catholic” and have recently attended a non-demoninational Christian, Community Church. There were dozens of young men and women in attendance, led by a young, inspirational pastor. His sermons are tailored to our modern problems with biblical solutions. Very hopeful for the future. No robes, no rituals or regulations - just pure love for Christ.


16 posted on 10/09/2012 3:51:56 AM PDT by sodpoodle (Life is prickly - carry tweezers.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

Labels and charts mean nothing in the search and practice of a spiritual life.

There are millions of Americans who do not attend church, but live moral lives - guided by the Ten Commandments of their parents and the Constitution.

I was raised Episcopalian, married a “Catholic” and have recently attended a non-demoninational Christian, Community Church. There were dozens of young men and women in attendance, led by a young, inspirational pastor. His sermons are tailored to our modern problems with biblical solutions. Very hopeful for the future. No robes, no rituals or regulations - just pure love for Christ.


17 posted on 10/09/2012 3:54:20 AM PDT by sodpoodle (Life is prickly - carry tweezers.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kearnyirish2
Although you are probably totally correct in your assertion, your conclusion is likely in error. Catholics in America really don't have to depend on the Vatican to teach them how to be Protestants.

BTW, just about every large family (out to the first cousins) has at least one divorced member ~ hence, that person will be attending a Protestant church ~ if at all. News gets out eh!

18 posted on 10/09/2012 3:57:02 AM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry; xzins; Alex Murphy
It’s strange, though, for such a supposedly declining group to attract so much spin. We’ve got Catholics on FR lumping Mormons into Protestantism on the one hand, so “unaffiliated” surely is as well. But, on the other hand, we’ve got the AP attempting to depict a decline.

Which is it?

A question that has been tossed about for a while around these parts.

FReeper xzins had this observation a few years ago:

Methodism came a couple hundred years after the reformation, so it’s ify whether one could agree with Wesley and include them in the reformation. The reformation churches, in my mind, should be the true definition of protestant.

It’s simply incorrect to view the Assembly of God or the Church of God, etc., as protestant. Some other label would be more appropriate: American Evangelical....something like that.

While FReeper Alex Murphy had this insight:

…In my own mind, I tend to break down "Protestant" into categories of:

"Reformed/Protestant" (16th century, those that trace denominational and creedal roots back to the Reformation),
"Evangelical" (17th century, like xzins' Wesleyans/Methodists or the Baptists, largely anabaptist, that arose after the Reformed groups);
"Restorationist" (19th century, independent "first century style" churches / denominations that can be traced back to the Stone/Campbell movement in NY's Hudson River valley); and
"Charismatic" (20th century, any "Spirit-led" but anti-creedal church or denomination that followed or appeared alongside the Restorationists, but especially those that originated with the "baby boomer" generation i.e. the Calvary Chapel/Vineyard churches).

I'm honestly not sure where I'd place groups like the "emergent churches" or even the Warren / Osteen style megachurches. They lack the strong theological distinctives (Calvinism, creedalism) that characterizes the earlier groups, and the strong cultural distinctives (display of charismatic gifts, fierce cultural isolationism) that characterizes the later groups. I tend to think that they should get their own category, but I usually lump them under the "evangelical" label because they usually associate themselves with that group socially.

The point being that I doubt there is a good, universally accepted, definition for what is "Protestant."

19 posted on 10/09/2012 4:03:14 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

nondenominational Christians who can no longer be categorized as Protestant
___________________________________________

LOL

This is written by some ijit who doesnt understand Christianity...


20 posted on 10/09/2012 4:05:59 AM PDT by Tennessee Nana
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

The only people who obsess over it are Catholics and apparently the AP.

How about splitting it thusly: Catholic Christian and nonCatholic Christian?

Take the chart for a spin under those auspices.


21 posted on 10/09/2012 4:07:58 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

“Reformed/Protestant” (16th century, those that trace denominational and creedal roots back to the Reformation),
“Evangelical” (17th century, like xzins’ Wesleyans/Methodists or the Baptists, largely anabaptist, that arose after the Reformed groups);

This represents serious scholastic error.

Anabaptists go back just as far as Luther. Menno Simons was the forunner for the anabaptists. The Baptists broke away from them in the US over the issue of pacifism.

Methodists are an offshoot of Anglicanism.


22 posted on 10/09/2012 4:10:42 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Tennessee Nana; Alex Murphy
This is written by some ijit who doesnt understand Christianity...

See post #19. Alex Murphy would probably disagree with you.

23 posted on 10/09/2012 4:13:16 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: JCBreckenridge

Anabaptists go back just as far as Luther.
______________________________________

Actually Anabaptists go back way before Luther...


24 posted on 10/09/2012 4:15:17 AM PDT by Tennessee Nana
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry
How about splitting it thusly: Catholic Christian and nonCatholic Christian?

Oh, I think there would be a few million Orthodox who would probably not agree with that division.

