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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 10-21-12, Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 10-21-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 10/20/2012 3:28:47 PM PDT by Salvation

October 21, 2012

 

Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Is 53:10-11

The LORD was pleased
to crush him in infirmity.

If he gives his life as an offering for sin,
he shall see his descendants in a long life,
and the will of the LORD shall be accomplished through him.

Because of his affliction
he shall see the light in fullness of days;
through his suffering, my servant shall justify many,
and their guilt he shall bear.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 33:4-5, 18-19, 20, 22

R. (22) Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
Upright is the word of the LORD,
and all his works are trustworthy.
He loves justice and right;
of the kindness of the LORD the earth is full.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
See, the eyes of the LORD are upon those who fear him,
upon those who hope for his kindness,
To deliver them from death
and preserve them in spite of famine.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
Our soul waits for the LORD,
who is our help and our shield.
May your kindness, O LORD, be upon us
who have put our hope in you.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

Reading 2 Heb 4:14-16

Brothers and sisters:
Since we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens,
Jesus, the Son of God,
let us hold fast to our confession.
For we do not have a high priest
who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses,
but one who has similarly been tested in every way,
yet without sin.
So let us confidently approach the throne of grace
to receive mercy and to find grace for timely help.

Gospel Mk 10:35-45

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him,
"Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you."
He replied, "What do you wish me to do for you?"
They answered him, "Grant that in your glory
we may sit one at your right and the other at your left."
Jesus said to them, "You do not know what you are asking.
Can you drink the cup that I drink
or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?"
They said to him, "We can."
Jesus said to them, "The cup that I drink, you will drink,
and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized;
but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give
but is for those for whom it has been prepared."
When the ten heard this, they became indignant at James and John.
Jesus summoned them and said to them,
"You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles
lord it over them,
and their great ones make their authority over them felt.
But it shall not be so among you.
Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.
For the Son of Man did not come to be served
but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many."

or Mk 10:42-45

Jesus summoned the Twelve and said to them,
"You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles
lord it over them,
and their great ones make their authority over them felt.
But it shall not be so among you.
Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.
For the Son of Man did not come to be served
but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many."


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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1 posted on 10/20/2012 3:28:56 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
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2 posted on 10/20/2012 3:44:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Isaiah 53:10-11

Fourth Song of the Servant of the Lord (Continuation)


[10] Yet it was the will of the LORD to bruise him;
he has put him to grief;
when he makes himself an offering for sin,
he shall see his offspring, he shall prolong his days;
the will of the LORD shall prosper in his hand;
[11] he shall see the fruit of the travail of his soul and be satisfied;
by his knowledge shall the righteous one, my servant,
make many to be accounted righteous;
and he shall bear their iniquities.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

52:13-53:12. This fourth Song of the Servant is one of the most commented on
passages in the Bible, as regards both its literary structure and its content. From
the point of view of structure, it interrupts the hymn-style of chapter 52 (which is
taken up again in chapter 54); the style here is more reflective; the theme, the va-
lue of suffering. In terms of content, the song is unusual in that it shows the ser-
vant triumphing through his humiliation and suffering. Even more than that — he
makes the pains and sins of others his own, in order to heal them and set them
free. Prior to this, the idea of “vicarious expiation” was unknown in the Bible. The
passage is original even in its vocabulary: it contains forty words that are not to
be found elsewhere in the Bible.

The poem, which is very carefully composed, divides into three stanzas: the first
(52:13-15) is put on the Lord’s lips and it acts as a kind of overture to what fol-
lows — taking in the themes of the triumph of the servant (v. 13), his humiliation
and suffering (v. 14), and the stunning effect that this has on his own people and
on strangers.

The second stanza (53:1-11a) celebrates the servant’s trials, and the good effects
they produce. This is spoken in the first person plural, standing for the people and
the prophet: both feel solidarity with the servant of the Lord. This stanza has four
stages to it: first (53:1-3) it describes the servant’s noble origins (he grew up be-
fore the Lord like a young plant: cf. v. 2) and the low esteem in which he is held
as a “man of sorrows”. Then we learn that all this suffering is atonement for the
sins of others (53:4-6). Traditionally, suffering was interpreted as being a punish-
ment for sins, but here it is borne on behalf of others. This is the first lesson to
be learned by those who see him “stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted”, and
it marks the climax of the poem. Thirdly (53:7-9), the point is made, again that
he has freely accepted suffering and meekly, offers himself as a sacrifice of
atonement (he is like a lamb, like a sheep). His death is as ignominious as the
suffering that precedes it. Finally (vv. 10-11a) we are told how fruitful all this suf-
fering is: like the patriarchs of old (the text seems to imply) the servant will have
many offspring and a long life and be a man of great wisdom.

In the, third stanza (53:11b-12) the Lord speaks again, finally acknowledging that
his servant’s sacrifice is truly efficacious: he will cause many to be accounted
“righteous”, that is, he will win their salvation (v. 11) and will share in the Lord’s
spoils (v. 12).

The fourth song of the servant of the Lord was from very early on interpreted as
having a current application. When the Jews of Alexandria made the Greek trans-
lation of the Old Testament (the Septuagint) around the second century BC, they
tinkered a little with the text to indicate that the servant in the poem stood for the
people of Israel in the diaspora. Those Jews, who encountered huge obstacles in
their effort to maintain their identity in that Hellenistic and polytheistic environ-
ment, found comfort in the hope that they would emerge enhanced, just like the
servant.

Jews of Palestine identified the victorious servant with the Messiah, but they rein-
terpreted the sufferings described here to apply them to the pagan nations. The
Dead Sea Scrolls interpret this song in the light of the ignominy experienced by
the Teacher of Righteousness, the probable founder of the group that established
itself at Qumran.

Jesus revealed his redemptive mission to be that of the suffering servant prophe-
sied by Isaiah here. He referred to him on a number of occasions — in his reply to
the request made by the sons of Zebedee (”the Son of man came not to be
served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many”: Mt 20:28 and par.);
at the Last Supper, when he announced his ignominious death among transgres-
sors, quoting 53:12 (Lk 22:37); in some passages in the fourth Gospel (Jn 12:32,
37-38); etc. He also seems to refer to it in his conversation with the disciples of
Emmaus (Lk 24:25ff) to explain his passion and death. Therefore, the first Chris-
tians interpreted Jesus’ death and resurrection in terms of this poem; evidence of
this is the expression “in accordance with the scriptures” in 1 Corinthians 15:3;
the words “for our trespasses” (Rom 4:25; 1 Cor 15:3-5); the Christological hymn
in the Letter to the Philippians (Phil 2:6-11); and expressions used in the First
Letter of Peter (1 Pet 2:22-25) and in other New Testament passages (Mt 8:17;
27:29; Acts 8:26-40; Rom 10:16; etc.).

Patristic tradition reads the song as a prophecy that found fulfillment in Christ
(cf. St Clement of Rome, “Ad Corinthios”, 16:1-14; St Ignatius Martyr, “Epistula
ad Polycarpum”, 1, 3; the so-called “Letter of Barnabas”, 5, 2 and “Epistula ad
Diognetuin”, 9, 2; etc.). The Church uses it in the Good Friday liturgy.

52:14. “Beyond human semblance”: this phrase sums up the description given in
53:2-3 and shows the intense pain reflected in the servant’s face: the description
is so graphic that Christian ascetical writing, with good reason, reads it as antici-
pating the passion of our Lord: “The prophet, who has rightly been called ‘the Fifth
Evangelist’, presents in this Song an image of the sufferings of the Servant with a
realism as acute as if he were seeing them with his own eyes: the eyes of the
body and of the spirit. [...] The Song of the Suffering Servant contains a descrip-
tion in which it is possible, in a certain sense, to identify the stages of Christ’s
Passion in their various details: the arrest, the humiliation, the blows, the spitting,
the contempt for the prisoner, the unjust sentence, and then the scourging, the
crowning with thorns and the mocking, the carrying of the Cross, the crucifixion
and the agony” (John Paul II, “Salvifici Doloris”, 17; cf. idem, “Dives in Misericor-
dia”, 7).

53:1. St Paul cites this verse to prove the need for preaching (Rom 10:16). The
verse also underlines the extraordinary degree of undeserved suffering endured
by the Servant. It is sometimes interpreted as a further sign of the humility of
Christ, who, being divine, took on the form of a servant: “Christ is a man of hum-
ble thought and feeling, unlike those who attack his flock. The heart of God’s ma-
jesty, the Lord Jesus Christ, did not come with loud cries of arrogance and pride;
he came in humility, as the Holy Spirit said of him: ‘Who has believed what we
have heard?’” (St Clement of Rome, “Ad Corinthios”, 16, 1-3).

53:4-5. “He has borne our griefs [or pains]”: the servant’s sufferings are not due
to his own personal sins; they are atonement for the sins of others. “The suffe-
rings of our Savior are our cure” (Theodoret of Cyrus, “De Incarnatione Domini”,
28). He suffered on account of the sins of the entire people, even though he was
not guilty of them. By bearing the penalty for those sins, he expiated the guilt in-
volved. St Matthew, after recounting some miraculous cures and the casting out
of devils, sees the words of v. 4a fulfilled in Christ (Mt 8:17). He interprets Jesus
Christ as being the servant foretold by the prophet, who will cure the physical suf-
fering of people as a sign that he is curing the root cause of all types of evil, that
is, sin, iniquity (v. 5). The miracles worked by Jesus for the sick are therefore a
sign of Redemption: “Christ’s whole life is a mystery of “redemption”. Redemp-
tion comes to us above all through the blood of his cross (cf. Eph 1:7; Col 1:13-
14; 1 Pet 1:18-19), but this mystery is at work throughout Christ’s entire life”
(”Catechism of the Catholic Church”, 517).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 10/20/2012 3:53:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Hebrews 4:14-16

Our Confidence is Based on Christ’s Priesthood


[14] Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the hea-
vens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. [15] For we have
not a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one
who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sinning. [16] Let
us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive
mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

14-16. The text now reverts to its main theme (cf. 2:17), that is, the priesthood
of Christ. It highlights the dignity of the new high priest, who has passed through
the heavens; and His mercy, too, for He sympathizes with our weaknesses. We
have, therefore, every reason to approach Him with confidence. “The believers
were at that time in a storm of temptation; that is why the Apostle is consoling
them, saying that our High Priest not only knows, as God, the weaknesses of
our nature: as man, He has also experienced the sufferings that affect us, al-
though He was free from sin. Since He knows our weaknesses so well, He can
give us the help we need, and when He comes to judge us, He will take that
weakness into account in His sentence” (”Interpretatio Ep. Ad Haebreos, ad loc.”).

We should respond to the Lord’s goodness by staying true to our profession of
faith. The confession or profession of faith referred to here is not simply an exter-
nal declaration: external confession is necessary but there must also be commit-
ment and a spirit of fidelity. A Christian needs to live up to all the demands of his
calling; he should be single-minded and free from doubts.

15. “If we should some time find ourselves sorely tempted by our enemies, it will
greatly help us to remember that we have on our side a high priest who is most
compassionate, for He chose to experience all kinds of temptation” (”St. Pius V
Catechism”, IV, 15, 14). In order to understand and help a sinner to get over his
falls and cope with temptation, one does not oneself need to have experience of
being tempted; in fact, only one who does not sin knows the full force of tempta-
tion, because the sinner gives in prior to resisting to the end. Christ never yielded
to temptation. He therefore experienced much more than we do (because we are
often defeated by temptation) the full rigor and violence of those temptations
which He chose to undergo as man at particular points in His life. Our Lord, then,
allowed Himself to be tempted, in order to set us an example and prevent us from
ever losing confidence in our ability to resist temptation with the help of grace (cf.
notes on Matthew 4:1-11 and paragraph).

“There is no man”, St. Jerome comments, “who can resist all tests except He
who, made in our likeness, has experienced everything but sin” (”Comm. In Ioan-
nam”, II, 46). Christ’s sinlessness, often affirmed in Sacred Scripture (Romans 8:
3; 2 Corinthians 5:21; John 8:46; 1 Peter 1:19; 2:21-24), follows logically from His
being God and from His human integrity and holiness. At the same time Christ’s
weakness, which He chose to experience out of love for us, is a kind of invitation
from God to pray for strength to resist sin. “Let us adore Christ who emptied Him-
self to assume the condition of a slave. He was tempted in every way that we are,
but did not sin. Let us turn in prayer to Him, saying, ‘You took on our human
weakness. Be the eyes of the blind, the strength of the weak, the friend of the
lonely’” (”Liturgy of the Hours”, Christmas Day, Evening Prayer I).

16. The “throne” is the symbol of Christ’s authority; He is King of the living and
the dead. But here it speaks of a “throne of grace”: through the salvation worked
by Christ, the compassionate Priest and Intercessor, God’s throne has become
a judgment seat from which mercy flows. Christ has initiated for mankind a time
of forgiveness and sanctification in which He does not yet manifest His position
as Sovereign Judge. Christ’s priesthood did not cease to operate with His death;
it continues in Heaven, where He forever pleads on our behalf, and therefore we
should have confident recourse to Him.

“What security should be ours in considering the mercy of the Lord! ‘He has but
to cry for redress, and I, the Ever-Merciful, will listen to him’ (Exodus 22:27). It is
an invitation, a promise that He will not fail to fulfill. ‘Let us then with confidence
draw near to the throne of grace, and we may receive mercy and find grace to
help in time of need’. The enemies of our sanctification will be rendered power-
less if the mercy of God goes before us. And if through our own fault and human
weakness we should fall, the Lord comes to our aid and raises us up” (St. J. Es-
criva, “Christ Is Passing By”, 7).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 10/20/2012 3:54:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Mark 10:35-45

The Sons of Zebedee Make Their Request


[35] And James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to Him, and said
to Him, “Teacher, we want You to do for us whatever we ask of You.” [36] And
He said to them, “What do you want Me to do for you?” [37] And they said to
Him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.”
[38] But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you
able to drink the cup that I drink, or to be baptized with the baptism with which
I am baptized?” [39] And they said to Him, “We are able.” And Jesus said to
them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am
baptized, you will be baptized; [40] but to sit at My right hand or at My left is not
Mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.” [41] And when
the ten heard it, they began to be indignant at James and John. [42] And Jesus
called them to Him and said to them, “You know that those who are supposed
to rule over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great men exercise authority
over them. [43] But it shall not be so among you; but whoever would be great
among you must be your servant, [44] and whoever would be first among you
must be slave of all. [45] For the Son of Man also came not to be served but to
serve, and to give His life as a ransom of many.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

35-44. We can admire the Apostles’ humility: they do not disguise their earlier
weakness and shortcomings from the first Christians. God also has wanted the
Holy Gospel to record the earlier weaknesses of those who will become the un-
shakeable pillars of the Church. The grace of God works wonders in people’s
souls: so we should never be pessimistic in the face of our own wretchedness:
“I can do all things in Him who strengthens me” (Philippians 4:13).

38. When we ask for anything in prayer, we should be ready, always, to accept
God’s will, even if it does not coincide with our own: “His Majesty knows best
what is suitable for us; it is not for us to advise Him what to give us, for He can
rightly reply that we know not what we ask” (St. Teresa, “Mansions”, II, 8).

43-45. Our Lord’s word and example encourage in us a genuine spirit of Chris-
tian service. Only the Son of God who came down from Heaven and freely sub-
mitted to humiliation (at Bethlehem, Nazareth, Calvary, and in the Sacred Host)
can ask a person to make himself last, if he wishes to be first.

The Church, right through history, continues Christ’s mission of service to man-
kind: “Experienced in human affairs, the Church, without attempting to interfere
in any way in the politics of States, ‘seeks but a solitary goal: to carry forward
the work of Christ Himself under the lead of the befriending Spirit. And Christ en-
tered this world to give witness to the truth, to rescue and not to sit in judgment,
to serve and not to be served’ (Vatican II, “Gaudium Et Spes”, 3). Sharing the no-
blest aspirations of men and suffering when she sees them not satisfied, she wi-
shes to help them attain their full flowering, and that is why she offers men what
she possesses as her characteristic attribute: a global vision of man and of the
human race” (Paul VI, “Populorum Progressio”, 13).

Our attitude should be that of our Lord: we should seek to serve God and men
with a truly supernatural outlook, not expecting any return; we should serve even
those who do not appreciate the service we do them. This undoubtedly does not
make sense, judged by human standards. However, the Christian identified with
Christ takes “pride” precisely in serving others; by so doing he shares in Christ’s
mission and thereby attains his true dignity: “This dignity is expressed in readi-
ness to serve, in keeping with the example of Christ, who ‘came not to be served
but to serve.’ If, in the light of this attitude of Christ’s, ‘being a king’ is truly possi-
ble only by ‘being a servant’, then ‘being a servant’ also demands so much spiri-
tual maturity that it must really be described as ‘being a king.’ In order to be able
to serve others worthily and effectively we must be able to master ourselves, pos-
sess the virtues that make this mastery possible” (Bl. John Paul II, “Redemptor
Hominis”, 21). Cf. note on Matthew 20:27-28.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 10/20/2012 3:55:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Oct 21, Invitatory for Sunday of the 29th week of Ordinary Time

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the rock who saves us, alleluia.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the rock who saves us, alleluia.

