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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 10-14-12, Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 10-14-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 10/13/2012 8:14:08 PM PDT by Salvation

October 14, 2012

Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Wis 7:7-11

I prayed, and prudence was given me;
I pleaded, and the spirit of wisdom came to me.
I preferred her to scepter and throne,
and deemed riches nothing in comparison with her,
nor did I liken any priceless gem to her;
because all gold, in view of her, is a little sand,
and before her, silver is to be accounted mire.
Beyond health and comeliness I loved her,
and I chose to have her rather than the light,
because the splendor of her never yields to sleep.
Yet all good things together came to me in her company,
and countless riches at her hands.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 90:12-13, 14-15, 16-17

R. (14) Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!
Teach us to number our days aright,
that we may gain wisdom of heart.
Return, O LORD! How long?
Have pity on your servants!
R. Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!
Fill us at daybreak with your kindness,
that we may shout for joy and gladness all our days.
Make us glad, for the days when you afflicted us,
for the years when we saw evil.
R. Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!
Let your work be seen by your servants
and your glory by their children;
and may the gracious care of the LORD our God be ours;
prosper the work of our hands for us!
Prosper the work of our hands!
R. Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!

Reading 2 Heb 4:12-13

Brothers and sisters:
Indeed the word of God is living and effective,
sharper than any two-edged sword,
penetrating even between soul and spirit, joints and marrow,
and able to discern reflections and thoughts of the heart.
No creature is concealed from him,
but everything is naked and exposed to the eyes of him
to whom we must render an account.

Gospel Mk 10:17-30

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up,
knelt down before him, and asked him,
"Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?"
Jesus answered him, "Why do you call me good?
No one is good but God alone.
You know the commandments: You shall not kill;
you shall not commit adultery;
you shall not steal;
you shall not bear false witness;
you shall not defraud;
honor your father and your mother."
He replied and said to him,
"Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth."
Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him,
"You are lacking in one thing.
Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor
and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me."
At that statement his face fell,
and he went away sad, for he had many possessions.

Jesus looked around and said to his disciples,
"How hard it is for those who have wealth
to enter the kingdom of God!"
The disciples were amazed at his words.
So Jesus again said to them in reply,
"Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God!
It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle
than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God."
They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves,
"Then who can be saved?"
Jesus looked at them and said,
"For human beings it is impossible, but not for God.
All things are possible for God."
Peter began to say to him,
"We have given up everything and followed you."
Jesus said, "Amen, I say to you,
there is no one who has given up house or brothers or sisters
or mother or father or children or lands
for my sake and for the sake of the gospel
who will not receive a hundred times more now in this present age:
houses and brothers and sisters
and mothers and children and lands,
with persecutions, and eternal life in the age to come."

or Mk 10:17-27

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up,
knelt down before him, and asked him,
"Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?"
Jesus answered him, "Why do you call me good?
No one is good but God alone.
You know the commandments: You shall not kill;
you shall not commit adultery;
you shall not steal;
you shall not bear false witness;
you shall not defraud;
honor your father and your mother."
He replied and said to him,
"Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth."
Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him,
"You are lacking in one thing.
Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor
and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me."
At that statement his face fell,
and he went away sad, for he had many possessions.

Jesus looked around and said to his disciples,
"How hard it is for those who have wealth
to enter the kingdom of God!"
The disciples were amazed at his words.
So Jesus again said to them in reply,
"Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God!
It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle
than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God."
They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves,
"Then who can be saved?"
Jesus looked at them and said,
"For human beings it is impossible, but not for God.
All things are possible for God."


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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1 posted on 10/13/2012 8:14:14 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
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please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 10/13/2012 8:58:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Wisdom 7:7-11

Solomon opts for wisdom


[7] Therefore I prayed, and understanding was given me;
I called upon God, and the spirit of wisdom came to me.
[8] I preferred her to scepters and thrones,
and I accounted wealth as nothing in comparison with her.
[9] Neither did I liken to her any priceless gem,
because all gold is but a little sand in her sight,
and silver will be accounted as clay before her.
[10] I loved her more than health and beauty,
and I chose to have her rather than light,
because her radiance never ceases.
[11] All good things came to me along with her,
and in her hands uncounted wealth.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

7:7-21. In Old Testament tradition, Solomon was seen as the epitome of the
wise man; but he was not born wise. As he says, he prayed and pleaded for it
(v. 7; cf. later chap. 8 and also 1 Kings 3:5ff; 5:9ff). And he put wisdom first —
before sceptres and thrones, precious stones, gold and silver, health and beauty;
even before the light of the sun (vv. 8-10). Because it was wisdom that he asked
for and not other things, God added them on top of his gift of wisdom (v. 11 ).
These verses and v. 14 will remind Christian readers of what our Lord says in the
sermon on the mount when he exhorts us to seek first the Kingdom of God and
his righteousness, and the rest will be added on (cf. Mt 6:25-33).

A familiar theme in wisdom writings is the superiority of spiritual things over ma-
terial things. In this passage ten comparisons make just that point: wisdom is
better than everything, even bodily health (cf. Sir 30:14-16). There is a strict pa-
rallelism in the passage, sometimes alternating “she” (wisdom) with the other
terms of comparison (”wealth”, “priceless gem”, “all gold” and “silver”). It is very
likely that there is an echo here of the views of the Stoics, who said that happi-
ness was the only virtue, above everything else, so therefore the wise man
should he ‘’imperturbable” (stoical), indifferent towards everything, good or evil.
But what this passage really has to do with is the notion, seen in earlier Jewish
wisdom writing, that neither gold nor any thing else for that matter can compare
with wisdom (cf. Job 28:15-19; Prov 3:14; 4-7); or that she is sweeter than honey,
more precious than any pearl or gem (cf. Ps 19:10; 119:72, 127; Prov 3:14-15;
8:11, 19; 16:16).

Having wisdom means, in the first place, letting oneself be guided by God and
being conscious that he holds man’s life in his hands. But wisdom also includes
understanding the world around us — the sort of “encyclopedic wisdom” held in
such high esteem in the ancient world and in the Bible (cf. 1 Kings 5:13-14). This
is because the visible world constitutes an harmonious whole, devised by divine
Wisdom, which provides man with instruction in everything from practical skills to
cosmology and the “elements”, “stoicheia” (v. 17), a term taken from Greek phi-
losophy and which was in common use in educated circles in the Hellenic world.
Still, “what is distinctive in the biblical text is the conviction that there is a pro-
found and indissoluble unity between the knowledge of reason and the knowledge
of faith. The world and all that happens within it, including history and the fate of
peoples, are realities to he observed, analyzed and assessed with all the resour-
ces of reason, but without faith ever being foreign to the process. Faith intervenes
not to abolish reason’s autonomy nor to reduce its scope for action, but solely to
bring the human being to understand that in these events it is the God of Israel
who acts” (Bl. John Paul II, “Fides et ratio”, 16).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 10/13/2012 9:02:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Hebrews 4:12-13

Through Faith We Can Attain God’s “Rest” (Continuation)


[12] For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword,
piercing to the division of soul and spirit, of joints and marrow, and discerning
the thoughts and intentions of the heart. [13] And before him no creature is hid-
den, but all are open and laid bare to the eyes of him with whom we have to do.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

12-13. The “word of God”, which the text speaks about, probably refers to Reve-
lation taken as a whole, particularly Sacred Scripture; but it may also refer to
the “Logos” or Word, the second person of the Holy Trinity. The “word” of God is
presented as an expression of God’s power: it is that active word (Genesis 1:3ff;
Psalm 33:9) which creates everything out of nothing. In the Wisdom books we
find this word personified (Sirach 42:15; 43:26; Wisdom 9:1; 18:15; Psalm 148:
1-5). But this living and active word of God is also to be seen in the New Testa-
ment(Galatians 3:8, 22) and in its full and perfect form in Christ himself (John 1:
1; Revelation 9:13).

God’s word is also very much at work in Revelation: “In the sacred books the
Father who is in heaven comes lovingly to meet his children, and talks to them.
And such is the force and power of the Word of God that it serves the Church
as her support and vigor, and the children of the Church as strength for their faith,
food for the soul, and a pure and lasting fount of spiritual life” (Vatican II, “Dei
Verbum”, 21).

God’s word is consoling and life-giving, but it also inspires fear in those who try
to ignore it. “The word of his truth is hotter and brighter than the sun, and pierces
the very depths of hearts and minds” (St Justin, “Dialogue with Trypho”, 121, 2).
The depths of a person’s heart, his deepest thoughts, attitudes and intentions, lie
open to God’s all-seeing eye. “What a person does or thinks is expressed in his
actions, but one can never be sure of what motivates his actions. That, however,
is never hidden from God” (St Thomas, “Commentary on Heb.” 4, 2).

The last judgment, which is a hidden backdrop to these words of the sacred text,
calls us to present conversion. “The Apostle of God wrote this not only for his
[immediate] readers but also for us. It behooves us therefore always to keep that
divine judgment before our minds, and to be full of fear and trembling and to keep
God’s commandments faithfully and be ever hopeful of that rest promised us which
we shall attain in Christ” (Theodoret of Cyrus, “Interpretatio Ep. ad Haebreos, ad
loc.”).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 10/13/2012 9:03:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Mark 10:17-30

The Rich Young Man


[17] And as He (Jesus) was setting out on His journey, a man ran up and knelt
before Him, and asked Him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
[18] And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good but God
alone. [19] You know the commandments: ‘Do not kill, Do not commit adultery,
Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and
mother.’” [20] And he said to Him, “Teacher, all these I have observed from my
youth.” [21] And Jesus looking upon him loved him, and said to him, “You lack
one thing; go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have trea-
sure in Heaven; and come, follow Me.” [22] At that saying his countenance fell,
and he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions.

Poverty and Renunciation


[23] And Jesus looked around and said to His disciples, “How hard it will be for
those who have riches to enter the Kingdom of God!” [24] And the disciples were
amazed at His words. But Jesus said to them again, “Children, how hard it is for
those who trust in riches to enter the Kingdom of God!” [25] It is easier for a ca-
mel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom
of God.” [26] And they were exceedingly astonished, and said to Him, “Then who
can be saved?” [27] Jesus looked at them and said, “With men it is impossible,
but not with God; for all things are possible with God.”

[28] Peter began to say to Him (Jesus), “Lo, we have left everything and followed
You.” [29] Jesus said, “Truly, I say to you, there is no one who has left house
or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or lands, for My sake and for
the Gospel, [30] who will not receive a hundredfold now in this time, houses and
brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions, and
in the age to come eternal life.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

17-18. As Matthew 19:16 makes clear, the young man approaches Jesus as an
acknowledged teacher of the spiritual life, in the hope that He will guide him to-
wards eternal life. It is not that Christ rejects the praise He is offered: He wants
to show the depth of the young man’s words: He is good, not because He is a
good man but because He is God, who is Goodness Itself. So, the young man
has spoken the truth, but he has not gone far enough. Hence the enigmatic na-
ture of Jesus’ reply and its profundity. The young man’s approach is upright but
too human; Jesus tries to get him to see things from an entirely supernatural
point of view. If this man is to really attain eternal life he must see in Christ not
just a good master but the divine Savior, the only Master, the only one who, be-
cause He is God, is Goodness Itself. Cf. note on Mt. 19:16-22. 19. Our Lord
has not come to abolish the Law but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17). The command-
ments are the very core of the Law and keeping them is necessary for attaining
eternal life. Christ brings these commandments to fulfillment in a double sense.
First, because He helps us discover their full implications for our lives. The light
of Revelation makes it easy for us to grasp the correct meaning of the precepts
of the Decalogue—something that human reason, on its own, can only achieve
with difficulty. Second, His grace gives us strength to counter our evil inclina-
tions, which stem from Original Sin. The commandments, therefore, still apply
in the Christian life: they are like signposts indicating the way that leads to
Heaven.

21-22. Our Lord knows that this young man has a generous heart. This is why
He treats him so affectionately and invites him to greater intimacy with God. But
He explains that this means renunciation—leaving his wealth behind so as to give
his heart whole and entire to Jesus. God calls everyone to holiness, but holiness
is reached by many different routes. It is up to every individual to take the neces-
sary steps to discover which route God wants him to follow. The Lord sows the
seed of vocation in everyone’s soul, to show him the way to go to reach the goal
of holiness, which is common to all.

In other words, if a person does not put obstacles in the way, if he responds ge-
nerously to God, he feels a desire to be better, to give himself more generously.
As fruit of this desire he seeks to know God’s will; he prays to God to help him,
and asks people to advise him. In responding to this sincere search, God uses
a great variety of instruments. Later, when a person thinks he sees the way God
wants him to follow, he may still not take the decision to go that way: he is afraid
of the renunciation it involves: at this point he should pray and deny himself if the
light—God’s invitation—is to win out against human calculation. For, although God
is calling, man is always free, and therefore, he can respond generously or be a
coward, like the young man we are told about in this passage. Failure to respond
generously to one’s vocation always produces sadness.

21. “In its precise eloquence”, Bl. John Paul II points out, commenting on this
passage, “this deeply penetrating event expresses a great lesson in a few words:
it touches upon substantial problems and basic questions that have in no way
lost their relevance. Everywhere young people are asking important questions —
questions on the meaning of life, on the right way to live, on the scale of values:
‘What must I do...?’ ‘What must I do to share in everlasting life?’...To each of you
I say therefore: heed the call of Christ when you hear him saying to you: ‘Follow
Me!’ Walk in My path! Stand by My side! Remain in My love! There is a choice
to be made: a choice for Christ and His way of life, and His commandment of
love.

“The message of love that Christ brought is always important, always relevant. It
is not difficult to see how today’s world, despite its beauty and grandeur, despite
the conquests of science and technology, despite the refined and abundant ma-
terial goods that it offers, is yearning for more truth, for more love, for more joy.
And all of this is found in Christ and in His way of life.... Faced with problems and
disappointments, many people will try to escape from their responsibility: escape
in selfishness, escape in sexual pleasure, escape in drugs, escape in violence,
escape in indifference and cynical attitudes. But today, I propose to you the op-
tion of love, which is the opposite of escape. If you really accept that love from
Christ, it will lead you to God. Perhaps in the priesthood or religious life; perhaps
in some special service to your brothers and sisters: especially to the needy, the
poor, the lonely, the abandoned, those whose rights have been trampled upon, or
those whose basic needs have not been provided for. Whatever you make of your
life, let it be something that reflects the love of Christ” (”Homily on Boston Com-
mon”).

22. “The sadness of the young man makes us reflect. We could be tempted to
think that many possessions, many of the goods of this world, can bring happi-
ness. We see instead in the case of the young man in the Gospel that his many
possessions had become an obstacle to accepting the call of Jesus to follow
Him. He was not ready to say “yes” to Jesus and “no” to self, to say “yes” to
love and “no” to escape. Real love is demanding. I would fail in my mission if I
did not clearly tell you so. For it was Jesus—Jesus Himself—who said: ‘You are
My friends if you do what I command you’ (John 15:14). Love demands effort and
a personal commitment to the will of God. It means discipline and sacrifice, but
it also means joy and human fulfillment.