Where would you classify Jehovah's Witnesses? Mormons? Oneness Pentecostals? (Catholics don't consider any of them as Christian at all...because of the rejection of the Trinity as defined by the First Council of Nicea...not sure about "non-Catholic Christians" though)

25 posted on 10/09/2012 4:18:05 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

A lot of the unaffiliated left their Protestant denomination because it was taken over by anti-Christian Communists poising as faux Christians. The did not find a new church home. The Episcopal Church — or, in reality, the Episcopagan Church — comes to mind. Once 4 million, it’s down to less than 1 million in church every Sunday and will be extinct in a generation. If they had remained faithfuyl and kept their share of the population, they should be up to 8 to 10 million.

Where are the many nondenominational churches in all this tally?


26 posted on 10/09/2012 4:19:30 AM PDT by WashingtonSource
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JCBreckenridge; Alex Murphy

Alex, ping to #22 (JCB disagreed with you...thought it would be polite to ping you to that post)


27 posted on 10/09/2012 4:20:04 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

To: RegulatorCountry

“But seriously, it’s an interesting gimmick, peeling off nondenominational Christians to get the crowing headline.”

Precisely. Nondenominationals have been growing while the denominational churches are in decline. People don’t follow denominational labels like they used to, and usually choose a church based on that church alone rather than the affiliation of the church. I wish people were more aware that doctrinal differences *matter*, but too many Christians have a shallow belief system.

The vast majority of non-denoms are Protestant.


29 posted on 10/09/2012 4:23:08 AM PDT by PastorBooks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

Then I’ll stick to my Calvinist roots for my Huguenot ancestors...

I was raised an Anglican and the Creeds are important to me...

TULIP


30 posted on 10/09/2012 4:24:41 AM PDT by Tennessee Nana
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Tennessee Nana

If Menno Simons wasn’t the founder - then who do you consider to be the founder? Simons was younger than Luther.


31 posted on 10/09/2012 4:41:55 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

He’s welcome to disagree, but he’s very wrong wrt the anabaptists.

I encourage you to read the depositions at Trent. Some of them talk about the Anabaptists.


32 posted on 10/09/2012 4:44:27 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

Interesting posts!


33 posted on 10/09/2012 4:44:37 AM PDT by PastorBooks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: PastorBooks
Interesting posts!

Thanks. The reason for me to post this piece was not to start (yet another) fight between Catholics and Protestants or a fight among Protestants.

I think the fact that the number of people who are leaving Christianity is a very disturbing trend. And, while your congregation or my congregation may be healthy and growing, there can be little doubt that more and more Americans are abandoning Christianity altogether.

That has horrible impacts, not only for the salvation of their souls, but for the overall cultural and political climate for the US, including for those of us who haven't and won't.

I just regret that some don't see that and prefer to snipe.

34 posted on 10/09/2012 4:56:59 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

It appears that it is simply a matter of definitions. If one were to actually label only those from reformation “protesting” denominations as protestants, then “protestants” would have not been a majority for a long, long time.

As long as one labels protestant as pretty much anything that is Christian but isn’t also Catholic, then protestants are still in the majority.

The problem, of course, with any group that “starts itself” is that it isn’t connected to a demonstrably historic lineage that goes back to Christ.


35 posted on 10/09/2012 5:04:46 AM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! True supporters of our troops pray for their victory!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley
Protestants no longer the majority in U.S.

I'm married to a Catholic. We are "non-denominational" Christians.

As Christians, regardless of denomination, we must all hang together, or for certain, as history teaches, we will certainly hang apart.

36 posted on 10/09/2012 5:05:30 AM PDT by Caipirabob (Communists... Socialists... Democrats...Traitors... Who can tell the difference?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: xzins
It appears that it is simply a matter of definitions. If one were to actually label only those from reformation “protesting” denominations as protestants, then “protestants” would have not been a majority for a long, long time.

Agreed. And it is not only a matter of secular people classifying groups. If I'm not mistaken, there is a whole group of Baptists who would bristle at the thought of being considered "Protestant."

The key point from this study is that those who either question or absolutely do not believe in the existence of God is growing. And that should concern all of us.

37 posted on 10/09/2012 5:21:21 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: sodpoodle; markomalley

There are many people that lead good moral lives and certainly many inspirational leaders. The positive moral community is good for America. America is open to all beliefs.

I still choose to belong to the Catholic Church that Jesus founded and receive Him in the Eucharist. The Catholic Church is welcoming to all and is trying to follow their mission to bring all to the glory of God in Heaven.

Peace be with you.


38 posted on 10/09/2012 5:32:05 AM PDT by ADSUM
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Happy Rain
America thrived back when Catholics and Protestants were butchering each other by the bushel

When was that? In 1307? Don't believe Columbus was alive then. And I am not Catholic.

39 posted on 10/09/2012 5:49:31 AM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Caipirabob

“As Christians, regardless of denomination, we must all hang together, or for certain, as history teaches, we will certainly hang apart.”

Amen, amen, amen.