6 posted on 10/20/2012 7:11:53 PM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 21, Office of Readings for Sunday of the 29th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 615
Proper Of Seasons: 405
Psalter: Sunday, Week I, 646

Office of Readings for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation!
O my soul, praise Him, for He is thy health and salvation!
All ye who hear, now to His temple draw near;
Praise Him in glad adoration.

Praise to the Lord, who over all things so wondrously reigneth,
Shelters thee under His wings, yea, so gently sustaineth!
Hast thou not seen how thy desires ever have been
Granted in what He ordaineth?

Praise to the Lord, who hath fearfully, wondrously, made thee;
Health hath vouchsafed and, when heedlessly falling, hath stayed thee.
What need or grief ever hath failed of relief?
Wings of His mercy did shade thee.

Praise to the Lord, who doth prosper thy work and defend thee;
Surely His goodness and mercy here daily attend thee.
Ponder anew what the Almighty can do,
If with His love He befriend thee.

Praise to the Lord, who, when tempests their warfare are waging,
Who, when the elements madly around thee are raging,
Biddeth them cease, turneth their fury to peace,
Whirlwinds and waters assuaging.

Praise to the Lord, who, when darkness of sin is abounding,
Who, when the godless do triumph, all virtue confounding,
Sheddeth His light, chaseth the horrors of night,
Saints with His mercy surrounding.

Praise to the Lord, O let all that is in me adore Him!
All that hath life and breath, come now with praises before Him.
Let the Amen sound from His people again,
Gladly for aye we adore Him.

“Praise to the Lord” by The Choristers of the Madeleine Choir School; Words: Joachim Neander, 1680. Music: Erneuerten Gesangbuch, 1665.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 See how the cross of the Lord stands revealed as the tree of life.

Psalm 1
There are two ways a man may take

They are happy who, putting all their trust in the cross, have plunged into the water of life (from an author of the second century).

Happy indeed is the man
who follows not the counsel of the wicked;
nor lingers in the way of sinners
nor sits in the company of scorners,
but whose delight is the law of the Lord
and who ponders his law day and night.

Ant. See how the cross of the Lord stands revealed as the tree of life.

He is like a tree that is planted
beside the flowing waters,
that yields its fruit in due season
and whose leaves shall never fade;
and all that he does shall prosper.
Not so are the wicked, not so!

Ant. See how the cross of the Lord stands revealed as the tree of life.

For they like winnowed chaff
shall be driven away by the wind.
When the wicked are judged they shall not stand,
nor find room among those who are just;
for the Lord guards the way of the just
but the way of the wicked leads to doom.

Ant. See how the cross of the Lord stands revealed as the tree of life.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord, you are the fullness of life of holiness and of joy. Fill our days and night with the love of your wisdom, that we may bear fruit in the beauty of holiness, like a tree watered by running streams.

Ant. See how the cross of the Lord stands revealed as the tree of life.

Ant. 2 Here is a King of my own choosing who will rule on Mount Zion.

Psalm 2
The Messiah, king and conqueror

The rulers of the earth joined forces to overthrow Jesus, your anointed Son (Acts 4:27).

Why this tumult among nations,
among peoples this useless murmuring?
They arise, the kings of the earth,
princes plot against the Lord and his Anointed.
“Come let us break their fetters,
come, let us cast off their yoke.”

Ant. Here is a King of my own choosing who will rule on Mount Zion.

He who sits in the heavens laughs;
the Lord is laughing them to scorn.
Then he will speak in his anger,
his rage will strike them with terror.
“It is I who have set up my king
on Zion, my holy mountain.”

Ant. Here is a King of my own choosing who will rule on Mount Zion.

I will announce the decree of the Lord:
The Lord said to me: “You are my Son.
It is I who have begotten you this day.
Ask and I shall bequeath you the nations,
put the ends of the earth in your possession.
With a rod of iron you will break them,
shatter them like a potter’s jar.”

Ant. Here is a King of my own choosing who will rule on Mount Zion.

Now, O kings, understand,
take warning, rulers of the earth;
serve the Lord with awe
and trembling, pay him your homage
lest he be angry and you perish;
for suddenly his anger will blaze.

Ant. Here is a King of my own choosing who will rule on Mount Zion.

Blessed are they who put their trust in God.

Ant. Here is a King of my own choosing who will rule on Mount Zion.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you gave the peoples of the world as the inheritance of your only Son; you crowned him as King of Zion, your holy city, and gave him your Church to be his bride. As he proclaims the law of your eternal kingdom, may we serve him faithfully, and so share his royal power forever.

Ant. Here is a King of my own choosing who will rule on Mount Zion.

Ant. 3 Lord, you are my protector; you have raised me up in glory.

Psalm 3
I am safe in the Lord’s keeping

Christ fell asleep in death, but he rose from the dead, for God was his deliverer (Saint Irenaeus).

How many are my foes, O Lord!
How many are rising up against me!
How many are saying about me:
“There is no help for him in God.”

Ant. Lord, you are my protector; you have raised me up in glory.

But you, Lord, are a shield about me,
my glory, who lift up my head.
I cry aloud to the Lord.
He answers from his holy mountain.

Ant. Lord, you are my protector; you have raised me up in glory.

I lie down to rest and I sleep.
I wake, for the Lord upholds me.
I will not fear even thousands of people
who are ranged on every side against me.

Ant. Lord, you are my protector; you have raised me up in glory.

Arise, Lord; save me, my God,
you who strike all my foes on the mouth,
you who break the teeth of the wicked!
O Lord of salvation, bless your people!

Ant. Lord, you are my protector; you have raised me up in glory.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you heard the cry of your Son when he was oppressed and saved him from the sleep of death. Arise, Lord, help your Church. Be its shield so that it may hold up its head and radiate the glory of the resurrection.

Ant. Lord, you are my protector; you have raised me up in glory.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

May the word of Christ ever fill your hearts.
Share with one another the wisdom you receive.

READINGS

First Reading
From the beginning of the book of Esther
The rejection of Vashti and the choosing of Esther

During the reign of Ahasuerus—this was the Ahasuerus who ruled over a hundred and twenty-seven provinces from India to Ethiopia—while he was occupying the royal throne in the stronghold of Susa, in the third year of his reign, he presided over a feast for all his officers and ministers: the Persian and Median aristocracy, the nobles, and the governors of the provinces.

Queen Vashti also gave a feast for the women inside the royal palace of King Ahasuerus.

On the seventh day, when the king was merry with wine, he instructed Mehuman, Biztha, Harbona, Bigtha, Abagtha, Zethar, and Carkas, the seven eunuchs who attended King Ahasuerus, to bring Queen Vashti into his presence wearing the royal crown, that he might display her beauty to the populace and the officials, for she was lovely to behold. But Queen Vashti refused to come at the royal order issued through the eunuchs. At this the king’s wrath flared up, and he burned with fury. He conferred with the wise men versed in the law, because the king’s business was conducted in general consultation with lawyers and jurists. He asked them, “What is to be done by law with Queen Vashti for disobeying the order of King Ahasuerus issued through the eunuchs?” In the presence of the king and of the officials, Memucan answered: “Queen Vashti has not wronged the king alone, but all the officials and the populace throughout the provinces of King Ahasuerus. If it please the king, let an irrevocable royal decree be issued by him and inscribed among the laws of the Persians and Medes, forbidding Vashti to come into the presence of King Ahasuerus and authorizing the king to give her royal dignity to one more worthy than she.

There was in the stronghold of Susa a certain Jew named Mordecai, son of Jair, son of Shimei, son of Kish, a Benjaminite, who had been exiled from Jerusalem with the captives taken with Jeconiah, king of Judah, whom Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, had deported. He was foster father to Hadassah, that is, Esther, his cousin; for she had lost both father and mother. The girl was beautifully formed and lovely to behold. On the death of her father and mother, Mordecai had taken her as his own daughter.

When the king’s order and decree had been obeyed and many maidens brought together to the stronghold of Susa under the care of Hegai, Esther also was brought in to the royal palace under the care of Hegai, custodian of the women. The girl pleased him and won his favor. So he promptly furnished her with cosmetics and provisions. Then picking out seven maids for her from the royal palace, he transferred both her and her maids to the best place in the harem. Esther did not reveal her nationality or family, for Mordecai had commanded her not to do so.

Esther was led to King Ahasuerus in his palace in the tenth month, Tebeth, in the seventh year of his reign. The king loved Esther more than all other women, and of all the virgins she won his favor and benevolence. So he placed the royal diadem on her head and made her queen in place of Vashti.

RESPONSORY Psalm 113:5-8; Luke 1:51-52

There is none so great as the Lord our God; he is enthroned on high and looks down upon the heavens and the earth.
He raises up the needy from the dust and lifts up the poor from the dunghill.

He has scattered the proud in their conceit. He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, and has lifted up the lowly.
He raises up the needy from the dust and lifts up the poor from the dunghill.

Second reading
From a letter to Proba by Saint Augustine, bishop
Let us exercise our desire in prayer

Why in our fear of not praying as we should, do we turn to so many things, to find what we should pray for? Why do we not say instead, in the words of the psalm: I have asked one thing from the Lord, this is what I will seek: to dwell in the Lord’s house all the days of my life, to see the graciousness of the Lord, and to visit his temple? There, the days do not come and go in succession, and the beginning of one day does not mean the end of another; all days are one, simultaneously and without end, and the life lived out in these days has itself no end.

So that we might obtain this life of happiness, he who is true life itself taught us to pray, not in many words as though speaking longer could gain us a hearing. After all, we pray to one who, as the Lord himself tells us, knows what we need before we ask for it.

Why he should ask us to pray, when he knows what we need before we ask him, may perplex us if we do not realize that our Lord and God does not want to know what we want (for he cannot fail to know it), but wants us rather to exercise our desire through our prayers, so that we may be able to receive what he is preparing to give us. His gift is very great indeed, but our capacity is too small and limited to receive it. That is why we are told: Enlarge your desires, do not bear the yoke with unbelievers.

The deeper our faith, the stronger our hope, the greater our desire, the larger will be our capacity to receive that gift, which is very great indeed. No eye has seen it; it has no color. No ear has heard it; it has no sound. It has not entered man’s heart; man’s heart must enter into it.

In this faith, hope and love we pray always with unwearied desire. However, at set times and seasons we also pray to God in words, so that by these signs we may instruct ourselves and mark the progress we have made in our desire, and spur ourselves on to deepen it. The more fervent the desire, the more worthy will be its fruit. When the Apostle tells us: Pray without ceasing, he means this: Desire unceasingly that life of happiness which is nothing if not eternal, and ask it of him who alone is able to give it.

RESPONSORY Jeremiah 29:13, 12, 11

You will seek me, and when you seek with your whole heart, you will find me.
You will pray to me, and I will listen to you.

I know the plans I have in mind for you, plans for your welfare and not for misfortune, plans that will give you a future full of hope.
You will pray to me, and I will listen to you.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day we bless you.
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
for we have put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
And we shall never hope in vain.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Almighty ever-living God,
grant that we may always
conform our will to yours
and serve your majesty in sincerity of heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

7 posted on 10/20/2012 7:12:04 PM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 21, Morning Prayer for Sunday of the 29th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 618
Proper of Seasons: 409
Psalter: Sunday, Week I, 651

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 689
Proper of Seasons: 635
Psalter: Sunday, Week I, 706

Morning Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

On this day, the first of days,
God the Father’s Name we praise;
Who, creation’s Lord and Spring
Did the world from darkness bring.

On this day the eternal Son
Over death His triumph won;
On this day the Spirit came
With His gifts of living flame.

O that fervent love today
May in every heart have sway,
Teaching us to praise aright
God, the Source of life and light.

Father, who didst fashion me
Image of Thyself to be,
Fill me with Thy love divine,
Let my every thought be Thine.

Holy Jesus, may I be
Dead and buried here with Thee;
And, by love inflamed, arise
Unto Thee a sacrifice.

Thou, who dost all gifts impart,
Shine, sweet Spirit, in my heart;
Best of gifts Thyself bestow;
Make me burn Thy love to know.

God, the blessèd Three in One,
Dwell within my heart alone;
Thou dost give Thyself to me;
May I give myself to Thee.

Words: From the Breviary of the Diocese of LeMans, 1748 (Die parente temporum); translated from Latin to English by Henry W. Baker in Hymns Ancient and Modern, 1861.; Music: Gott Sei Dank, Neues geistreiches Gesangbuch, by Johann A. Freylinghausen (Halle, Germany: 1704); Performed by: Keble College Choir.
Click here to purchase “On this day, the first of days” by Keble College Choir

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 As morning breaks I look to you, O God, to be my strength this day, alleluia.

Psalm 63
A soul thirsting for God

Whoever has left the darkness of sin yearns for God.
O God, you are my God, for you I long;
for you my soul is thirsting.
My body pines for you
like a dry, weary land without water.
So I gaze on you in the sanctuary
to see your strength and your glory.

Ant. As morning breaks I look to you, O God, to be my strength this day, alleluia.

For your love is better than life,
my lips will speak your praise.
So I will bless you all my life,
in your name I will lift up my hands.
My soul shall be filled as with a banquet,
my mouth shall praise you with joy.

Ant. As morning breaks I look to you, O God, to be my strength this day, alleluia.

On my bed I remember you.
On you I muse through the night
for you have been my help;
in the shadow of your wings I rejoice.
My soul clings to you;
your right hand holds me fast.

Ant. As morning breaks I look to you, O God, to be my strength this day, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, creator of unfailing light, give that same light to those who call to you. May our lips praise you; our lives proclaim your goodness; our work give you honor, and our voices celebrate you for ever.

Ant. As morning breaks I look to you, O God, to be my strength this day, alleluia.

Ant. 2 From the midst of the flames the three young men cried out with one voice: Blessed be God, alleluia.

Canticle – Daniel 3:57-88, 56
Let all creatures praise the Lord

All you servants of the Lord, sing praise to him (Revelation 19:5).

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.
You heavens, bless the Lord.
All you waters above the heavens, bless the Lord.
All you hosts of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Sun and moon, bless the Lord.
Stars of heaven, bless the Lord.

Ant. From the midst of the flames the three young men cried out with one voice: Blessed be God, alleluia.

Every shower and dew, bless the Lord.
All you winds, bless the Lord.
Fire and heat, bless the Lord.
Cold and chill, bless the Lord.
Dew and rain, bless the Lord.
Frost and chill, bless the Lord.
Ice and snow, bless the Lord.
Nights and days, bless the Lord.
Light and darkness, bless the Lord.
Lightnings and clouds, bless the Lord.

Ant. From the midst of the flames the three young men cried out with one voice: Blessed be God, alleluia.

Let the earth bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Mountains and hills, bless the Lord.
Everything growing from the earth, bless the Lord.
You springs, bless the Lord.
Seas and rivers, bless the Lord.
You dolphins and all water creatures, bless the Lord.
All you birds of the air, bless the Lord.
All you beasts, wild and tame, bless the Lord.
You sons of men, bless the Lord.

Ant. From the midst of the flames the three young men cried out with one voice: Blessed be God, alleluia.

O Israel, bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Priests of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Servants of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Spirits and souls of the just, bless the Lord.
Holy men of humble heart, bless the Lord.
Hananiah, Azariah, Mishael, bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.

Ant. From the midst of the flames the three young men cried out with one voice: Blessed be God, alleluia.

Let us bless the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
Let us praise and exalt him above all forever.
Blessed are you, Lord, in the firmament of heaven.
Praiseworthy and glorious and exalted above all forever.

Ant. From the midst of the flames the three young men cried out with one voice: Blessed be God, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Let the people of Zion rejoice in their King, alleluia.

Psalm 149
The joy of God’s holy people.

Let the sons of the Church, the children of the new people, rejoice in Christ, their King (Hesychius).
Sing a new song to the Lord,
his praise in the assembly of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in its maker,
let Zion’s sons exult in their king.
Let them praise his name with dancing
and make music with timbrel and harp.

Ant. Let the people of Zion rejoice in their King, alleluia.

For the Lord takes delight in his people.
He crowns the poor with salvation.
Let the faithful rejoice in their glory,
shout for joy and take their rest.
Let the praise of God be on their lips
and a two-edged sword in their hand,

to deal out vengeance to the nations
and punishment on all the peoples;
to bind their kings in chains
and their nobles in fetters of iron;
to carry out the sentence pre-ordained;
this honor is for all his faithful.

Ant. Let the people of Zion rejoice in their King, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Let Israel rejoice in you, Lord, and acknowledge you as creator and redeemer. We put our trust in your faithfulness and proclaim the wonderful truths of salvation. May your loving kindness embrace us now and for ever.

Ant. Let the people of Zion rejoice in their King, alleluia.

READING Revelation 7:10, 12

Salvation is from our God, who is seated on the throne, and from the Lamb! Praise and glory, wisdom and thanksgiving and honor, power and might, to our God forever and ever. Amen!
The audio for this hour uses a longer reading taken from the single volume Christian Prayer, while this abbreviated text is from the 4 volume Liturgy of the Hours.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.
Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.

You are seated at the right hand of the Father,
have mercy on us.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. The Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.

Luke 1:68 – 79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.

INTERCESSIONS

Christ is the sun that never sets, the true light that shines on every man. Let us call out to him in praise:
Lord, you are our life and our salvation.

Creator of the stars, we thank you for your gift, the first rays of the dawn,
and we commemorate your resurrection.
Lord, you are our life and our salvation.

May your Holy Spirit teach us to do your will today,
and may your Wisdom guide us always.
Lord, you are our life and our salvation.

Each Sunday give us the joy of gathering as your people,
around the table of your Word and your Body.
Lord, you are our life and our salvation.

From our hearts we thank you,
for your countless blessings.
Lord, you are our life and our salvation.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Almighty ever-living God,
grant that we may always
conform our will to yours
and serve your majesty in sincerity of heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

8 posted on 10/20/2012 7:12:12 PM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 21, Midday Prayer for Sunday of the 29th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 623
Proper of Seasons: 409 (concluding prayer)
Psalter: Sunday, Week I, 657 (Midday)

Midday Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time using Current Psalmody

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

O Lord my God! when I in awesome wonder
Consider all the worlds Thy hands have made,
I see the stars, I hear the mighty thunder,
Thy power throughout the universe displayed:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

When through the woods and forest glades I wander
And hear the birds sing sweetly in the trees;
When I look down from lofty mountain grandeur
And hear the brook and feel the gentle breeze:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss; Originally this was a Swedish folk melody, “O Store Gud” by Carl Boberg (1859-1940) and was translated by Stuart K. Hine in 1899.
”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 What better can we do than take refuge in the Lord! His love will never fail, alleluia.

Psalm 118
Song of joy for salvation
This Jesus is the stone which, rejected by you builders, has become the chief stone supporting all the rest (Acts 4:11).

I

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love endures for ever.

Let the sons of Israel say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let the sons of Aaron say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let those who fear the Lord say:
“His love endures for ever.”

I called to the Lord in my distress;
he answered and freed me.
The Lord is at my side; I do not fear.
What can man do against me?
The Lord is at my side as my helper:
I shall look down on my foes.

It is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in princes.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. What better can we do than take refuge in the Lord! His love will never fail, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lord is my strength, and I shall sing his praise, alleluia.

II

The nations all encompassed me;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.

They compassed me, compassed me about;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me about like bees;
they blazed like a fire among thorns.
In the Lord’s name I crushed them.

I was hard-pressed and was falling
but the Lord came to help me.
The Lord is my strength and my song;
he is my savior.
There are shouts of joy and victory
in the tents of the just.

The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
his right hand raised me.
The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
I shall not die, I shall live
and recount his deeds.
I was punished, I was punished by the Lord,
but not doomed to die.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord is my strength, and I shall sing his praise, alleluia.

Ant. 3 I shall proclaim your goodness, Lord, for you have answered me.

III

Open to me the gates of holiness:
I will enter and give thanks.
This is the Lord’s own gate
where the just may enter.
I will thank you for you have answered
and you are my savior.

The stone which the builders rejected
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord,
a marvel in our eyes.
This day was made by the Lord;
we rejoice and are glad.

O Lord, grant us salvation;
O Lord, grant success.
Blessed in the name of the Lord
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord;
the Lord God is our light.

Go forward in procession with branches
even to the altar.
You are my God, I thank you.
My God, I praise you.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good;
for his love endures for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you have given us the great day of rejoicing: Jesus Christ, the stone rejected by the builders, has become the cornerstone of the Church, our spiritual home. Shed upon your Church the rays of your glory, that it may be seen as the gate of salvation open to all nations. Let cries of joy and exultation ring out from its tents, to celebrate the wonder of Christ’s resurrection.

Ant. I shall proclaim your goodness, Lord, for you have answered me.

READING Galatians 6:7b-8

A man will reap only what he sows. If he sows in the field of the flesh, he will reap a harvest of corruption; but if his seed-ground is the spirit, he will reap everlasting life.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Your promise, Lord, will stand for ever.
In every generation your word is true.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Almighty ever-living God,
grant that we may always
conform our will to yours
and serve your majesty in sincerity of heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

9 posted on 10/20/2012 7:12:27 PM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 21, Evening Prayer for Sunday of the 29th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 632
Proper of Seasons: 409
Psalter: Sunday, Week I, 661

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 694
Proper of Seasons: 622
Psalter: Sunday, Week I, 712

Evening Prayer II for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

O God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Our shelter from the stormy blast,
And our eternal home.

Under the shadow of Thy throne
Thy saints have dwelt secure;
Sufficient is Thine arm alone,
And our defense is sure.

Before the hills in order stood,
Or earth received her frame,
From everlasting Thou art God,
To endless years the same.

A thousand ages in Thy sight
Are like an evening gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
Before the rising sun.

Time, like an ever rolling stream,
Bears all its sons away;
They fly, forgotten, as a dream
Dies at the opening day.

O God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Be Thou our guard while troubles last,
And our eternal home.

O God, Our Help in Ages Past by Sheffield Cathedral Choir; Words: Isaac Watts, 1719. Music: William Croft, 1708
“O God, Our Help in Ages Past” by Sheffield Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

Psalm 110
The Messiah, king and priest

Christ’s reign will last until all his enemies are made subject to him (1 Corinthians 15:25).

The Lord’s revelation to my Master:
“Sit on my right:
your foes I will put beneath your feet.”

Ant. The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

The Lord will wield from Zion
your scepter of power:
rule in the midst of all your foes.

Ant. The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

A prince from the day of your birth
on the holy mountains;
from the womb before the dawn I begot you.

Ant. The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

The Lord has sworn an oath he will not change.
“You are a priest for ever,
a priest like Melchizedek of old.”

Ant. The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

The Master standing at your right hand
will shatter kings in the day of his great wrath.

Ant. The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

He shall drink from the stream by the wayside
and therefore he shall lift up his head.

Ant. The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, we ask you to give us victory and peace. In Jesus Christ, our Lord and King, we are already seated at your right hand. We look forward to praising you in the fellowship of all your saints in our heavenly homeland.

Ant. The Lord will stretch forth his mighty scepter from Zion, and he will reign for ever, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The earth is shaken to its depths before the glory of your face.

Psalm 114
The Israelites are delivered from the bondage of Egypt

You too left Egypt when, at baptism, you renounced that world which is at enmity with God (Saint Augustine).

When Israel came forth from Egypt,
Jacob’s sons from an alien people,
Judah became the Lord’s temple,
Israel became his kingdom.

Ant. The earth is shaken to its depths before the glory of your face.

The sea fled at the sight:
the Jordan turned back on its course,
the mountains leapt like rams
and the hills like yearling sheep.

Ant. The earth is shaken to its depths before the glory of your face.

Why was it, sea, that you fled,
that you turned back, Jordan, on your course?
Mountains, that you leapt like rams,
hills, like yearling sheep?

Ant. The earth is shaken to its depths before the glory of your face.

Tremble, O earth, before the Lord,
in the presence of the God of Jacob,
who turns the rock into a pool
and flint into a spring of water.

Ant. The earth is shaken to its depths before the glory of your face.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Almighty God, ever-living mystery of unity and Trinity, you gave life to the new Israel by birth from water and the Spirit, and made it a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a people set apart as your eternal possession. May all those you have called to walk in the splendor of the new light render you fitting service and adoration.

Ant. The earth is shaken to its depths before the glory of your face.

Ant. 3 All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Canticle – See Revelation 19:1-7
The wedding of the lamb

Alleluia.
Salvation, glory, and power to our God:
Alleluia.
his judgments are honest and true.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Alleluia.
Sing praise to our God, all you his servants,
Alleluia.
all who worship him reverently, great and small.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The Lord our all-powerful God is King;
Alleluia.
Let us rejoice, sing praise, and give him glory.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The wedding feast of the Lamb has begun,
Alleluia.
and his bride is prepared to welcome him.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

READING 2 Corinthians 1:3-4

Praised be God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and the God of all consolation! He comforts us in all our afflictions and thus enables us to comfort those who are in trouble, with the same consolation we have received from him.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.
The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

Eternal ages praise
the greatness of your glory.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. When the Son of Man comes to earth, do you think he will find faith in men’s hearts?

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. When the Son of Man comes to earth, do you think he will find faith in men’s hearts?

INTERCESSIONS

Christ the Lord is our head; we are his members. In joy let us call out to him:
Lord, may your kingdom come.

Christ our Savior, make your Church a more vivid symbol of the unity of all mankind,
make it more effectively the sacrament of salvation for all peoples.
Lord, may your kingdom come.

Through your presence, guide the college of bishops in union with the Pope,
give them the gifts of unity, love and peace.
Lord, may your kingdom come.

Bind all Christians more closely to yourself, their divine Head,
lead them to proclaim your kingdom by the witness of their lives.
Lord, may your kingdom come.

Grant peace to the world,
let every land flourish in justice and security.
Lord, may your kingdom come.

Grant to the dead the glory of resurrection,
and give us a share in their happiness.
Lord, may your kingdom come.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Almighty ever-living God,
grant that we may always
conform our will to yours
and serve your majesty in sincerity of heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

10 posted on 10/20/2012 7:12:35 PM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 21, Night Prayer for Sunday of the 29th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, Page 1172
Vol II, Page 1628
Vol III, Page 1272
Vol IV, Page 1236

Christian Prayer:
Page 1037

Night Prayer after Evening Prayer II on Sundays and Solemnities

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:

We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

Christé, eléison
Christé, eléison

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

HYMN

O radiant Light, O Son divine
Of God the Father’s deathless face
O image of the light sublime
That fills the heavenly dwelling-place

Lord Jesus Christ, as daylight fades
As shine the lights of eventide
We praise the Father with the Son
The spirit blest and with them one.

O Son of God, the source of life
Praise is your due by night and day
Unsullied lips must raise the strain
Of your proclaimed and splendid name.

O Radiant Light by Choir of The Cathedral of the Madeleine & The Madeleine Choir School; Lyrics copyright 1973, Fides Publishers, Inc. Notre Dame, Indiana from “Morning Praise and Evensong”. Used by permission of the publisher for non-profit or devotional purposes.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

Psalm 91
Safe in God’s sheltering care

I have given you the power to tread upon serpents and scorpions (Luke 10:19).

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
and abides in the shade of the Almighty
says to the Lord: “My refuge,
my stronghold, my God in whom I trust!”

It is he who will free you from the snare
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night
nor the arrow that flies by day,
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon.

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach;
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.

Your eyes have only to look
to see how the wicked are repaid,
you who have said: “Lord, my refuge!”
and have made the Most High your dwelling.

Upon you no evil shall fall,
no plague approach where you dwell.
For you has he commanded his angels,
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you upon their hands
lest you strike your foot against a stone.
On the lion and the viper you will tread
and trample the young lion and the dragon.

Since he clings to me in love, I will free him;
protect him for he knows my name.
When he calls I shall answer: “I am with you,”
I will save him in distress and give him glory.

With length of life I will content him;
I shall let him see my saving power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

READING Revelation 22:4-5

They shall see the Lord face to face and bear his name on their foreheads. The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

GOSPEL CANTICLE

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
we have celebrated today
the mystery of the rising of Christ to new life.
May we now rest in your peace,
safe from all that could harm us,
and rise again refreshed and joyful,
to praise you throughout another day.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Blessing

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

11 posted on 10/20/2012 7:12:46 PM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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WDTPRS 29th Ordinary Sunday: “bear with me” – glory and pregnancy

The Collect for the 29th Ordinary Sunday is found the ancient Gelasian Sacramentary among the prayers for the 5th Sunday after Easter.  Those of you who participate in celebrations of Holy Mass according to the 1962 Missale Romanum will hear this Collect on the Sunday after Ascension.

Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, fac nos tibi semper et devotam gerere voluntatem, et maiestati tuae sincero corde servire.

LITERAL RENDERING:

Almighty eternal God, cause us always both to bear towards You a devout faith, and to serve Your majesty with a sincere heart.

ICEL (1973 translation of the 1970MR):

Almighty and ever-living God, our source of power and inspiration, give us strength and joy in serving you as followers of Christ.

CURRENT ICEL (2011):

Almighty ever-living God, grant that we may always conform our will to yours and serve your majesty in sincerity of heart.

The complex verb gero means basically “to bear, wear, carry, have”.  In the supplement to the great Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary, Souter’s A Glossary of Later Latin, we find that after the 3rd century A.D. gero can be “to celebrate a festival”.  This is confirmed in Blaise’s dictionary of liturgical Latin vocabulary; gero is “celebrate”.  In a construction with a dative pronoun (such as tibi) and morem (from mos as in the infamous exclamation O tempora! O mores!) it can mean “perform someone’s will.”  I think today’s tibi…gerere substitutes devotam voluntatem for morem.  That servio (“serve”) is one of those verbs constructed with the dative case, as in “to be useful for, be of service to”.

In our Latin prayers maiestas is usually synonymous with gloria.  Fathers of the Church St. Hilary of Poitiers (+368) and St. Ambrose of Milan (+397), and also early liturgical texts, use this concept of “glory” or “majesty” for more than simple fame or splendor of appearance.  A liturgical Latin gloria can be the equivalent of biblical Greek doxa and Hebrew kabod.   Doxa was translated into Latin also with the words like maiestas and claritas, which in some contexts become forms of address (“Your Majesty”).  This “glory” or “majesty” is a divine characteristic.  God will share His gloria with us in heaven. We will be transformed by it, made more radiant as the images of God we are meant to be.  Our contact with God in the sacraments and liturgical worship advances the transformation which will continue in the Beatific Vision.  “And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being changed into his likeness from one degree of glory to another (a claritate in claritatem); for this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit” (2 Cor 3:18).

When God wished to speak with Moses, His Presence would descend on the meeting tent as a cloud of glory (Hebrew shekhinah). Moses’ face would shine radiantly from his encounters with God and had to be covered with a veil (cf. Exodus 34).  The shekhinah remains with us architecturally in our churches… in some places at least.  Even more than the burning presence lamp, a baldachin or a veil covering the tabernacle is the sign of the Lord’s Presence.

When we enter the holy precincts of a church, our encounter with the Lord in mystery must continue the transformation which began with baptism.  During the Year of Faith, commit to be well-prepared to meet the Lord in your parish church.  Be properly disposed in body through your fast, in spirit through confession.

Today’s Collect always brings to my mind a fresco by Piero della Francesca (+1492) in little Monterchi near Arezzo. “La Madonna del Parto” shows Mary great with Child, a subject rare in Renaissance painting.  One meaning of the Latin verb gero is “to be pregnant” as in gerere partum.  In the fresco, twin angels in Renaissance garb delicately lift tent-like draperies on each side to reveal Mary standing with eyes meditatively cast down, one hand placed on her hip for support, her other hand upon her unborn Child.  The fresco, this wonder depiction of life, was ironically painted originally for a cemetery chapel.  The drapery and the angels invoke the image of a baldachin and the veil of a tabernacle.  It calls to mind the tent in the wilderness where the Ark with the tablets and its golden angels were preserved, wherein Moses spoke to God so that his face reflected God’s majesty.

Mary, too, is Ark of the Real Presence, the Tabernacle in which Christ reposed.  She, like the tent of the Ark, was overshadowed.  Our Sunday Collect reminds us also to look to Mary, the Mother of God and Mother of the Church, our Mother.  She is the perfect example of the service to others that flows from loving her Son, bearing the faith, serving God’s transforming glory.

12 posted on 10/20/2012 7:12:57 PM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Isaiah 53:10-11 ©
The Lord has been pleased to crush his servant with suffering.
If he offers his life in atonement,
he shall see his heirs, he shall have a long life
and through him what the Lord wishes will be done.
His soul’s anguish over,
he shall see the light and be content.
By his sufferings shall my servant justify many,
taking their faults on himself.

Psalm Psalm 32:4-5,18-20,22 ©
May your love be upon us, O Lord, as we place all our hope in you.
The word of the Lord is faithful
  and all his works to be trusted.
The Lord loves justice and right
  and fills the earth with his love.
May your love be upon us, O Lord, as we place all our hope in you.
The Lord looks on those who revere him,
  on those who hope in his love,
to rescue their souls from death,
  to keep them alive in famine.
May your love be upon us, O Lord, as we place all our hope in you.
Our soul is waiting for the Lord.
  The Lord is our help and our shield.
May your love be upon us, O Lord,
  as we place all our hope in you.
May your love be upon us, O Lord, as we place all our hope in you.

Second reading Hebrews 4:14-16 ©
Since in Jesus, the Son of God, we have the supreme high priest who has gone through to the highest heaven, we must never let go of the faith that we have professed. For it is not as if we had a high priest who was incapable of feeling our weaknesses with us; but we have one who has been tempted in every way that we are, though he is without sin. Let us be confident, then, in approaching the throne of grace, that we shall have mercy from him and find grace when we are in need of help.

Gospel Acclamation Jn14:6
Alleluia, alleluia!
I am the Way, the Truth and the Life, says the Lord;
No one can come to the Father except through me.
Alleluia!
Or Mk10:45
Alleluia, alleluia!
The Son of Man came to serve
and to give his life as a ransom for many.
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 10:35-45 ©
James and John, the sons of Zebedee, approached Jesus. ‘Master,’ they said to him ‘we want you to do us a favour.’ He said to them, ‘What is it you want me to do for you?’ They said to him, ‘Allow us to sit one at your right hand and the other at your left in your glory.’ ‘You do not know what you are asking’ Jesus said to them. ‘Can you drink the cup that I must drink, or be baptised with the baptism with which I must be baptised?’ They replied, ‘We can.’ Jesus said to them, ‘The cup that I must drink you shall drink, and with the baptism with which I must be baptised you shall be baptised, but as for seats at my right hand or my left, these are not mine to grant; they belong to those to whom they have been allotted.’
  When the other ten heard this they began to feel indignant with James and John, so Jesus called them to him and said to them, ‘You know that among the pagans their so-called rulers lord it over them, and their great men make their authority felt. This is not to happen among you. No; anyone who wants to become great among you must be your servant, and anyone who wants to be first among you must be slave to all. For the Son of Man himself did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.’

Gospel Mark 10:42-45 ©
Jesus called the Twelve to him and said to them, ‘You know that among the pagans their so-called rulers lord it over them, and their great men make their authority felt. This is not to happen among you. No; anyone who wants to become great among you must be your servant, and anyone who wants to be first among you must be slave to all. For the Son of Man himself did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.’

13 posted on 10/20/2012 8:32:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


 

PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION



Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen.

14 posted on 10/20/2012 8:39:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL
15 posted on 10/20/2012 8:40:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Welcome to 40 Days for Life: September 26 - November 4, 2012
16 posted on 10/20/2012 8:42:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
17 posted on 10/20/2012 8:49:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
18 posted on 10/20/2012 8:50:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


19 posted on 10/20/2012 8:51:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


20 posted on 10/20/2012 8:52:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

21 posted on 10/20/2012 8:53:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL


A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


22 posted on 10/20/2012 8:55:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 

October Devotion: The Holy Rosary
 

This feast was established by Pope Pius V to commemorate the great victory of the Christian army against the Turks in the Battle of Lepanto in 1571.

All soldiers on the battlefield prayed the Rosary for three hours and the wind has shifted in their favor. They were able to defeat an army three times bigger, in one of the greatest naval victory in history.

Pope Pius V named this the Feast of Our Lady of Victories, to be celebrated on October 7th.

In 1573, Pope Gregory XIII changed the title of this memorial to Feast of the Holy Rosary.

 

 

Pope Paul VI established the form that we celebrate this feast today, in 1969 under the name “Our Lady of the Rosary”.

“The celebration of this day invites all to mediate upon the mysteries of Christ, following the example of the Blessed Virgin Mary who was so singularly associated with the incarnation, passion and glorious resurrection of the Son of God.”



Madonna del Rosario

Caravaggio

1607

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.
 

The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)
1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

The Luminous Mysteries or Mysteries of Light
(Thursdays) see Rosarium Virginis Mariae
1. Jesus' Baptism in the Jordan (II Corinthians 5:21, Matthew 3:17 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Gratitude for the gift of Faith]
2. Jesus' self-manifestation at the wedding of Cana (John 2:1- 12) [Spiritual fruit - Fidelity]
3. Jesus' proclamation of the Kingdom of God, with His call to conversion (Mark 1:15, Mark 2:3-13; Luke 7:47- 48, John 20:22-23) [Spiritual fruit - Desire for Holiness]
4. Jesus' Transfiguration (Luke 9:35 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Spiritual Courage]
5. Jesus' institution of the Eucharist, as the sacramental expression of the Paschal Mystery. (Luke 24:13-35 and parallels, 1 Corinthians 11:24-25) [Spiritual fruit - Love of our Eucharistic Lord]

The Sorrowful Mysteries
(Tuesdays and Fridays)
1. The Agony in the Garden (Matthew 26:36-46, Luke 22:39-46) [Spiritual fruit - God's will be done]
2. The Scourging at the Pillar (Matthew 27:26, Mark 15:15, John 19:1) [Spiritual fruit - Mortification of the senses]
3. The Crowning with Thorns (Matthew 27:27-30, Mark 15:16-20, John 19:2) [Spiritual fruit - Reign of Christ in our heart]
4. The Carrying of the Cross (Matthew 27:31-32, Mark 15:21, Luke 23:26-32, John 19:17) [Spiritual fruit - Patient bearing of trials]
5. The Crucifixion (Matthew 27:33-56, Mark 15:22-39, Luke 23:33-49, John 19:17-37) [Spiritual fruit - Pardoning of Injuries]

The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]

 

The Fifteen Promises Granted to Those Who Recite the Rosary [Catholic Caucus]
Essays for Lent: The Rosary

Radio Replies Second Volume - The Rosary
Town Rejects Rosary as Offensive and the Prayers that Changed Everything
No-contact order over a student's rosary
Collecting 860 rosaries result of a lifelong passion (Catholic Caucus)
After rosary campaign, Florida sheriff abruptly shuts down abortion clinic on Marian feast
Public Rosary in San Francisco to draw thousands [Catholic Caucus]
Chicago's Incredible Floating Rosary
Enourmous Rosary floats over Chicago
Surprised by the Joyful Mysteries (of the Rosary) [Catholic Caucus]
HISTORY OF THE ROSARY [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

The Rosary-a tool for evangelization [Catholic Caucus]
OUR LADY AND HEAVEN’S PEACE PLAN (Say the Rosary) [Ecumenical]
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 5th Joyful Mystery: The Finding in the Temple (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 4th Joyful Mystery: The Presentation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 3rd Joyful Mystery: The Nativity (Patristic Rosary)
Praying the Holy Rosary in October
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 2nd Joyful Mystery: The Visitation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 1st Joyful Mystery: The Annuniciation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] On the Rosary
Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: 15 [20] Mysteries of the Holy Rosary & When They Are Prayed

It Was the Rosary: Mainz Priest Talks About His Vocation
Rosary to Halt Construction of NYC Mosque (Catholic Caucus)
British Soldier Shot in Afghanistan is Saved by His ROSARY...Like His Great-Grandfather in WWII
Catholic Caucus: Rosary Beads Saved My Life, British Soldier Says
British soldier shot in Afghanistan is saved my his ROSARY
Rosary returned to Vietnam vet as pledged 44 years ago
Rosary for the Bishop celebrates six months of prayer, global expansion
Rosary Rallies for Priests Give Final Flourish to Their Special Year (ECUMENICAL)
The Unseen Power of the Rosary
Worldwide Rosary Relay to Offer Prayer for Priests

Boy Suspended For Rosary -- Reinstated
NY school sued after teen suspended over rosary
Student Suspended for Wearing Rosary Beads
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] The 3:30 Beads!
Catholic Biblical Apologetics: Private Devotions to Mary: The Rosary
Benedict XVI Promotes Rosary in Fatima [Catholic Caucus]
Archbishop Naumann, Bishop Finn Lead Mother's Day Rosary at Planned Parenthood
Did the Apostles Pray the Rosary? (First Novena to the Holy Spirit?) [Catholic Caucus]
The Importance of the Meditated Holy Rosary -- What the Popes have to say [Catholic Caucus]
A Ladder from Earth to Heaven: The Rosary for All Christians

Jesus is in the Holy Rosary
The Rosary, a powerful weapon against the devil
History of The Scriptural Rosary [Ecumenical]
The Lord Is with Thee
Rosary of Our Lady's Tears(Catholic Prayer Thread)
The Rosary and Me - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
Rosary promoted as path to Christ and peace [at third annual Rosary Bowl NW]
The Efficacy and Power of One Hail Mary [Ecumenical]
“ Let Us Do It!“ (Sunday: Rosary to be simultaneously prayed on five continents)
The Fruits of the Mysteries of the Rosary

[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
The Family Rosary [Try it for Lent!] (Catholic Caucus)
History of the Scriptural Rosary - Meditating on The Word
Rosary Resurgence [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: How to Pray the Rosary: Contemplating Christ With Mary [Ecumenical]
[Oregon] Rosary Bowl focuses on links between prayer, evangelization
Praying the Rosary By Bishop Fulton J. Sheen(Catholic Caucus)
Rosary-Prayers Aiming to Break Record [Catholic Caucus]
Rosary vs. Repetitious Prayer [Ecumenical]
The Luminous Mysteries [of the Rosary]: Knowing Jesus in His Public Ministry

Rosary Is a School of Mary, Says Pope: Encourages Recitation [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
New campaign launched to promote family rosary
The Rosary and the Republic
Chant the Rosary... in Latin!
(...)and the rosary
Estimated 50,000 recite rosary in event at Rose Bowl
Our Lady of Victory (HLI Page)
Rosary to Mark St. Martha's Feast
Pray the Rosary
Rosary Aids Spiritual Growth, Says Pope


Image Detail

Remembering Lepanto
The Battle that Saved the Christian West (October 7, 1571: Battle of Lepanto)
Battle of Lepanto: Armada of the Cross
Remember Lepanto
How Europe Escaped Speaking Arabic
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Civilization in the Balance: The Battle of Lepanto and Election ‘08
LEPANTO

A Call To Prayer: This Lepanto Moment [Repost]
Lepanto, 1571: The Battle That Saved Europe
Celebrating the Battle of Lepanto
Clash of civilizations: Battle of Lepanto revisited
Lepanto, Bertone e Battesimo, Oh My!
Lepanto Sunday
Our Lady of the Rosary of La Naval (A Mini-Lepanto in the Philippines)
Swiss Guards at the Battle of Lepanto, 7 October 1571
Battle of Lepanto
LEPANTO, 7 OCTOBER 1571: The Defense of Europe

Battle of Lepanto
Remember Lepanto!
The Battle of Lepanto
On This Day In History, The Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Chesterton's Lepanto
The Miracle At Lepanto...
Lepanto
The Naval Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto

23 posted on 10/20/2012 8:58:32 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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October 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: New Evangelization. That the New Evangelization may progress in the oldest Christian countries.

Missionary Intention: World Mission Day. That the celebration of World Mission Day may result in a renewed commitment to evangelization.


24 posted on 10/20/2012 8:59:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

The Carpenter Fisherman
Fr. Paul Scalia

Jesus Christ was a carpenter by trade. The apostles James and John were fishermen. Yet on at least one occasion He showed Himself the better fisherman — teaching them how to present the bait, set the hook and land the fish. It just happens that James and John were the fish He caught.

First, He presents the bait. Our Lord’s own goodness lures James and John. The dignity of His sacred humanity draws those sensible, hardworking men away from their business, to follow Him (cf. Mk 1:20). They desire not only to follow Him and behold His glory but also to have a share in that glory: “Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left” (Mk 10:37).

As Our Lord makes clear, they “do not realize what they are asking” (Mk 10:38). They think of His glory in worldly, earthly terms. They imagine themselves reigning with Him in Jerusalem over the re-established kingdom of Israel. Like fish chasing a lure, the brothers chase after what they think they want.

Then, He sets the hook. Now that Jesus has led the “Sons of Thunder” to desire His glory, He elicits from them a commitment to attain that glory: “Can you drink the cup that I drink or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?” (Mk 10:38) And they bite, “We can” (Mk 10:39). Now they have committed themselves to Him and to His mission.

Finally, with that commitment expressed, He reels them in: “The cup that I drink, you will drink, and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized” (Mk 10:39). Thus they come to be sharers in Our Lord’s passion and death. James becomes the first martyr among the apostles, and John stands faithfully at the foot of the cross.

Centuries earlier Jeremiah had lamented, “You duped me, Lord, and I let myself be duped” (Jer 20:7). Perhaps James and John felt similarly. They approached Our Lord with a request for worldly glory; they departed having committed themselves to share in His redemptive suffering. Not quite what they expected. Better.

This is not a warning against asking the Lord for something. Rather, it is a wonderful illustration of how He takes the imperfect in us and turns it to good — even to greatness. We all approach Him, as did James and John, with imperfect motives. We ask for things — perhaps even good things — partly from devotion, partly from selfishness. We do not know what we are asking. But our mixed motives do not deter Him. He draws us to Himself by motives less than perfect and brings us gradually — purifying our motives, deepening our understanding — to Himself.

Thus a sick man might begin to pray simply out of fear of dying. But by degrees he will find himself praying out of love. A young man will enter the seminary with wooden, worldly notions of the priesthood…and years later be drawn to the depth of it. God often draws a man and woman together by shallow, superficial considerations (physical attraction, common interests, etc.), but in the sacrament of matrimony He leads them to a deeper, sacrificial love.

Yet as good as He is at fishing for souls, He cannot catch us without our consent. We need to allow Him to draw us to Himself — indeed, ask Him to do so.

Fr. Scalia is pastor of St. John the Beloved Parish in McLean.


25 posted on 10/20/2012 9:10:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

 For the Son of man also has not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as redemption for many. Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year B

 -  29th Sunday in ordinary time

For the Son of man also has not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as redemption for many.

For the Son of man also has not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as redemption for many. Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Mark 10:35-45

35 And James and John the sons of Zebedee, came to him, saying: Master, we desire that whatsoever we shall ask, you will do for us:
36 But he said to them: What would you like me to do for you?
37 And they said: Grant to us, that we may sit, one on your right hand, and the other on your left hand, in your glory.
38 And Jesus said to them: You do not know what you ask. Can you drink of the chalice that I drink of: or be baptized with the baptism wherewith I am baptized?
39 But they said to him: We can. And Jesus said to them: You shall indeed drink of the chalice that I drink of: and with the baptism wherewith I am baptized you shall be baptized.
40 But to sit on my right hand, or on my left, is not mine to give to you, but to them for whom it is prepared.
41 And the ten hearing it, began to be much displeased at James and John.
42 But Jesus calling them, said to them: You know that they who seem to rule over the Gentiles, lord it over them: and their princes have power over them.
43 But it is not so among you: but whoever will be greater, shall be your minister.
44 And whoever will be first among you, shall be the servant of all.
45 For the Son of man also has not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as redemption for many.

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

29th Sunday in ordinary time - For the Son of man also has not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as redemption for many. This world is full of spiritual dangers. It is good to work to obtain what is needed physically, but it is better still to work spiritually to obtain salvation. My apostles had moments of pride as every human being does, in which they wanted to feel themselves above others. Power, money, fame and pleasures are the temptations that every human being has to overcome in order to receive my approval.

God is supremely just, for this reason his Kingdom is available to the will of each individual who only has to choose: either the celestial way or the easy way.

The way of the world is open to all human beings, it is easy to walk, it offers everything that exalts the senses, pride and temporal happiness; in fact it is like a current of dirty water that drags towards the abyss and death.

I have come to point my way in order to offer you eternal life. My way is difficult to find, difficult to walk and takes you to the summit of humility, it has the cross as support and its reward is the freedom of the soul, it is a river of living water that offers peace and hope.

Human passions offend God because they create false gods in the flesh and the mind; materialism causes attachment to temporal things at the cost of despising what is spiritual; injustice offends God who is Charity; impurity stains the pure soul that God has given to each one.

All human beings offend God in one way or another; however I have not come to judge but to save, I have not come to condemn but to warn.

Unless you repent you are taking the risk of perishing eternally. But my Mercy is infinitely great; my goodness extends beyond my death on the cross. I want to save the souls that have cost me so much; I only need your cooperation, this is why I ask you to put into practice my teachings.

He who wishes to enter into the Kingdom of Heaven must work humbly without waiting for the reward; he must feel himself always small before God and must be willing to serve his neighbour; all this he does in imitation of me. I guarantee that his labour will not be in vain.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


26 posted on 10/20/2012 9:16:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

In today’s gospel, the Lord Jesus speaks of crosses and crowns. The apostles have only crowns in mind, but the Lord Jesus knows the price of that crown. And thus, he must teach them, and us, that crowns, namely the things that we value most, come only through the cross.

It may help to remember the context of this gospel. Jesus is making his final journey to Jerusalem. He is on his way to the Cross, and has announced this Cross already, on two occasions, to his disciples. But all through this final journey, they prove unwilling, and or incapable of grasping what he is trying to teach them.

Today’s gospel is a perfect illustration of a common biblical theme known as the inept response. What this refers to is the common pattern in the gospels wherein Jesus will give a profound and important teaching, and within a matter of verses, or even just a few words, the apostles demonstrate that they have absolutely no understanding of what he just told them.

Today’s gospel illustrates the inept response. You may recall that on the previous two Sundays, the Lord gave two critically important teachings. Two weeks ago he stood a young child in their midst and spoke of the child as being truly great. He also warned that we must be able to receive the kingdom of God like a little child. Last week, he warned of the pernicious effects of wealth, how hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of heaven.

And yet, as this gospel opens, on very heels of those teachings, James and John, and later all the apostles, wish honors upon themselves. They want seats at the head of the table, high offices in the Kingdom, which they still conceive of, in very worldly terms. Nevermind, that Jesus has taught them that the place of honor is not at the head of the table, or even at the foot of the table. The place of honor is for those who wait on tables.

And thus we see here the “inept response.” The apostles, and us, we just don’t get it. No matter how clear Jesus is, no matter how often he repeats himself, we just don’t get it.

Let’s look at this gospel in 3 specific stages.

I. Misplaced Priorities–the Gospel opens with James and John approaching the Lord with an inept question, even a demand. “Grant that in your glory, we may sit, one that you right, and the other at your left.”

As we have already seen, this is a misplaced priority. Their understanding of the places of honor is worldly. Further, they want to move right to the head of the table. They want the Lord merely to grant them this honor. Even in a worldly way of thinking,  places of leadership, places a high honor, must usually be earned. Some are born into royalty, but most of the rest of us attain to leadership and honors only after years of effort. Thus, even from a worldly point of view, James and John are being utterly bold, and exhibit little understanding that prior to honors comes labor, comes the earning of it. Their priorities are misplaced. They want to crown but without the cross.

II. Major Price–the Lord Jesus, replies to them, “You do not know what you are asking! Can you drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?”

Was Jesus astonished, was he amused, or was he sad? It is not easy to say. But the bottom line is clear, they had absolutely no idea what they were asking. And neither do we. So often we want blessings, we want honors, we want seats in the high places. But we give little thought to the crosses that are necessary both to get there, and to stay there.

Those who finally do attain to leadership, often know what cross it is. It can be lonely, there are many pressures, often there are many long hours, and the heavy weight of a sense of responsibility. True leadership has its perks, but it is hard, and most leaders know also the consistent sting of criticism and isolation.

There is an old joke among bishops, to the effect that “When a man becomes a bishop, two things are certain. He will never again have a bad meal. And he will never again hear the truth.” Leaders in many other walks of life know something very similar.

And thus the Lord Jesus wonders if James and John have any idea what they are really talking about, what they are really asking for. His question is also poignant, for he has been trying to teach them of the kind of passion, the pain, the crucifixion that awaits him, and which he must endure before he, even the Lord of glory, must endure before entering into his glory. No, not only do they not know what they are asking, they just don’t get it.

And this must make the Lord very sad. Sometimes we underestimate the kind of suffering the Lord endured long before the garden of Gethsemane that fateful night, as the sufferings of his passion began in earnest. To one degree or another, prior to that evening, the Lord endured a kind of death by a thousand cuts: enemies trying to trap him, crowds wanting medical miracles but no true healing, strident and judgmental Pharisees, and other religious leaders, ridicule, and disciples who walked away from him as he talked on the Eucharist. And even the Twelve  to whom he looked for friendship, seemed completely disconnected from what he is trying to teach them. He also knew that one would betray him, another deny him, and all but one, would abandon him, and never make it to the foot of the cross. Oh the grief that they gave the Lord.

And Oh the grief that we continue to offer up, how we continue to offend his external glory and be difficult cases for the Lord. How easy it is for us to be hardheaded, stubborn, to have a neck of iron and a forehead  of brass! No, it is hard to scorn the apostles, for we do the very same things

To them and to us the Lord can only remind us of the major price, the true cost. No cross, no crown! Ultimately, Heaven costs everything, for we must leave all this world behind to attain to heaven. The Easter Sunday of glory, whether in this world or in the world to come, is accessed only by a journey through Good Friday.

It is a major price,  but it is a price that James and John seem dismissive of. They simply state, categorically, that they are able to drink the cup the Lord drinks, and to be baptized into his death. But again, they have no idea what they’re talking about. Neither do most of us.

III. Medicinal Prescription–the other apostles join in the confusion, and the inept response by becoming indignant that James and John tried to get special dibs on the seats of honor. Their indignity simply shows that they share in the inept response and they have no idea of anything the Lord is talking about.

Thus the Lord tries to bring the big picture of the cross, more down to earth. He tries to make it plain. He says that the greatest in the kingdom is the servant of all, indeed, the slave of all. Is this plain enough? It is not those who sit at the head of the table, even those who sit at the foot of the table, nor any place at the table. The greatest are those who wait on the table, who serve.

Do they get it? Probably not. Neither do we. It takes most of us a lifetime before we finally get it through our thick skulls, that the point in life is not to have the corner office with a view. We have everything upside down, and exactly backwards. We are not rich in what matters to God. We think of bank accounts, addresses, the square footage of homes, salaries and titles, not things of service.

It may take our death beds before we finally realize that the greatest people in our lives are those with the ministry of care, those who feed us, perhaps change our bandages, and give us basic care.

We like these apostles can be so foolish. At the end of the day, and at our final judgment, God will not care about the square footage of our house, our titles and honors. What will capture his notice is when we served, when we gave a cup of cold water, or food for the hungry. When we instruct the ignorant, prayed for the dying and cared for the needs of the poor. He will look for the calluses and the wounds of our service, of our proclamation of his kingdom. And he will tell us that what we did for the least we did for him

Don’t miss the point of this gospel. Life is not what we usually think. There is no crown without the cross. Honors in the kingdom, crowns and the kingdom, are reserved for those who serve, who take up the cross of washing the feet of others, of going to the lowest places.

In today’s gospel, the Lord speaks of crosses and crowns, and in that very order. We will not gain, we cannot gain, any crown in his kingdom without being baptized into his death, into his cross, into the humble servitude of dying for others in loving service.


27 posted on 10/20/2012 9:22:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday Gospel Reflections

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Isaiah 53:10-11 II: Hebrews 4:14-16
Gospel
Mark 10:35-45

35 And James and John, the sons of Zeb'edee, came forward to him, and said to him, "Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you."
36 And he said to them, "What do you want me to do for you?"
37 And they said to him, "Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory."
38 But Jesus said to them, "You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or to be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?"
39 And they said to him, "We are able." And Jesus said to them, "The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized;
40 but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared."
41 And when the ten heard it, they began to be indignant at James and John.
42 And Jesus called them to him and said to them, "You know that those who are supposed to rule over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great men exercise authority over them.
43 But it shall not be so among you; but whoever would be great among you must be your servant,
44 and whoever would be first among you must be slave of all.
45 For the Son of man also came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many."


Interesting Details
  • (v.35) James and John are two of Jesus most intimate disciples. They were with him at the transfiguration. This may explain the way they ask Jesus for favors, like children who try to get a commitment from an adult before the adult knows what he is in for! Their request shows their ambition, and how little they care for the others.
  • (v.37) It seems almost impossible that after Jesus predicts his suffering and death three times (since 8:31) the disciples still do not understand. How patient Jesus is with his disciples.
  • (v.38) The "cup" and "baptism" are symbols of Jesus suffering and death. Here Mark ties together two events in Jesus life: his baptism at Jordan and his death on the cross. Paul will later teaches Christian baptism as a dying with Christ.
  • (v.41) Jesus does not reprimand James and John immediately after their request for first places. Perhaps he wants them to see the consequence of their ambition. The result is the lost of peace among the disciples.
  • (v.42) The term "lord it over" is a vivid way of describing leadership as raw power.
  • (v.43) The term "servant," diakonos, literally means "the one who waits on tables."
  • (v.45) This is a description of Jesus as a servant: to give his life as ransom for all. "Ransom" means the price of deliverance or liberation, as in the release of a slave.

One Main Point

Jesus teaches his disciples about what it means to be a Christian: it is NOT to "lord it" over others. It is to be a servant, the one who waits on tables. And honor is achieved through one's suffering as a servant.


Reflections
  1. I imagine myself present with James and John in their "private" meeting with Jesus. As they have asked favors from him, so have I. What are the favors I have asked of Jesus? How would he answer me?
  2. In my community (family, social group, church, etc) how do I serve others? Would Jesus have to say to me, "It should not be so among you"?
  3. The disciples were shortsighted, ambitious, and selfish men. What love and confidence Jesus must have had on these men who went on to become pillars of the church. How do I look upon my brothers and their weaknesses? How should I look upon them?

28 posted on 10/20/2012 9:26:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, October 21, 2012
Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Isaiah 53:10-11
Psalm 33:4-5, 18-20, 22
Hebrews 4:14-16
Mark 10:35-45 or 10:42-45

For His exceeding charity wherewith God loved us He sent His Son in the likeness of sinful flesh.

-- Romans viii. 3


29 posted on 10/20/2012 9:30:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


30 posted on 10/20/2012 9:47:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 10
35 And James and John the sons of Zebedee, come to him, saying: Master, we desire that whatsoever we shall ask, thou wouldst do it for us: Et accedunt ad eum Jacobus et Joannes filii Zebedæi, dicentes : Magister, volumus ut quodcumque petierimus, facias nobis. και προσπορευονται αυτω ιακωβος και ιωαννης οι υιοι ζεβεδαιου λεγοντες διδασκαλε θελομεν ινα ο εαν αιτησωμεν ποιησης ημιν
36 But he said to them: What would you that I should do for you? At ille dixit eis : Quid vultis ut faciam vobis ? ο δε ειπεν αυτοις τι θελετε ποιησαι με υμιν
37 And they said: Grant to us, that we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory. Et dixerunt : Da nobis ut unus ad dexteram tuam, et alius ad sinistram tuam sedeamus in gloria tua. οι δε ειπον αυτω δος ημιν ινα εις εκ δεξιων σου και εις εξ ευωνυμων σου καθισωμεν εν τη δοξη σου
38 And Jesus said to them: You know not what you ask. Can you drink of the chalice that I drink of: or be baptized with the baptism wherewith I am baptized? Jesus autem ait eis : Nescitis quid petatis : potestis bibere calicem, quem ego bibo, aut baptismo, quo ego baptizor, baptizari ? ο δε ιησους ειπεν αυτοις ουκ οιδατε τι αιτεισθε δυνασθε πιειν το ποτηριον ο εγω πινω και το βαπτισμα ο εγω βαπτιζομαι βαπτισθηναι
39 But they said to him: We can. And Jesus saith to them: You shall indeed drink of the chalice that I drink of: and with the baptism wherewith I am baptized, you shall be baptized. At illi dixerunt ei : Possumus. Jesus autem ait eis : Calicem quidem, quem ego bibo, bibetis ; et baptismo, quo ego baptizor, baptizabimini : οι δε ειπον αυτω δυναμεθα ο δε ιησους ειπεν αυτοις το μεν ποτηριον ο εγω πινω πιεσθε και το βαπτισμα ο εγω βαπτιζομαι βαπτισθησεσθε
40 But to sit on my right hand, or on my left, is not mine to give to you, but to them for whom it is prepared. sedere autem ad dexteram meam, vel ad sinistram, non est meum dare vobis, sed quibus paratum est. το δε καθισαι εκ δεξιων μου και εξ ευωνυμων ουκ εστιν εμον δουναι αλλ οις ητοιμασται
41 And the ten hearing it, began to be much displeased at James and John. Et audientes decem, cœperunt indignari de Jacobo et Joanne. και ακουσαντες οι δεκα ηρξαντο αγανακτειν περι ιακωβου και ιωαννου
42 But Jesus calling them, saith to them: You know that they who seem to rule over the Gentiles, lord it over them: and their princes have power over them. Jesus autem vocans eos, ait illis : Scitis quia hi, qui videntur principari gentibus, dominantur eis : et principes eorum potestatem habent ipsorum. ο δε ιησους προσκαλεσαμενος αυτους λεγει αυτοις οιδατε οτι οι δοκουντες αρχειν των εθνων κατακυριευουσιν αυτων και οι μεγαλοι αυτων κατεξουσιαζουσιν αυτων
43 But it is not so among you: but whosoever will be greater, shall be your minister. Non ita est autem in vobis, sed quicumque voluerit fieri major, erit vester minister : ουχ ουτως δε εσται εν υμιν αλλ ος εαν θελη γενεσθαι μεγας εν υμιν εσται υμων διακονος
44 And whosoever will be first among you, shall be the servant of all. et quicumque voluerit in vobis primus esse, erit omnium servus. και ος εαν θελη υμων γενεσθαι πρωτος εσται παντων δουλος
45 For the Son of man also is not come to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a redemption for many. Nam et Filius hominis non venit ut ministraretur ei, sed ut ministraret, et daret animam suam redemptionem pro multis. και γαρ ο υιος του ανθρωπου ουκ ηλθεν διακονηθηναι αλλα διακονησαι και δουναι την ψυχην αυτου λυτρον αντι πολλων

(*) "το βαπτισμα ο εγω βαπτιζομαι βαπτισθησεσθε". Amusing that it takes 11 words to translate: "with the baptism wherewith I am baptized, you shall be baptized"

31 posted on 10/21/2012 7:25:00 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
35. And James and John, the sons of Zebedee, come to him, saying, Master, we would that you should do for us whatsoever we shall desire.
36. And he said to them, What would you that I should do for you?
37. They said to him, Grant to us that we may sit, one on your right hand, and the other on your left hand, in your glory.
38. But Jesus said to them, You know not what you ask: can you drink of the cup that I drink of? and be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?
39. And they said to him, We can. And Jesus said to them, You shall indeed drink of the cup that I drink of; and with the baptism that I am baptized withal shall you be baptized:
40. But to sit on my right hand and on my left hand is not mine to give; but it shall be given to them for whom it is prepared.

CHRYS. The disciples hearing Christ oftentimes speaking of His kingdom, thought that this kingdom was to be before His death, and therefore now that His death was foretold to them, they came to Him, that they might immediately be made worthy of the honors of the kingdom: wherefore it is said, And James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to him, saying, Master, we would that you should do for us whatever we shall desire.

For ashamed of the human weakness which they felt, they came to Christ, taking Him apart from the disciples; but our Savior, not from ignorance of what they wanted to ask, but from a wish of making them answer Him, puts this question to them; And he said to them, What would you that I should do for you?

THEOPHYL. Now the above mentioned disciples thought that He was going up to Jerusalem, to reign there, and then to suffer what He had foretold. And with these thoughts, they desired to sit on the right and the left hand; wherefore there follows, They said to him, Grant to us that we may sit, one on your right hand, the other on your left hand, in the glory.

AUG. Matthew has expressed that this was said not by themselves, but by their mother, since she brought their wishes to the Lord; wherefore Mark briefly implies rather that they themselves, than that their mother, had used the words.

CHRYS. Or we may fitly say that both took place; for seeing themselves honored above the rest, they thought that they could easily obtain the foregoing petition; and that they might the more easily succeed in their request, they took their mother with them, that they might pray to Christ together with her.

AUG. Then the Lord both according to Mark, and too Matthew, answered them rather than their mother. For it goes on, But Jesus said to them, You know not what you ask.

THEOPHYL. It will not be as you think, that I am to reign as a temporal king in Jerusalem, but all these things, that is, these which belong to My kingdom, are beyond your understanding; for to sit on My right hand is so great a thing that it surpasses the Angelic orders.

BEDE; Or else, they know not what they ask, who seek from the Lord a seat of glory, which they do not yet merit.

CHRYS. Or else He says, You know not what you ask; as if He said, You speak of honors, but I am discoursing of wrestlings and toil; for this is not a time of rewards, but of blood, of battles, and dangers. Wherefore He adds, Can you drink of the cup that I drink of, and be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized withal? He draws them on by way of question, that by communication with Himself, their eagerness might increase.

THEOPHYL. But by the cup and baptism, He means the cross; the cup, that is, as being a potion by Him sweetly received, but baptism is the cause of the cleansing of our sins. And they answer Him, without understanding what He had said; wherefore it goes on: And they said to him, We can; for they thought that He spoke of a visible cup, and of the baptism of which the Jews made use, that is, the washings before their meals.

CHRYS. And they answered thus quickly, because they expected that what they had asked would he listened to; it goes on: And Jesus said to them, You shall indeed drink of the cup that I drink of, and with the baptism that I am baptized withal shall you be baptized; that is, you shall be worthy of martyrdom, and suffer even as I.

BEDE; A question is raised, however, how James and John drank the cup of martyrdom, or how they were baptized with the baptism of the Lord, when the Scripture relates, that only James the Apostle was beheaded by Herod whilst John finished his life by a natural death. But if we read ecclesiastical histories, in which it is related, that he also on account of the witness which he bore was cast into a cauldron of burning oil, and was immediately sent away to the island of Patmos, we shall then see that the spirit of martyrdom was in him, and that John drank the cup of confession, which the Three Children also drank in the furnace of fire, though the persecutor did not spill their blood. It goes on: But to sit on my right hand and on my left hand is not mine to give, but it shall be given to them for whom it is prepared.

CHRYS. Where two questions are raised, one is, whether a seat on His right hand is prepared for any one; the other, whether the Lord of all has it not in His power to give it to those for whom it is prepared. To the first then we say, that no one sits on His right hand or on His left, for that throne is inaccessible to a creature. How then did He say, To sit on my right hand or on my left is not mine to give you, as though it belonged to some who were to sit there? He however answers the thoughts of those who asked Him, condescending to their meaning; for they did not know that lofty throne and seat, which is on the right hand of the Father, but sought one thing alone, that is, to possess the chief place, and to be set Over others. And since they had heard it said of the Apostles, that they were to sit on twelve thrones, they begged for a place higher than all the rest, not knowing what was said.

To the second question we must say, that such a gift does not transcend the power of the Son of God, but what is said by Matthew, it is prepared by My Father, is the same as if it were said, "by Me" wherefore also Mark did not say here, by My Father. What therefore Christ says here is this, you shall die, he says, for Me, but this is not enough to enable you to obtain the highest place, for if another person comes possessing besides martyrdom all other virtues, he will possess much more than you; for the chief place is prepared for those, who by works are enabled to become the first. Thus then the Lord instructed them not to trouble themselves vainly and absurdly for high places; at the same time He would not have Him made sad.

BEDE; Or else, it is not mine to give to you, that is, to proud persons, for such as yet they were. It is prepared for other persons, and be you other, that is, lowly, and it is prepared for you.

41. And when the ten heard it, they began to be much displeased with James and John.
42. But Jesus called them to him, and said to them, you know that they which are accounted to rule over the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and their great ones exercise authority upon them.
43. But so shall it not be among you: hut whoever will be great among you, shall be your minister:
44. And whoever of you will be the chiefest, shall be servant of all.
45. For even the Son of man came not to be ministered to, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many.

THEOPHYL. The other Apostles are indignant at seeing James and John seeking for honor; wherefore it is said, And when the ten heard it, they began to be much displeased with James and John. For being influenced by human feeling, they were moved with envy; and their first displeasure arose from their seeing that they were not taken up by the Lord; before that time they were not displeased, because they saw that they themselves were honored before other men. At this time the Apostles were thus imperfect, but afterwards they yielded the chief place one to another.

Christ however cures them; first indeed by drawing them to Himself in order to comfort them; and his is meant, when it is said, But Jesus called them to him; then by showing them that to usurp honor, and to desire the chief place, belongs to Gentiles. Wherefore there follows: And said to them, you know that they which are accounted to rule over the Gentiles exercise lordship; and their great ones exercise authority over them. The great ones of the Gentiles thrust themselves into the chief place tyrannically and as lords. It goes on: But so shall it not be among you.

BEDE; In which He teaches, that he is the greater, who is the less, and that he becomes the lord, who is servant of all: vain, therefore, was it both for the one party to seek for immoderate things, and the other to be annoyed at their desiring greater things, since we are to arrive at the height of virtue not by power but by humility. Then He proposes an example, that if they lightly regarded His words, His deeds might make them ashamed, saying, For even the Son of man came not to be ministered to, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many.

THEOPHYL. Which is a greater thing than to minister. For what can be greater or more wonderful than that a man should die for him to whom he ministers?

Nevertheless, this serving and condescension of humility was His glory, and that of all; for before He was made man, He was known only to the Angels; but now that lie has become man and has been crucified, He not only has glory Himself; but also has taken up others to a participation in His glory, and ruled by faith over the whole world.

BEDE; He did not say, however, that He gave His life as a ransom for all, but for many, that is, for those who would believe on Him.

Catena Aurea Mark 10
32 posted on 10/21/2012 7:25:40 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Christ Carrying the Cross

Sebastiano del Piombo

1535-40
Oil on slate, 157 x 118 cm
Szépmûvészeti Múzeum, Budapest

33 posted on 10/21/2012 7:26:13 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
The Women Saints of Britain, Saint Margaret Chitheroe

The Women Saints of Britain


Saint Margaret Chitheroe

by Joanna Bogle

If a group of Catholics in Britain was asked to name some female saints, it is likely that the first names that came to mind would not be British ones. Probably, an initial list would produce names like Bernadette of Lourdes, Thérèse of Lisieux, Margaret-Marie Alacoque, Teresa of Avila, Catherine of Sienna, Claire of Assisi.

But, as an English Catholic, I have become increasingly interested in the women saints who lived in my country, spoke my language, and have a special message for Catholic women today who seek to uphold the Faith amid many pressures. They include Anne Line, Margaret Clitheroe, and Margaret Ward, all martyred during the Reformation period for their loyal adherence to the Catholic Church and the pope. All were canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970. The first of these, Anne Line, is a Christmas martyr, in that she was arrested on Candlemas Day and met her death soon afterward. And she is a London saint, which strikes a chord with me as a fellow Londoner.

Saint Anne Line
A while ago, a friend contacted me and said, “we ought to find out about Anne Line!” She had learned something of her story and wanted to know more. We set out together by car from my house in the southern suburbs and -- after, I’m afraid, a couple of dreadful muddles -- we eventually arrived at Dunmow in Essex on the other side of London, where Anne, who was martyred in 1601, is honored.

She grew up at Dunmow, the daughter of William Heigham, who was a staunch supporter of Calvinist doctrines, and who disowned both her and her brother when they announced their conversion to Catholicism as young adults. Anne married a fellow convert, Roger Line, but their time together was short, as not long after the wedding he was arrested for attending Mass -- at that time a serious offense -- and exiled. He died abroad in 1594.

Anne devoted the rest of her life to harboring priests and making arrangements for them to say Mass. It is thanks to women of her caliber that the Faith was preserved in England, and the risks she took were great. Eventually, she was arrested when she had arranged for Mass to be celebrated by a Jesuit, Father Francis Page, in her house. It was Candlemas Day, 1601. Tried at the Old Bailey, she was hanged on February 27, 1601, affirming her faith and refusing to express regret at having helped a priest.

Today, there are two churches in Essex named after Anne Line -- both modern and very ugly, but with real devotion to the saint. On our little pilgrimage, we visited both of these, met with great friendliness -- cups of tea, warm welcome from clergy and from various parishioners who were about -- and realized that there is a genuine local cult that reflects a real gratitude for the gift of the Catholic Faith that has been passed on to us.

Saint Margaret Clitheroe
In the north of England, a shrine in York welcomes pilgrims who want to honor the memory of Saint Margaret Clitheroe. “The Pearl of York”, born Margaret Middleton, was the daughter of a candlemaker who was also Sheriff of York. She was not raised a Catholic but became one shortly after her marriage to John Clitheroe, a wealthy butcher. He was not a Catholic, but had a brother who was a priest.

Margaret and John were a devoted couple. In addition to raising their children, Margaret began instructing a number of others in the Faith, and providing facilities for priests, including her brother-in-law, to say Mass. In York, a little house in The Shambles, a butcher’s shop over which the Clitheroe family lived, now honors the memory of all of this.

Eventually, Margaret’s work was discovered and she was arrested. Rather than have her children forced to give evidence against her, or lie in her defense, she chose not to plead before the court, and was sentenced to be pressed to death as a punishment for this. It was a slow and cruel death as weights were loaded on to a board, which crushed her down.

Her courage and faith drew admiration from many, and significance was seen in the fact that the date of her death was Good Friday. Her husband was devastated by her death: “Let them take all I have and save only her, she is the best wife in all England, and the best Catholic”. Their daughter became a nun and both sons became priests.

Editor note:
Saint Margaret Chitheroe
Martyr – ca 1556 – March 25, 1586
Feast day – March 26 (United Kingdom)

Margeret Clitherow (or Clitheroe) was born in York, England in about 1556, two years before the reign of Elizabeth I began .  In 1571, Margaret married John Clitherow, a wealthy butcher and a chamberlain of the city. Though her husband belonged to the Church of England, he had a brother who was a Catholic priest and Margaret became a Catholic a few years after their marriage.  She hid priests from the authorities during this time of persecution of Catholics. Some of the priests were martyred.

On March 10, 1586, Margaret was arrested for harboring priests, attending Mass, etc. She refused to plead, as the only witnesses against her would be her own young children and servants, whom she could not bear to involve in the trial. She was condemned to be pressed to death. “God be thanked, I am not worthy of so good a death as this", she said. Although she was probably with child at the time, this horrible sentence was carried out on March 25 (Feast of the Annunciation), 1586. She was laid on the ground, a sharp stone beneath her back, her hands stretched out in the form of a cross and bound to two posts. A door was placed on her, which was weighted down with stones until she was crushed to death. Her last words during an agony of fifteen minutes, were "Jesu! Jesu! Jesu! have mercy on me!"

Her sons Henry and William became priests, and her daughter Anne entered Saint Ursula’s convent in Louvain, Belgium. The biography of Margaret Clitherow, was written by her confessor, John Mush.

She was canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970 as one of the forty martyrs of England and Wales.  Her feast day is March 26.


Related Link on the Vatican Website:

APOSTOLIC JOURNEY TO GREAT BRITAIN, HOLY MASS FOR THE FAMILIES, HOMILY OF JOHN PAUL II, York, Monday, 31 May 1982


34 posted on 10/21/2012 2:53:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
St. Hilarion
Feast Day: October 21
Born: 291 at Gaza, Palestine
Died: 371 at Cyprus



35 posted on 10/21/2012 3:11:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Hilarion

St. Hilarion
Feast Day: October 21
Born: 291 :: Died: 371

Hilarion was born at Tabatha, south of Gaza in Palestine. He was the son of Pagan parents who did not believe in God. When he was a teenager he left his home in Palestine to study in Alexandria in Egypt.

There at the age of 15, he learned about the Christian faith, and soon was baptized. His conversion started him out on a glorious journey leading him closer to God. Before long, he was off to visit the famous St. Anthony of Egypt in the desert.

Hilarion wanted to be alone to serve Jesus, whom he had just come to love. He stayed two months with St. Anthony, but it was not quiet enough there for him.

Many people came to St. Anthony for help. Hilarion could not find the peace he was looking for, so he left. After giving everything he had to the poor, he went into the wilderness to live alone as a hermit.

He wore a shirt made of hair and skins and a short shepherd's cloak. He fasted during the day and had a small meal after sunset. He supported himself by weaving baskets but spent the rest of his time in prayer.

Hilarion faced many temptations and at times he felt that God did not hear his prayers at all. But he did not let these temptations stop him from praying even harder.

After twenty years in the desert, the holy man worked his first miracle. He was also able to drive demons out of people.

Soon many people began coming to his hut to beg his help. Several men asked him to let them stay with him to learn from him how to pray and do penance.

In his great love for God and people, the saint invited them to stay. But finally, when he was sixty-five, he began to travel. He went from one country to another in search of peace and quiet.

However, the fame of his miracles of mercy always brought crowds of visitors. A few years before his death in 371, Hilarian finally found a lonely cave in Cyprus and at last felt that he was truly alone with God. He was eighty years old when he died.


36 posted on 10/21/2012 3:16:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, October 21

Liturgical Color: Green


Today the Church honors St. Margaret Clitherow, one of the Martyrs of England. Because she hid priests and allowed Masses to be said on her property during a time of persecution, she was pressed to death at Tyburn in 1556.


37 posted on 10/21/2012 4:54:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: October 21, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Almighty ever-living God, grant that we may always conform our will to yours and serve your majesty in sincerity of heart. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: October 21st

Twenty-Ninth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost

And James and John, the sons of Zeb'edee, came forward to him, and said to him, "Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you." And he said to them, "What do you want me to do for you?" And they said to him, "Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory." But Jesus said to them, "You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or to be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?" (Mk 10:35-38).

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah, 53:10-11, and is the conclusion of the fourth Suffering Servant Song; Christ's divine gifts become our means to salvation.

The second reading is from the Letter of St. Paul to the Hebrews 4:14-16 and discusses how Christ, our high priest, is greater than the priests of the Mosaic Law. Our confidence is based on Christ's high priesthood. He is the perfect priest because He is merciful and compassionate. As man, He has experienced the sufferings that affect us, although He was free from sin. Since He knows our weaknesses so well, He can give us the help we need, and when He comes to judge us, He will take that weakness into account. We should respond to the Lord's goodness by staying true to our profession of faith. A Christian needs to live up to all the demands of his calling; he should be single-minded and free from doubts.

The Gospel is from St. Mark, 10:35-45. Our own natural inclination most likely would be to react like the other ten Apostles and become vexed with James and John and to tell them what we thought of their selfish worldly ambitions. However, our Lord's gentle answer: "you do not know what you are asking" shows us that ignorance of the nature of the kingdom he was going to set up, was the cause of their very human ambitions. They, with the other Apostles, had still the common Jewish idea of the messianic kingdom. They thought the Messiah—and they were now convinced that Jesus was the promised Messiah—would set up a political kingdom in Palestine, oust the pagan Romans and eventually extend his kingdom to all nations. That this kingdom he would set up would be universal, extending to all nations, was indicated in almost all the messianic prophecies in the Old Testament, but that this kingdom would be spiritual, not political, was not grasped by most of Christ's contemporaries including the Apostles.

Jesus, knowing that his Apostles still had this wrong idea, was gentle with James and John. He took this opportunity to tell them that he would set up a glorious kingdom but that his sufferings and death would be a necessary prelude to its establishment. He had already referred to his sufferings and death three times, but the mention fell on deaf ears. Their argument was: how could he suffer death when he has still to establish his earthly kingdom? The truth in fact was that it was by means of his sufferings and death that he would establish his glorious kingdom. He challenged the two Apostles then to know if they were willing to pay the price for a high place in his glorious kingdom: were they prepared to follow him through suffering and death? He accepted their affirmation, knowing it to be true, but told them their position of honor depended on his Father's decision. Once they realized the nature of his glorious kingdom they would be the last to look for positions of honor in it.

While no Christian today thinks that Christ came on earth in order to make us wealthy, happy and prosperous during our few years on earth, there are, unfortunately, many Christians who are unwilling to accept Christ's teaching that the way to heavenly glory is the way of the cross. "All this and heaven too" is their motto. It would, of course, be marvelous if all our days on earth were days of peace, happiness and prosperity to be followed by eternal happiness when we "shuffle off this mortal coil." But any man who has the use of reason sees that our world is inhabited by weak, sin-inclined and usually sinful mortals, himself included-weak mortals who can and do disturb the peace and harmony that could regulate our mortal lives. There are "accidents" on our roads and highways every day of the year, frequently causing death or grave injury to hundreds. The rules of the road, if kept by all, would prevent ninety-nine percent of such accidents—the other one percent are caused by mechanical failure. Would any man be so naive as to expect that we could have even one day free from car accidents?

Because man has a free-will, he is liable to abuse it by choosing what is sinful and wrong. Most of the crosses and trials we meet in life are caused by violations—by ourselves and others—of the rules of life and the laws of charity and justice. To prevent this abuse of free-will, God would have to deprive men of that essential gift which, with his intellect, makes him a man. Likewise, we could prevent all road accidents by removing the steering wheels from cars but then we would have no cars. Let us face the fact, almost all the hardships and sufferings which we have to bear in life, are caused by the unjust and uncharitable actions of our fellowmen and even God himself, following his own wise pattern of life for men on earth, cannot prevent such evil actions.

Would God want to prevent all such injustices and all this inhumanity of man toward his fellowman? Not that he approves of it, much less causes it, but can he not have a purpose in permitting it? How would we, his children on earth, earn heaven if this world were an earthly paradise? What loving father would keep his children from school because they found it a hardship, and when they could be so happy playing at home all day and every day? School is absolutely necessary for those children's future, and it is because fathers are truly kind to their children that they compel them to undergo this temporary hardship. God is the kindest of fathers. He wants us all in heaven. He has mapped out the road which will lead us there. He allows these hardships to come our way so that we can prepare for our real future life.

With James and John, let us tell our divine Lord that we are ready to follow him on the path to Calvary; that we are ready to drink the cup of sufferings which he drank and to be immersed in the sorrows which he endured. He went through all of this for us; we are doing it for our own sakes. He carried the real cross—ours is light when compared with his; furthermore, he will help us to bear our daily trial and struggles. How could any Christian become weary and fainthearted when he has Christ helping him on the road?

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


38 posted on 10/21/2012 5:00:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Hebrews 4:14-16

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

“We have a great high priest.” (Hebrews 4:14)

During this Year of Faith, Pope Benedict XVI is inviting all of us to pass through the “door of faith” each and every day. The key ques­tion we face is this: With all that I have to do each day, why should I carve out time to do this? Will I find anything special on the other side of this door?

Today’s second reading offers us an answer: “We have a great high priest” whom we can “confidently approach” to receive all the grace we need to live in this world (Hebrews 4:14, 16). We won’t be disappointed if we pass through this door!

So what’s the basis for our con­fidence? It’s that Jesus wants to lift us up. He wants to pour his heart into us as we pour out our hearts to him in prayer. We don’t even have to drum up the confidence to come to him; he will give it to us as a gift of his grace. He will convince us that he is with us every step of the way.

Jesus is our great high priest. He has been tested as we are tested, so he knows what we go through in our lives. He feels all our joys and triumphs, and he shares in our times of pain and doubt. He is with us even when we think we are all alone, pouring his grace on us even when we think the well has run dry.

This reading also tells us that Jesus sits on a “throne of grace,” not condemnation (Hebrews 4:16). He is not one to dole out harsh punish­ments or make impossible demands. Rather, he offers love and mercy at every turn. He is moved by our weaknesses, and he will never aban­don us!

So why should we take the time out of our busy days to walk through this door of faith? Because the person who is on the other side of the door loves us more than any­one else in the whole world.

“Lord, I believe; help my unbelief!”

Isaiah 53:10-11; Psalm 33:4-5, 18-20, 22; Mark 10:35-45

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

(Isaiah 53:10-11; Psalm 33:4-5,18-20,22; Hebrews 4:14-16; Mark 10:35-45)

1. In the first reading today, we see an Old Testament prophecy of what our Savior Jesus, out of his great love for us, had to suffer on the cross—to take away our sins and bring us to eternal life with him. What impact on your life has the knowledge that God loves you so much that he was willing to allow his Son to suffer and die on the cross for your salvation? What are some of the ways you have personally experienced God’s great love for you?

2. The Responsorial Psalm speaks of putting our trust and our hope in the Lord, and waiting on him. It ends with these words: “May your kindness, O Lord, be upon us who have put our hope in you.” Are there any areas of your life where you struggle to trust the Lord? What steps can you take to increase your trust and hope in the Lord?.

3. In the second reading, the Letter to the Hebrews tells us that we can approach the “throne of grace” confidently to receive “mercy and find grace for timely help” (Hebrews 4:16). What does this Scripture mean to you? What can hold you back from taking this promise of God to heart, especially when you need “timely help”?

4. The Letter to the Hebrews also says that, like us, Christ has “similarly been tested in every way, yet without sin” (Hebrews 4:15). When it comes to our sins, it is easy to be either overly scrupulous or to take them too lightly. What is your attitude towards the sin in your life?

5. In the Gospel, Jesus tells the apostles, who were vying for positions of honor, what following him would entail: “whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.” He was calling them—and us—to be “servant leaders.” What do you think this term means? In what ways was Jesus a servant leader? In what ways do you relate to your family and to others as a servant leader? In what ways do you not?

6. The meditation tells us that God’s “throne of grace” is an open door of faith for us. It then challenges us with this question: “So why should we take the time out of our busy days to walk through this door of faith?” How would you answer this question?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord to increase your faith and hope in him. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point


39 posted on 10/21/2012 5:09:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

WHAT DO YOU WANT ME TO DO FOR YOU?

(A biblical refection on THE 29th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 21 October, 2012) 

Gospel Reading: Mark 10:35-45 

First Reading: Is 53:10-11; Psalms: Ps 33:4-5,18-19,20,22; Second Reading: Heb 4:14-16 

The Scripture Text

And James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to Him, and said to Him, “Teacher, we want You to do for us whatever we ask of You.” And He said to them, “What do you want Me to do for you?” And they said to Him, “Grant us to sit, one at Your right hand and one at Your left, in Your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what You are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or to be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?” And they said to Him, “We are able.” And Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at My right hand or at My left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.” And when the ten heard it, they began to be indignant at James and John. And Jesus called them to Him and said to them, “You know that those who are supposed to rule over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great men exercise authority over them. But it shall not be so among you; but whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of man also came not to be served but to serve, and to give His life as a ransom for many.” (Mk 10:35-45 RSV) 

If you had one wish, what would you ask for? Good health and long life? Wealth? Power? The conversion of loved ones? Honor and praise from others?

How about meaningful work with a lot of suffering and few external rewards?

When James and John asked for seats of honor and authority in Jesus’ Kingdom, the other apostles/disciples became indignant, apparently jealous of being passed over. But Jesus gently asked these two men whether they were prepared to follow Him down the only road to His Kingdom, which is the way of the cross.

Baptized into His death, all Christians will reign with Him. But how do we live out the reality of that union? Jesus tells us we won’t find good models in secular society, where leaders “lord it over” those they are called to lead. For this, we have to look to Jesus, who came as “the slave of all,” and to the men and women who imitated Him. Saints Francis of Assisi, Elizabeth of Hungary, Frances of Rome, Damien of Molokai are only a very few of such imitators of Christ.

One such woman of the 20th century was Mother Teresa of Calcutta. For more than fifty years, Mother Teresa dedicated herself to serving the “poorest of the poor” throughout the world. Along with sisters who joined her religious congregation, she did not just help the poor; she lived among them, embracing a life of poverty in imitation of Jesus, who also became poor so that we could become rich (2Cor 8:9). And as she did, she discovered the same truth about material goods that Jesus sought to teach James and John about prestige and worldly respect. “The more you have, the more you are occupied, and the less you give. But the less you have, the freer you are. Poverty for us is a freedom.”

Because she wanted to be filled only with Christ, Mother Teresa was able to give generously, both of herself and of Jesus, love. Often, the work was exhausting and thankless. But it also generated laughter, hope, and glimpses of the glory of God…… a perfect joy! Therefore, let us fix our eyes on Jesus and ask Him to help us serve as fully as He – and all the saints – did.

Short Prayer: Holy Spirit, You upheld Jesus throughout His life. Grant me eyes of faith to see You and the heart of compassion to share You with others. Make me a living witness to the love that can transform the world. Amen. 


40 posted on 10/21/2012 5:22:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
A Christian Pilgrim

TRUE GREATNESS

(A biblical refection on THE 29th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 21 October, 2012) 

First Reading: Is 53:10-11; Psalms: Ps 33:4-5,18-19,20,22; Second Reading: Heb 4:14-16; Gospel Reading: Mk 10:35-45 

NOBLE prizes are awarded every year in literature, economics and science. People who have made outstanding contributions in these fields are given due recognition for their achieved greatness.

Excellence is recognized in the sports world, too. For example, when Pete Rose surpassed Ty Cobb’s record number of hits in 1985, he assured himself a place in baseball’s Hall of Fame.

We all aspire to greatness in some form or other. It is a desire which our Lord addresses in today’s Gospel.

The brothers James and John approach Jesus with their own idea of greatness – to sit at His right hand and His left when He comes into His Kingdom, a sort of instant-success notion of greatness.

But Jesus has other ideas about greatness. Greatness begins with a cup of suffering and a baptism of pain. Greatness is achieved through service.

We have here another reversal of values for which Jesus is famous. “The first shall be last,” “He who loses his life shall save it,” and “He who humbles himself shall be exalted” are other examples of how Jesus often reverses our values.

Greatness through suffering and service is not exalted” are other examples of how Jesus often reverses our values.

Greatness through suffering and service is not exactly a popular notion today. Greatness through making a lot of money or by drawing huge crowds at a rock concert seems to be today’s standard.

But if we look deeper into enduring examples of greatness, we see that the Lord is right. Alexander the Great was a remarkable leader because he stood by his men in battle. Albert the Great was an intellectual giant because he disciplined himself for study. Beethoven was a master composer because he struggled long hours to get the right note. Martin Luther was a great reformer because he persisted in spite of opposition.

True greatness was achieved by these men because they were willing to make sacrifices to realize their vision. They attained their goals because they were able to endure disappointments along the way.

So if we are aspiring to greatness in some area, we have to be able to suffer sometimes, put up with pain, whether physical or emotional, and overcome obstacles. Moreover, if we aspire to higher forms of greatness in terms of what makes us truly human and holy, then we have to be willing to serve others and even to lay down our lives for them.

The word serve might bother us a little because we commonly associate it with activity that is menial or demeaning. But the sense in which our Lord uses the term service includes any act that is noble and unselfish, any gesture that affirms and encourages someone, and any deed that is done with kindness and generosity.

Understood this way, people who are achieving greatness in God’s eyes are: parents who raise their children according to Christian values; teachers who inspire students to high ideals; doctors and nurses who heal and care for the sick; volunteers who visit shut-ins; neighbors whom we can call in any emergency.

In closing, we might say that James and John were acting like wimps when they went after an easy, suffering-free, false kind of greatness. Pray that we might be real men and real women who aspire to genuine greatness – a greatness that has a God-magnitude about it – the giving of service and even our lives for others.

Note: Taken from Albert Cylwicki, CSB, HIS WORD RESOUNDS, Makati, Philippines: St. Paul Publications, 1991, pages 189-190.


41 posted on 10/21/2012 5:23:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scrpture Study

Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle B

October 21, 2012

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Isaiah 53:10-11

Psalm: 33:4-5,18-19,20,22

Second Reading: Hebrews 4:14-16

Gospel Reading: Mark 10:35-45

  • This Sunday’s Gospel reading finds Jesus still resolutely making his way to Jerusalem and his destiny and, for the third time in Mark’s gospel, predicting his upcoming Passion to his disciples (Mark 10:32-34. See also Mark 8:31 and 9:30-32).
  • The apostles James and John (along with St. Peter) formed what can be called Jesus’ “inner circle.” They appear with him at key moments where the other apostles are not invited—at the raising of the daughter of Jairus (Mark 5:21-24, 35-43), the Transfiguration (Mark 9:2-8), and in the Garden of Gethsemane during his prayer of agony (Mark 14:32-42).
  • It was not long before this Sunday’s episode, however, that he rebuked them as they argued over which of them was the greatest (verses 9:33-37). And now, with Jesus’ latest prediction of his Passion still in their ears, James and John (verse 35) and then the other disciples (verse 41) again display a preoccupation with worldly ambition: they still misunderstand the Kingdom.
  • Jesus takes the opportunity to contrast their concept of power-leadership in the world with that of servant-leader in the Kingdom of Heaven.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • Considering the 2nd Reading, What do you think Jesus really thinks of you? How well do you think he understands the problems you face? How much do you think he actually likes you? How confident are you to approach the “throne of grace”—and how often do you do it to seek help for yourself when you need it?
  • In the Gospel, what view of the Kingdom are James and John still clinging to? How do you think could they respond like this in light of Jesus’ words in verses 33—34?
  • What is the “baptism” James and John are to be baptized with (verse 38)? What forms did that baptism take in their lives (see Acts 12:2 and Revelation 1:9)?
  • What are the cup (Matthew 26:39), the baptism (Luke 12:49-50), and the glory (John 1:14, 17:5) as each applies to Jesus?
  • What were some of the reasons, do you think, the other disciples were “indignant” at James and John (verse 41)?
  • How does Jesus practice what he preached? In this context, what is a “ransom for many” (verse 45)? How is the death of Christ the ultimate service to all?
  • Who in your experience has been a true servant leader? Are you a servant leader at work or home? Could you be? How? Do you resist following the servant’s path to greatness? What is one way could you serve this week?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 608, 618, 1225, 1551, 1570

 

His Majesty knows best what is suitable for us; it is not for us to advise him what to give us, for he can rightly reply that we know not what we ask.     –St. Teresa of Avila


42 posted on 10/21/2012 5:29:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 

The Throne of Grace and Mercy

Pastor’s Column
29th Sunday in Ordinary Time
October 21, 2012
 
 
Since we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the son of God, let us hold fast to our profession of faith. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who has been tested in every way, yet without sin. So let us confidently approach the throne of grace to receive mercy and find grace for timely help.
                                                  Hebrews 4:14 – 16
 
 
         
          As many of you know, my sister died this week in Portland after a long illness, which has turned my thoughts to the mystery of life after death. What do we find when we pass over into eternity? What lies beyond the veil of death? We can rely on Jesus who created us to give us some of the answers to these questions, even though at present we see only with the eyes of faith.
 
          It was Jesus and Jesus alone who fully passed from heaven to earth when he was born and back to heaven after he died. And he promised to be with us always in other forms! We do well to rely on an eyewitness account of what the world of the future is like, and Jesus provides this. What can we learn from this beautiful passage?
 
          Jesus sympathizes with our weaknesses. Jesus was both fully God and fully human. When we remember this, we can realize that when we pray to him, he also fully understands our struggles and trials, or weaknesses and sins, because he has been there. He knows that we cannot see God, and that we were designed to live and dwell with him. Jesus’ answer to our weaknesses and trials is always the cross! He does not always take away our own sufferings, but always offers us his own that we might unite our weakness with his own as an act of love. The supreme symbols of the weakness Jesus took on for love of you and me may be seen when we look at a crucifix or receive the Eucharist. Jesus, then, uses the weakness inherent in human life as a way to unite us with his love.
 
          Jesus sits on a throne of grace and mercy. Jesus is not waiting to throw a book at you on the last day! Some people condemn themselves, it is true, but only if they do not want and choose to reject the mercy of God.  The Mass in particular is a fountain of grace, forgiveness and strength for the journey. How could Almighty God reveal himself in a weaker form than bread and wine? He has done this for you alone. And he has promised to forgive every sin we commit, so long as we ask, especially in the Sacrament of Reconciliation.
 
          Jesus gives us timely help. Sometimes, it does seem as if God’s timing is off, but he really does know what he is doing, and while many things make no sense here, when we are in eternity, even a lifetime of suffering will seem to have passed in a moment. Like many of you, I am anxious to have a nice long face-to-face talk with Jesus, because I have many questions about why things happen the way they do, but until then, we can rely on the fact that everything Jesus permits in our lives is intended to assist us in our journey to heaven, and to help others along the way. 
 
                                                                                                    Father Gary

43 posted on 10/21/2012 5:39:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center blog

Cup of Salvation: Scott Hahn reflects on the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 10.19.12 |


Cup of Salvation

The sons of Zebedee hardly know what they’re asking in today’s Gospel. They are thinking in terms of how the Gentiles rule, of royal privileges and honors.

But the road to Christ’s kingdom is by way of His cross. To share in His glory, we must be willing to drink the cup that He drinks.

The cup is an Old Testament image for God’s judgment. The wicked would be made to drink this cup in punishment for their sins (see Psalm 75:9; Jeremiah 25:15, 28; Isaiah 51:17). But Jesus has come to drink this cup on behalf of all humanity. He has come to be baptized—which means plunged or immersed—into the sufferings we all deserve for our sins (compare Luke 12:50).

In this He will fulfill the task of Isaiah’s suffering servant, whom we read about in today’s First Reading.

Readings:
Isaiah 53:10-11
Psalm 33:4-5,18-20,22
Hebrews 4:14-16
Mark 10:35-45

Like Isaiah’s servant, the Son of Man will give His life as an offering for sin, as once Israel’s priests offered sacrifices for the sins of the people (see Leviticus 5:17-19).

Jesus is the heavenly high priest of all humanity, as we hear in today’s Epistle. Israel’s high priests offered the blood of goats and calves in the temple sanctuary. But Jesus entered the heavenly sanctuary with His own blood (see Hebrews 9:12).

And by bearing our guilt and offering His life to do the will of God, Jesus ransomed “the many”—paying the price to redeem humanity from spiritual slavery to sin and death. 

He has delivered us from death, as we rejoice in today’s Psalm.

We need to hold fast to our confession of faith, as today’s Epistle exhorts us. We must look upon our trials and sufferings as our portion of the cup He promised to those who believe in Him (see Colossians 1:24). We must remember that we have been baptized into His passion and death (see Romans 6:3).

In confidence, let us approach the altar today, the throne of grace, at which we drink the cup of His saving blood (see Mark 14:23-24).


44 posted on 10/21/2012 5:53:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
29th Sunday -- Our Mission of Faith
 
"Whoever wishes to be great among you will be will your servant . . . "
 
Is 53: 10-11
Hb 4:14-16
Mk 10: 35-45

Towards the end of his life Pope John Paul II wrote that all the horrible experiences of his youth (death of his mother, brother and father; Nazi and Communist oppression in Poland) taught him that there was a “limit imposed on evil in . . . history.” This limit had to do with the mercy of God.  Ultimately, despite what seemed like the unmovable strength of evil, its destruction and darkness, God’s love ultimately remains greater and we need not be afraid. 

How many of us could say the same?  These are the thoughts and convictions of a man who was tried and tested greatly and through his own perseverance and the grace of God came out on top.  It is an inspiring testimony to the power of faith that was lived out not with force and fear but with the moral power of love and truth.  

The Church has begun a Year of Faith and we again hear a word that is both ancient and new: Evangelization. It is a word that has spoken in darkness and persecution over the ages of Christian history.

When Pope John XXIII formerly opened the Second Vatican Council in October of 1962 he spoke about opening the windows and the necessary reform of the Church which is both ancient and new.  He spoke about optimism and not despair in the face of global nuclear threat. The Church must speak to the modern world in a way that is not stilted and distant but active and participatory. That is no small task to announce with conviction the powerful message of Christ’s Gospel.   

To share the good news of the Gospel of Jesus Christ is to evangelize.  It began with the mission of the Church entrusted to it by Christ himself: “Go and make disciples of all nations . . .” (Mt 28: 19).  Those words have passed down from generation to generation of Christians. We can say with confidence that the mission of the early Church is still our mission today - to be of service to society which sorely needs good news and a clear moral voice.

In this Year of Faith we now hear of a “new” Evangelization which calls all of us to not be silent or passive about our faith.  Pope Benedict XVI has set two visions for the new evangelization:

-           To “re-propose” the Gospel to “those regions awaiting the first evangelization.” It may be hard to imagine in this age of information overload and instant communication that someone has never heard of Jesus Christ and his Church.  Yet, we think of lands that have been so consistently non-Christian as to essentially know nothing about the significance of our salvation in Christ.

-           Secondly, the new evangelization re-proposes the faith “to those regions where the roots of Christianity are deep but who have experienced a serious crisis of faith due to secularization.”  We don’t have to look far at all to see how much God and religion, Christianity and the voice of Catholicism in particular, have been pushed far to the margins here in America, Canada, and Western Europe.  We need to hear a “let’s take another look at this” invitation. Some would rather the Church simply stand in the corner like a potted plant and say nothing in regards to moral issues that threaten to reform culture in ways far from the truth revealed to us by God. But effective evangelization is not silent. How must the Church speak and fulfill its mission of service? 

In our Gospel this Sunday from Mark 10: 35-45, we hear of two brothers, James and John, among the chosen twelve who misread the very mission of Jesus.  They presume Jesus’ mission is rooted in fame, success and earthly power.  When the time is right, they want to take advantage of opportunities to bask in that same glory and power: "Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left."

The other disciples are clearly resentful at this blatant grab for power.  For in the ancient culture of Jesus’ day, the only way one could advance would be through deceptive means. It was somewhat fatalistic as the occupation of one’s family (father) determined the future career of the sons. Privilege was believed to be foreordained and to fight against one’s fate was evil.

Our Lord reminds James and John, and through them ourselves, that his mission is one of humble service and it is there where greatness lies. That true Christian leadership is not expressed with the self-glorification of raw power but with the authority of moral example and service to others after the imitation of Jesus himself: “. . . whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all. For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many." (Mk 10: 44-45). What better moment was that expressed in than the cross?

How, then, would we best re-propose the faith of the Church to others and to ourselves? The history of Christianity has shown us less than stellar examples of moments when the intent was laudable but the method used was misguided in the spread of the faith - the Crusades and the Inquisition for example. 

But we see true conversions taking place through the moral leadership of our great saints: Francis of Assisi, Vincent de Paul, Teresa of Avila, Blessed Mother Teresa, and Blessed Pope John Paul II just to name a few. Through them the faith was re-proposed to those who already believed. It seems to me, this is what Jesus is getting at as he invites James and John, and us, to drink from: “. . . the cup that I drink from you will drink, and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized . . .” (Mk 10: 39).

Jesus speaks of a cup to drink from.  As we gather for the Eucharist we are fed on his Word and share in the living presence of the risen Lord where we eat his body and drink his blood. Our year of faith challenges every one of us to hear again that Word and Presence re-presented to us. It seems that it can begin with the place where we are most fed for the mission of Jesus is not ours but his.  We need to begin with ourselves – to re-propose the faith to our own lives first and only then can we be authentic and convincing disciples of the Lord.  

This Sunday, it might be good for all of us to pause a moment and reflect as to just how deeply the good news of Christ has touched me.  Though I may indeed be trying my best, is there some part that has yet to embrace the challenge of the Gospel?  Do I need to hear it again – to hear a re-proposition of what I may think I have heard but only in part? 
 
Fr. Tim

45 posted on 10/21/2012 6:16:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Insight Scoop

No Cross, no Kingdom. Know the Cross, know the Kingdom.

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, October 21, 2012 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Isa 53:10-11
• Ps 33:4-5, 18-19, 20, 22
• Heb 4:14-16
•  Mk 10:35-45

“No pain, no gain.” The well-known saying became popular among exercise enthusiasts in the 1980s. It was a motto for those who knew from experience that peak physical fitness requires perspiration, pain, and commitment. Variations of the sweaty slogan have been traced back to the seventeenth-century English poet Robert Herrick, and Ben Franklin, in the 1734 edition of Poor Richard's Almanack, wrote: “There are no gains, without pains...”

None of those sloganeers, I’m guessing, had the Passion and death of Jesus Christ in mind. But it fits, even if only as a introductory summary. And today’s Gospel could be given a similar slogan of sorts: “No Cross, no Kingdom.”

The conversation between Jesus and the sons of Zebedee, James and John, is a bit unsettling. It should certainly surprise anyone who thinks the disciples were dutifully pious saints from the very beginning, or simply robotic “yes-men” foils for Jesus. “Teacher,” they boldly—even impatiently and demandingly—declared to Jesus, “we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.”

How audacious! My initial thought is, “Who do they think they are? Don’t they know who they are talking to?” Then, after further reflection, I have to admit how often I have approached Jesus in the same way, making demands in the guise of thinly veiled impatience. I need this done now, God! I want an answer immediately—and here’s the answer I expect!

Of course, God wants us to come to him with our problems and fears. But there is an essential difference between approaching God with humble trust and telling him, “Do what I ask of you!” The correct approach recognizes who we are in the light of God’s revealed truth and love. “For me,” wrote St. Thérèse of Lisieux, “prayer is a surge of the heart; it is a simple look turned toward heaven.” James and John looked toward heaven, not with the simple humility of gratitude, but with a selfish hunger for personal glory.

They wanted to be rulers and sons of God, seated on the right and left hands of the Lord. Perhaps they had in mind the well-known words of the Psalmist: “The LORD says to my lord: ‘Sit at my right hand, till I make your enemies your footstool’” (Ps. 110:1). Jesus provided the necessary reality check: “You do not know what you are asking.” When we make demands of God, it indicates that we have lost sight of who we are and what God desires us to be. This is why the prayer given by Jesus to his disciples states, “Thy kingdom come, thy will be done…”

It is one thing to follow a teacher; it is quite another to follow the Son of God to the Cross. As we heard in last week’s Gospel, the rich young ruler could not follow Jesus because of his attachment to riches. Likewise, all of us struggle with burdens, baggage, and desires that threaten to keep us from the Cross, or tempt us to come down from it. As someone dryly observed, “The only problem with a living sacrifice is it wants to crawl off the altar.”

Jesus asked his disciples if they could drink the cup he would drink. Throughout the Old Testament the cup often symbolized God’s judgment, and of the death—ultimately spiritual in nature—waiting the unrepentant wicked. The only man who didn’t deserve to drink the cup was the sinless God-man. But “through his suffering,” God proclaimed through the prophet Isaiah, “my servant shall justify many and their guilt he shall bear.” Willing to drink the deadly cup, the risen Lord and great high priest now offers the life-saving cup of his blood, the cup of the new and everlasting covenant which anticipates the feast of the coming Kingdom (CCC 2837, 2861).

“Apart from the cross,” St. Rose of Lima said, “there is no other ladder by which we may get to heaven” (cf. CCC 618). No Cross, no Kingdom. Know the Cross, know the Kingdom.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the October 18, 2009, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


46 posted on 10/21/2012 6:40:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

To Serve Is to Reign
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time



Father Steven Reilly, LC

Mark 10:35-45

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him, "Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you." He replied, "What do you wish me to do for you?" They answered him, "Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left." Jesus said to them, "You do not know what you are asking. Can you drink the cup that I drink or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?" They said to him, "We can." Jesus said to them, "The cup that I drink, you will drink, and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give but is for those for whom it has been prepared." When the ten heard this, they became indignant at James and John. Jesus summoned them and said to them, "You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all. For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many."

Introductory Prayer: Lord Jesus, your apostles longed to follow you. You want to show me the difference between earthly and heavenly glory. For you, what matters is not being at Christ’s right or left but sharing in his redemptive work. As I kneel before you today, I want to offer myself and all of today’s struggles and efforts as a sign of my friendship and love.

Petition: Lord Jesus, help me to learn how to be a Christian leader.

1. Gentile Rulers, AKA, the Bossy Soul: People who “make their authority felt” have a variety of ways to do so. Sometimes they thank you for your good idea and then proceed to tell you why it would never work. Their approach is sometimes subtle — a quiet reminder of potential negative consequences. Other times it can be a shout to help focus attention. We all know people like this, people who boss others around. Maybe we’re even one of them…. Jesus has only one answer for this outlook — his own example: “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve.…” Jesus is Lord, but he wasn’t bossy!

2. If Not a Gulp, at Least a Sip: For James and John to follow Christ, they will have to “drink the cup” that the Lord will drink. What is this cup? Fast forward to Gethsemane: “Father, if you are willing, take this cup away from me” (Luke 22:42). Jesus’ own human nature struggled with the implications of full adherence to God’s plan. Ultimately, he would drink that cup — one of bitter suffering, to the very dregs. He called James and John to imitate him. He is inviting us as well. Fortunately, he prepares our souls to be generous. He guides us to greater spiritual maturity, offering us little “sips” from his cup. The small sufferings of daily life purify our souls.

3. Servant Leadership: Jesus’ life was a “ransom for many.” He was the servant of Yahweh and, as such, he constantly served others in their most profound needs. Jesus met people where they were the weakest: he helped the blind regain their sight, the lame to walk, lepers to be cleansed, the deaf to hear, the dead to rise, and to the poor he preached the good news (Cf. Matthew 11:5). A leader has vision, but unless he is a servant leader, he may see only his vision. We cannot allow ourselves to be out of touch with the needs of those around us. Let us strive to serve others by meeting them on their level.

Conversation with Christ: Thank you, Lord, for this time of prayer. I have seen how you formed James and John. Through humble service of my neighbor, help me to go to the next level.

Resolution: I will perform a hidden act of charity for someone whom I find bothersome.


47 posted on 10/21/2012 7:40:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

This Sunday’s Gospel: John and James

by Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D. on October 19, 2012

It was time to make their move.  Usually it was Peter who took the initiative, but now it was their turn.  They cleared their throats and asked the master for the best seats in the house, the places of honor right next to the throne.

Of course, in this conversation, recounted in Sunday’s gospel, John and James were referring to that glorious moment when Jesus would be finally acclaimed as king of Israel, indeed, of all the world.  They envisioned themselves as prime minister A and prime minister B who should naturally bask in the splendor of the monarch.

Jesus was quite restrained in his correction.  For it would be natural for the disciples to strive for excellence since God created us to do so.  And it would natural for them to think that excellence would mean privilege, honor and glory, for that is how everyone seems to think of it, whether Jew or Gentile.  Both chief priests and Roman governors were surrounded with pomp and circumstance, servants and sycophants.

Jesus wanted them to be ambitious to achieve true greatness, which is not about having big heads but big hearts.  It is that love called charity that makes men and women truly great, since it makes them like God in whose image they were created.  And Jesus had begun to show them what God’s love was like, but they’d not gotten the point.  Their feet had not yet been washed and the King had not been crowned with thorns.  They’d not yet understood that love is self-emptying, that true greatness lies in sacrifice, that “prime minister” means servant of all.

In a world where self-interest and self-promotion are the law of the land, such a love is destined to suffer.  To be great in love is to suffer much.  The cup of feasting may come, but only after the cup of suffering.  Jesus had come to drain this bitter cup to its dregs.  Were they ready to drink it with him?  Glibly they answered yes, oblivious to the implications of their choice.  They’d learn soon enough what it would entail.

Jesus, says the letter to the Hebrews, can be compassionate and merciful with us, because he was tempted in every way that we are tempted, though he never succumbed.  He could correct the sons of Zebedee with gentleness because he himself was tempted to gain the favor and glory of the kingdoms of the world by bowing before the father of pride (Mathew 4:8-9).  He chose instead humbly to serve the Father of mercy.

You’d think it would be easier for us to get the point than the two brothers.  After all, we received the spirit of understanding when, in baptism and confirmation, we put on the mind of Christ.  We know the end of the story–that the resurrection follows the crucifixion.

But unfortunately, there’s still a scar left on all us from the snakebite passed down to us by our first parents, and a residue of the serpent’s venom still lingers on.  There is a tug within us to climb over others in our rise to greatness, to exalt ourselves even at others expense, even to trip up others so that we may get ahead.  We are tempted to let others take the rap so that we might look good, to leave others holding the bag while we escape scott-free, to leave the dirty dishes for others lest, God forbid, we do more than our “fair share.”

If we are to be followers of Jesus and be truly great, we must renounce placing any limits on how much we are willing to give or whom we are willing to serve.  The one who is greatest, and is most like God, is not the one who appears on the cover of People magazine.  It is the one who will go to the greatest lengths for those who are least worthy and least grateful.

 

Dr. Marcellino D’Ambrosio writes from Texas.


48 posted on 10/21/2012 7:45:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

The Greatness of Christ’s Followers

by Food For Thought on October 21, 2012

Let us remember that the Church exists to evangelize. The Church, which is you and I, is missionary by nature. Through our baptism, we were baptized into this body of Christ, the Church. For better or for worse, we are symbols of Jesus Christ in the world. It is therefore our mission, our very lifeblood to see Mission Sunday, not as an outsider, but as someone called to be on mission.

Sadly, in the Church today many Catholics have been sacramentalized but not catechized: baptized but not formed in the teaching of Jesus and his Church. A certain lethargy has attached itself to the Church, making many of us spiritually anemic, reluctant to share faith with others. Almost like parasites, we eagerly receive the sacraments and other riches of the Church, but we hesitate to share it with others. We listen to God’s Word, but are reluctant to proclaim it ourselves. We must ask ourselves, why? Is it because the Word of God has not embedded itself within us? Does Jesus mean anyone or anything to us at all?

An old principle goes: we cannot give to others what we do not have ourselves. Hence we need first of all to be “missionized.” lf our Christianity is only a matter of rules and regulations like going to Church on Sundays and not eating meat on Fridays; if our faith is only a matter of convenience and not of conviction; if Christ is only a statue and not a person whom we really know, then we are certainly thinking and viewing Mission Sunday as an outsider. We will end up with excuses saying: “Not me, I am too busy; I am too afraid, I don’t know to talk to others about Christ.”

We need to have the faith level conviction in our intellect and in our heart. Once that happens, we will need no urging to witness to Christ. We will feel impelled from within to celebrate and share the life of Jesus. We must begin today because now is the acceptable moment of salvation. In our own corner of the world, let us light the lamp of Christ by what we say and how we live, by what we believe and what we stand for, and by the attitudes we manifest. Let these be seen and heard loud and clear at home, in our study and work place, in our neighborhood, and particularly with those who do not share our faith. May the people around us begin to see a difference in our lives, and let that difference be Christ himself. After all, he is there to inspire us every step of the way. Let us not forget that with his great commission: “Go make disciples of all nations,” we also have his great promise: “Know that I am with you always until the end of time.”

Mission Sunday is a day to thank God for our faith. Christ expects each one of us to never let a day pass without proclaiming God’s message of salvation to those around us. None of us can say that we cannot be a good Christian, that we cannot pray, that we cannot offer to God our crosses for the salvation of our brothers and sisters. If we try, we shall discover that we can help to spread the kingdom of God far more that we think.

Let us keep in mind that there is no shorter way to heaven than helping others to reach there. And so, as we worship God today, let us pray we may have the courage to shout out and offer to all those around us Christ and his message of salvation for Christ is our lifeblood and theirs as well.


49 posted on 10/21/2012 7:51:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body


<< Sunday, October 21, 2012 >> 29th Sunday Ordinary Time
 
Isaiah 53:10-11
Hebrews 4:14-16

View Readings
Psalm 33:4-5, 18-20, 22
Mark 10:35-45

 

SUFFERING SERVANTS

 
"Through His suffering, My Servant shall justify many." —Isaiah 53:11
 

Isaiah prophesied that the Messiah would not only be the Christ (the Anointed One) and Emmanuel (God with us), but also God's "Servant." The Servant-Messiah would transform the world primarily through suffering. This Suffering Servant would be crushed in infirmity, burdened with all our guilt, afflicted, and put to death "as an Offering for sin" (see Is 53:10-11). Jesus was the Fulfillment of Isaiah's prophecy. He came not "to be served but to serve — to give His life in ransom for the many" (Mk 10:45).

Jesus calls us to follow Him and "serve the needs of all" (Mk 10:44). At first, we're open to this, but we later want to change our minds as we realize that our service will also be primarily through suffering. We are tempted to contrive a Christianity which minimizes suffering. Christianity does remove much suffering by healing the sick and setting people free from the evil one. However, authentic Christianity frees us from some sufferings to free us for other sufferings: rejection, self-sacrifice, and persecution. We must decide whether or not to serve, suffer, and be a Christian. Be a suffering servant; be a Christian.

 
Prayer: Father, may I rejoice in the measure I serve and suffer (see 1 Pt 4:13).
Promise: "Let us confidently approach the throne of grace to receive mercy and favor and to find help in time of need." —Heb 4:16
Praise: "Exult, you just, in the Lord; praise from the upright is fitting" (Ps 33:1). Alleluia!

50 posted on 10/21/2012 7:53:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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