“Dear young people: do not be afraid of honest effort and work; do not be afraid
of the truth. With Christ’s help, and through prayer, you can answer His call, re-
sisting temptations and fads, and every form of mass manipulation. Open your
hearts to the Christ of the Gospels—to His love and His truth and His joy. Do not
go away sad!...

“Follow Christ! You who are single or who are preparing for marriage. Follow
Christ! You who are young or old. Follow Christ! You who are sick or aging; who
are suffering or in pain. You who feel the need for healing, the need for love, the
need for a friend—follow Christ!

“To all of you I extend—in the name of Christ—the call, the invitation, the plea:
‘Come and follow Me’” (Bl. John Paul II, “Homily on Boston Common”).

23-27. The reaction of the rich young man gives our Lord another opportunity to
say something about the way to use material things. In themselves they are good:
they are resources God has made available to people for their development in so-
ciety. But excessive attachment to things is what makes them an occasion of sin.
The sin lies in “trusting” in them, as if they solve all life’s problems, and turning
one’s back on God. St. Paul calls covetousness idolatry (Colossians 3:5). Christ
excludes from the Kingdom of God anyone who becomes so attached to riches
that his life is centered around them. Or, more accurately, that person excludes
himself.

Possessions can seduce both those who already have them and those who are
bent on acquiring them. Therefore, there are—paradoxically—poor people who are
really rich, and rich people who are really poor. Since absolutely everyone has
an inclination to be attached to material things, the disciples see salvation as an
impossible goal: “Then who can be saved?” No one, if we rely on human re-
sources. But God’s grace makes everything possible. Cf. note on Matthew 6:11.

Also, not putting our trust in riches means that everyone who does have wealth
should use it to help the needy. This “demands great generosity, much sacrifice
and unceasing effort on the part of the rich man. Let each one examine his con-
science, a conscience that conveys a new message for our times. Is he prepared
to support out of his own pocket works and undertakings organized in favor of the
most destitute? Is he ready to pay higher taxes so that the public authorities can
intensify their efforts in favor of development?” (Paul VI, “Populorum Progressio”,
47).

28-30. Jesus Christ requires every Christian to practise the virtue of poverty: He
also requires us to practise real and effective austerity in the possession and use
of material things. But of those who have received a specific call to apostolate—as
in the case, here, of the Twelve—He requires absolute detachment from property,
time, family, etc. so that they can be fully available, imitating Jesus Himself who,
despite being Lord of the universe, became so poor that He had nowhere to lay
His head (cf. Matthew 8:20). Giving up all these things for the sake of the King-
dom of Heaven also relieves us of the burden they involve: like a soldier shedding
some encumbrance before going into action, to be able to move with more agility.
This gives one a certain lordship over all things: no longer the slave of things, one
experiences that feeling St. Paul referred to: “As having nothing, and yet posses-
sing everything” (2 Corinthians 6:10). A Christian who sheds his selfishness in
this way has acquired charity and, having charity, he has everything: “All are
yours; you are Christ’s; and Christ is God’s” (1 Corinthians 3:22-23).

The reward for investing completely in Christ will be fully obtained in eternal life:
but we will also get it in this life. Jesus says that anyone who generously leaves
behind his possessions will be rewarded a hundred times over in this life.

He adds “with persecutions” (v. 30) because opposition is part of the reward for
giving things up out of love for Jesus Christ: a Christian’s glory lies in becoming
like the Son of God, sharing in His cross so as later to share in His glory: “pro-
vided we suffer with Him in order that we may also be glorified with Him (Romans
8:17); “all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted’ (2
Timothy 3:12).

29. These words of our Lord particularly apply to those who by divine vocation
embrace celibacy, giving up their right to form a family on earth. By saying “for
My sake and for the Gospel” Jesus indicates that His example and the demands
of His teaching give full meaning to this way of life: “This, then, is the mystery of
the newness of Christ, of all that He is and stands for; it is the sum of the highest
ideals of the Gospel and of the Kingdom; it is a particular manifestation of grace,
which springs from the paschal mystery of the Savior and renders the choice of
celibacy desirable and worthwhile on the part of those called by our Lord Jesus.
Thus, they intend not only to participate in Christ’s priestly office, but also to
share with Him His very condition of living” (Paul VI, “Sacerdotalis Coelibatus”,
23).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 10/13/2012 9:04:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Wisdom 7:7-11 ©
I prayed, and understanding was given me;
I entreated, and the spirit of Wisdom came to me.
I esteemed her more than sceptres and thrones;
compared with her, I held riches as nothing.
I reckoned no priceless stone to be her peer,
for compared with her, all gold is a pinch of sand,
and beside her silver ranks as mud.
I loved her more than health or beauty,
preferred her to the light,
since her radiance never sleeps.
In her company all good things came to me,
at her hands riches not to be numbered.

Psalm Psalm 89:12-17 ©
Fill us with your love so that we may rejoice.
Make us know the shortness of our life
  that we may gain wisdom of heart.
Lord, relent! Is your anger for ever?
  Show pity to your servants.
Fill us with your love so that we may rejoice.
In the morning, fill us with your love;
  we shall exult and rejoice all our days.
Give us joy to balance our affliction
  for the years when we knew misfortune.
Fill us with your love so that we may rejoice.
Show forth your work to your servants;
  let your glory shine on their children.
Let the favour of the Lord be upon us:
  give success to the work of our hands.
Fill us with your love so that we may rejoice.

Second reading Hebrews 4:12-13 ©
The word of God is something alive and active: it cuts like any double-edged sword but more finely: it can slip through the place where the soul is divided from the spirit, or joints from the marrow; it can judge the secret emotions and thoughts. No created thing can hide from him; everything is uncovered and open to the eyes of the one to whom we must give account of ourselves.

Gospel Acclamation Mt11:25
Alleluia, alleluia!
Blessed are you, Father,
Lord of heaven and earth,
for revealing the mysteries of the kingdom
to mere children.
Alleluia!
Or Mt5:3
Alleluia, alleluia!
How happy are the poor in spirit:
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 10:17-30 ©
Jesus was setting out on a journey when a man ran up, knelt before him and put this question to him, ‘Good master, what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ Jesus said to him, ‘Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: You must not kill; You must not commit adultery; You must not steal; You must not bring false witness; You must not defraud; Honour your father and mother.’ And he said to him, ‘Master, I have kept all these from my earliest days.’ Jesus looked steadily at him and loved him, and he said, ‘There is one thing you lack. Go and sell everything you own and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.’ But his face fell at these words and he went away sad, for he was a man of great wealth.
  Jesus looked round and said to his disciples, ‘How hard it is for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!’ The disciples were astounded by these words, but Jesus insisted, ‘My children,’ he said to them ‘how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.’ They were more astonished than ever. ‘In that case’ they said to one another ‘who can be saved?’ Jesus gazed at them. ‘For men’ he said ‘it is impossible, but not for God: because everything is possible for God.’
  Peter took this up. ‘What about us?’ he asked him. ‘We have left everything and followed you.’ Jesus said, ‘I tell you solemnly, there is no one who has left house, brothers, sisters, father, children or land for my sake and for the sake of the gospel who will not be repaid a hundred times over, houses, brothers, sisters, mothers, children and land – not without persecutions – now in this present time and, in the world to come, eternal life.’

Gospel Mark 10:17-27 ©
Jesus was setting out on a journey when a man ran up, knelt before him and put this question to him, ‘Good master, what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ Jesus said to him, ‘Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: You must not kill; You must not commit adultery; You must not steal; You must not bring false witness; You must not defraud; Honour your father and mother.’ And he said to him, ‘Master, I have kept all these from my earliest days.’ Jesus looked steadily at him and loved him, and he said, ‘There is one thing you lack. Go and sell everything you own and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.’ But his face fell at these words and he went away sad, for he was a man of great wealth.
  Jesus looked round and said to his disciples, ‘How hard it is for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!’ The disciples were astounded by these words, but Jesus insisted, ‘My children,’ he said to them ‘how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.’ They were more astonished than ever. ‘In that case’ they said to one another ‘who can be saved?’ Jesus gazed at them. ‘For men’ he said ‘it is impossible, but not for God: because everything is possible for God.’

6 posted on 10/13/2012 9:08:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION



Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. These prayers were in effect until after Vatican II. A decade later Paul VI said, "satan has entered the sanctuary." Could the elimination of these powerful prayers with a ten year indulgence have played a huge part in allowing the devil such easy access? The answer is obvious. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. After Vatican II, in legion with the devil Giovanni Montini outlawed this necessary prayer and then one wonders how "the smoke of satan" got into the sanctuary? The conciliarists wanted to make sure the words in bold below would never see the light of day again for in it Leo foretold what would happen: The shepherd would be struck, the sheep scattered. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen.


7 posted on 10/13/2012 9:10:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL
8 posted on 10/13/2012 9:11:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Welcome to 40 Days for Life: September 26 - November 4, 2012
9 posted on 10/13/2012 9:12:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
10 posted on 10/13/2012 9:16:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
11 posted on 10/13/2012 9:17:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


12 posted on 10/13/2012 9:19:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


13 posted on 10/13/2012 9:20:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

14 posted on 10/13/2012 9:21:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


15 posted on 10/13/2012 9:22:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 

October Devotion: The Holy Rosary
 

This feast was established by Pope Pius V to commemorate the great victory of the Christian army against the Turks in the Battle of Lepanto in 1571.

All soldiers on the battlefield prayed the Rosary for three hours and the wind has shifted in their favor. They were able to defeat an army three times bigger, in one of the greatest naval victory in history.

Pope Pius V named this the Feast of Our Lady of Victories, to be celebrated on October 7th.

In 1573, Pope Gregory XIII changed the title of this memorial to Feast of the Holy Rosary.

 

 

Pope Paul VI established the form that we celebrate this feast today, in 1969 under the name “Our Lady of the Rosary”.

“The celebration of this day invites all to mediate upon the mysteries of Christ, following the example of the Blessed Virgin Mary who was so singularly associated with the incarnation, passion and glorious resurrection of the Son of God.”



Madonna del Rosario

Caravaggio

1607

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.
 

The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)
1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

The Luminous Mysteries or Mysteries of Light
(Thursdays) see Rosarium Virginis Mariae
1. Jesus' Baptism in the Jordan (II Corinthians 5:21, Matthew 3:17 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Gratitude for the gift of Faith]
2. Jesus' self-manifestation at the wedding of Cana (John 2:1- 12) [Spiritual fruit - Fidelity]
3. Jesus' proclamation of the Kingdom of God, with His call to conversion (Mark 1:15, Mark 2:3-13; Luke 7:47- 48, John 20:22-23) [Spiritual fruit - Desire for Holiness]
4. Jesus' Transfiguration (Luke 9:35 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Spiritual Courage]
5. Jesus' institution of the Eucharist, as the sacramental expression of the Paschal Mystery. (Luke 24:13-35 and parallels, 1 Corinthians 11:24-25) [Spiritual fruit - Love of our Eucharistic Lord]

The Sorrowful Mysteries
(Tuesdays and Fridays)
1. The Agony in the Garden (Matthew 26:36-46, Luke 22:39-46) [Spiritual fruit - God's will be done]
2. The Scourging at the Pillar (Matthew 27:26, Mark 15:15, John 19:1) [Spiritual fruit - Mortification of the senses]
3. The Crowning with Thorns (Matthew 27:27-30, Mark 15:16-20, John 19:2) [Spiritual fruit - Reign of Christ in our heart]
4. The Carrying of the Cross (Matthew 27:31-32, Mark 15:21, Luke 23:26-32, John 19:17) [Spiritual fruit - Patient bearing of trials]
5. The Crucifixion (Matthew 27:33-56, Mark 15:22-39, Luke 23:33-49, John 19:17-37) [Spiritual fruit - Pardoning of Injuries]

The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]

 

The Fifteen Promises Granted to Those Who Recite the Rosary [Catholic Caucus]
Essays for Lent: The Rosary

Radio Replies Second Volume - The Rosary
Town Rejects Rosary as Offensive and the Prayers that Changed Everything
No-contact order over a student's rosary
Collecting 860 rosaries result of a lifelong passion (Catholic Caucus)
After rosary campaign, Florida sheriff abruptly shuts down abortion clinic on Marian feast
Public Rosary in San Francisco to draw thousands [Catholic Caucus]
Chicago's Incredible Floating Rosary
Enourmous Rosary floats over Chicago
Surprised by the Joyful Mysteries (of the Rosary) [Catholic Caucus]
HISTORY OF THE ROSARY [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

The Rosary-a tool for evangelization [Catholic Caucus]
OUR LADY AND HEAVEN’S PEACE PLAN (Say the Rosary) [Ecumenical]
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 5th Joyful Mystery: The Finding in the Temple (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 4th Joyful Mystery: The Presentation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 3rd Joyful Mystery: The Nativity (Patristic Rosary)
Praying the Holy Rosary in October
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 2nd Joyful Mystery: The Visitation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 1st Joyful Mystery: The Annuniciation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] On the Rosary
Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: 15 [20] Mysteries of the Holy Rosary & When They Are Prayed

It Was the Rosary: Mainz Priest Talks About His Vocation
Rosary to Halt Construction of NYC Mosque (Catholic Caucus)
British Soldier Shot in Afghanistan is Saved by His ROSARY...Like His Great-Grandfather in WWII
Catholic Caucus: Rosary Beads Saved My Life, British Soldier Says
British soldier shot in Afghanistan is saved my his ROSARY
Rosary returned to Vietnam vet as pledged 44 years ago
Rosary for the Bishop celebrates six months of prayer, global expansion
Rosary Rallies for Priests Give Final Flourish to Their Special Year (ECUMENICAL)
The Unseen Power of the Rosary
Worldwide Rosary Relay to Offer Prayer for Priests

Boy Suspended For Rosary -- Reinstated
NY school sued after teen suspended over rosary
Student Suspended for Wearing Rosary Beads
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] The 3:30 Beads!
Catholic Biblical Apologetics: Private Devotions to Mary: The Rosary
Benedict XVI Promotes Rosary in Fatima [Catholic Caucus]
Archbishop Naumann, Bishop Finn Lead Mother's Day Rosary at Planned Parenthood
Did the Apostles Pray the Rosary? (First Novena to the Holy Spirit?) [Catholic Caucus]
The Importance of the Meditated Holy Rosary -- What the Popes have to say [Catholic Caucus]
A Ladder from Earth to Heaven: The Rosary for All Christians

Jesus is in the Holy Rosary
The Rosary, a powerful weapon against the devil
History of The Scriptural Rosary [Ecumenical]
The Lord Is with Thee
Rosary of Our Lady's Tears(Catholic Prayer Thread)
The Rosary and Me - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
Rosary promoted as path to Christ and peace [at third annual Rosary Bowl NW]
The Efficacy and Power of One Hail Mary [Ecumenical]
“ Let Us Do It!“ (Sunday: Rosary to be simultaneously prayed on five continents)
The Fruits of the Mysteries of the Rosary

[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
The Family Rosary [Try it for Lent!] (Catholic Caucus)
History of the Scriptural Rosary - Meditating on The Word
Rosary Resurgence [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: How to Pray the Rosary: Contemplating Christ With Mary [Ecumenical]
[Oregon] Rosary Bowl focuses on links between prayer, evangelization
Praying the Rosary By Bishop Fulton J. Sheen(Catholic Caucus)
Rosary-Prayers Aiming to Break Record [Catholic Caucus]
Rosary vs. Repetitious Prayer [Ecumenical]
The Luminous Mysteries [of the Rosary]: Knowing Jesus in His Public Ministry

Rosary Is a School of Mary, Says Pope: Encourages Recitation [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
New campaign launched to promote family rosary
The Rosary and the Republic
Chant the Rosary... in Latin!
(...)and the rosary
Estimated 50,000 recite rosary in event at Rose Bowl
Our Lady of Victory (HLI Page)
Rosary to Mark St. Martha's Feast
Pray the Rosary
Rosary Aids Spiritual Growth, Says Pope


Remembering Lepanto
The Battle that Saved the Christian West (October 7, 1571: Battle of Lepanto)
Battle of Lepanto: Armada of the Cross
Remember Lepanto
How Europe Escaped Speaking Arabic
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Civilization in the Balance: The Battle of Lepanto and Election ‘08
LEPANTO

A Call To Prayer: This Lepanto Moment [Repost]
Lepanto, 1571: The Battle That Saved Europe
Celebrating the Battle of Lepanto
Clash of civilizations: Battle of Lepanto revisited
Lepanto, Bertone e Battesimo, Oh My!
Lepanto Sunday
Our Lady of the Rosary of La Naval (A Mini-Lepanto in the Philippines)
Swiss Guards at the Battle of Lepanto, 7 October 1571
Battle of Lepanto
LEPANTO, 7 OCTOBER 1571: The Defense of Europe

Battle of Lepanto
Remember Lepanto!
The Battle of Lepanto
On This Day In History, The Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Chesterton's Lepanto
The Miracle At Lepanto...
Lepanto
The Naval Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto

16 posted on 10/13/2012 9:23:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

October 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: New Evangelization. That the New Evangelization may progress in the oldest Christian countries.

Missionary Intention: World Mission Day. That the celebration of World Mission Day may result in a renewed commitment to evangelization.


17 posted on 10/13/2012 9:24:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith
18 posted on 10/13/2012 9:29:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Arlington Catholic Herald

All things are possible for God
Fr. Jack Peterson, YA

Jesus makes it clear in this week’s Gospel that God’s radical gift of Himself to us demands a radical gift of ourselves back to Him. Nothing, especially money or possessions, should get in the way of loving God with all of our hearts, surrendering our lives to Him and dedicating ourselves to following His will.

Mark the Evangelist recounts the story of the man with many possessions who approaches Jesus with great reverence and asks, “What must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus first mentions the importance of the Ten Commandments. After the man admits to the admirable reality that he has followed the commandments since his youth, Jesus looks on him with love and says, “Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” The gentleman leaves Jesus’ presence a very sad man “for he had many possessions.”

This is a distressing story and an uncommon one in the Gospels. It is distressing because he is a good man whom Jesus looked on with love, yet he was unable to respond with all his heart to Jesus and His request. It is uncommon because when most people meet Jesus in the Gospels, when they encounter His powerful love, they respond rather generously.

Next, Jesus takes this opportunity to preach: “How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God. … It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.”

Why would Jesus offer this startling challenge to His listeners? He is suggesting that the wealthy face a particularly challenging path to God’s gift of salvation.

The rich usually are very skilled at accomplishing certain tasks that earn a generous income. Consequently, they often have a variety of resources including money to throw at life’s many problems, for example, with the law, personal health or a struggling relative. Additionally, the rich usually are connected to others who have influence and power in this world whom they can turn to for additional assistance. All of these realities combine to tempt the rich with the illusion that they do not really need God to get through life. They are masters of their own lives and destiny.

When we lose that deep awareness in our gut that God is infinitely good and that everything good in life comes from Him, we come to a bad place in life. We fail to be properly grateful to God for His blessings. We are slow to admit our sins and our need for Jesus’ mercy. We don’t embrace the truth that Jesus has the answers to life’s biggest questions. We live as if we do not need God in our lives.

After Jesus warns His disciples about the dangers of being rich and how easy it is for them to turn away from the Lord, Jesus’ disciples ask, “‘Then who can be saved?’ Jesus looked at them and said, ‘For human beings it is impossible, but not for God. All things are possible for God.’”

This great truth about salvation is very encouraging. While we can’t work out our salvation on our own, with God’s grace, all things are possible. Salvation from sin, self-deception and hell is not something that we can scratch and claw our way to by good old-fashioned hard work or being extra clever. Rather, it is a gift from God. It is something that He offers freely to His children from the depths of His love and unexplainable goodness.

Our job as Christians is to fall on our knees and accept the gift of salvation with great humility and gratitude. Our job is to respond to His offer with conversion of heart and a spirit of generous service to our neighbor. Our job is to strive to love Him radically in return, even if it is with just a tiny glimmer of the amazing love that He has bestowed upon us.

The challenge for the rich is to recognize their need for God. In the end, it is the same challenge for every Christian. The poor can fail at this challenge as well. By God’s grace, we can overcome this challenge.

Lord, open my eyes to see and appreciate my great need for You.

Fr. Peterson is assistant chaplain at Marymount University in Arlington and director of the Youth Apostles Institute in McLean.


19 posted on 10/13/2012 9:36:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Work of God

 One thing is wanting from you: go, sell whatsoever you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me. Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year B

 -  28th Sunday in ordinary time

One thing is wanting from you: go, sell whatsoever you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.

One thing is wanting from you: go, sell whatsoever you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me. Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Mark 10:17-30

17 As he was setting out in a journey, a certain man running up and kneeling before him, asked him, Good Master, what shall I do that I may receive life everlasting?
18 And Jesus said to him, why do you call me good? None is good but one, that is God.
19 You know the commandments: Do not commit adultery, do not kill, do not steal, bear not false witness, do no fraud, honour your father and mother.
20 But he answering, said to him: Master, all these things I have observed from my youth.
21 And Jesus looking on him, loved him, and said to him: One thing is wanting from you: go, sell whatsoever you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.
22 Who being struck sad at that saying, went away sorrowful: for he had great possessions.
23 And Jesus looking round about, said to his disciples: How hardly shall they that have riches, enter into the kingdom of God!
24 And the disciples were astonished at his words. But Jesus again answering, said to them: Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches, to enter into the kingdom of God?
25 It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.
26 Who wondered the more, saying among themselves: Who then can be saved?
27 And Jesus looking on them, said: With men it is impossible; but not with God: for all things are possible with God.
28 And Peter began to say unto him: Behold, we have left all things, and have followed you.
29 Jesus answering, said: Amen I say to you, there is no man who has left house or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or children, or lands, for my sake and for the gospel,
30 Who shall not receive a hundred times as much, now in this time; houses, and brethren, and sisters, and mothers, and children, and lands, with persecutions: and in the world to come life everlasting.

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

28th Sunday in ordinary time - One thing is wanting from you: go, sell whatsoever you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me. Why do you call me good? No one is good but God. Let us reflect on this. Of course I am good; I am God. But I have said this to clarify the divine goodness compared to that of human beings. There are many who are good for the Glory of God. They strive constantly to grow spiritually, which is very desirable; but it is so difficult to equal the divine goodness. By contrast there are many who consider themselves good with their auto justification, without knowing that they are harming themselves with their pride.

Here we have another call to humility. That rich man who came to me, considered himself good because he was doing many good things, but because he was rich, his heart was in material riches, not in the Kingdom of Heaven. I exhorted him to perfection, calling him to detach himself from what is earthly, to share with the poor and to follow me so that he could accumulate treasures of goodness in Heaven.

Many are deceived with the concept they have about themselves, they think that they are very well before God. I call them to humility, in which the concept that really matters is the one I have of you.

My wish is for every one to seek to be good as I am good, to be holy as I am holy, to be perfect as I am perfect. In order to do good things before God, you must have great desire to please Him, in other words you must obey the commandments, travel by the road of humility, practice abnegation, put into practice my teachings and keep a very humble concept of yourselves with respect to God. Here is where many stumble in the spiritual way, the same happened to Lucifer (light bearer) who was the most beautiful angel, his beauty and perfections made him blind up to the point of feeling equal and greater than God. That cost him his eternal ruin. (Ezequiel 28:1-19)

No one can make himself good, holy or perfect. This is my work in each soul; this is why I have come trace my way, so that all those who follow me obtain perfection through my Grace.

For this reason I have said, he who exults himself will be humbled and he who humbles himself will be exalted.

My way is poor but takes you to eternal riches. My truth is hard and painful but takes you to wisdom and eternal joy. My life is the life of the soul, those who die to the world begin to live for me and to enjoy the life I offer for all eternity.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


20 posted on 10/13/2012 9:43:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

What does Heaven Cost? A Meditation on the Gospel for the 28th Sunday of the Year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

The Gospel today invites us to wrestle with fundamental, essential, and focal questions, What does heaven cost? And, Am I willing to pay it?

I. Problematic Pondering. A man asks Jesus, “Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?

Now, his question is a good one, but it is problematic, because he couches it in terms of his own personal power and achievement. For, he wonders what he, himself, must do to attain eternal life.

The problem is, none of us have the holiness or the spiritual wealth or power to attain heaven based merely on what we do. The kind of righteousness we need can come only from God. The misguided question of the rich man betrays two common misunderstandings that we bring to the question of salvation and our need for redemption.

The first misunderstanding is rooted in a minimizing of how serious our condition is. We tend to think we’re basically in good shape, perhaps we have a few flaws, but basically we mean well and are decent people. We suspect that a few sacraments occasional prayers, and a few spiritual push-ups will be sufficient. But any look to the crucifix will belie our tendency to minimize. If it took the death of the Son of God, and a death that horrible to rescue me, then my condition must be worse than I commonly think with my darkened intellect.

Jesus once  told the parable of a man who owed a huge debt, a debt of 10,000 talents (cf Mt 18:24). This man is us, and the amount is so huge as to be almost unimaginable. No man with such a debt is going to be able to work a little overtime, or get a part-time job to pay it off. 10,000 talents is beyond the national debt. You get the point? We’re in trouble, we have absolutely no ability to rescue ourselves.

A second misunderstanding is that we tend to intellectualize, and minimize what the law of God actually requires. “Okay, so I’m not supposed to kill anyone, no problem! I don’t like the sight of blood anyway! I’ve got this commandment down.” But this thinking minimizes the commandment and what it is wholeheartedly asking of us. This point will be developed more fully below, so here we mention it only in passing.

These two misunderstandings seem to under-gird the problematic nature of the rich man’s question. Jesus, in order to engage the man further, besides, in effect, to play along with the premise. And this leads us to the 2nd point.

II. Playful Prescription -  Jesus decides to engage the man’s premise and says to him, You know the commandments: You shall not kill; you shall not commit adultery; you shall not steal; you shall not bear false witness; you shall not defraud; honor your father and your mother.”

Jesus is being playful here in the sense that he draws out the flawed premise of the man, that somehow he can attain to heaven by something he does.

It is interesting to ponder why Jesus only quotes the Second Table of the Law, the part pertaining to our love of neighbor, but he omits to draw from the First Table of the Law, the Commandments pertaining to the love of God. Perhaps we may see in this a premise by the Lord that the man does love God, for he is seeking the Kingdom of Heaven, and how to enter into it.  Thus, the Lord focuses on the Second Table of the Law, which is in evidence in this man’s life, at least in this interaction with the Lord. Further, as Scripture says elsewhere, “How can you say you love God whom you do not see, if you do not love your neighbor whom you do see.” (1 John 4:20).  Hence, the Second table of the Law, fleshes out the First table.

Now, mind you, the Lord is not affirming here that the keeping of the Commandments can save or justify us. For his even if we consider ourselves blameless, Scripture affirms, the just man sins seven times a day (Prov 24:16). Indeed we can affirm with Isaiah I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips (Is 6:5). And we must say with Paul, I do not nullify the grace of God, for if righteousness comes through the Law, then Christ died for no purpose. (Gal 2:21).

While it is true, that the law  gives us a necessary and clear frame of reference for what pleases God,  in the end, its summons, “Be holy, for I the Lord your God am holy” (Lev 19:22), is not attainable through mere  human effort, unaided by grace. Jesus makes it clear that when God says “be holy” he does not have in mind any mere human holiness, for Jesus says, “Be perfect, as your Heavenly Father is perfect.” (Matthew 5:48).

Thus Jesus is drawing out the problematic premise, of the man. But as we next see, the rich man does not take the hint.

III. Perceived Perfection - Strangely, and humorously to our mind, the man boldly says, Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth.

Notice, that his perfection is a perceived perfection, for simply noting it in himself does not mean he actually has it in himself. Having heard Jesus quote the second table of the Law, he announces that he has observed all of these from his youth!

To be fair, his self-analysis was not uncommon for a Jewish man of his time. The Jewish people, had a great reverence for the Law, a beautiful thing in itself. But, the law tended to be understood by them in a fairly minimalist, legalistic, and perfunctory  manner.

For example,  a conversation with a scribe of the law about the duty to love one’s neighbor, the Scribe asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor.” (LK 10:29) As if to say, “If I have to love my neighbor, and I acknowledge my duty to do so, how can I so define neighbor as to be something manageable?” In other words, if justice comes to the law, and I honestly recognize that I have limits, then the law must have limits, and I need to define those limits in such a way that the keeping of the law remains within my power.

Jesus sets aside such thinking in the sermon on the Mount, (Matt 5-7), where he calls for the law to be observed, not in a minimalist sense, but in the sense that fulfills it, that is to say, fills it full.  Thus He  says it is not enough, not to kill,  but that commandment requires of us that we reject everything that leads ultimately to killing, or wishing people were dead.  Thus, the commandment not to kill requires not only that we not take life, but that we also banish from our heart and mind, by God’s grace, hateful anger, retribution, and revenge. The commandment not to commit adultery requires, not merely that we avoid breaking our marriages  vows, but that, by God’s grace, we see banished from our heart and mind lustful, impure, and unrighteous sexual thoughts.

Hence,  the Commandments, and precepts of the law cannot, and should not, be understood in a minimalist way.  Thus,  Jesus sets aside the usual manner of the people of his time to reduce the law to something manageable and then declare they have kept it. God seeks more than perfunctory observance, his grace desires to accomplish within us wholehearted observance. Hence, we need grace, in order to be saved, in order to qualify for anything that God calls holy.

So Jesus sets aside the rich man’s claims of righteousness, and now is ready to called question, “what does heaven cost?”

IV. Pricey Prescription – Yes, what does heaven cost? And the answer is, everything! Jesus, looking at him with love, says to him You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.

Ultimately, what heaven costs, is to leave this world and everything in it, to go and possess God, and heaven.  To have heaven, we must set aside this world, not only its life, but its pomp, its ephemeral glories,  itss passing pleasures.  You want heaven? Gotta leave here!

And though we know this, we often live in a way that seeks to postpone the inevitable and to ignore the joke that this world is ultimately playing on us. The world says, “You can have it all!” Yes, and then you die and lose everything. But we like to postpone facing that , we like to pretend that, perhaps, it ain’t necessarily so. We’re like the gambler who goes to the casino, thinking we will be the exception. But in the end, the house always wins. You can’t cheat life, and in the end, whatever we have, whatever we claim to have won, we lose.

In the end, there is only one way to attain the things of lasting value. Only what you do for Christ will last. The Lord says “Store up for yourselves treasure in heaven, that neither rust or moths can corrode, nor thieves break in and steal.” (Lk 12:33).

Notice that the Lord says that being generous to the needy and poor is a way of storing up treasure in heaven.  Sadly, most of us aren’t buying it, thinking that clinging to it here is a way of keeping it.  It isn’t. Whatever we have here, is slipping through our fingers like so much sand. The only way to keep it unto life internal is to give it away, to the needy, the poor, and to allow it to advance the kingdom of heaven and its values.

Otherwise, wealth is not only not helpful is harmful. There are many text in the Scriptures that speak of the danger and the harm of wealth, how it compromises our souls and endangers our salvation:

1. Mk 10:23-25 Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, “How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God!” The disciples were amazed at his words. But Jesus said again, “Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.”

2. 1 Tim 6:7 for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world; 8 but if we have food and clothing, with these we shall be content. But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and hurtful desires that plunge men into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is the root of all evils; it is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced their hearts with many pangs.

3. Luke 16:13 “No servant can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money.

4. Luke 6:24-25 “But woe to you who are rich, for you have already received your comfort. Woe to you who are well fed now, for you will go hungry. Woe to you who laugh now, for you will mourn and weep.

5. Mat 19:30 But many that are first will be last, and the last first.

6. James 2:5 Listen, my beloved brethren. Has not God chosen those who are poor in the world to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom which he has promised to those who love him?

7. St.  Augustine also says  Such, O my soul, are  the miseries that attend on riches. They are gained with toil  and kept with fear. They are enjoyed with danger, and lost with grief. It is hard to be saved if we have them; and impossible if we love them; and scarcely can we have them, but that we shall love them inordinately. Teach us, O Lord, this difficult lesson: to manage conscientiously the goods we possess and not covetously desire more than you give to us. (Letter 203)

Thus, while the Lord’s claim that heaven costs everything bewilders us, we cannot fail to see that it is true and that the world’s claims on us are rooted in a lie, in fake and passing declarations that somehow we can be secure in the passing glories the world. Yes, and then you die, end of glory. But we like the lie, and so we entertain it. But in the end, we give everything back, because it was never ours, it only seemed that way.

How foolish we are, how blind. And speaking of blindness, not that the Lord looked at the man with love. But somehow the man went away sad. That look of love from the Lord never reached his soul. If it had, the result would surely have been different.

And this leads us to the final point:

V. Powerful Possibility - So starting in shocking is this teaching, that even the apostles, who had in fact left everything to follow the Lord, are shocked by it. There they see, and are in touch with how deep this wound is in the human heart, how deep our delusion that the world and its goods can satisfy us. They see and know how strong and numerous are the hooks that this world has in us. Thus, they cry out “Then who can be saved!?” And Jesus responds “For man it is impossible, but not for God. All things are possible for God.”

Thus, in the end, salvation must be God’s work. He alone can take these tortured hearts of ours, so rooted in passing things, and make them willing to forsake all things for the kingdom of heaven.  Only God can take our disordered love and directed to its proper end, the love rooted in God, and the things waiting for us in heaven. Only God can remove our obsession with the Titanic and place us squarely in the Noah’s Ark that is the Church, Peter’s barque.

Yes, God can give us a new heart, a properly ordered heart, our heart that desires first and foremost God’s love, a heart that can say You O Lord are enough, a heart that can say I gratefully receive Lord what you give me, and I covet nothing more. Thank you Lord, it is enough, you are enough.

Don’t miss the look of love that Jesus gave the young man, that he gives you. In the end, only a greater love, God’s love received, can replace the disordered love we have for this world.


21 posted on 10/13/2012 9:48:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday Gospel Reflections

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Wisdom 7:7-11 II: Hebrews 4:12-13
Gospel
Mark 10:17-30

17 And as he was setting out on his journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?"
18 And Jesus said to him, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone.
19 You know the commandments: 'Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and mother.'"
20 And he said to him, "Teacher, all these I have observed from my youth."
21 And Jesus looking upon him loved him, and said to him, "You lack one thing; go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me."
22 At that saying his countenance fell, and he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions.
23 And Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, "How hard it will be for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!"
24 And the disciples were amazed at his words. But Jesus said to them again, "Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God!
25 It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God."
26 And they were exceedingly astonished, and said to him, "Then who can be saved?"
27 Jesus looked at them and said, "With men it is impossible, but not with God; for all things are possible with God."
28 Peter began to say to him, "Lo, we have left everything and followed you."
29 Jesus said, "Truly, I say to you, there is no one who has left house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or lands, for my sake and for the gospel,
30 who will not receive a hundredfold now in this time, houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions, and in the age to come eternal life.


Interesting Details
  • (v.18) When Jesus reprimands the rich man that "no one is good but God alone," Jesus is not denying His divine status or mission (see Mk 9:37). Rather, He wants the rich man to fix his eyes upon God as the only source of goodness.
  • (vv.21-22) This is one of the saddest stories in the Gospel. A man whom Jesus loves rejects His invitation to discipleship. When the man asks "what must I do to receive eternal life?" He does not realize a call to discipleship would mean so much sacrifice.
  • (vv.23-24) On addressing His disciples, Jesus begins by stressing the difficulty of the rich entering heaven; then He passes quickly to stressing that entering heaven is very hard for everyone. In fact, it is impossible!
  • v.25 demonstrates just how impossible it is to enter heaven based on human achievements alone.
  • (v.26) In Judaism, wealth was at times taken as God's blessing. Therefore, the disciples were astonished that God said it was hard for the rich to enter heaven. Jesus had changed the meaning of wealth .
  • (v.27) Salvation is not through man's achievements. It is God's achievement.
  • (v.28) Peter's statement contrasts the disciples actions against that of the rich man. "We have given up everything to follow you". Their "everything" may not be money. It is whatever they cling to that is not God: be it family, social status, behaviors...
  • (v.30) Jesus lists the promised rewards, which are a hundredfold more than the sacrifices of following him. Not only will his disciples receive eternal life, but in this life too they will receive much.
  • (v.30) "and persecutions as well". Is this an ironic description of the "rewards?" Or is it simply the reality of Christian experience?

One Main Point

"Good Master, what must I do to receive eternal life?" "Come and follow me..." It may be difficult for men, but "...all things are possible with God."


Reflections
  1. I examine my current life: my wealth (be it rich or poor), my health (be it well or sick), my behaviors. Which helps me be closer to God? Which keeps me away from Him?
  2. Jesus' teachings are demanding and challenging. I ask that He look upon me with love, so that I can trust Him like a child upon his parent, to trust that "all things are possible with God."

22 posted on 10/13/2012 9:53:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, October 14, 2012
Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Wisdom 7:7-11
Psalm 90:12-17
Hebrews 4:12-13
Mark 10:17-30 or 10:17-27

Strive to acquire the virtues you think your brothers lack, and then you will no longer see their defects, because you yourselves will not have them.

-- St. Augustine


23 posted on 10/13/2012 9:55:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


24 posted on 10/13/2012 9:57:09 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Oct 14, Invitatory for Twenty-Eighth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, worship the Lord for we are his people, the flock he shepherds, alleluia.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, worship the Lord for we are his people, the flock he shepherds, alleluia.

25 posted on 10/14/2012 3:30:55 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 14, Office of Readings for Sunday of the 28th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 615
Proper of Seasons: 370
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1087

Christian Prayer:
Does not contain Office of Readings.

Office of Readings for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
Early in the morning our song shall rise to thee.
Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity!

Holy, holy, holy! All the saints adore thee,
casting down their golden crowns around the glassy sea;
cherubim and seraphim falling down before thee,
which wert, and art, and evermore shalt be.

Holy, holy, holy! Though the darkness hide thee,
though the eye of sinful man thy glory may not see,
only thou art holy; there is none beside thee,
perfect in power, in love and purity.

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
All thy works shall praise thy name, in earth and sky and sea.
Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity.

Melody: Nicaea 11.12.12.10; Music: John B. Dykes, 1823-1876; Text: Reginald Heber, 1783-1826
“Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty” performed by Norwich Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Psalm 24
The Lord’s entry into his temple

Christ opened heaven for us in the manhood he assumed (St. Irenaeus).

The Lord’s is the earth and its fullness,
the world and all its peoples.
It is he who set it on the seas;
on the waters he made it firm.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Who shall climb the mountain of the Lord?
Who shall stand in his holy place?
The man with clean hands and pure heart,
who desires not worthless things,
who has not sworn so as to deceive his neighbor.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

He shall receive blessings from the Lord
and reward from the God who saves him.
Such are the men who seek him,
seek the face of the God of Jacob.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Who is the king of glory?
The Lord, the mighty, the valiant,
the Lord, the valiant in war.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Who is he, the king of glory?
He, the Lord of armies,
he is the king of glory.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

When your Son was unjustly condemned, Lord God, and surrounded by the impious, he cried to you, and you set him free. Watch over your people as the treasure of your heart and guide their steps along safe paths that they may see your face.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Ant. 2 Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Psalm 66
Eucharistic hymn

The Lord is risen and all people have been brought by him to the Father (Hesychius).

I

Cry out with joy to God, all the earth,
O sing to the glory of his name.
O render him glorious praise.
Say to God: “How tremendous your deeds!

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Because of the greatness of your strength
your enemies cringe before you.
Before you all the earth shall bow;
shall sing to you, sing to your name!”

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Come and see the works of God,
tremendous his deeds among men.
He turned the sea into dry land,
they passed through the river dry-shod.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Let our joy then be in him;
he rules for ever by his might.
His eyes keep watch over the nations;
let rebels not rise against him.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

O peoples, bless our God,
let the voice of his praise resound,
of the God who gave life to our souls
and kept our feet from stumbling.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

For you, O God, have tested us,
you have tried us as silver is tried:
you led us, God, into the snare;
you laid a heavy burden on our backs.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

You let men ride over our heads;
we went through fire and through water
but then you brought us relief.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

II

Burnt offering I bring to your house;
to you I will pay my vows,
the vows which my lips have uttered,
which my mouth spoke in my distress.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

I will offer burnt offerings of fatlings
with the smoke of burning rams.
I will offer bullocks and goats.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Come and hear, all who fear God.
I will tell what he did for my soul:
to him I cried aloud,
with high praise ready on my tongue.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

If there had been evil in my heart,
the Lord would not have listened.
But truly God has listened;
he has heeded the voice of my prayer.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Blessed be God who did not reject my prayer
nor withhold his love from me.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Almighty Father, in the death and resurrection of your own Son you brought us through the waters of baptism to the shores of new life. By those waters and the fire of the Holy Spirit you have given each of us consolation. Accept our sacrifice of praise; may our lives be a total offering to you, and may we deserve to enter your house and there with Christ praise your unfailing power.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

God’s word is alive; it strikes to the heart.
It pierces more surely than a two-edged sword.

READINGS

First reading
From the beginning of the book of the prophet Haggai
1:1—2:10
Exhortation to rebuild the temple and its future glory

On the first day of the sixth month in the second year of King Darius, the word of the Lord came through the prophet Haggai to the governor of Judah, Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, and to the high priest Joshua, son of Jehozadak:

Thus says the Lord of hosts: This people says: “Not now has the time come to rebuild the house of the Lord.” (Then this word of the Lord came through Haggai, the prophet:) Is it time for you to dwell in your own paneled houses, while this house lies in ruins?

Now thus says the Lord of hosts:
Consider your ways!
You have sown much, but have brought in little;
you have eaten, but have not been satisfied;
You have drunk, but have not been exhilarated;
have clothed yourselves, but not been warmed;
And he who earned wages
earned them for a bag with holes in it.

Thus says the Lord of hosts:
Consider your ways!
Go up into the hill country;
bring timber, and build the house
That I may take pleasure in it
and receive my glory, says the Lord.
You expected much, but it came to little;
and what you brought home, I blew away.

For what cause? says the Lord of hosts.
Because my house lies in ruins,
while each of you hurries to his own house.
Therefore the heavens withheld from you their dew,
and the earth her crops.
And I called for a drought
upon the land and upon the mountains;
Upon the grain, and upon the wine, and upon the oil,
and upon all that the ground brings forth;
Upon men and upon beasts,
and upon all that is produced by hand.

Then Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, and the high priest Joshua, son of Jehozadak, and all the remnant of the people listened to the voice of the Lord, their God, and to the words of the prophet Haggai, because the Lord, their God, had sent him, and the people feared because of the Lord. And the Lord’s messenger, Haggai, proclaimed to the people as the message of the Lord: I am with you, says the Lord.

Then the Lord stirred up the spirit of the governor of Judah, Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, and the spirit of the high priest Joshua, son of Jehozadak, and the spirit of all the remnant of the people, so that they came and set to work on the house of the Lord of hosts, their God, on the twenty-fourth day of the sixth moon.

In the second year of King Darius, on the twenty-first day of the seventh month, the word of the Lord came through the prophet Haggai: Tell this to the governor of Judah, Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, and to the high priest Joshua, son of Jehozadak, and to the remnant of the people:

Who is left among you
that saw this house in its former glory?
And how do you see it now?
Does it not seem like nothing in your eyes?

But now take courage, Zerubbabel, says the Lord,
and take courage, Joshua, high priest, son of Jehozadak,
And take courage, all you people of the land,
says the Lord, and work!
For I am with you, says the Lord of hosts.
This is the pact that I made with you
when you came out of Egypt,
And my spirit continues in your midst;
do not fear!

For thus says the Lord of hosts:
One moment yet, a little while,
and I will shake the heavens and the earth,
the sea and the dry land.
I will shake all the nations,
and the treasures of all the nations will come in.
And I will fill this house with glory,
says the Lord of hosts.
Mine is the silver and mine the gold,
says the Lord of hosts.
Greater will be the future glory of this house
than the former, says the Lord of hosts;
And in this place I will give peace,
says the Lord of hosts.

RESPONSORY Haggai 1:8; Isaiah 56:7

Go up into the hill country and build a house;
and I will take pleasure in it, says the Lord.

My house shall be called a house of prayer for all nations.
And I will take pleasure in it, says the Lord.

Second reading
From a commentary on Haggai by Cyril of Alexandria, bishop
My name is great among the nations

When our Savior came, he appeared as a divine temple, glorious beyond any comparison, far more splendid and excellent than the older temple. He exceeded the old as much as worship in Christ and the gospels exceeds the cult of the laws, as much as truth exceeds its shadows.

Furthermore, I might point out that originally there was just one temple at Jerusalem, in which one people, the Israelites, offered their sacrifices. Since the only-begotten Son became like us, and as Scripture says, though he was Lord and God, he has shone upon us, the rest of the world has been filled with places of worship. Now there are countless worshipers who honor the universal God with spiritual offerings and fragrant sacrifices. This, surely, is what Malachi foretold, speaking, as if in the person of God: I am a great king, says the Lord; my name is honored among the nations, and everywhere there is offered to my name the fragrance of a pure sacrifice.

With justice, therefore, do we say that the final temple, the Church, will be more glorious. To those who are so solicitous for the Church and labor for its construction, Haggai declares that a gift will be made, a gift from heaven given by the Savior. That gift is Christ himself, the peace of all men; through him we have access in the one Spirit to the Father. The prophet goes on to say: I will give peace to this place and peace of soul to save all who lay the foundation to rebuild the temple. Christ too says somewhere: My peace I give you. Paul will teach how profitable this is for those who love: The peace of Christ, he says, which surpasses all understanding will keep your minds and hearts. Isaiah, the seer, made the same prayer: O Lord our God, give us peace, for you have given us everything. Once a man has been found worthy of Christ’s peace, he can easily save his soul and guide his mind to carry out exactingly the demands of virtue.

Haggai, therefore, declares that peace will be given to all who build. One builds the Church either as a teacher of the sacred mysteries, as one set over the house of God, or as one who works for his own good by setting himself forth as a living and spiritual stone in the holy temple, God’s dwelling place in the Spirit. The results of these efforts will profit such men so that each will be able to gain his own salvation without difficulty.

RESPONSORY Psalm 84:5; Zechariah 2:11

Blessed are they who dwell in your house, O Lord;
they will praise you for ever.

Many nations will join the Lord on that day, and they will be his people.
They will praise you for ever.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day we bless you.
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
for we have put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
And we shall never hope in vain.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

May your grace,
O Lord, we pray,
at all times go before us and follow after
and make us always determined to carry out good works.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

26 posted on 10/14/2012 3:31:01 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 14, Morning Prayer for Sunday of the 28th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 618
Proper of Seasons: 375
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1091

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 689
Proper of the Season: 634
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 925

Morning Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

From all that dwell below the skies,
Let the Creator’s Name arise;
Alleluia, alleluia.
Let the Redeemer’s Name be sung,
Through every land, by every tongue.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Eternal are Thy mercies, Lord;
Eternal truth attends Thy Word.
Alleluia, alleluia.
Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore,
Till sunshine rise and set no more.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Your lofty themes, ye mortals, bring,
In songs of praise divinely sing;
Alleluia, alleluia.
The great salvation loud proclaim,
And shout for joy the Savior’s Name.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

In every land begin the song;
To every land the strains belong;
Alleluia, alleluia.
In cheerful sounds all voices raise,
And fill the world with loudest praise.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

From All That Dwell Below the Skies by St. Michael’s Singers; Words: Isaac Watts, 1719. Music: John Hatton, 1793.
From All That Dwell Below the Skies by St. Michael’s Singers is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Psalm 118
Song of joy for salvation

The Lord our mighty God now reigns supreme; let us rejoice and be glad and give him praise (Revelation 19:6-7).

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love endures for ever.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Let the sons of Israel say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let the sons of Aaron say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let those who fear the Lord say:
“His love endures for ever.”

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

I called to the Lord in my distress;
he answered and freed me.
The Lord is at my side; I do not fear.
What can man do against me?
The Lord is at my side as my helper:
I shall look down on my foes.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

It is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in princes.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

The nations all encompassed me;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me, compassed me about;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me about like bees;
they blazed like a fire among thorns.
In the Lord’s name I crushed them.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

I was hard-pressed and was falling
but the Lord came to help me.
The Lord is my strength and my song;
he is my savior.
There are shouts of joy and victory
in the tents of the just.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
his right hand raised me.
The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
I shall not die, I shall live
and recount his deeds.
I was punished, I was punished by the Lord,
but not doomed to die.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Open to me the gates of holiness:
I will enter and give thanks.
This is the Lord’s own gate
where the just may enter.
I will thank you for you have answered
and you are my savior.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

The stone which the builders rejected
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord,
a marvel in our eyes.
This day was made by the Lord;
we rejoice and are glad.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

O Lord, grant us salvation;
O Lord, grant success.
Blessed in the name of the Lord
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord;
the Lord God is our light.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Go forward in procession with branches
even to the altar.
You are my God, I thank you.
My God, I praise you.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good;
for his love endures for ever.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you have given us the great day of rejoicing: Jesus Christ, the stone rejected by the builders, has become the cornerstone of the Church, our spiritual home. Shed upon your Church the rays of your glory, that it may be seen as the gate of salvation open to all nations. Let cries of joy and exultation ring out from its tents, to celebrate the wonder of Christ’s resurrection.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Ant.2 Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Canticle – Daniel 3:52-57
Let all creatures praise the Lord

The Creator… is blessed for ever (Romans 1:25).

Blessed are you, O Lord, the God of our fathers,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

And blessed is your holy and glorious name,
praiseworthy and exalted above all for all ages.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you in the temple of your holy glory,
praiseworthy and glorious above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you on the throne of your kingdom,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you who look into the depths
from your throne upon the cherubim,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you in the firmament of heaven,
praiseworthy and glorious forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord,
praise and exalt him above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Ant. 3 Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

Psalm 150
Praise the Lord

Let mind and heart be in your song: this is to glorify God with your whole self (Hesychius).

Praise God in his holy place,
praise him in his mighty heavens.
Praise him for his powerful deeds,
praise his surpassing greatness.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

O praise him with sound of trumpet,
praise him with lute and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance,
praise him with strings and pipes.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

O praise him with resounding cymbals,
praise him with clashing of cymbals.
Let everything that lives and that breathes
give praise to the Lord.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, maker of heaven and earth and of all created things, you make your just ones holy and you justify sinners who confess your name. Hear us as we humbly pray to you: give us eternal joy with your saints.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

READING 2 Timothy 2:8, 11-13

Remember that Jesus Christ, a descendant of David,
was raised from the dead. You can depend on this:
If we have died with him
we shall also live with him;
If we hold out to the end
we shall also reign with him.
But if we deny him he will deny us. If we are unfaithful
he will still remain faithful, for he cannot deny himself.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

We cry aloud how marvelous you are,
as we call upon your name.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. You have left everything to follow me; you will have it all returned a hundredfold and will inherit eternal life.

Luke 1:68 – 79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. You have left everything to follow me; you will have it all returned a hundredfold and will inherit eternal life.

INTERCESSIONS

Open your hearts to praise the God of power and goodness, for he loves us and knows our needs:
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

We bless you, almighty God, King of the universe, because you called us while we were yet sinners,
to acknowledge your truth and to serve your majesty.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

O God, you opened the gates of mercy for us,
let us never turn aside from the path of life.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

As we celebrate the resurrection of your beloved Son,
help us to spend this day in the spirit of joy.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

Give to your faithful, O Lord, a prayerful spirit of gratitude,
that we may thank you for all your gifts.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

The Lord’s Prayer

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

May your grace,
O Lord, we pray,
at all times go before us and follow after
and make us always determined to carry out good works.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

27 posted on 10/14/2012 3:31:10 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 14, Midday Prayer for Sunday of the 28th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 623
Proper of Seasons: 375 (concluding prayer)
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1097 (Midday)

Midday Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time using the Current Psalmody

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

O Lord my God! when I in awesome wonder
Consider all the worlds Thy hands have made,
I see the stars, I hear the mighty thunder,
Thy power throughout the universe displayed:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

When through the woods and forest glades I wander
And hear the birds sing sweetly in the trees;
When I look down from lofty mountain grandeur
And hear the brook and feel the gentle breeze:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss; Originally this was a Swedish folk melody, “O Store Gud” by Carl Boberg (1859-1940) and was translated by Stuart K. Hine in 1899.
”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Psalm 23
The Good Shepherd
The Lamb himself will be their shepherd and will lead them to the springs of living waters (Revelation 7:17).

The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.
Fresh and green are the pastures
where he gives me repose.
Near restful waters he leads me,
to revive my drooping spirit.

He guides me along the right path;
he is true to his name.
If I should walk in the valley of darkness
no evil would I fear.
You are there with your crook and your staff;
with these you give me comfort.

You have prepared a banquet for me
in the sight of my foes.
My head you have anointed with oil;
my cup is overflowing.

Surely goodness and kindness shall follow me
all the days of my life.
In the Lord’s own house shall I dwell
for ever and ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord Jesus Christ, Shepherd of your Church, you give us new birth in the waters of baptism, anoint us with saving oil, and call us to salvation at your table. Dispel the terrors of death and the darkness of error. Lead your people along safe paths that they may rest securely in you and live for ever in your Father’s house.

Ant. He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Psalm 76
Thanksgiving for victory
They will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven (Matthew 24:30).

I

God is made known in Judah;
in Israel his name is great.
He set up his tent in Jerusalem
and his dwelling place in Zion.
It was there he broke the flashing arrows,
the shield, the sword, the armor.

You, O Lord, are resplendent,
more majestic than the everlasting mountains.
The warriors, despoiled, slept in death;
the hands of the soldiers were powerless.
At your threat, O God of Jacob,
horse and rider lay stunned.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

II

You, you alone, strike terror.
Who shall stand when your anger is roused?
You uttered your sentence from the heavens;
the earth in terror was still
when God arose to judge,
to save the humble of the earth.

Men’s anger will serve to praise you;
its survivors surround you in joy.
Make vows to your God and fulfill them.
Let all pay tribute to him who strikes terror,
who cuts short the life of princes,
who strikes terror in the kings of the earth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Your power is awesome, Father, and wonderful is your holiness. In your presence the earth both trembles and stands still, for you shattered death’s power by the cross. Rise to help your people: give your light, and grant salvation to the meek of the earth, that they may praise your name in heaven.

Ant. Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

READING Deuteronomy 10:12

What does the Lord, your God, ask of you but to fear the Lord, your God, and follow his ways exactly, to love and serve the Lord, your God, with all your heart and all your soul?

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Lord, who can dwell in your sanctuary?
One whose life is blameless, and whose heart is true.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

May your grace,
O Lord, we pray,
at all times go before us and follow after
and make us always determined to carry out good works.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

28 posted on 10/14/2012 3:31:16 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 14, Evening Prayer for Sunday of the 28th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 632
Proper of Seasons: 375
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1101

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 694
Proper of Seasons: 635
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 931

Evening Prayer II for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Love divine, all loves excelling,
joy of heaven, to earth come down,
fix in us thy humble dwelling,
all thy faithful mercies crown.
Jesus, thou art all compassion,
pure, unbounded love thou art;
visit us with thy salvation,
enter every trembling heart.

Come, almighty to deliver,
let us all thy life receive;
suddenly return, and never,
nevermore thy temples leave.
Thee we would be always blessing,
serve thee as thy hosts above,
pray, and praise thee without ceasing,
glory in thy perfect love.

Finish then thy new creation;
pure and spotless let us be;
let us see thy great salvation
perfectly restored in thee:
changed from glory into glory,
till in heaven we take our place,
till we cast our crowns before thee,
lost in wonder, love, and praise.

“Love divine all loves excelling”; Words: Charles Wesley, 1747. Music: John Zundel, 1870
“Love divine all loves excelling” by Gloucester Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

Psalm 110
The Messiah, king and priest

Christ’s reign will last until all his enemies are made subject to him (1 Corinthians 15:25).

The Lord’s revelation to my Master:
“Sit on my right:
your foes I will put beneath your feet.”

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

The Lord will wield from Zion
your scepter of power:
rule in the midst of all your foes.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

A prince from the day of your birth
on the holy mountains;
from the womb before the dawn I begot you.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

The Lord has sworn an oath he will not change.
“You are a priest for ever,
a priest like Melchizedek of old.”

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

The Master standing at your right hand
will shatter kings in the day of his great wrath.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

He shall drink from the stream by the wayside
and therefore he shall lift up his head.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, we ask you to give us victory and peace. In Jesus Christ, our Lord and King, we are already seated at your right hand. We look forward to praising you in the fellowship of all your saints in our heavenly homeland.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Psalm 112
The happiness of the just man

Live as children born of the light. Light produces every kind of goodness and justice and truth (Ephesians 5:8-9).

Happy the man who fears the Lord,
who takes delight in all his commands.
His sons will be powerful on earth;
the children of the upright are blessed.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Riches and wealth are in his house;
his justice stands firm for ever
He is a light in the darkness for the upright:
he is generous, merciful and just.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

The good man takes pity and lends,
he conducts his affairs with honor.
The just man will never waver:
he will be remembered for ever.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

He has no fear of evil news;
with a firm heart he trusts in the Lord.
With a steadfast heart he will not fear;
he will see the downfall of his foes.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Open-handed, he gives to the poor;
his justice stands firm for ever.
His head will be raised in glory.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

The wicked man sees and is angry,
grinds his teeth and fades away;
the desire of the wicked leads to doom.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you are the eternal light which illumines the hearts of good people. Help us to love you, to rejoice in your glory, and so to live in this world as to avoid harsh judgment in the next. May we come to see the light of your countenance.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Ant. 3 Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Canticle – See Revelation 19:1-7
The wedding of the Lamb

Alleluia.
Salvation, glory, and power to our God:
Alleluia.
his judgments are honest and true.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
Sing praise to our God, all you his servants,
Alleluia.
all who worship him reverently, great and small.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The Lord our all-powerful God is King;
Alleluia.
Let us rejoice, sing praise, and give him glory.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The wedding feast of the Lamb has begun,
Alleluia.
and his bride is prepared to welcome him.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

READING Hebrews 12:22-24

You have drawn near to Mount Zion and the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, to myriads of angels in festal gathering, to the assembly of the first-born enrolled in heaven, to God the judge of all, to the spirits of just men made perfect, to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood which speaks more eloquently than that of Abel.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.
Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.

His wisdom is beyond compare,
mighty is his power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. One of them, realizing that he had been cured, returned praising God in a loud voice, alleluia.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. One of them, realizing that he had been cured, returned praising God in a loud voice, alleluia.

INTERCESSIONS

Rejoicing in the Lord, from whom all good things come, let us pray:
Lord, hear our prayer.

Father and Lord of all, you sent your Son into the world, that your name might be glorified in every place,
strengthen the witness of your Church among the nations.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Make us obedient to the teachings of your apostles,
and bound to the truth of our faith.
Lord, hear our prayer.

As you love the innocent,
render justice to those who are wronged.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Free those in bondage and give sight to the blind,
raise up the fallen and protect the stranger.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Fulfill your promise to those who already sleep in your peace,
through your Son grant them a blessed resurrection.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

May your grace,
O Lord, we pray,
at all times go before us and follow after
and make us always determined to carry out good works.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

29 posted on 10/14/2012 3:31:22 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 14, Night Prayer for Sunday of the 28th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, Page 1172
Vol II, Page 1628
Vol III, Page 1272
Vol IV, Page 1236

Christian Prayer:
Page 1037

Night Prayer after Evening Prayer II on Sundays and Solemnities

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:

We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

Christé, eléison
Christé, eléison

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

HYMN

O radiant Light, O Son divine
Of God the Father’s deathless face
O image of the light sublime
That fills the heavenly dwelling-place

Lord Jesus Christ, as daylight fades
As shine the lights of eventide
We praise the Father with the Son
The spirit blest and with them one.

O Son of God, the source of life
Praise is your due by night and day
Unsullied lips must raise the strain
Of your proclaimed and splendid name.

O Radiant Light by Choir of The Cathedral of the Madeleine & The Madeleine Choir School; Lyrics copyright 1973, Fides Publishers, Inc. Notre Dame, Indiana from “Morning Praise and Evensong”. Used by permission of the publisher for non-profit or devotional purposes.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

Psalm 91
Safe in God’s sheltering care

I have given you the power to tread upon serpents and scorpions (Luke 10:19).

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
and abides in the shade of the Almighty
says to the Lord: “My refuge,
my stronghold, my God in whom I trust!”

It is he who will free you from the snare
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night
nor the arrow that flies by day,
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon.

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach;
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.

Your eyes have only to look
to see how the wicked are repaid,
you who have said: “Lord, my refuge!”
and have made the Most High your dwelling.

Upon you no evil shall fall,
no plague approach where you dwell.
For you has he commanded his angels,
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you upon their hands
lest you strike your foot against a stone.
On the lion and the viper you will tread
and trample the young lion and the dragon.

Since he clings to me in love, I will free him;
protect him for he knows my name.
When he calls I shall answer: “I am with you,”
I will save him in distress and give him glory.

With length of life I will content him;
I shall let him see my saving power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

READING Revelation 22:4-5

They shall see the Lord face to face and bear his name on their foreheads. The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

GOSPEL CANTICLE

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
we have celebrated today
the mystery of the rising of Christ to new life.
May we now rest in your peace,
safe from all that could harm us,
and rise again refreshed and joyful,
to praise you throughout another day.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Blessing

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

30 posted on 10/14/2012 3:31:30 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: Salvation; All
Was I the only one uncomfortable with today's Gospel reading? I'm broke financially - so it's not about me personally. But the reading seems to imply that attaining wealth is sinful. Or am I misinterpreting it?

Anyone?

"You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me." At that statement his face fell, and he went away sad, for he had many possessions.

Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, "How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!" The disciples were amazed at his words. So Jesus again said to them in reply, "Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God."

31 posted on 10/14/2012 9:03:20 AM PDT by Tired of Taxes
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To: Tired of Taxes

The rich young man missed his opportunity to follow Jesus because of his possessions.

The point of the Gospel is what do we hold as more important than following Jesus?

Is it having a TV?

Having a new car?

Not checking in with your family?

Money is not evil — it is the love of money that is evil. And this rich young man wanted his possessions.

Did you see the line — only in Mark, “Jesus looked at him and loved him.” Jesus knew this young man was searching, and he loved him for that.


32 posted on 10/14/2012 2:28:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Tired of Taxes

This was Sacrificial Giving Sunday at my church today, so this was a great Gospel. The line at the end tells the disciples that they will receive one hundered-fold back for giving, even if it is straightening out the pews Monday morning or mopping the floors after coffee and donuts.

It is what we give in total:

Time
Talent
Treasure

All the emphasis cannot be put on the money alone.

The ending sentence also tells the apostles that they will suffer persecution. So will we as we follow Christ’s command to love others as he loved the Church.


33 posted on 10/14/2012 2:31:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A saint's day is superseded by the Sunday Liturgy.

Saint Callistus I, Pope and Martyr

Saint Callistus I, Pope and Martyr
Optional Memorial
October 14th

(+222) A slave in youth, St. Callistus was renown for his mercy toward repentant sinners, thus incurring the criticism of many Rigorists, most notably Tertullian. He defended the faith against the Adoptionist and Modalist heresies regarding the Holy Trinity and the Person of Jesus Christ. He was martyred in Rome during the reign of Alexander Severus.

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003

Collect:
O God, who raised up Pope Saint Callistus the First
to serve the Church
and attend devoutly to Christ's faithful departed,
strengthed us, we pray, by his witness to the faith,
so that, rescued from the slavery of corruption,
we may merit an incorruptible inheritance.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading:1 Peter 5:1-4
So I exhort the elders among you, as a fellow elder and a witness of the sufferings of Christ as well as a partaker in the glory that is to be revealed. Tend the flock of God that is your charge, not by constraint but willingly, not for shameful gain but eagerly, not as domineering over those in your charge but being examples to the flock. And when the chief Shepherd is manifested you will obtain the unfading crown of glory.

Gospel Reading: Luke 22:24-30
A dispute also arose among them, which of them was to be regarded as the greatest. And he said to them, "The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and those in authority over them are called benefactors. But not so with you; rather let the greatest among you become as the youngest, and the leader as one who serves. For which is the greater, one who sits at table, or one who serves? Is it not the one who sits at table? But I am among you as one who serves.

"You are those who have continued with me in my trials; and I assign to you, as my Father assigned to me, a kingdom, that you may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom, and sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel.


34 posted on 10/14/2012 2:50:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information:
St. Callistus I
Feast Day: October 14
Died: 223
Patron of: cemetery workers



35 posted on 10/14/2012 2:56:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Callistus

 
Feast Day: October 14
Born:(around) 165 :: Died:222

This great pope and martyr was once a young slave in Rome, who got into serious trouble. His master, a Christian, had put him in charge of a bank. Because other Christians, who took loans from the bank, refused to pay back the money, the bank went broke.

Callistus knew that he would be blamed even though he was not at fault and in fear, he ran away from Rome. He was caught, after jumping into the sea to try to get away. His sentence was a terrible one: he was chained and put to hard labor in a mill.

From this punishment Callistus was released, only because the people the bank owed money to, hoped he could get some of their money back. But once again he was arrested, this time for having gotten into a fight and was sent to the mines of Sardinia.

Fortunately, when the emperor freed all the Christians who had been punished and sent to those mines, Callistus was freed too. From that time on, things became better for him.

Pope St. Zephrinus got to know and trust St. Callistus. He put him in charge of the public Christian cemetery in Rome. This cemetery even today is called the Cemetery of St. Callistus.

Many popes were buried in it. Callistus proved himself worthy of the pope's confidence in him. St. Zephrinus not only ordained him a priest, but also made him his friend and advisor.

Later on, St. Callistus himself became pope. Some people complained because he showed too much mercy to sinners. However, the holy pope ruled that even murderers could be given communion after they had done penance for their sins.

He also declared that the rich could marry the poor. This made the Romans very angry because it was against their law. But Pope Callistus would not give in; he said that the Church law was always greater than the Roman law.

This great pope always defended the true teachings of Jesus. He was killed for his faith in 222 with a glorious martyrdom.

The life of St. Callistus reminds us that God can choose anyone to do his work. We only need to have faith and trust in Him.


36 posted on 10/14/2012 3:02:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, October 14

Liturgical Color: Green


Today the Church recalls St. Dominic Loricatus. When he discovered that his father paid a bribe to have him ordained a priest, he dedicated himself to a life of extreme penance. He was appointed prior of a hermitage founded by St. Peter Damian.


37 posted on 10/14/2012 4:45:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: October 14, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: May your grace, O Lord, we pray, at all times go before us and follow after and make us always determined to carry out good works. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: October 14th

Twenty-Eighth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

And Jesus looking upon him loved him, and said to him, "You lack one thing; go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me." At that saying his countenance fell, and he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions. And Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, "How hard it will be for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!" (Mk 10:21-23).

Today is the Optional Memorial of St. Callistus I which is superseded by the Sunday Liturgy.

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Book of Wisdom, 7:7-11 and is the conclusion of the fourth Suffering Servant Song; Christ's divine gifts become our means to salvation.

The second reading is from St. Paul's Letter to the Hebrews 4:12-13 which discusses how Christ, our high priest, is greater than the priests of the Mosaic Law. Our confidence is based on Christ's high priesthood. He is the perfect priest because He is merciful and compassionate. As man, He has experienced the sufferings that affect us, although He was free from sin. Since He knows our weaknesses so well, He can give us the help we need, and when He comes to judge us, He will take that weakness into account. We should respond to the Lord's goodness by staying true to our profession of faith. A Christian needs to live up to all the demands of his calling; he should be single-minded and free from doubts.

The Gospel is from St. Mark, 10:17-30. By coming to Jesus with his problem this man has done all Christians a good turn. We have learned from Christ's answer that over-attachment to worldly goods is one of the big obstacles to entering heaven. The man in this story was a good-living man, he kept all the commandments from his youth upward and he had an interest in eternal life, while many of his compatriots of that day had not. Reading this man's heart like an open book, Christ saw that not only was he fit for eternal life but that he was one who could have a very high place in heaven if he would leave everything and become a close follower of his. Not only would he become a saint, but he would lead many to sanctity.

The price to pay for this privilege, however, seemed too high to this "good man." "He had great possessions" and he was too attached to them so he could not accept Christ's offer, "his countenance fell and he went away sorrowful." Although his case was exceptional, Christ saw in him the makings of a saint and he asked him to make an exceptional sacrifice, one which he did not and does not ask of all his followers; his remark to the disciples later: "how hard it will be for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God" holds for all time and for all mankind.

This statement of Christ, however, does not mean that a follower may not possess any of this world's goods. He may possess and use those goods, but what he must not do is to allow them to take such a hold on him that he has no time for acquiring everlasting goods— the Christian virtues. Unfortunately, there are Christians whose whole purpose in this life is the accumulation of worldly goods. Concentration on such accumulation is wrong, but in many cases the methods of acquisition are unjust: defrauding laborers of their just wages; overcharging customers; cheating in business deals; giving false measures and many other devices which produce unearned wealth.

All this is far from Christian justice, and those who have let such sinful greed to regulate their lives are certainly not on the road to heaven. There are other sins, of course, which can keep us from heaven, but of all the sins a man can commit this irrational greed for the wealth of this world seems the most unreasonable of them all. How utterly inane and foolish to have spent a lifetime collecting something from which we shall soon be parted forever! The rich man's bank-book and his gilt-edged shares will be not only valueless in the after-life but they, if unjustly acquired, will be witnesses for the prosecution at the judgment on which one's eternal future depends. While most of us are not guilty of such excessive greed for wealth, we all do need to examine our consciences as to how we acquire and use the limited wealth we have. There are very rich men who have acquired their wealth honestly and justly and who spend much of their wealth on charitable causes. Their wealth will not hinder them from reaching heaven. On the other hand, there are many in the middle and lower income-bracket who may be offending against justice through the means they use to acquire what they have, and in the little helps which they refuse to a needy neighbor. We may not be able to found a hospital for the poor, or pay an annuity to support the family of a disabled fellow workman, but we are not excused from bringing a little gift to our neighbors who are in hospital, or from supplying even part of a meal for the dependants of the injured workman.

Remember that Christ praised the widow who put a mite (a cent) into the collection-box for the poor in the temple area, and he also said that a cup of cold water given in his name would not go without reward. We need not be rich in order to be charitable; often our own exaggerated sense of our poverty can make us hard-hearted and mean toward our fellowmen who look to us for help. The true Christian, whose principal purpose in life is to serve God, will not overburden himself with unnecessary pieces of luggage; instead he will travel light and be ever ready to help others also to carry their burdens.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


38 posted on 10/14/2012 4:49:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Word Among Us

Meditation: Hebrews 4:12-13

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

“The word of God is … sharper than any two-edged sword.” (Hebrews 4:12)

What a vivid image! God’s word is razor sharp, able to cut through our innermost thoughts. It can expose the inner motives and desires of our hearts. Most of us would cringe at the thought of such a weapon. So it’s good to know that this isn’t the whole picture.

If we want a fuller picture, we need to look at today’s Gospel reading. A wealthy man asks Jesus how he can gain eternal life. Jesus recounts the commandments, and the man is sure he has kept them. What is he still missing? This is when Mark gives us a vital detail: Jesus looked at him, “loved him,” and told him to give his money to the poor and then come follow him (Mark 10:21).

It’s this look of love that cut through the man’s confusion and exposed his real self. Jesus saw his sincerity, but also saw the “one thing” that stood in his way: he was too attached to his wealth (Mark 10:21). Jesus’ “look” wasn’t one of harsh scrutiny. It was an inviting look. It was a warm and compas­sionate look that saw the man’s strengths and weaknesses and offered him the grace to become the disciple he wanted to be.

It’s unfortunate that the rich man “went away sad” (Mark 10:22). But you don’t have to fol­low his footsteps! Every day, Jesus, the living Word of God, looks on you with the same penetrating gaze. He sees everything in you—the good, the bad, and the ugly—and he loves you intensely.

So take a moment now to let Jesus search you. As you do, you’ll discover that he sees so much goodness in your heart—goodness that you take for granted or didn’t even know was there. Of course he sees areas that need to change. But he is so happy with everything else that he is more than eager to help you make those changes.

“Lord Jesus, nothing in me is hidden from you. Thank you for looking on me with such love!”

Wisdom 7:7-11; Psalm 90:12-17; Mark 10:17-30

 


Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. The first reading prays for prudence and wisdom. Prudence is not fear, or timidity. It is the ability to direct our conduct in accordance with our judgment—to know what is really good in every circumstance and to choose the right means of achieving it. Why do you find that there are times when your actions are not aligned with what you know to be correct? Discuss what steps you can take to improve coordination between your judgment and your actions?

2. Wisdom, which is one of the gifts of the Holy Spirit, enables us to know God and His will for us. The author of the Book of Wisdom says that it is more valuable then a throne, riches, gold, silver, health, and comeliness. Why would he make such a drastic claim? What area(s) of your life do you need prayers for an increase in the gift of wisdom. If you are in a small group, ask the other members to pray for you.

3. In the responsorial Psalm, we hear these words, “Teach us to number our days aright, that we gain wisdom of heart” (Psalm 90:12). Why do you think numbering our days aright is tied to wisdom? We also hear the psalmist ask to be filled with the Lord’s kindness so that “we may shout for joy and gladness all our days” (90:14). What can you do to open yourself more to the Lord’s kindness so you can express your thankfulness with greater joy?

4. The second reading tells us that God’s word is “living and effective,” and so finely tuned an instrument it can discern the very thoughts of our heart. How do you use God’s word, the Scripture, to help form your thoughts and direct your actions? How can you go even deeper in studying and applying Scripture to your daily life?

5. In the Gospel, Jesus’ admonition against riches also applies to all of those things in our lives that have a hold on us and distract us from loving and serving God. What can you do to lessen the hold “things” have over you and increase the hold God has over you? Jesus also went on to say that whatever we give up for him and the Gospel, he would give even more back to us (a hundred fold!!). Why do we often struggle to believe this? Discuss some ways your possessions (your time, your talent, and your treasure) can be better used to serve God, his Church, and others.

6. In the meditation, we hear these words, “Every day, Jesus, the living Word of God, looks on you with the same penetrating gaze. He sees everything in you—the good, the bad, and the ugly—and he loves you intensely.” Do you believe this? The title for this meditation is “Seeing Ourselves as Jesus Sees Us.” How would you describe how Jesus sees you? In light of this, what can you do to deepen your relationship with Jesus?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord to give you a heart open to seeing Jesus’ loving gaze upon you. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.


39 posted on 10/14/2012 4:55:17 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Christian Pilgrim

WE MUST TRAVEL LIGHT

(A biblical refection on THE 28th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 14 October, 2012) 

Gospel Reading: Mark 10:17-30 

First Reading: Wis 7:7-11; Psalms: Ps 90:12-17; Second Reading: Heb 4:12-13 

The Scripture Text

And as He was setting out on His journey, a man ran up and knelt before Him, and asked Him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: ‘Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and mother.’” And he said to Him, “Teacher, all these I have observed from my youth.” And Jesus looking upon him loved him, and said to him, “You lack one thing; go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow Me.” At that saying his countenance fell, and he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions. 

And Jesus looked around and said to His disciples, “How hard it will be for those who have riches to enter the Kingdom of God!” And the disciples were amazed at His words. But Jesus said to them again, “Children, how hard it is for those who trust in riches to enter the Kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of God.” And they were exceedingly astonished, and said to Him, “Then who can be saved?” Jesus looked at them and said, “With men it is impossible, but not with God; for all things are possible with God.” Peter began to say to Him, “Lo, we have left everything and followed You.” Jesus said, “Truly, I say to you, there is no one who has left house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or lands, for My sake and for the Gospel, who will not receive a hundredfold now in this time, houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions, and in the age to come eternal life.” (Mk 10:17-30 RSV) 

There is one thing we have all experienced – being bound by the things we carry. At times, our possessions come to possess us. We feel restricted by them. We have not “travelled light,” and now we are finding out how hard it is to get home. It is indeed a common sight at airports or railway stations. In the airport’s luggage claim are we can see a man having a very hard time carrying all of his suitcases out of the area. In the end, carrying too much only impedes our progress and frustrates the realization of our goals.

In our Gospel reading of today, we encounter the sad story of the man “who had too much.” He was a good and respectable person. He had observed all of the rules and regulations. No doubt he had obtained his wealth by honest, hard work. He probably thought that the rules of business could also be applied to gaining everlasting life. However, Jesus indicates that there is still one more thing required: Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow Me” (Mk 10:21). How did the rich man respond? In this regard, Mark put a short note: “At that saying his countenance fell, and he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions” (Mk 10:22).

It is important to note that Jesus loved the rich man and called him to follow the radical way of poverty. The giving up of earthly treasures means that one comes to receive heavenly treasures. It is not enough to see what one has and give to the poor. One must then follow Jesus. To simply give up one’s possessions but not follow Jesus is to be materially and spiritually poor.

Finally, we should note that Jesus does call the rich to enter the Kingdom. He says, however, that it is hard. For material possessions weigh us down and blind us to the treasures that moth cannot consume, rust cannot destroy, or thief cannot break in and steal. Earthly treasures seem so immediate and lasting. Heavenly treasures have a ring of “pie in the sky when we die.” A true spirit of wisdom is needed for us to know the things that really matter.

The letter to the Hebrews brings our reflections into sharp focus: “The word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and spirit, of joints and marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart” (Heb 4:12). Today God’s word challenges us to travel light and accept the treasures of heaven provided by God’s loving grace. Like the rich man whom Jesus loved, we must decide what will fill us up. We can go away sad because too much of the world is our hearts. Or we can empty ourselves so that God can fill us up with the richness of His peace and love. What will it be? 

Short Prayer: Heavenly Father, through Your Holy Spirit, remind me always that I must travel light and accept the treasures of heaven by Your loving grace. Amen. 


40 posted on 10/14/2012 5:00:35 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for October 14, 2012:

“The spirit of wisdom came to me.” (Wisdom 7:7) What’s the wisest thing your beloved has ever said or done (besides marrying you)? Tell him or her. What’s the dumbest thing you’ve ever done? Forgive yourself.


41 posted on 10/14/2012 5:43:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Scripture Study for Catholics

Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle B

October 14, 2012

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Wisdom 7:7-11

Psalm: 90:12-17

Second Reading: Hebrews 4:12-13

Gospel Reading: Mark 10:17-30

  • Jesus is preparing to leave the area of Galilee “beyond the Jordan” on his way to Jerusalem (Mark 10:10, 17, 32). He continues his instruction on discipleship.
  • Jesus is approached by a man (Matthew tells us he is a young man, Matthew 19:20) who asks what he must do to enter the Kingdom of Heaven (verse 17). We find out later that this young man is also rich (v. 22). At the time, wealth was considered to be a sign of divine favor, if not election.
  • Jesus cites to him the last seven of the Ten Commandments—the ones having to do with love of neighbor (Exodus 20:2-17; Deuteronomy 5:6-21.He also adds a prohibition against fraud which, while not one of the Ten Commandments, may be inferred from Deuteronomy 24:14.). The rich young man assures Jesus that he has kept these from his youth.
  • Jesus, looking into this young man’s heart, sees something there that will cause him to be the only one in the Gospels to refuse a personal call from the Lord.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • In the 1st Reading, the writer is asking for wisdom, a gift he knows should be prized above all gifts. What kind of things does God want us to value and ask him for? What kind of things do I ask of God in my prayer time?
  • In light of the 2nd Reading, how do you approach the reading of Scripture or homilies at Mass? Can you think of any occasions when hearing God’s word helped to reveal intentions that had lain buried, perhaps for years?
  • In questioning the rich young man’s address to him as “good teacher,” and pointing out that “no one is good but God alone,” is Jesus denying his divinity, or affirming it? Why or why not?
  • Jesus quizzes the young man on only a partial list of the 10 Commandments (see Exodus 20). How well might the man obeyed the one’s not mentioned—those relating directly to God?
  • Why does Jesus command the man as he does (verse 21; see also Mark 8:34)? What does the man’s response reveal about what was incomplete about his good works?
  • What does the disciple’s shock reveal about them? On what basis is it possible for anyone to receive the Kingdom?
  • How many possessions do you have? How do they affect your relationship with Jesus? How dismayed are you when he asks you to give them up? Aside from riches, what is the “one thing” (verse 21)—friends, job, lifestyle, free time—that keeps you from completely following Jesus?
  • Are you more like the children we read about last week (Mark 10:13-16) or the rich young man in terms of the way you approach God?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 2068, 2072, 1858, 1618, 2082

 

Riches are not forbidden, but the pride of them is.  –St. John Chrysostom

 


42 posted on 10/14/2012 6:13:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Young Man Encounters Jesus
Pastor’s Column
28th Sunday Ordinary Time
October 14, 2012
 
 
          Is there something deeply lacking in my relationship with God? In this Sunday’s gospel of the rich young man and his haunting encounter with Jesus (Mark 10:17-30), Mark has an added detail that the other Gospels lack – he notes that Jesus looks at this young man and loves him. Why does he love him so much? This man has spent his life loving God without even realizing it, because he was trying to keep the Commandments. When I try to keep the Commandments of God, I love God.  It is really just that simple. Once again we see that love is not a feeling we have for someone – even though that is important– rather, love is a series of actions, of behaviors, of being obedient to what God asks me to do. 
 
          This rich young man has reached a very critical point in his life. Without realizing it he has literally come to the opportunity of a lifetime, one that would never come again, one that would come to very few people in human history. In most other Gospel accounts of a personal call by Jesus, it is Jesus himself who seeks the person out and says "follow me", but here it is the man who seeks Jesus. He takes the initiative as Jesus is about to walk away!
 
          No doubt the rich young man had been watching and listening to Jesus.  Now he sees his opportunity slipping away. He's been hesitating – perhaps afraid to ask – he knows that Jesus is about to get up and go away, so he finally summons his courage and comes before Jesus to ask his question.  He is not far from the kingdom of God, yet he misses his opportunity because something is held back. Money and wealth are not everyone's problem, but it was this man's problem.  All that he might have been in this world and the next were hanging on this one decision.  The man choses his worldly possessions and goes away sad. 
 
          Imagine yourself running up to Jesus as he's about to set out on the journey. What would you say to him? What would he say to you? Would you have the courage to ask him "What more do I need to do? Or perhaps, “What is coming between you and me, Lord, in our relationship?”  Do you have the courage to ask this question, and then to act on it? 
 
          There are many ways I can tell what priority God has in my life.  For example, if I don't attend mass on Sunday because there's a sports game on, then sports are more important to me than Jesus.  If I find time for everything but prayer, then almost everything is more important than Jesus.  How I act with the people I love at home is an indication of how much I love Christ, too.  How I spend my money is a very good indication of my real priorities.  We can tell a great deal about God’s place by simply looking at our checkbook. What have I done with what God has given me in my life? What is that one thing you and God will agree on that you must do? If God should reveal this to you, if you have the courage to ask, also pray for the courage to act, and not go away sad like this man did!
                                                                                                   
                                                                                          Father Gary

43 posted on 10/14/2012 6:18:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
St. Paul Center Blog

Wisdom and Riches: Scott Hahn reflects on the 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 10.12.12 |


Rich young Ruler

The rich young man in today’s Gospel wanted to know what we all want to know—how to live in this life so that we might live forever in the world to come. He sought what today’s Psalm calls “wisdom of heart.”

He learns that the wisdom he seeks is not a program of works to be performed, or behaviors to be avoided. As Jesus tells him, observing the commandments is essential to walking the path of salvation—but it can only get us so far.

The Wisdom of God is not precepts, but a person—Jesus Christ. Jesus is the Wisdom whose Spirit was granted to Solomon in today’s First Reading. Jesus is the Word of God spoken of in today’s Epistle. And Jesus, as He reveals himself to the rich man today, is God.

Readings:
Wisdom 7:7-11
Psalm 90:12-17
Hebrews 4:12-13
Mark 10:17-30

In Jesus we encounter Wisdom, the living and effective Word of God. As He does with the rich man today, He looks upon each of us with love. That look of love, that loving gaze, is a personal invitation—to give up everything to follow Him.

Nothing is concealed from His gaze, as we hear in the Epistle. In His fiery eyes, the thoughts of our hearts are exposed, and each of us must render an account of our lives (see Revelation 1:14).

We must have the attitude of Solomon, preferring Wisdom to all else, loving Him more than even life itself. This preference, this love, requires a leap of faith. We will be persecuted for this faith, Jesus tells His disciples today. But we must trust in His promise—that all good things will come to us in His company.

What, then, are the “many possessions” that keep us from giving ourselves totally to God? What are we clinging to—material things, comfort zones, relationships? What will it take for us to live fully for Christ’s sake and the sake of the Gospel?

Let us pray for the wisdom to enter into the kingdom of God. With the Psalmist, let us ask Him, “Teach us.”


44 posted on 10/14/2012 6:31:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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28th Sunday: "Go, sell what you have..."
 
 

Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?
 
 
 
 
Wisdom 7: 7-11
Hebrews 4: 12-13
Mk 10: 17-30

If you had a choice which would you rather loose: your family ties or all your possessions?  Granted, that isn’t much of a choice because both are important to us.  But, in the end, I think the vast majority of us would gladly part with our possessions rather than our ties to the family.  You hear of unfortunate folks who lose their home in a fire and with that most of what they hold dear.  The material memories, the personal items which have emotional attachments and memories of stories told.  But, the family is able to escape and everyone is saved.  Stuff you can replace but people are one of a kind. 
This Sunday’s Gospel reading from Mark poses a similar question.  Jesus encounters a well-meaning young man who happens to be very rich.  The young man poses a question to Jesus, the same question that each of us must ask: “Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” In the man’s question, however, there may be a sense of entitlement – “. . . inherit eternal life?”  It is as if God owes us something? Essentially he is asking, “What must I do to be saved?” but implies – “inherit” – as if God was going to pass on to him what was his due as we may feel our parents owe us stuff as they pass on from this life to the next.
All that aside for now, however, the question elicits a response from Jesus as he ticks off the precepts of the Ten Commandments.  The man states that he has been a serious minded Jew – “. . . all of these I have observed from my youth.” Evidently, he senses that there is still something missing.  In ancient belief, the many riches he enjoys are a sign to him that God has blessed him for being so faithful but he still wonders if there is something more.  Jesus’ answer is unexpected.
“You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor . . . then come, follow me.”  The incredulous response of the man is sad, “. . . At that statement, his face fell and he went away sad, for he had many possessions . . .” Remember Jesus looked upon him with love – he may indeed have wanted him to join his group of disciples but his attachments were too many. 
Is Jesus asking us to choose abject poverty before we can say we follow him?  Our western modern minds go that way indeed.  But, look at the Gospel in its entirety today.  Later, Peter queries: “We have given up everything and followed you.” We’ve done what you asked the young man to do so what’s in it for us?  “Everything” seems to imply more than material possessions.  Family ties have been left behind, the comfort of home and security of regular employment have been set aside, we travel from village to village and risk our reputations, etc.  This is no small sacrifice that the disciples of Jesus have made.
Our Lord’s response is reassuring about the “riches” that will come to them: “. . . a hundred times more now and in this present life . . .” But the what’s in it for us question seems natural but still a bit off the mark.  Jesus essentially lays the grounds for discipleship.  That his mission is so essential that our priorities must be set right before we attach ourselves to his mission.  This doesn’t necessarily mean we all need to be Francis of Assisi but we do need to have our attachments and detachments in proper order. 
God must be first in our lives.  If stuff and even human ties hold us tighter, then we might need to take a look at our priorities.  It’s a kind of a “I can’t have it all” and “I must choose between” perspective.  It seems to me that once God is center stage in our life, then all the stuff and the emotional ties to family and friends come into its proper order. We can live easily with something that isn’t new and shiny, the latest and the greatest, because we have found that our spiritual life provides so much more:

Each week we gather as Church around the table of the Lord.  Not to be spectators but to fully and actively participate.  Yet, if we simply leave Church at the end of holy Mass with no connection to our daily lives we are missing the point of coming at all.  Here we bring all that we have and are.  We offer it in thanksgiving and repentance and then go forth to "glorify the Lord by our lives."  By the choices we make and the example we give to others throughout our week, we show that God is always first above all things.
Where is God in your life?  I recently read what I thought was a wonderful insight about the power of secular culture today: “We give a nod to God and then go and do what we want.”  What about the so called cafeteria Catholics? Recently I heard about a parishioner who boldly proclaimed he was a “cafeteria Catholic” and proud of it.  I would guess he is choosing only the easy stuff. 
Much to ponder this weekend.  Jesus does ask much of us if we are really serious but we’re not just let out to dry.  He states that salvation is really God’s business and that with his help we will do well: “For human beings it is impossible, but not for God.  All things are possible for God.”  Reassuring words if we let go. 
More will come . . .
Fr. Tim

45 posted on 10/14/2012 6:43:50 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

“What must I do to inherit eternal life?”

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, October 14, 2012 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Wis 7:7-11
• Ps 90:12-13, 14-15, 16-17
• Heb 4:12-13
• Mk 10:17-30

“Once we see Jesus as a teacher of enlightenment, faith changes its focus,” wrote New Age guru Deepak Chopra in his 2008 best-seller, The Third Jesus: The Christ We Cannot Ignore (New York, 2008), “You don't need to have faith in the Messiah or his mission.”

[My lengthy review and critique of Chopra's book can be read on Ignatius Insight: "Chopra's Christ: The Mythical Creation of a New Age Panthevangelist".]

Chopra’s statement is a perfect summation of the way many people today claim to accept Christ while actually rejecting him. And although the language of “enlightenment” might be modern and monistic, Chopra’s approach is hardly new. In fact, it bears a strong resemblance to the path chosen by the rich young ruler, whose encounter with Jesus is described in today’s Gospel reading.

Kneeling in respect, the man addressed Jesus as “Good teacher” and asked, “What must I do to inherit eternal life?” It was a good start. After all, many people of the first century and the twenty-first century (and every century between) have failed to appreciate Jesus as a teacher. Many of them, it seems, don’t even ask the basic, essential questions about their existence: “Who am I? Why am I here? What or who am I made for?”

“Why,” Jesus asked the man, “do you call me good? No one is good but God alone.” This response is often misunderstood or misinterpreted.  Some skeptics say, “See! Jesus denied that he was God!” But this misses how Jesus used questions to prompt deeper answers, and how he offered in his response an invitation to deeper reflection and recognition. Put another way, Jesus was asking the rich young man to more clearly identify the basis for his recognition that Jesus was good.

In reciting some of the core commandments of the Law, Jesus further opened the doors of invitation. He knew—as the one of gave the Law and fulfilled it perfectly—that the Law was a signpost, not the destination. The Law, as Paul often pointed out, reveals our desperate need for God, but cannot save us.

The young man seemed to implicitly understand the incomplete nature of the Law, for he had observed the Law his entire life, yet wanted something more. Jesus then took the invitation to the next level, asking him to sell his possessions, “then come, follow me.” It is here that the rubber meets the road, for it is one thing to give your attention to a teacher for a few hours, days, or semesters; it is quite another to give yourself completely to the Savior. It’s nice to have a good teacher; it’s frightening to a put your life in the hands of the Messiah and to join in his mission.

“He did not follow,” wrote St. Augustine of the rich young man, “He just wanted a good teacher, but he questioned who the teacher was and scorned the identity of the One who was teaching.” Jesus seems so agreeable as long as he agrees with us. It is so much easier to make him a mere teacher, or to remake him in our image and according to our likes and dislikes. Jesus, however, will have none of it, for he came not just to teach but also to transform.

The treasure of earth is so tangible, while the treasure of heaven can seem remote and unobtainable. Pleasure is so immediate, while God can sometime seem so distant. Power is intoxicating, while humility can appear dry and dull. We can be tempted to despair, like the disciples, and exclaim, “Then who can be saved?” In response to this question, Jesus offered a third invitation—or, better, a third overture of the same essential invitation: “For human beings it is impossible, but not for God.” This is the invitation to total faith and familial trust in God the Father, who sent the Son as Savior, and who gives the Holy Spirit as a seal “in our hearts as a guarantee” (cf. 2 Cor. 1:21-22).

 Many men—rich, famous, and otherwise—have rejected the invitation. Will we depart in sadness or accept in gladness?

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the October 11, 2009, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


46 posted on 10/14/2012 6:56:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

God's Own Gaze, Full of Love

 on October 14, 2012 5:26 PM | 
 

Head-of-Christ-c.1648.jpg

The Face of Christ or, if you will, the Gaze of Christ, is a motif that recurs frequently in the preaching of Pope Benedict XVI, as well as in his writings. In today's Angelus Address, the Holy Father alludes to that mysterious exchange of gazes, by which a particular vocation -- and often one to the priesthood or monastic life -- is both offered and received. That exchange of gazes is, of course, but the beginning. A priestly or monastic (or religious) vocation cannot be sustained except by growing into an exchange of gazes that becomes habitual. And this habitual exchange of gazes is, in fact, the gift of contemplation.

There may be readers of Vultus Christi who have, at one time or another, recognized the gaze of Christ resting upon with with an unspeakable tenderness. This sometimes happens when one is lingering in the radiance of the Eucharistic Face of Jesus. It may also happen when one is bent over the Word of God, or praying the Psalms. Meet the gaze of Christ with your own gaze. Look at Him. Begin to live, as Blessed Elisabeth of the Trinity says, with "your eyes in His eyes." And should He call you to monastic life, communicate with us at Silverstream Priory. Do not go away sad. Say "yes" to the joy of having nought but Christ, and of preferring nothing whatsoever to His love.

Here is the text of the Holy Father's Angelus Address:

Dear brothers and sisters!

When God Conquers a Heart

Wealth is the principal topic of this Sunday's Gospel (Mark 10:17-30). Jesus teaches that it is very difficult for a rich person to enter the Kingdom of God, but not impossible; in fact, God can conquer the heart of a person who has many possessions and move him to solidarity and sharing with the needy, with the poor, to enter into the logic of the gift. This is how wealth presents itself in the life of Jesus Christ, who - as the Apostle Paul writes - "rich though he was, he became poor for us so that we might become rich though his poverty" (2 Corinthians 8:9).

After Life in Its Fullness

As often happens in the Gospels, everything begins from an encounter. In this case Jesus' meeting with a man who "had many possessions" (Mark 10:22). He was a person who from his youth had faithfully observed the commandments of God's Law, but he had not yet found true happiness; this is why he asks Jesus what he must do to "inherit eternal life" (10:17). On the one hand, like everyone else, he is after life in its fullness. On the other hand, being used to depending on his wealth, he thinks that he might be able to "buy" eternal life in some way, perhaps by observing some special commandment.

He Went Away Sad

Jesus welcomes the profound desire that is in him and, the evangelist notes, casts a gaze full of love upon him, God's own gaze (cf. 10:21). But Jesus also understands what the man's weakness is: it is precisely his attachment to his many possessions, and this is why he invites him to give everything to the poor, so that his treasure - and thus his heart - will no longer be on earth but in heaven, and adds: "Come! Follow me!" (10:22). That man, instead of accepting Jesus' invitation, goes away sad (10:23) since he is unable to give up his wealth, which can never give him happiness and eternal life.

Not Impossible for God

It is at this point that Jesus offers his teaching to the disciples, and to us today: "How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!" (10:23). The disciples are puzzled, and even more so when Jesus adds: "It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God." But seeing that the disciples are astonished he says: "For human beings it is impossible, but not for God.

Saints Poor and Rich

All things are possible for God" (10:24-27). St. Clement comments on the episode in this way: "The story teaches the rich that they must not neglect their salvation as if they were already condemned. They need not throw their wealth into the sea or condemn it as insidious and hostile to life, but they must learn how to use their wealth and obtain life" ("What rich person will be saved?" 27, 1-2). The Church's history is full of examples of rich people who used their possessions in an evangelical way, achieving sanctity. We need only think of St. Francis, St. Elizabeth or St. Charles Borromeo. May the Virgin Mary, Seat of Wisdom, help us to welcome Jesus' invitation with joy so that we might enter into the fullness of life.


47 posted on 10/14/2012 7:13:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Vultus Christi

Praying to Saint Joseph for Priests

 on October 14, 2012 6:23 PM |
Knock_shrine.JPG

To follow up on my homily at Knock yesterday, I thought I might share again the prayers to Saint Joseph for priests that I was inspired to write some years ago.

Prayer to Saint Joseph for Priests

O glorious Saint Joseph,
who, on the word of the angel
speaking to you in the night,
put fear aside to take your Virgin Bride into your home,
show yourself today the advocate and protector of priests.
Protector of the Infant Christ,
defend them against every attack of the enemy,
preserve them from the dangers that surround them
on every side.
Remember Herod's threats against the Child,
the anguish of the flight into Egypt by night,
and the hardships of your exile.
Stand by the accused;
stretch out your hand to those who have fallen;
comfort the fearful;
forsake not the weak;
and visit the lonely.
Let all priests know that in you
God has given them a model
of faith in the night, obedience in adversity,
chastity in tenderness, and hope in uncertainty.
You are the terror of demons
and the healer of those wounded in spiritual combat.
Come to the defence of every priest in need;
overcome evil with good.
Where there are curses, put blessings,
where harm has been done, do good.
Let there be joy for the priests of the Church,
and peace for all under your gracious protection.
Amen.

A Priest's Prayer to Saint Joseph

Saint Joseph,
I take you this day as my advocate and defender,
my counselor and my friend.
Open your heart to me
as you opened your home to the Virgin Mother
in her hour of need.
Protect my holy priesthood
as you protected the life of the Infant Christ
threatened by cruel Herod.
In darkness bring me light;
in weakness, strength,
and in fear the peace that passes understanding.
For the sake of the tender love that bound you
to the Virgin Mary and the Infant Christ,
be for me, Saint Joseph, a constant intercessor
and a shield against every danger of body, mind, and soul
so that, in spite of my weaknesses and sins,
my priesthood may bring glory to Christ
and serve to increase the beauty of holiness
in his bride the Church.
Amen.

Prayer to Saint Joseph for a Particular Priest

Saint Joseph,
I present to you this day
Father N., priest of Jesus Christ,
and beg you to be to him
advocate and defender,
counselor and friend.
Open your heart to him
as you opened your home to the Virgin Mother
in her hour of need.
Protect his holy priesthood
as you protected the life of the Infant Christ
threatened by cruel Herod.
In darkness bring him light;
in weakness, strength,
and in fear the peace that passes understanding.
For the sake of the tender love that bound you
to the Virgin Mary and the Infant Christ,
be for him, Saint Joseph, a constant intercessor
and a shield against every danger of body, mind, and soul
so that, in spite of his weaknesses and sins,
his priesthood may bring glory to Christ
and serve to increase the beauty of holiness
in his bride the Church.
Amen.


48 posted on 10/14/2012 7:14:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Regnum Christi

Hitting the Spiritual Wall
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time




Father James Swanson, LC

Mark 10:17-30

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up, knelt down before him, and asked him, "Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" Jesus answered him, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: ´You shall not kill; you shall not commit adultery; you shall not steal; you shall not bear false witness; you shall not defraud; honor your father and your mother.´" He replied and said to him, "Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth." Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him, "You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me." At that statement his face fell, and he went away sad, for he had many possessions. Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, "How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!" The disciples were amazed at his words. So Jesus again said to them in reply, "Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God." They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves, "Then who can be saved?" Jesus looked at them and said, "For human beings it is impossible, but not for God. All things are possible for God." Peter began to say to him, "We have given up everything and followed you." Jesus said, "Amen, I say to you, there is no one who has given up house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or lands for my sake and for the sake of the gospel who will not receive a hundred times more now in this present age: houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions, and eternal life in the age to come."

 Introductory Prayer: I come to you Jesus, my friend and my teacher, so that by listening to you I will discover you more, learn from you more and fully accept the demanding conditions of following you. I love you Lord, and I trust myself entirely to you.

 Petition: Help me, Lord, to accept generously the sacrifices that you ask of me today.

 1. A Sincere Question: Jesus meets a man who wants to do whatever is necessary to obtain eternal life. How do we know this? When Jesus lists off the commandments for him as examples of what he must do to obtain eternal life, he replies that he has observed all of them since his youth.  Mark goes on to tell us that, “Jesus looking at him, loved him.” If the man weren’t telling the truth, Jesus would have said so, perhaps jogging his conscience and helping him to see where he still needed to improve in his following of the commandments. Jesus does this with us every day if we are sincere and ask ourselves daily if we are truly doing God’s will. He has no qualms in telling us where we are failing and helping us to do better.

 2. A Sincere Life: Apparently this man is telling the truth. He has always made an earnest effort and has been successful in following all that his Jewish faith asks -- at least insofar as he understands God’s Law. Perhaps we wish we could also respond with a clear conscience, “I have kept all these.” Yet as human beings, we are weak. We can fall at any time. What God expects to see from us is not a life without sin, but that we seek repentance and a quick return to obedience when we do fall. A person who makes light of his sins against God, even in just little things, is destroying his conscience. In contrast, by taking responsibility for our sins, repenting and quickly getting up from our falls, we show our commitment to respect the moral demand of God’s commandments, and we prepare the ground to receive the grace of moral perfection that we cannot achieve by ourselves.

 

 3. But He Can’t Step Up: The man is doing everything that his Jewish faith requires and still he wants to do more for God. He has never refused God anything. Jesus sees he is ready for the next step. He calls him to be an apostle. He calls him to give up everything else in his life and follow him. You would think that since he has never denied God anything, he would be able to say “yes” to this. But he cannot. It is too much. Although he doesn’t realize it, there are things he possesses that he loves more than God.  Sometimes we progress in our spiritual life, giving everything that God asks for, until the day he asks for something we aren’t prepared to give. Our spiritual life stalls -- sometimes for years -- until we are willing to give what Jesus asks for. Christ calls all people to perfection, to place God above all things. He promises that if we give up our own selves to follow him, he will fill our lives with himself.

 Conversation with Christ: Dear Jesus, I have tried to follow you faithfully. You know that sometimes it has been a struggle. Help me to leave my comfort zone. Help me to give up the other loves that come before you. Help me to be as generous today as you hope I will be.

 Resolution: What is the moment in which I usually fail God on a Sunday? I will make sure to be faithful in that moment today.


49 posted on 10/14/2012 7:28:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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What is the State of My Faith?

by Food For Thought on October 13, 2012 · 2 Comments

In today’s first reading, St. Paul reassures the Galatians who were counted among the Gentiles. But while the laws as laid down by Moses (the Mosaic law) fulfilled a role, its adherents put more emphasis on “form” rather than on “substance,” and they believed that salvation could be attained exclusively by believers who fulfilled the law to the letter. The scribes and Pharisees of Jesus’ time did not understand that what mattered more was their faith and the state of their hearts. They were blind to the freedom that Christ offered to those who believed in him. Gentiles and Jews are co-equal heirs, as long as they “hear the Word of God and observe it” (Luke 11:28) with their hearts.

Christian traditions, rituals, and symbolism hold an important place in our faith life, but Christ tells us that more than mere observance of rules and rituals, God delights in a people who listen to His voice and who model their lives after His teachings, acting with kindness, humility, mercy, and concern for others.

What is the state of my faith? Do I take pains to know my Savior through reading and meditation on Scripture? Do I recite a novena to a saint during the Mass, failing instead to listen and meditate on the gospel that chronicles Christ’s own words and his life? Today, let us resolve to put more “substance” rather than “form” to the day-to-day practice of our faith.


50 posted on 10/14/2012 7:39:09 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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