40 posted on 10/09/2012 5:51:16 AM PDT by PastorBooks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: markomalley
The originators of the term 'Evangelical' thought of it as including the Lutherans ~

'Protestant' is a generic term for Christians who are not Catholic. I am sure the folks who came up with the 'No longer a majority' were busy excluding the Holy Rollers from the list.

41 posted on 10/09/2012 5:55:50 AM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

And now that the Catholic Church has decided to start speaking to the flock in some garbled mixture of Latin and Middle English, look for those numbers to start dropping too.


42 posted on 10/09/2012 6:25:44 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley
"Among the reasons for the change are the growth in nondenominational Christians who can no longer be categorized as Protestant"

That is a very subjective decision to make and hints that the whole issue is one of semantics. Many, many (but certainly not all) of the "nondenominational Christians" are the most Protestant congregations out there. In fact many of those churches were formed by orthodox Protestants fleeing their now liberal Mainline denominations for a completely Orthodox, bible based, nondenominational Church. They are congregationalists and from an ecclessiastical standpoint are almost identical to Baptist churches.

43 posted on 10/09/2012 6:26:58 AM PDT by circlecity
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley
" . . .nondenominational Christians who can no longer be categorized as Protestant, . . ."

ROTFLMAO, that's rich. What are they, New Age dolphin worshipers? Elvis worshipers? UFO worshipers?

Just because they use new buzzwords as part of their marketing campaign doesn't change their basic doctrines, the heresies they prefer, or their intrinsic anti-Catholic teaching.

No matter what they prefer to call themselves they're part and parcel of the same half truths and heresies they absorbed from their Protestant parents. People trying to run away from the fact that they're Protestant is no different than the democrat fascists running away from admitting they're liberal now that everyone knows liberalism is destructive. Neither group has changed a thing they believe or teach, they just want to distance themselves from their own actions since it's getting painfully obvious that they're the cause of the mess this country is in.

Scratch the surface on the relativistic, self-centered, freedom from responsibility, feelgood, doctrines that have taken over Western societies and you find the same basic things Luther taught. Protestants (no matter what they call themselves) teach the doctrine of Self Alone and the worship of your own, Most High and Holy Self.

Here you go, have a slice of nondenominational happiness.

44 posted on 10/09/2012 6:27:11 AM PDT by Rashputin (Jesus Christ doesn't evacuate His troops, He leads them to victory.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: markomalley
"Among the reasons for the change are the growth in nondenominational Christians who can no longer be categorized as Protestant"

That is a very subjective decision to make and hints that the whole issue is one of semantics. Many, many (but certainly not all) of the "nondenominational Christians" are the most Protestant congregations out there. In fact many of those churches were formed by orthodox Protestants fleeing their now liberal Mainline denominations for a completely Orthodox, bible based, nondenominational Church. They are congregationalists and from an ecclessiastical standpoint are almost identical to Baptist churches.

45 posted on 10/09/2012 6:30:26 AM PDT by circlecity
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Happy Rain

***America thrived back when Catholics and Protestants were butchering each other by the bushel****

In this day and age one should remember the opening lines from the movie EL CID.

“When men speak of you they speak of poets and scientists!
BURN YOUR BOOKS! Make WARRIORS of your poets! Have your scientists make new poisons for our arrows!

Set Christian king against Christian king! Then when they are weak I will sweep up from Africa!”—Bin Yusef


46 posted on 10/09/2012 8:07:19 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: markomalley

I’ll bet the Muslim population is growing, because like Catholics they are born into the religion, and a lot of them are born. Catholics not so much anymore, because even though they deny it, most use birth control.


47 posted on 10/09/2012 9:49:23 AM PDT by crosshairs (America: Once the land of the free. Still the home of the brave.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Rashputin
Well, those few well-chosen scraps of bile really opened my eyes to the spiritual shortcomings of a billion plus people. With a technique of persuasion like that you should have no trouble getting a job as a high level GOP political strategist.

No wonder Christianity is in decline when the hearts of its champions are filled with hatred, contempt and ill will to their fellow Human Beings.

48 posted on 10/09/2012 9:51:40 AM PDT by Vanders9
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry
How about splitting it thusly: Catholic Christian and nonCatholic Christian?

Sorry. But if one cannot accept that Christ's death on the cross was all sufficient to atone for sin, one cannot be Christian. If you think there are other things in which you must do for that salvation to take, you are not acknowledging that God's grace is sufficient. Christianity is a personal relationship with Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. It's not a "religion". A lot of people are being deceived by the Great Deceiver (Satan) and unfortunately will not figure it out until they leave this life. Then it's too late.
49 posted on 10/09/2012 9:56:47 AM PDT by crosshairs (America: Once the land of the free. Still the home of the brave.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: ADSUM
I still choose to belong to the Catholic Church that Jesus founded

Actually Constantine the Great founded what is today the Catholic Church around 325 A.D., or so. Constantine was very pagan oriented too.
50 posted on 10/09/2012 10:01:04 AM PDT by crosshairs (America: Once the land of the free. Still the home of the brave.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-200201-247 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson