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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 10-28-12, Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 10-28-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 10/27/2012 8:30:59 PM PDT by Salvation

October 28, 2012

Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Jer 31:7-9

Thus says the LORD:
Shout with joy for Jacob,
exult at the head of the nations;
proclaim your praise and say:
The LORD has delivered his people,
the remnant of Israel.
Behold, I will bring them back
from the land of the north;
I will gather them from the ends of the world,
with the blind and the lame in their midst,
the mothers and those with child;
they shall return as an immense throng.
They departed in tears,
but I will console them and guide them;
I will lead them to brooks of water,
on a level road, so that none shall stumble.
For I am a father to Israel,
Ephraim is my first-born.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 126:1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 6

R. (3) The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.
When the LORD brought back the captives of Zion,
we were like men dreaming.
Then our mouth was filled with laughter,
and our tongue with rejoicing.
R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.
Then they said among the nations,
"The LORD has done great things for them."
The LORD has done great things for us;
we are glad indeed.
R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.
Restore our fortunes, O LORD,
like the torrents in the southern desert.
Those that sow in tears
shall reap rejoicing.
R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.
Although they go forth weeping,
carrying the seed to be sown,
They shall come back rejoicing,
carrying their sheaves.
R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

Reading 2 Heb 5:1-6

Brothers and sisters:
Every high priest is taken from among men
and made their representative before God,
to offer gifts and sacrifices for sins.
He is able to deal patiently with the ignorant and erring,
for he himself is beset by weakness
and so, for this reason, must make sin offerings for himself
as well as for the people.
No one takes this honor upon himself
but only when called by God,
just as Aaron was.
In the same way,
it was not Christ who glorified himself in becoming high priest,
but rather the one who said to him:
You are my son:
this day I have begotten you;
just as he says in another place:
You are a priest forever
according to the order of Melchizedek.

Gospel Mk 10:46-52

As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a sizable crowd,
Bartimaeus, a blind man, the son of Timaeus,
sat by the roadside begging.
On hearing that it was Jesus of Nazareth,
he began to cry out and say,
"Jesus, son of David, have pity on me."
And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent.
But he kept calling out all the more,
"Son of David, have pity on me."
Jesus stopped and said, "Call him."
So they called the blind man, saying to him,
"Take courage; get up, Jesus is calling you."
He threw aside his cloak, sprang up, and came to Jesus.
Jesus said to him in reply, "What do you want me to do for you?"
The blind man replied to him, "Master, I want to see."
Jesus told him, "Go your way; your faith has saved you."
Immediately he received his sight
and followed him on the way.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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1 posted on 10/27/2012 8:31:08 PM PDT by Salvation
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2 posted on 10/27/2012 8:33:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Jeremiah 31:7-9

Restoration promised


[7] For thus says the Lord:
“Sing aloud with gladness for Jacob,
and raise shouts for the chief of the nations;
proclaim, give praise, and say,
‘The Lord has saved his people,
the remnant of Israel.’
[8] Behold, I will bring them from the north country,
and gather them from the farthest parts of the earth,
among them the blind and the lame,
the woman with child and her who is in travail, together;
a great company, they shall return here.
[9] With weeping they shall come,
and with consolations I will lead them back,
I will make them walk by brooks of water,
in a straight path in which they shall not stumble;
for I am a father to Israel,
and Ephraim is my first-born.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

31:1-14. The oracles in this chapter hinge on the promise that Israel will relive its
experiences of earlier times, when it enjoyed the love and protection of God, its
father and shepherd, as it made its way through the wilderness to find tranquility
in the promised land.

The prophet again predicts the happy return of the exiles (vv. 2-3) and the resto-
ration of Israel and of the holy city, here given the glorious name of Zion (vv. 4-6).
The people will return home rejoicing at the goodness of God (vv. 7-9), who will
continue to shower blessings on them (vv. 10-14). The passage stresses the
kindness shown by God. He reveals himself as “a father to Israel” (v. 9) and
“shepherd” to his flock (v. 10), for he is faithful to the love he has for them (v. 3).

Referring to this and other passages in the prophetical books that speak of God’s
tender mercy, Bl. John Paul II points out that “it is significant that in their prea-
ching the prophets link mercy, which they often refer to because of the people’s
sins, with the incisive image of love on God’s part. The Lord loves Israel with the
love of a special choosing, much like the love of a spouse (cf. e.g. Hos 2:21-25;
Is 54 6-8), and for this reason he pardons its sins and even its infidelities and be-
trayals. When he finds repentance and true conversion, he brings his people back
to grace (cf. Jer 31:20; Ezek 39:25-29). In the preaching of the prophets, mercy
signifies a special power of love, which prevails over the sin and infidelity of the
chosen people. [...] Connected with the mystery of creation is the mystery of the
election, which in a special way shaped the history of the people whose spiritual
father is Abraham by virtue of his faith. Nevertheless, through this people which
journeys forward through the history both of the Old Covenant and of the New, that
mystery of election refers to every man and woman, to the whole great human fa-
mily. ‘I have loved you with an everlasting love, therefore I have continued my faith-
fulness to you’ (Jer 31:3)” (”Dives in Misericordia, 4).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 10/27/2012 8:35:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Hebrews 5:1-6

Christ Has Been Made High Priest by God the Father


[1] For every high priest chosen from among men is appointed to act on behalf of
men in relation to God, to offer gifts and sacrifices for sins. [2] He can deal gently
with the ignorant and wayward, since he himself is beset with weakness. [3] Be-
cause of this he is bound to offer sacrifice for his own sins as well as for those of
the people. [4] And one does not take the honor upon himself, but he is called by
God, just as Aaron was.

[5] So also Christ did not exalt himself to be made a high priest, but was appoin-
ted by him who said to him, “Thou art my Son, today I have begotten thee”; [6]
as he says also in another place, “Thou art a priest for ever, after the order of
Melchizedek.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1-10. The central theme of the epistle, broached in 2:17 and taken up again in 4:
14-15, is discussed from here up to the start of chapter 10 — the theme of Christ
as high priest, the high priest who really can free us from all sin. In fact, Christ is
the only perfect Priest: other priests—in both natural religions and the Jewish re-
ligion — are only prefigurements of Christ. The first thing to be emphasized, be-
cause the writer is addressing people of Jewish background, is that Christ’s priest-
hood is on a higher plane than that of the priests of the Old Law. However, the
argument applies not only to the priesthood of Aaron, to whose family all Israelite
priests belonged, but also, indirectly, to all forms of priesthood before Christ. But
there is a basic difference, in that whereas other priests were chosen by men,
Aaron was chosen by God. Sacred Scripture introduces him as Moses’ brother
(cf. Ex 6:20), acting as his interpreter to Pharaoh (because Moses was “slow of
speech”: Ex 4: 10; cf. 7:1-2) and joining him to lead the people out of Egypt (cf.
Ex 4:27-30). After the Israelites left Egypt, God himself instituted the priesthood
of Aaron to minister and carry out divine worship at the tabernacle and later at
the temple in Jerusalem (cf. Ex 28:1-5).

Divine intervention, therefore, brought to a close the period when sacrifice was
offered by the head of the family or the chief of the tribe and when no specific
calling or external ordination rite was connected with priesthood. Thus, for exam-
ple, in the Book of Genesis we read that Cain, and Abel, themselves offered sac-
rifices (cf. Gen 4:35), as did Noah after coming safely through the flood (cf. Gen
8:20); and the patriarchs often offered sacrifices to God in adoration or thanksgi-
ving or to renew their Covenant—for example, Abraham (cf. Gen 12:8; 15:8-17;
22:1-13) and Jacob (cf. Gen 26:25; 33:20), etc.

Although for a considerable time after the institution of the Aaron priesthood,
sacrifices continued to be offered also by private individuals — for example, in the
period of the Judges, the sacrifice of Gideon (Judg 6:18,25-26) or that of Sam-
son’s parents (Judg 13:15-20) — gradually the convictions grew that to be a priest
a person had to have a specific vocation, one which was not given to anyone out-
side males of the line of Aaron (cf. Judg 17:7-13), whom God had chosen from
out of all the people of Israel, identifying him by the sign of his rod sprouting buds
(Num 17:16-24). God himself meted out severe punishment to Korah and his
sons when they tried to set themselves up as rivals of Aaron: they were devoured
by fire from heaven (cf. Num 16); and it was specified in Mosaic legislation time
and time again that only the sons of Aaron could act as priests (cf. Num 3:10;
17:5; 18:7). This priesthood offered the sacrifices of Mosaic worship—the burnt
offerings, cereal offerings, sin offerings and peace offerings (cf. Lev 6). To the de-
scendants of Aaron, assisted by the Levites, was entrusted also the care of the
tabernacle and the protection of the ark of the Covenant. They received their mi-
nistry and had it confirmed by the offering of sacrifice and by anointing of the
man’s head and hands with oil (Ex 29; Lev 8-9; Num 3:3). For all these reasons
Hebrew priests were honored and revered by the people and regarded (not without
reason, because God had ordained them) as on a much higher plane than other
priests particularly those of the peoples of Canaan, the priests of Baal, for exam-
ple. In Christ’s time the high priest was the highest religious authority in Israel;
his words were regarded as oracular statements, and his decisions could have
important political repercussions.

However, Christ came with the very purpose of taking this ancient institution and
transforming it into a new, eternal priesthood. Every Christian priest is, as it were,
Christ’s instrument or an extension of his sacred humanity. Christian priests do
not act in their own name, nor are they mere representatives of the people: they
act in the name of God. “Here we have the priest’s identity: he is direct and daily
instrument of the saving grace which Christ has won for us” (St. J. Escriva, “In
Love with the Church”, 39). It is really Christ who is acting through them by
means of their words, gestures etc. All of this means that Christian priesthood
cannot be separated from the eternal priesthood of Christ. This extension of God’s
providence (in the form of the Old Testament priesthood and the priesthood insti-
tuted by Christ in the New Testament and the mission entrusted to New Testa-
ment priests) should lead us to love and honor the priesthood irrespective of the
human defects and shortcomings of these ministers of God: “To love God and
not venerate his Priests...is not possible” (St J. Escriva, “The Way”, 74).

1a. These words provide a very good short definition of what every priest is.

“The office proper to a priest”, St Thomas Aquinas points out, “is to be a media-
tor between God and the people, inasmuch as he bestows divine things on the
people (he is called “sacerdos” (priest), which means ‘a giver of sacred things’,
“sacra dans” [...]), and again inasmuch as he offers the people’s prayer to God
and in some way makes satisfaction to God for their sins” (”Summa Theologiae”,
III, q.22, a.1).

In this passage of the letter we can detect an echo of the description of Aaron in
the Book of Sirach: “He chose him out of all the living to offer sacrifice to the Lord,
incense and a pleasing odor as a memorial portion, to make atonement for the
people” (Sir 45:16). Four elements characterize the office of the high priest (the
text speaks of the “high” priest in the strict sense, but it is applicable to all
priests —1) his special dignity, because although he is a man he has been spe-
cially chosen by God; 2) the purpose of his mission, which is the good of man-
kind (”to act on behalf of men”); 3) the “material” side of his office, that is, public
divine worship; 4) the specific acts he must perform, the offering of sacrifice at
appropriate times.

In the specific case of priesthood instituted by God—such as that of Aaron or the
new priesthood instituted by Christ—the calling (”taken” or “chosen” from among
men) is not simply an influence the person feels interiorly, or a desire to be a
priest: its divine origin is confirmed by nomination by the proper authority, and
by official consecration.

1b. A priest is “chosen from among men”, that is, he should possess a human
nature. This is a further sign of God’s mercy: to bring about our salvation he uses
someone accessible to us, one who shares our human condition, “so that man
might have someone like himself to have recourse to” (St Thomas, “Commentary
on Heb, ad loc.”). These words also indicate the extent of God’s kindness be-
cause they remind us that the divine Redeemer not only offered himself and
made satisfaction for the sins of all, but desired that “the priestly life which the
divine Redeemer had begun in his mortal body by his prayers and sacrifice
(should not cease). He willed it to continue unceasingly through the ages in his
mystical body, which is the Church; and therefore he instituted a visible priest-
hood to offer everywhere a clean oblation (Mal 1:11), so that all men all over the
world, being diverted from sin, might serve God conscientiously, and of their own
free will” (Pius XII, “Mediator Dei”, 1).

He is “chosen from among men” also in the sense that he is given special con-
secration which is some way marks him off from the rest of the people of God.
St John Chrysostom comments, recalling Jesus triple question to Peter after the
Resurrection (cf. Jn 21:15-17): “When he asked Peter if he loved him, he did not
do so because he needed to know whether his disciple loved him, but because
he wanted to show how great his own love was; thus, when he says, ‘Who then
is the faithful and prudent servant’, he does not say this because he does not
know the answer, but in order to show us how unique and wonderful an honor it
is, as can be deduced from the rewards: ‘he will place him over all his goods.’
And he concludes that the priest ought to be outstanding in holiness (”De Sacer-
dotio”, II, 1-2).

“The priests of the New Testament”, Vatican II reminds us, “are, by their vocation
to ordination, set apart in some way in the midst of the people of God, but this is
not in order that they should be separated from that people or from anyone, but
that they should be completely consecrated to the task for which God chose
them” (”Presbyterorum Ordinis”, 3). This calling, then, constitutes a distinction
but not a separation because it is indissolubly linked to a specific mission: a
priest is “chosen from among men” but for the purpose of acting “on behalf of
men in relation to God”. In this delicate balance between divine call and spiritual
mission to men lies the essence of priesthood. Christians, therefore, should ne-
ver view a priest as “just another person”. “They want to find in the priest the vir-
tues appropriate to any Christian and even any upright man—understanding, jus-
tice, commitment to work (priestly work, in this case), charity, good manners,
social refinement. But the faithful also want to be able to recognize clearly the
priestly character: they expect the priest to pray, not to refuse to administer the
sacraments; they expect him to be open to everyone and not set himself up to
take charge of people or become an aggressive leader of human factions, of
whatever shade (cf. “Presbyterorum Ordinis”, 6). They expect him to bring love
and devotion to the celebration of Mass, to sit in the confessional, to console the
sick and the troubled; to teach sound doctrine to children and adults, to preach
the Word of God and no mere human science which—no matter how well he may
know it—is not the knowledge that saves and brings eternal life; they expect him
to give counsel and be charitable to those in need” (St. J. Escriva, “In Love with
the Church”, 42).

Priests “could not be the servants of Christ unless they were witnesses and dis-
pensers of a life other than that of this earth. On the other hand, they would be
powerless to serve men if they remained aloof from their life and circumstances”
(”Presbyterorum Ordinis”, 3). In this connection, Bl. John Paul II made the fol-
lowing appeal: “Yes, you are chosen from among men, given to Christ by the
Father, to be in the world, “in the heart of society”. You are appointed to act on
behalf of men (Heb 5:1). The priesthood is the sacrament whereby the Church
is to be seen as the society of the people of God; it is the ‘social’ sacrament.
Priests should ‘convoke’ each of the communities of the people of God, around
them but not for themselves—for Christ!” (”Homily at an Ordination of Priests”, 15
June 1980).

The specific function of the priest has, then, been clearly identified: he is con-
cerned about his brethren but he is not here to solve temporal problems; his role
is only “in relation to God”. “Christian ministerial priesthood is different from any
other priesthood in that it is not an office to which someone is appointed by others
to intercede with God on their behalf; it is a mission to which a man is called by
God (Heb 5: 1-10; 7:24; 9: 11-28) to be towards others a living sign of the pre-
sence of Christ, the only Mediator (1 Tim 2:5), Head and Shepherd of his people
[...]. In other words, Christian priesthood is essentially (this is the only possible
way it can be understood) an eminently sacred mission, both in its origin (Christ)
and in its content (the divine mystery) and by the very manner in which it is con-
ferred (a sacrament)” (A. del Portillo, “On Priesthood”, pp. 59f).

2-3. From the moral qualities a priest needs, these verses single out mercy and
compassion, which lead him, on the one hand, to be gentle to sinners and, at the
same time, to desire to make personal reparation for their sins. The Latin transla-
tion of v. 2a puts the emphasis on the fact that the priest shares in suffering for
sin: he can “suffer along with” (”aeque condolere”) but in just measure on seeing
those who go astray, and, imitating Christ, he can himself perform some of the
penance those sinners should be doing. The original word translated here as
“deal gently” recalls the profound, but serene, sorrow which Abraham felt when
Sarah died (cf. Gen 23:2) and at the same time it alludes to the need for forbea-
rance, generosity and understanding: a priest must be a person who, while rejec-
ting sin, is understanding to the sinner and conscious that it may take him time
to mend his ways. He is also inclined to put the sinner’s intentions in the best
light (cf. Gal 6:1): people do not always sin deliberately; they can sin out of ig-
norance (that is, not realizing the gravity of their actions) and, more often than
not, out of weakness.

The Old Testament makes a clear distinction between sin committed unwittingly
(cf. Lev 4:2-27; Num 14:24, 27-29) and sins of rebelliousness (cf. Num 15:22-31;
Deut 17:12). Further on (cf. Heb 6:4-6; 10:26-27; 12:17), the letter will again refer
to the gravity of sins committed out of malice. Here, however, it is referring to sin,
whether grave or not, committed out of weakness. “Ignorant” and “wayward” are
almost synonymous, for a person who sins out of ignorance is described in He-
brews by a word which means “he who goes astray, he who does not know the
way”. The basic reason why a priest should be understanding and compassio-
nate is his awareness of his own weakness. Thus, the Church puts these words
on his lips in Eucharistic Prayer I: “’nobis quoque peccatoribus’—for ourselves,
too, sinners” (cf. Wis 9:5-6). A priest is compassionate and understanding be-
cause “he himself is beset with weakness”. The word translated as “beset” con-
tains the idea of surrounded or covered by or wrapped as if in a cloak. Pope Pius
XI wrote: “When we see a man exercising this faculty (of forgiving sins), we can-
not but repeat (not out of pharisaical scandal, but with reverent amazement)
those words, ‘Who is this, who even forgives sins?’ (Lk 7:49). It is the Man-God,
who had and has ‘authority on earth to forgive sins’ (Lk 5:24), and has chosen to
communicate it to his priests, and thereby with the generosity of divine mercy to
meet the human conscience’s need of purification. Hence the great consolation
the guilty man receives who experiences remorse and contritely hears the priest
tell him in God’s name, ‘I absolve you from your sins.’ The fact that he hears this
said by someone who himself will need to ask another priest to speak the same
words to him, does not debase God’s merciful gift: it enhances it, for the hand of
God who works this wonder is seen (as operating) by means of a frail creature”
(Pius XII, “Ad Catholici Sacerdotii”).

3. Everyone, including the priest, is a sinner. In the Old Testament rites for the
Day of Atonement (”Yom Kippur”), the high priest, before entering the Holy of
Holies, offered a sin-offering for his own sins (cf. Lev 16:3, 6, 11; Heb 9:6-14); so
too the priests of the New Testament have a duty to be holy, to reject sin, to ask
for forgiveness of their own sins, and to intercede for sinners.

The model the priest should always have before him is Jesus Christ, the eternal
high priest. “The main motive force actuating a priest should be the determination
to attain the closest union with the divine Redeemer [...]. He should continually
keep Christ before his eyes. Christ’s commands, actions and example he should
follow most assiduously, in the conviction that it is not enough for him to submit
to the duties by which the faithful are bound, but that he must at a daily increa-
sing pace pursue the perfection of life which the high dignity of a priest demands”
(Pius XII, “Menti Nostrae”, 7). But, one might object, Christ never had any defect,
never sinned, because his human nature was perfect and totally holy: is he not
therefore too perfect a model for men who when it comes down to it are sinners?
The answer is, No, not at all, for he himself said, “I have given you an example,
that you also should do as I have done to you” (Jn 13:15). Besides, when the text
(v. 2) refers to “weakness” this may refer to two things the weakness of human
nature (of man as creature), and the imperfection resulting from his faults and his
passions. The former kind of defect is one Christ shares with us; the second is
one he does not.

For this very reason, in the case of the priest, consciousness of his sins, plus
his conviction that he has been called by Christ, moves him to be very committed
to his apostolic ministry of reconciliation and penance; and in the first instance
priests perform this ministry for one another. “Priests, who are consecrated by
the anointing of the Holy Spirit and sent by Christ, mortify the works of the flesh
in themselves and dedicate themselves completely to the service of people” (Va-
tican II, “Presbyterorum Ordinis”, 12). As Bl. John Paul II stressed, “the priest’s
celebration of the Eucharist and administration of the other sacraments, his pas-
toral zeal, his relationship with the faithful, his communion with this brother
priests, his collaboration with his bishop, his life of prayer — in a word, the whole
of his priestly existence — suffers an inexorable decline if by negligence or for
some other reason he fails to receive the sacrament of Penance at regular inter-
vals and in a spirit of genuine faith and devotion. If a priest were no longer to go
to confession or properly confess his sins, his priestly being and his priestly ac-
tion would feel the effect of this very soon, and it would also be noticed by the
community of which he was the pastor.

“But I also add that even in order to be a good and effective minister of Penance
he priest needs to have recourse to the source of grace and holiness present in
this sacrament. We priests, on the basis of our personal experience, can certain-
ly say that, the more careful we are to receive the sacrament of Penance and to
approach it frequently and with good dispositions, the better we fulfill our own mi-
nistry as confessors and ensure that our penitents benefit from it. And on the
other hand this ministry would lose much of its effectiveness if in some way we
were to stop being good penitents. Such is the internal logic of this great sacra-
ment. It invites all of us priests of Christ to pay renewed attention to our personal
confession” (”Reconciliatio Et Paenitentia”, 31).

What the Pope says here ultimately stems from the fact that “ as ministers of the
sacred mysteries, especially in the sacrifice of the Mass, priests act in a special
way in the person of Christ who gave himself as a victim to sanctify men” (”Pres-
byterorum Ordinis”, 13).

In this way, “Christ the shepherd is present in the priest so as continually to ac-
tualize the universal call to conversion and repentance which prepares for the co-
ming of the Kingdom of heaven (cf. Mt 4:17). He is present in order to make men
understand that forgiveness of sins, the reconciliation of the soul and God, can-
not be the outcome of a monologue, no matter how keen a person’s capacity for
reflection and self-criticism. He reminds us that no one, alone, can calm his own
conscience; that the contrite heart must submit its sins to the Church — institu-
tion, to the man-priest, who in the sacrament of Penance is a permanent objective
witness to the radical need which fallen humanity has of the man-God, the only
Just One, the only Justifier” (A. del Potillo, “On Priesthood”, p. 62).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States


4 posted on 10/27/2012 8:36:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Mark 10:46-52

The Blind Man of Jericho


[46] And they (Jesus and His disciples) came to Jericho; and as He was leaving
Jericho with His disciples and a great multitude, Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, the
son of Timaeus, was sitting by the roadside. [47] And when he heard that it was
Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mer-
cy on me!: [48] And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent; but he cried out
all he more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” [49] And Jesus stopped and said,
“Call him.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; rise, He is
calling you.” [50] And throwing off his mantle he sprang up and came to Jesus.
[51] And Jesus said to him, “What do you want Me to do for you?” And the blind
man said to Him, “Master, let me receive my sight.” [52] And Jesus said to him,
“Go your way; your faith has made you well.” And immediately he received his
sight and followed him on the way.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

46-52. “Hearing the commotion the crowd was making, the blind man asks,
‘What is happening?’ They told him, ‘It is Jesus of Nazareth.’ At this his soul was
so fired with faith in Christ that he cried out, ‘Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on
me!’

“Don’t you feel the same urge to cry out? You who are also waiting at the side of
the way, of this highway of life that is so very short? You who need more light,
you who need more grace to make up your mind to seek holiness? Don’t you feel
an urgent need to cry out, ‘Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me’? What a beau-
tiful aspiration for you to repeat again and again!...

“’Many rebuked him, telling him to be silent.’ As people have done to you, when
you sensed that Jesus was passing your way. Your heart beat faster and you too
began to cry out, prompted by an intimate longing. Then your friends, the need to
do the done thing, the easy life, your surroundings, all conspired to tell you: ‘Keep
quiet, don’t cry out. Who are you to be calling Jesus? Don’t bother Him.’

“But poor Bartimaeus would not listen to them. He cried out all the more: ‘Son of
David, have mercy on me.’ Our Lord, who had heard him right from the beginning,
let him persevere in his prayer. He does the same with you. Jesus hears our cries
from the very first, but he waits. He wants us to be convinced that we need Him.
He wants us to beseech Him, to persist, like the blind man waiting by the road
from Jericho. ‘Let us imitate him. Even if God does not immediately give us what
we ask, even if many people try to put us off our prayers, let us still go on pra-
ying’ (St. John Chrysostom, “Hom. on St. Matthew”, 66).

“’And Jesus stopped, and told them to call Him.’ Some of the better people in the
crowd turned to the blind man and said, ‘Take heart; rise, He is calling you.’ Here
you have the Christian vocation! But God does not call only once. Bear in mind
that our Lord is seeking us at every moment: get up, He tells us, put aside your
indolence, your easy life, your petty selfishness, your silly little problems. Get
up from the ground, where you are lying prostrate and shapeless. Acquire height,
weight and volume, and a supernatural outlook.

“And throwing off his mantle the man sprang up and came to Jesus. He threw off
his mantle! I don’t know if you have ever lived through a war, but many years ago
I had occasion to visit a battlefield shortly after an engagement. There strewn all
over the ground, were greatcoats, water bottles, haversacks stuffed with family
souvenirs, letters, photographs of loved ones...which belonged, moreover, not to
the vanquished but to the victors! All these items had become superfluous in the
bid to race forward and leap over the enemy defenses. Just as happened to Bar-
timaeus, as he raced towards Christ.

“Never forget that Christ cannot be reached without sacrifice. We have to get rid
of everything that gets in the way—greatcoat, haversack, water bottle. You have
to do the same in this battle for the glory of God, in this struggle of love and
peace by which we are trying to spread Christ’s Kingdom. In order to serve the
Church, the Pope and all souls, you must be ready to give up everything super-
fluous....

“And now begins a dialogue with God, a marvelous dialogue that moves us and
sets our hearts on fire, for you and I are now Bartimaeus. Christ, who is God, be-
gins to speak and asks, ‘Quid tibi vis faciam?’ ‘What do you want Me to do for
you?’ The blind man answers. ‘Lord, that I may see.’ How utterly logical! How
about yourself, can you really see? Haven’t you too experienced at times what
happened to the blind man of Jericho? I can never forget how, when meditating
on this passage many years back, and realizing that Jesus was expecting some-
thing of me, though I myself did not know what it was, I made up my own aspira-
tions: ‘Lord, what is it You want! What are You asking of me’? I had a feeling that
He wanted me to take on something new and the cry, ‘Rabboni, ut videam’, ‘Mas-
ter, that I may see,’ moved me to beseech Christ again and again, ‘Lord, what-
ever it is that You wish, let it be done.’

“Pray with me now to our Lord: ‘doce me facere voluntatem tuam, quia Deus me-
us es tu” (Psalm 142:10) (’teach me to do Thy will, for You art my God’). In short,
our lips should express a true desire on our part to correspond effectively to our
Creator’s promptings, striving to follow out His plans with unshakeable faith, be-
ing fully convinced that He cannot fail us....

“But let us go back to the scene outside Jericho. It is now to you that Christ is
speaking. He asks you, ‘What do you want Me to do for you?’ ‘Master, let me
receive my sight.’ Then Jesus answers, ‘Go your way. Your faith has made you
well.’ And immediately he received his sight and followed Him on His way.” Fol-
lowing Jesus on His way. You have understood what our Lord was asking to from
you and you have decided to accompany Him on His way. You are trying to walk
in His footsteps, to clothe yourself in Christ’s clothing, to be Christ Himself: well,
your faith, your faith in the light our Lord is giving you, must be both operative
and full of sacrifice. Don’t fool yourself. Don’t think you are going to find new ways.
The faith He demands of us is as I have said. We must keep in step with Him,
working generously and at the same time uprooting and getting rid of everything
that gets in the way” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of God”, 195-198).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 10/27/2012 8:37:35 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Jeremiah 31:7-9 ©
The Lord says this:
Shout with joy for Jacob!
Hail the chief of nations!
Proclaim! Praise! Shout:
‘The Lord has saved his people,
the remnant of Israel!’
See, I will bring them back
from the land of the North
and gather them from the far ends of earth;
all of them: the blind and the lame,
women with child, women in labour:
a great company returning here.
They had left in tears,
I will comfort them as I lead them back;
I will guide them to streams of water,
by a smooth path where they will not stumble.
For I am a father to Israel,
and Ephraim is my first-born son.

Psalm Psalm 125:1-6 ©
What marvels the Lord worked for us! Indeed we were glad.
When the Lord delivered Zion from bondage,
  it seemed like a dream.
Then was our mouth filled with laughter,
  on our lips there were songs.
What marvels the Lord worked for us! Indeed we were glad.
The heathens themselves said: ‘What marvels
  the Lord worked for them!’
What marvels the Lord worked for us!
  Indeed we were glad.
What marvels the Lord worked for us! Indeed we were glad.
Deliver us, O Lord, from our bondage
  as streams in dry land.
Those who are sowing in tears
  will sing when they reap.
What marvels the Lord worked for us! Indeed we were glad.
They go out, they go out, full of tears,
  carrying seed for the sowing:
they come back, they come back, full of song,
  carrying their sheaves.
What marvels the Lord worked for us! Indeed we were glad.

Second reading Hebrews 5:1-6 ©
Every high priest has been taken out of mankind and is appointed to act for men in their relations with God, to offer gifts and sacrifices for sins; and so he can sympathise with those who are ignorant or uncertain because he too lives in the limitations of weakness. That is why he has to make sin offerings for himself as well as for the people. No one takes this honour on himself, but each one is called by God, as Aaron was. Nor did Christ give himself the glory of becoming high priest, but he had it from the one who said to him: You are my son, today I have become your father, and in another text: You are a priest of the order of Melchizedek, and for ever.

Gospel Acclamation Jn8:12
Alleluia, alleluia!
I am the light of the world, says the Lord;
anyone who follows me will have the light of life.
Alleluia!
Or cf.2Tim1:10
Alleluia, alleluia!
Our Saviour Jesus Christ abolished
and he has proclaimed life through the Good News.
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 10:46-52 ©
As Jesus left Jericho with his disciples and a large crowd, Bartimaeus (that is, the son of Timaeus), a blind beggar, was sitting at the side of the road. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout and to say, ‘Son of David, Jesus, have pity on me.’ And many of them scolded him and told him to keep quiet, but he only shouted all the louder, ‘Son of David, have pity on me.’ Jesus stopped and said, ‘Call him here.’ So they called the blind man. ‘Courage,’ they said ‘get up; he is calling you.’ So throwing off his cloak, he jumped up and went to Jesus. Then Jesus spoke, ‘What do you want me to do for you?’ ‘Rabbuni,’ the blind man said to him ‘Master, let me see again.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Go; your faith has saved you.’ And immediately his sight returned and he followed him along the road.

6 posted on 10/27/2012 8:40:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 10/27/2012 8:42:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION



Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen.

8 posted on 10/27/2012 8:43:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL
9 posted on 10/27/2012 8:52:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Welcome to 40 Days for Life: September 26 - November 4, 2012
10 posted on 10/27/2012 8:53:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
11 posted on 10/27/2012 9:05:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
12 posted on 10/27/2012 9:07:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


13 posted on 10/27/2012 9:07:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


14 posted on 10/27/2012 9:10:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

15 posted on 10/27/2012 9:12:35 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL


A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


16 posted on 10/27/2012 9:13:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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October Devotion: The Holy Rosary
 

This feast was established by Pope Pius V to commemorate the great victory of the Christian army against the Turks in the Battle of Lepanto in 1571.

All soldiers on the battlefield prayed the Rosary for three hours and the wind has shifted in their favor. They were able to defeat an army three times bigger, in one of the greatest naval victory in history.

Pope Pius V named this the Feast of Our Lady of Victories, to be celebrated on October 7th.

In 1573, Pope Gregory XIII changed the title of this memorial to Feast of the Holy Rosary.

 

 

Pope Paul VI established the form that we celebrate this feast today, in 1969 under the name “Our Lady of the Rosary”.

“The celebration of this day invites all to mediate upon the mysteries of Christ, following the example of the Blessed Virgin Mary who was so singularly associated with the incarnation, passion and glorious resurrection of the Son of God.”



Madonna del Rosario

Caravaggio

1607

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.
 

The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)
1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

The Luminous Mysteries or Mysteries of Light
(Thursdays) see Rosarium Virginis Mariae
1. Jesus' Baptism in the Jordan (II Corinthians 5:21, Matthew 3:17 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Gratitude for the gift of Faith]
2. Jesus' self-manifestation at the wedding of Cana (John 2:1- 12) [Spiritual fruit - Fidelity]
3. Jesus' proclamation of the Kingdom of God, with His call to conversion (Mark 1:15, Mark 2:3-13; Luke 7:47- 48, John 20:22-23) [Spiritual fruit - Desire for Holiness]
4. Jesus' Transfiguration (Luke 9:35 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Spiritual Courage]
5. Jesus' institution of the Eucharist, as the sacramental expression of the Paschal Mystery. (Luke 24:13-35 and parallels, 1 Corinthians 11:24-25) [Spiritual fruit - Love of our Eucharistic Lord]

The Sorrowful Mysteries
(Tuesdays and Fridays)
1. The Agony in the Garden (Matthew 26:36-46, Luke 22:39-46) [Spiritual fruit - God's will be done]
2. The Scourging at the Pillar (Matthew 27:26, Mark 15:15, John 19:1) [Spiritual fruit - Mortification of the senses]
3. The Crowning with Thorns (Matthew 27:27-30, Mark 15:16-20, John 19:2) [Spiritual fruit - Reign of Christ in our heart]
4. The Carrying of the Cross (Matthew 27:31-32, Mark 15:21, Luke 23:26-32, John 19:17) [Spiritual fruit - Patient bearing of trials]
5. The Crucifixion (Matthew 27:33-56, Mark 15:22-39, Luke 23:33-49, John 19:17-37) [Spiritual fruit - Pardoning of Injuries]

The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]

 

The Fifteen Promises Granted to Those Who Recite the Rosary [Catholic Caucus]
Essays for Lent: The Rosary

Radio Replies Second Volume - The Rosary
Town Rejects Rosary as Offensive and the Prayers that Changed Everything
No-contact order over a student's rosary
Collecting 860 rosaries result of a lifelong passion (Catholic Caucus)
After rosary campaign, Florida sheriff abruptly shuts down abortion clinic on Marian feast
Public Rosary in San Francisco to draw thousands [Catholic Caucus]
Chicago's Incredible Floating Rosary
Enourmous Rosary floats over Chicago
Surprised by the Joyful Mysteries (of the Rosary) [Catholic Caucus]
HISTORY OF THE ROSARY [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

The Rosary-a tool for evangelization [Catholic Caucus]
OUR LADY AND HEAVEN’S PEACE PLAN (Say the Rosary) [Ecumenical]
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 5th Joyful Mystery: The Finding in the Temple (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 4th Joyful Mystery: The Presentation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 3rd Joyful Mystery: The Nativity (Patristic Rosary)
Praying the Holy Rosary in October
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 2nd Joyful Mystery: The Visitation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 1st Joyful Mystery: The Annuniciation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] On the Rosary
Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: 15 [20] Mysteries of the Holy Rosary & When They Are Prayed

It Was the Rosary: Mainz Priest Talks About His Vocation
Rosary to Halt Construction of NYC Mosque (Catholic Caucus)
British Soldier Shot in Afghanistan is Saved by His ROSARY...Like His Great-Grandfather in WWII
Catholic Caucus: Rosary Beads Saved My Life, British Soldier Says
British soldier shot in Afghanistan is saved my his ROSARY
Rosary returned to Vietnam vet as pledged 44 years ago
Rosary for the Bishop celebrates six months of prayer, global expansion
Rosary Rallies for Priests Give Final Flourish to Their Special Year (ECUMENICAL)
The Unseen Power of the Rosary
Worldwide Rosary Relay to Offer Prayer for Priests

Boy Suspended For Rosary -- Reinstated
NY school sued after teen suspended over rosary
Student Suspended for Wearing Rosary Beads
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] The 3:30 Beads!
Catholic Biblical Apologetics: Private Devotions to Mary: The Rosary
Benedict XVI Promotes Rosary in Fatima [Catholic Caucus]
Archbishop Naumann, Bishop Finn Lead Mother's Day Rosary at Planned Parenthood
Did the Apostles Pray the Rosary? (First Novena to the Holy Spirit?) [Catholic Caucus]
The Importance of the Meditated Holy Rosary -- What the Popes have to say [Catholic Caucus]
A Ladder from Earth to Heaven: The Rosary for All Christians

Jesus is in the Holy Rosary
The Rosary, a powerful weapon against the devil
History of The Scriptural Rosary [Ecumenical]
The Lord Is with Thee
Rosary of Our Lady's Tears(Catholic Prayer Thread)
The Rosary and Me - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
Rosary promoted as path to Christ and peace [at third annual Rosary Bowl NW]
The Efficacy and Power of One Hail Mary [Ecumenical]
“ Let Us Do It!“ (Sunday: Rosary to be simultaneously prayed on five continents)
The Fruits of the Mysteries of the Rosary

[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
The Family Rosary [Try it for Lent!] (Catholic Caucus)
History of the Scriptural Rosary - Meditating on The Word
Rosary Resurgence [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: How to Pray the Rosary: Contemplating Christ With Mary [Ecumenical]
[Oregon] Rosary Bowl focuses on links between prayer, evangelization
Praying the Rosary By Bishop Fulton J. Sheen(Catholic Caucus)
Rosary-Prayers Aiming to Break Record [Catholic Caucus]
Rosary vs. Repetitious Prayer [Ecumenical]
The Luminous Mysteries [of the Rosary]: Knowing Jesus in His Public Ministry

Rosary Is a School of Mary, Says Pope: Encourages Recitation [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
New campaign launched to promote family rosary
The Rosary and the Republic
Chant the Rosary... in Latin!
(...)and the rosary
Estimated 50,000 recite rosary in event at Rose Bowl
Our Lady of Victory (HLI Page)
Rosary to Mark St. Martha's Feast
Pray the Rosary
Rosary Aids Spiritual Growth, Says Pope


Image Detail

Remembering Lepanto
The Battle that Saved the Christian West (October 7, 1571: Battle of Lepanto)
Battle of Lepanto: Armada of the Cross
Remember Lepanto
How Europe Escaped Speaking Arabic
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Civilization in the Balance: The Battle of Lepanto and Election ‘08
LEPANTO

A Call To Prayer: This Lepanto Moment [Repost]
Lepanto, 1571: The Battle That Saved Europe
Celebrating the Battle of Lepanto
Clash of civilizations: Battle of Lepanto revisited
Lepanto, Bertone e Battesimo, Oh My!
Lepanto Sunday
Our Lady of the Rosary of La Naval (A Mini-Lepanto in the Philippines)
Swiss Guards at the Battle of Lepanto, 7 October 1571
Battle of Lepanto
LEPANTO, 7 OCTOBER 1571: The Defense of Europe

Battle of Lepanto
Remember Lepanto!
The Battle of Lepanto
On This Day In History, The Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Chesterton's Lepanto
The Miracle At Lepanto...
Lepanto
The Naval Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto

17 posted on 10/27/2012 9:14:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

October 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: New Evangelization. That the New Evangelization may progress in the oldest Christian countries.

Missionary Intention: World Mission Day. That the celebration of World Mission Day may result in a renewed commitment to evangelization.


18 posted on 10/27/2012 9:15:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY MK 10:46-52
Metaphors can help us deepen our faith
Fr. Jerry J. Pokorsky

For many Catholics, the definition of “faith” is hard to grasp. It is not uncommon, for example, for those experiencing a sense of harsh abandonment and suffering to conclude, falsely, that they are undergoing a “crisis of faith.” A metaphor for faith is usually helpful in sorting out such misunderstandings. Of course, metaphors do not provide the precision of a scholastic definition. But a reasonably accurate metaphor prepares us to enter more deeply into the mystery leading us to the faith Jesus exhorts us to have: “If you had faith like a mustard seed, you would say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and be planted in the sea’; and it would obey you” (Lk 17:16).

Christ Himself uses metaphors in the Gospels. The “kingdom of God” parables, for example, help us begin to identify our destiny as well as the obstacles we face in our pursuit of it. The scattering of seed, the vibrant growth or the choking off by weeds provide vivid images to help us understand the nature of this kingdom. Christ is truly the master of the metaphor — witness the poignant parable of the prodigal son. Of course, His richest metaphor of all is the raw material for the blessed Eucharist, where the metaphor of bread is elevated. And Christ, “the bread of life,” becomes present again among us again at every Mass.

But metaphors should be on target. Contrary to the cliche, faith is never “blind.” In this Sunday’s Gospel, we hear about Bartimaeus, a blind man, begging by the roadside. To the annoyance of the disciples, he pesters Christ until he receives a hearing and pleads, “Master, I want to see.” Christ immediately responds, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.” Bartimaus at last has the eyes to see Christ clearly and to follow Him. Indeed true faith opens our eyes to Jesus.

Contemporary metaphors for faith are not lacking. Years ago, the famous Hubble orbiting telescope, because of a design flaw, needed to be fitted with corrective lenses. After astronauts retrofitted the Hubble, the stunning images that came back were those of a distant universe, including images of magnificent energy bursts. Faith is like corrective lenses to the eyes of our fallen nature that help us to see deep within the ways and heart of Christ.

Communication with spaceships also provides useful images of faith. When Apollo 13 during its famous mission to the moon was crippled by an explosion, the astronauts returned to earth only because of their ability to communicate with NASA’s mission control. Faith in Christ and His church is something like that. Tuned in to the church’s teaching by faith, we are infallibly guided to our heavenly destination despite the slings and arrows of our daily lives. And similarly, there is the traditional image of the church as the “barque of Peter,” a ship of safe haven in the stormy waters of life.

Yet metaphors, however clear and effective, always fall short. St. Paul acknowledges this when he writes, “Eye has not seen, ear has not heard, nor has it so much as dawned on man what God has prepared for those who love him” (1 Cor 2:9). Hence, to enter more deeply into the mysteries of faith, it is necessary to advance with the formulation of magisterial definitions. Even here, a metaphor can be useful.

Catholic author Flannery O’Connor wrote wonderfully eccentric short stories with profound insights obviously gleaned from her faith. In her letters, she defines dogmas of the faith as “windows to the infinite.” When we in faith accept a Catholic dogma, we do not close our eyes, but rather we see more clearly the divine mysteries. The dogma of the incarnation of Christ — the word made flesh — reveals that the Second Person of the Trinity became man. In pondering the meaning, we cannot but conclude that God and man are reconciled in the person of Christ. Human nature hence is elevated by God above all other creation. The dogma of the Incarnation not only teaches us about Christ, but about our innate human dignity.

With our eyes opened by metaphors of faith, we may be better able to appreciate the power of the written word and doctrinal formulations. Perhaps we are able to grasp this definition of faith as taught by the First Vatican Council: “Faith, which is the beginning of human salvation, the Catholic church professes to be a supernatural virtue, by means of which, with the grace of God inspiring and assisting us, we believe to be true what He has revealed, not because we perceive its intrinsic truth by the natural light of reason, but because of the authority of God Himself, who makes the revelation and can neither deceive nor be deceived.”

Faith, the size of a mustard seed and precisely defined. And worthy of hours of prayerful meditation. Now that isn’t so hard, is it?

Fr. Pokorsky is pastor of St. Michael Parish in Annandale.


19 posted on 10/27/2012 9:23:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Work of God

What do you want me to do for you? Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year B

 -  30th Sunday in ordinary time

What do you want me to do for you?

What do you want me to do for you? Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Mark 10:46-52

46 And they came to Jericho: and as he went out of Jericho, with his disciples, and a very great multitude, Bartimeus the blind man, the son of Timeus, sat by the way side begging.
47 Who when he had heard, that it was Jesus of Nazareth, began to cry out, and to say: Jesus son of David, have mercy on me.
48 And many rebuked him, that he might hold his peace; but he cried a great deal the more: Son of David, have mercy on me.
49 And Jesus, standing still, commanded him to be called. And they call the blind man, saying to him: Be of better comfort: arise; he called you.
50 Who casting off his garment leaped up, and came to him.
51 And Jesus answering, said to him: What do you want me to do for you? And the blind man said to him: Rabboni, that I may see.
52 And Jesus said to him: Go your way, your faith has made you whole. And immediately he saw, and followed him in the way.

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

30th Sunday in ordinary time - What do you want me to do for you? Jesus son of David, have mercy on me. – Can you see how easy it is to ask for my compassion and how I am always ready to respond? … I told him, What do you want me to do for you? And the blind man said: Rabboni, that I may see. I said to him Go on your way, your faith has made you whole, and instantly he recovered his sight.

First of all, this man has recognized me as the Son of David; he has believed in the Holy Scriptures, in the promises made to the people of Israel and has given credit to my Mercy and my Power. He has recognized the promised Messiah and despite being blind he used his voice to call my attention and benefit from my gift.

When someone invokes my compassion, he not only obtains what he needs, but the rays of my mercy envelope his body, mind, soul and spirit. I know the pain, the wounds, the resentments, the sin and the needs of each one; my wish is to heal and to bless all those who come to me with faith.

My Mercy is infinite and very easy to receive, but it is obtained according to the faith and hope with which it is requested, since I reward the humility of everyone who calls me. One of the gifts that my Father has given to everyone is suffering, without it human beings would feel themselves in a Paradise that would not have a connection with God and they would never feel fear of offending Him or the need of finding Him.

Suffering came to the world as a consequence of sin. It was well that in my Mercy I opened the eyes of many blind people, but it is even more important that each one opens his spiritual eyes to see the way I see, this way they can know me and live in my Presence.

Many have the notion that miracles do not exist, many discredit the Holy Scriptures denying them; I assure you that miracles continue to occur daily as a reward to faith. If someone comes to me with faith and confidence in my power, I will respond to him in accordance with the Will of my Father who wishes the salvation of all his children. Many don’t obtain what they wish, but I assure you that all prayers are listened to and there is always an answer in connection with each petition.

There is more joy in giving than in receiving, I feel great joy being able to help a soul that comes to me, I rejoice in humility and repentance. This is why I don’t judge but understand human misery. I wait eagerly that every soul leaves the ways of darkness and comes back to my light to obtain the benefits that my Mercy wishes to grant.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


20 posted on 10/27/2012 9:27:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

A Man Who Saw by Hearing – A Meditation on the Gospel of the 30th Sunday of the Year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

In today’s gospel there is a very familiar story of the healing of the blind man Bartimaeus. As with any familiar story, the danger is that we, upon hearing its opening lines say, “Oh that story,” and we just sort of tune out. But there are many things in the details of the story that we can easily miss. Ultimately the story of Bartimaeus is also our story, for we too must let the Lord heal our blindness and give us sight. One paradox of this gospel that we shall note, is that the man receives his sight as the result of hearing.

Let’s look at this gospel in 6 stages.

Stage I–Perception of the Problem–the text says, As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples, and a sizable crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind man sat by the roadside begging.

Bartimaeus has many troubles, he is blind, and he is poor. But although he is physically blind, he is not spiritually blind. For he knows he has troubles, he knows he is blind. And to know our troubles, to be in touch with our neediness, is an important spiritual insight that many lack.

It is possible for some to feel self-satisfied and to be unaware of how blind, pitiable, poor and naked they really are before God (cf Rev 3:17). Indeed, so poor and so needy that we depend on God for every beat of our heart. But some who are spiritually blind, lose this insight in becoming proud. They fail to ask for help from the Lord,  they fail to ask for grace. Jesus once said to the Pharisees Jesus said, “If you were blind, you would not be guilty of sin; but since you claim you can see, your guilt remains.” (John 9:41)  In other words, physical blindness is not their problem, spiritual blindness is. And because they think themselves righteous on their own power, they do not need God nor do they truly seek him. Only humility and a true “vision” and experience of one’s poverty can help us to call out as we should.

But our blind man knows that he is blind and so he calls for help. As we shall see, however, his cries for help need some direction, a need to be properly specified and directed.

So we begin by simply noting this man is blind, but still, he has spiritual insight.

Do we have this? Do we really understand how blind we are? We struggle to see God, we struggle to see and understand ourselves, we struggle to see others with compassion and understanding. Indeed, God is more present to us than anything in this world. Yet, we see all the things of this world, and still struggle to see God. Neither do we see our own dignity, or the dignity and the gift of others,  yes, even the dignity of our enemies. We do not see or understand how things work together, and we struggle to see and find meaning in the events of our day. We are also blind to our sin, and we seldom understand what harm our sin actually does.

Yes, we have a great deal of blindness, we do struggle to see. But perhaps our worst blindness is it we do not even consider how blind we are. But too easily, like the Pharisees we go on thinking that we know a few things, and that therefore we know many things.

Consider the humility of the blind man, who knows he is blind who knows he needs help, and grace, and mercy. It is a humility that opens the door. Stage one in our journey must be the perception of the problem.

Stage II–the Proclamation that is Prescribed. – The text says  On being told it was Jesus of Nazareth who was passing by, he began to cry out and say “Jesus son of David have pity on me.”

Note the subtle but important transition here. Up until this point he was calling upon anyone, who happened to pass by, for help. But no mere passerby, nor anyone in this world, can ultimately help him with his real problem.

It is the same with us. Though we may turn to science, or medicine, philosophy, economics or politics, none of these can really help us. At best they can specify what is wrong, give us temporary medicines, passing comforts, etc. But all their solutions will be rooted in this world, which is passing away.

True vision can only be granted by the Lord, who opens for us a vision of glory, and who alone can draw safely to that place where joys will never end and visions never cease.

The blind man is told of the presence of Jesus. And hearing this, he directs his cry away from any mere passerby to the Lord who alone can heal him: Jesus, son of David, have pity on me! The world, and passersby can get him money, perhaps a meal, but only Jesus can give him meaning, the true vision that he really needs to see.

And do not miss this point that’s seeing comes paradoxically through hearing. For faith comes by hearing, and hearing from the word of God (cf Rom 10:17). It is a truth that faith is about hearing, not seeing. For most frequently, we doubt what we see. Even if our eyes see marvels, we think, “They have a way of doing that.” No, the eye is never satisfied with seeing (cf Eccl. 1:8). Faith comes by hearing, and faith is obedience to what is heard. We walk by faith, by an inner seeing, not by physical sight.

Thus, it is by hearing that the blind man will come to see Jesus who can help them to see. He hears from others that Jesus is passing by, and he takes up the proclamation that is prescribed, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me!”

Stage III–the Perseverance that Produces–the text says, And they rebuked him, telling him to be silent. Yet he kept calling all the more, “Son of David, have pity on me!” Jesus stopped and said, “call him.” So they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage; get up. Jesus is calling you.

Is it true fact, that those of us who seek to put our trust in the Lord, and call on him, will often experience rebuke, hostility, and ridicule from the world. Note that the blind man ignores all of this. And so should we. He has heard the Name above all names, who alone in heaven and earth can save, and he calls upon him.

Yes, Jesus does delay, he does not answer him right away. But the blind man persevered, calling out all the more, and eventually, Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.”

Why does God delay? This is a very deep mystery, but it is clear that one of the effects of his delay would seem to be to test our faith and strengthen it. In the end, it is not an incantation that saves us, but faith. Simply shouting, “In the name of Jesus!” Is not enough. The Name of Jesus is not some incantation like, “Open sesame.” Rather, it is an announcement of faith, and faith is more than words. Ultimately, it is not words alone that save us, but the faith that must underlie those words, “Jesus! Save me”

Stage IV–the Priority that is Presented–the text says, He threw aside his cloak, sprang up, and came to Jesus.

Do not miss this important detail. His cloak was probably the most valuable thing he owned. In that climate, a very arid climate, it gets cool in the evening after sunset. The temperature drops rapidly. So critical was the cloak, that Scripture forbade the taking of a cloak as collateral for a loan:  If a man is poor, do not go to sleep with his pledge in your possession. Return his cloak to him by sunset so that he may sleep in it. (Deut 24:12-13)

But note, this man cast aside his cloak, and leaving it behind, he went to Jesus. Thus, he leaves behind perhaps the most valuable and necessary thing for his survival in this world. To miss a meal, might be inconvenient but it would not kill him. But to sleep one night, a cold night, without his cloak might well end his life through hypothermia. But leaving everything, he runs to the Lord.

What of us? What are we willing to leave behind to find Christ? An old gospel song says, I’d rather have Jesus than silver and gold. Another old hymn says, There’s nothing between my soul in the Savior. Is there? Are you willing to leave it behind?? Are you and I free enough to do so?

Stage V–The Permission that is Procured–the text says, Jesus said to him in reply, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man replied to him, Master, I want to see!

Why does Jesus asked this question? Can he not see what a blind man needs? Perhaps.

But honestly, healing takes courage. The fact is, in life, most seek mere relief. True healing takes courage because it brings change, and new demands. If the blind man is healed, it would no longer be acceptable that he should sit and beg. Having been healed, more will be expected of him. His life will be irrevocably changed.

Yes, to be healed requires courage. Many of us wonder, of the Lord’s delay in answering our prayers. Perhaps a question from last week’s gospel is applicable as we cry to the Lord: Do you have any idea what you are asking?” Often we do not.

Truth be told, most of us want relief more than healing. There is a big difference. The Lord is in the healing business, but most of us just want relief. Do not miss what the Lord says here. In effect, he says to the blind man, and to us, “Are you really sure you want healing?” The Lord respects us, and our freedom. He wants our consent before he goes to work. And often, though many of us think we want healing, we don’t really know what we are asking.

The Lord waits, until a request makes real sense. He knows that most of us are not always ready for what he really offers. He asks, and when our yes becomes definitive, he goes to work.

Stage VI – The Path that is Pursued–the text says, Jesus told him, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.” Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus on the way.

As we have already seen, true healing brings forth radical change. And now man who sat by the road begging, sees, but is also up and walking about. And what is he doing? He is  following Jesus. For faith has saved him, and faith not only gives sight, but summons us to obedience, an obedience that has us walk in the path of the Lord.

You see, (pardon the pun), faith is more than an offer of relief. True faith instills real change. A change in direction, a change in the way we walk.

And thus this gospel speaks to us of a man who was blind. And paradoxically he received his faith by hearing. For he heard of Jesus and called on him. Yes, his sight came from his hearing. And faith grants to vision by hearing. True vision, is to see Christ, and having seen him by hearing, to follow after him.

I have it on the best authority that as he followed Jesus up the road, he sang this song:


21 posted on 10/27/2012 9:40:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday Gospel Reflections

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Jeremiah 31:7-9 II: Hebrews 5:1-6
Gospel
Mark 10:46-52

46 And they came to Jericho; and as he was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a great multitude, Bartimae'us, a blind beggar, the son of Timae'us, was sitting by the roadside.
47 And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!"
48 And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent; but he cried out all the more, "Son of David, have mercy on me!"
49 And Jesus stopped and said, "Call him." And they called the blind man, saying to him, "Take heart; rise, he is calling you."
50 And throwing off his mantle he sprang up and came to Jesus.
51 And Jesus said to him, "What do you want me to do for you?" And the blind man said to him, "Master, let me receive my sight."
52 And Jesus said to him, "Go your way; your faith has made you well." And immediately he received his sight and followed him on the way.


Interesting Details
  • (v.46) The end of the road is near. Jericho is 15 miles from Jerusalem, where Jesus will enter into his passion and death. Jericho at the time would be crowded with pilgrims on their way to celebrate Passover in Jerusalem.
  • (v.47-48) Bartimeus is persistent and determined to catch Jesus' attention. It is a desperate desire combined with great faith in Jesus as the one who will save him.
  • (v.47) Bartimeus addresses Jesus as "Son of David", a title for the Messiah, as has been prophesized in the Old Testament. Mark wants to emphasize that Jesus is indeed the Messiah, the one who will liberate Israel.
  • (v.48) Why do people scold this blind man? It is customary for a rabbi or distinguished teacher to teach the crowd while on his journey to Passover celebration. The crowd following Jesus may be offended by Bartimeus' cry drowning out what they are trying to listen to. If so, then they do not understand Jesus, who is always merciful.
  • (v.50) Jesus calls Bartimeus. His response is immediate and enthusiastic! He did not say "Wait until I have done this or that." Instead, he jumped up and came without aid. In answering the call of Jesus, Bartimeus "throws aside his cloak". For a beggar, the cloak may be his bed at night, it may be what he uses to collect the coins he begs. The beggar throws aside what little securities he has.
  • (v.51) "What do you want me to do for you?" Jesus, and probably everyone else there, knows the man's need. In asking the question, Jesus confirms his (and our) freedom to choose.
  • (v.52) "Go your way." When the man can see, he chooses to go Jesus' way.

One Main Point

Bartimeus, the blind beggar, is a model for all disciples. He is singularly focused on Jesus as the source of his salvation. He rejoices when he is called, throwing away whatever he holds dear, in faith that what Jesus gives is worth much more.


Reflections
  1. The blind man is not vague in his request to Jesus. He knows what he needs--to see. What do I need spiritually? I ask God to help me in my self-examination.
  2. I contrast the response of this blind man, and that of the rich man in Mark 17-22. Jesus asks the rich man to sell what he has and give to the poor. The rich man walks away sad, unwilling to do as Jesus asks. In the Gospel today, the blind man throws away what little he has. What is Jesus asking me to do in my daily life? Does my response resemble that of the blind man, or the rich man? Which is my security, "my cloak?" I ask God for FAITH, to trust him.

22 posted on 10/27/2012 9:45:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, October 28, 2012
Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Jeremiah 31:7-9
Psalm 126:1-6
Hebrews 5:1-6
Mark 10:46-52

My daughter, I see more Pharisees among Christians than there were around Pilate.

-- St Margaret of Cortona


23 posted on 10/27/2012 9:51:09 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


24 posted on 10/27/2012 9:52:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Amen.


25 posted on 10/27/2012 10:00:31 PM PDT by onyx (FREE REPUBLIC IS HERE TO STAY! DONATE MONTHLY! IF YOU WANT ON SARAH PALIN''S PING LIST, LET ME KNOW)
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Oct 28, Invitatory for Thirtieth Sunday of Ordinary Time

 

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, the king of the apostles, alleluia.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, the king of the apostles, alleluia.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, the king of the apostles, alleluia.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, the king of the apostles, alleluia.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did
in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah
they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, the king of the apostles, alleluia.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, the king of the apostles, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, the king of the apostles, alleluia.

26 posted on 10/28/2012 3:52:43 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 28, Office of Readings for Sunday of the 30th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 615
Proper of Seasons: 437
Psalter: Sunday, Week II, 791

Christian Prayer:
Does not contain Office of Readings.

Office of Readings for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Hail Redeemer, King divine!
Priest and Lamb, the throne is thine;
King, whose reign shall never cease,
Prince of everlasting peace.

Angels, saints and nations sing:
“Praise be Jesus Christ our King;
Lord of life, earth, sky and sea,
King of love on Calvary!”

Eucharistic King, what love
draws thee daily from above,
clad in signs of bread and wine:
feed us, lead us, keep us thine!

Angels, saints and nations sing:
“Praise be Jesus Christ our King;
Lord of life, earth, sky and sea,
King of love on Calvary!”

King, whose name creation thrills,
rule our hearts, our minds, our wills;
till in peace, each nation rings
with thy praises, King of kings.

Angels, saints and nations sing:
“Praise be Jesus Christ our King;
Lord of life, earth, sky and sea,
King of love on Calvary!”

“Hail Redeemer King Divine” performed by Frank Patterson Music by Charles Rigby; Words by Patrick Brennan (1877-1952), Additional verses by John McHugh.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Lord, our God, in splendor and majesty you are clothed, wrapped in light as in a robe, alleluia.

Psalm 104
Hymn to God the Creator

To be in Christ means being a completely new creature. Everything of the old is gone, now everything is made anew (2 Corinthians 5:17).

I

Bless the Lord, my soul!
Lord God, how great you are,
clothed in majesty and glory,
wrapped in light as in a robe!

Ant. Lord, our God, in splendor and majesty you are clothed, wrapped in light as in a robe, alleluia.

You stretch out the heavens like a tent.
Above the rains you build your dwelling.
You make the clouds your chariot,
and walk on the wings of the wind,
you make the winds your messengers
and flashing fire your servants.

Ant. Lord, our God, in splendor and majesty you are clothed, wrapped in light as in a robe, alleluia.

You founded the earth on its base,
to stand firm from age to age.
You wrapped it with the ocean like a cloak:
the waters stood higher than the mountains.

Ant. Lord, our God, in splendor and majesty you are clothed, wrapped in light as in a robe, alleluia.

At your threat they took to flight;
at the voice of your thunder they fled.
They rose over the mountains and flowed down
to the place which you had appointed.
You set limits they might not pass
lest they return to cover the earth.

Ant. Lord, our God, in splendor and majesty you are clothed, wrapped in light as in a robe, alleluia.

You make springs gush forth in the valleys;
they flow in between the hills.
They give drink to all the beasts of the field;
the wild asses quench their thirst.
On their banks dwell the birds of heaven;
from the branches they sing their song.

Ant. Lord, our God, in splendor and majesty you are clothed, wrapped in light as in a robe, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Lord, our God, in splendor and majesty you are clothed, wrapped in light as in a robe, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lord has brought forth bread from the earth, and wine to give warmth to men’s hearts, alleluia.

II

From your dwelling you water the hills;
earth drinks its fill of your gift.
You make the grass grow for the cattle
and the plants to serve man’s needs,
that he may bring forth bread from the earth
and wine to cheer man’s heart;
oil, to make him glad
and bread to strengthen man’s heart.

Ant. The Lord has brought forth bread from the earth, and wine to give warmth to men’s hearts, alleluia.

The trees of the Lord drink their fill,
the cedars he planted on Lebanon;
there the birds build their nests;
on the treetop the stork has her home.
The goats find a home on the mountains
and rabbits hide in the rocks.

Ant. The Lord has brought forth bread from the earth, and wine to give warmth to men’s hearts, alleluia.

You made the moon to mark the months;
the sun knows the time for its setting.
When you spread the darkness it is night
and all the beasts of the forest creep forth.
The young lions roar for their prey
and ask their food from God.

Ant. The Lord has brought forth bread from the earth, and wine to give warmth to men’s hearts, alleluia.

At the rising of the sun they steal away
and go to rest in their dens.
Man goes forth to his work,
to labor till evening falls.

Ant. The Lord has brought forth bread from the earth, and wine to give warmth to men’s hearts, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord has brought forth bread from the earth, and wine to give warmth to men’s hearts, alleluia.

Ant. 3 The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

II

How many are your works, O Lord!
In wisdom you have made them all.
The earth is full of your riches.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

There is the sea, vast and wide,
with its moving swarms past counting,
living things great and small.
The ships are moving there
and the monsters you made to play with.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

All of these look to you
to give them their food in due season.
You give it, they gather it up:
you open your hand, they have their fill.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

You hide your face, they are dismayed;
you take back your spirit, they die,
returning to the dust from which they came.
You send forth your spirit, they are created;
and you renew the face of the earth.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

May the glory of the Lord last for ever!
May the Lord rejoice in his works!
He looks on the earth and it trembles;
the mountains send forth smoke at his touch.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

I will sing to the Lord all my life,
make music to my God while I live.
May my thoughts be pleasing to him.
I find my joy in the Lord.
Let sinners vanish from the earth
and the wicked exist no more.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

Bless the Lord, my soul.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, as you made springs in valleys to form streams between mountains, so you made living streams of grace flow from the Apostles that their teaching may bring salvation to all the nations. May we have a practical knowledge of their doctrine, be obedient to their commands, obtain remission of sins through their prayers, and finally receive the reward of eternal happiness.

Ant. The Lord looked upon all he had made and saw that it was very good, alleluia.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Blessed are your eyes, for they see God’s works.
And your ears, for they hear his word.

READINGS

First Reading
From the beginning of the book of Wisdom
1:1-15
In praise of God’s wisdom

Love justice, you who judge the earth;
think of the Lord in goodness,
and seek him in integrity of heart;
Because he is found by those who test him not,
and he manifests himself to those who do not disbelieve him.
For perverse counsels separate a man from God,
and his power, put to the proof, rebukes the foolhardy;

Because into a soul that plots evil wisdom enters not,
nor dwells she in a body under debt of sin.
For the holy spirit of discipline flees deceit
and withdraws from senseless counsels;
and when injustice occurs it is rebuked.

For wisdom is a kindly spirit,
yet she acquits not the blasphemer of his guilty lips;
Because God is the witness of his inmost self
and the sure observer of his heart
and the listener to his tongue.
For the spirit of the Lord fills the world,
is all-embracing, and knows what man says.

Therefore no one who utters wicked things can go unnoticed,
nor will chastising condemnation pass him by.
For the devices of the wicked man shall be scrutinized,
and the sound of his words shall reach the Lord,
for the chastisement of his transgressions;
Because a jealous ear hearkens to everything,
and discordant grumblings are no secret.
Therefore guard against profitless grumbling,
and from calumny withhold your tongues;
For a stealthy utterance does not go unpunished,
and a lying mouth slays the soul.

Court not death by your erring way of life,
nor draw to yourselves destruction by the works of your hands.
Because God did not make death,
nor does he rejoice in the destruction of the living.
For he fashioned all things that they might have being;
and the creatures of the world are wholesome,
And there is not a destructive drug among them
nor any domain of the nether world on earth,
For justice is undying.

RESPONSORY Proverbs 3:13, 15, 17; James 3:17

Happy is the one who finds wisdom; it is more precious than your most valued possessions.
Its ways are pleasant; all its paths lead to peace.

Wisdom that comes from God is utterly pure; it is also peaceable, gentle, full of kindness and manifests itself in good works.
Its ways are pleasant; all its paths lead to peace.

Second reading
From a letter to the Corinthians by Saint Clement, pope
In his goodness to all, God gives order and harmony to the world

Let us fix our gaze on the Father and Creator of the whole world, and let us hold on to his peace and blessings, his splendid and surpassing gifts. Let us contemplate him in our thoughts and with our mind’s eye reflect upon the peaceful and restrained unfolding of his plan; let us consider the care with which he provides for the whole of his creation.

By his direction the heavens are in motion, and they are subject to him in peace. Day and night fulfill the course he has established without interfering with each other. The sun, the moon and the choirs of stars revolve in harmony at his command in their appointed paths without deviation. By his will the earth blossoms in the proper seasons and produces abundant food for men and animals and all the living things on it without reluctance and without any violation of what he has arranged.

Yet unexplored regions of the abysses and inexpressible realms of the deep are subject to his laws. The mass of the boundless sea, joined together by his ordinance in a single expanse, does not overflow its prescribed limits but flows as he commanded it. For he said: Thus far shall you come, and your waves will be halted here. The ocean, impassable for men, and the worlds beyond it are governed by the same edicts of the Lord.

The seasons, spring, summer, autumn and winter, follow one another in harmony. The quarters from which the winds blow function in due season without the least deviation. And the ever-flowing springs, created for our health as well as our enjoyment, unfailingly offer their breasts to sustain human life. The tiniest of living creatures meet together in harmony and peace. The great Creator and Lord of the universe commanded all these things to be established in peace and harmony, in his goodness to all, and in overflowing measure to us who seek refuge in his mercies through our Lord Jesus Christ; to him be glory and majesty for ever and ever. Amen.

RESPONSORY See Judith 9:12; 6:19

O Lord, you rule the heavens and the earth; you created the seas. You are the king of the universe.
Hear the prayer of your servants.

Lord, God of heaven and earth, have pity on the humiliation of our people.
Hear the prayer of your servants.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day we bless you.
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
for we have put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
And we shall never hope in vain.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Almighty
ever-living God,
increase our faith,
hope and charity,
and make us love what you command,
so that we may merit what you promise.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

27 posted on 10/28/2012 3:52:51 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 28, Morning Prayer for Sunday of the 30th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 618
Proper of Seasons: 441
Psalter: Sunday, Week II, 795

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 689
Proper of Seasons: 636
Psalter: Sunday, Week II, 780

Morning Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

All hail, adored Trinity!
all hail, eternal Unity!
O God the Father, God the Son,
and God the Spirit, ever One.

To thee upon this holy day,
we offer up our thankful lay;
thou hearest in thy love’s great wealth,
and praising thee is all our health.

Three Persons praise we evermore,
our only God our hearts adore;
in thy sweet mercy ever kind
may we our sure protection find.

O Trinity! O Unity!
Be present as we worship thee;
and with the songs that angels sing
unite the hymns of praise we bring.

“All hail, adored Trinity” by Keble College Choir; Words: Unknown author, 11th Century (Ave! Colenda Trinitas); translated from Latin to English by John Chandler, Lauda Syon, Part 1, 1857.
“All hail, adored Trinity” performed by Keble College Choir is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

Psalm 118
Song of joy for salvation

This Jesus is the stone which, rejected by you builders, has become the chief stone supporting all the rest (Acts 4:11).

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love endures for ever.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

Let the sons of Israel say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let the sons of Aaron say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let those who fear the Lord say:
“His love endures for ever.”

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

I called to the Lord in my distress;
he answered and freed me.
The Lord is at my side; I do not fear.
What can man do against me?
The Lord is at my side as my helper:
I shall look down on my foes.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

It is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in princes.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

The nations all encompassed me;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me, compassed me about;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me about like bees;
they blazed like a fire among thorns.
In the Lord’s name I crushed them.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

I was hard-pressed and was falling
but the Lord came to help me.
The Lord is my strength and my song;
he is my savior.
There are shouts of joy and victory
in the tents of the just.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
his right hand raised me up.
The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
I shall not die, I shall live
and recount his deeds.
I was punished, I was punished by the Lord,
but not doomed to die.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

Open to me the gates of holiness:
I will enter and give thanks.
This is the Lord’s own gate
where the just may enter.
I will thank you for you have answered
and you are my savior.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

The stone which the builders rejected
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord,
a marvel in our eyes.
This day was made by the Lord;
we rejoice and are glad.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

O Lord, grant us salvation;
O Lord, grant success.
Blessed in the name of the Lord
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord;
the Lord God is our light.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

Go forward in procession with branches
even to the altar.
You are my God, I thank you.
My God, I praise you.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good;
for his love endures for ever.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you have given us the great day of rejoicing: Jesus Christ, the stone rejected by the builders, has become the cornerstone of the Church, our spiritual home. Shed upon your Church the rays of your glory, that it may be seen as the gate of salvation open to all nations. Let cries of joy and exultation ring out from its tents, to celebrate the wonder of Christ’s resurrection.

Ant. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, alleluia.

Ant.2 Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Canticle – Daniel 3:52-57
Let all creatures praise the Lord

The Creator… is blessed for ever (Romans 1:25).

Blessed are you, O Lord, the God of our fathers,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever;

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

And blessed is your holy and glorious name,
praiseworthy and exalted above all for all ages.

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Blessed are you in the temple of your holy glory,
praiseworthy and glorious above all forever.

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Blessed are you on the throne of your kingdom,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Blessed are you who look into the depths
from your throne upon the cherubim,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Blessed are you in the firmament of heaven,
praiseworthy and glorious forever.

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord,
praise and exalt him above all forever.

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Let us sing a hymn of praise to our God, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Praise the Lord for his infinite greatness, alleluia.

Psalm 150
Praise the Lord

Let mind and heart be in your song: this is to glorify God with your whole self (Hesychius).

Praise God in his holy place,
praise him in his mighty heavens.
Praise him for his powerful deeds,
praise his surpassing greatness.

Ant. Praise the Lord for his infinite greatness, alleluia.

O praise him with sound of trumpet,
praise him with lute and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance,
praise him with strings and pipes.

Ant. Praise the Lord for his infinite greatness, alleluia.

O praise him with resounding cymbals,
praise him with clashing of cymbals.
Let everything that lives and that breathes
give praise to the Lord.

Ant. Praise the Lord for his infinite greatness, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, maker of heaven and earth and of all created things, you make your just ones holy and you justify sinners who confess your name. Hear us as we humbly pray to you: give us eternal joy with your saints.

Ant. Praise the Lord for his infinite greatness, alleluia.

READING Ezekiel 36:25-27

I will sprinkle clean water upon you to cleanse you from all your impurities, and from all your idols I will cleanse you. I will give you a new heart and place a new spirit within you, taking from your bodies your stony hearts and giving you natural hearts. I will put my spirit within you and make you live by my statutes, careful to observe my decrees.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

We cry aloud how marvelous you are,
as we call upon your name.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. Son of David, have pity on me. What do you want me to do for you? Lord, restore my sight.

Luke 1:68 – 79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Son of David, have pity on me. What do you want me to do for you? Lord, restore my sight.

INTERCESSIONS

Let us give thanks to our Savior who came into this world as God’s presence among us. Let us call upon him:
Christ, King of Glory, be our light and our joy.

Lord Jesus, you are the rising Sun, the firstfruits of the future resurrection,
grant that we may not sit in the shadow of death but walk in the light of life.
Christ, King of Glory, be our light and our joy.

Show us your goodness, present in every creature,
that we may contemplate your glory everywhere.
Christ, King of Glory, be our light and our joy.

Do not allow us to be overcome by evil today,
but grant that we may overcome evil through the power of good.
Christ, King of Glory, be our light and our joy.

You were baptized in the Jordan and anointed by the Holy Spirit,
grant that we may this day give thanks to your Holy Spirit.
Christ, King of Glory, be our light and our joy.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Almighty
ever-living God,
increase our faith,
hope and charity,
and make us love what you command,
so that we may merit what you promise.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

28 posted on 10/28/2012 3:52:56 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 28, Midday Prayer for Sunday of the 30th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 623
Psalter: Sunday, Week II, 801 (Midday)
Proper: 805 (reading), 437 (concluding prayer)

Midday Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time using Current Psalmody

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

O Lord my God! when I in awesome wonder
Consider all the worlds Thy hands have made,
I see the stars, I hear the mighty thunder,
Thy power throughout the universe displayed:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

When through the woods and forest glades I wander
And hear the birds sing sweetly in the trees;
When I look down from lofty mountain grandeur
And hear the brook and feel the gentle breeze:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss; Originally this was a Swedish folk melody, “O Store Gud” by Carl Boberg (1859-1940) and was translated by Stuart K. Hine in 1899.
”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Psalm 23
The Good Shepherd
The Lamb himself will be their shepherd and will lead them to the springs of living waters (Revelation 7:17).

The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.
Fresh and green are the pastures
where he gives me repose.
Near restful waters he leads me,
to revive my drooping spirit.

He guides me along the right path;
he is true to his name.
If I should walk in the valley of darkness
no evil would I fear.
You are there with your crook and your staff;
with these you give me comfort.

You have prepared a banquet for me
in the sight of my foes.
My head you have anointed with oil;
my cup is overflowing.

Surely goodness and kindness shall follow me
all the days of my life.
In the Lord’s own house shall I dwell
for ever and ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord Jesus Christ, Shepherd of your Church, you give us new birth in the waters of baptism, anoint us with saving oil, and call us to salvation at your table. Dispel the terrors of death and the darkness of error. Lead your people along safe paths that they may rest securely in you and live for ever in your Father’s house.

Ant. He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Psalm 76
Thanksgiving for victory
They will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven (Matthew 24:30).

I

God is made known in Judah;
in Israel his name is great.
He set up his tent in Jerusalem
and his dwelling place in Zion.
It was there he broke the flashing arrows,
the shield, the sword, the armor.

You, O Lord, are resplendent,
more majestic than the everlasting mountains.
The warriors, despoiled, slept in death;
the hands of the soldiers were powerless.
At your threat, O God of Jacob,
horse and rider lay stunned.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

II

You, you alone, strike terror.
Who shall stand when your anger is roused?
You uttered your sentence from the heavens;
the earth in terror was still
when God arose to judge,
to save the humble of the earth.

Men’s anger will serve to praise you;
its survivors surround you in joy.
Make vows to your God and fulfill them.
Let all pay tribute to him who strikes terror,
who cuts short the life of princes,
who strikes terror in the kings of the earth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Your power is awesome, Father, and wonderful is your holiness. In your presence the earth both trembles and stands still, for you shattered death’s power by the cross. Rise to help your people: give your light, and grant salvation to the meek of the earth, that they may praise your name in heaven.

Ant. Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

READING Romans 8:26

The Spirit helps us in our weakness; for we do not know how to pray as we ought; but the Spirit himself makes intercessions for us with groanings that cannot be expressed in speech.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Lord, grant a hearing to my prayer.
Give me wisdom as you promised.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Almighty
ever-living God,
increase our faith,
hope and charity,
and make us love what you command,
so that we may merit what you promise.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

29 posted on 10/28/2012 3:53:02 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 28, Evening Prayer for Sunday of the 30th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 632
Proper of Seasons: 441
Psalter: Sunday, Week II, 805

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 694
Proper of Seasons: 637
Psalter: Sunday, Week II, 786

Evening Prayer II for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Love divine, all loves excelling,
joy of heaven, to earth come down,
fix in us thy humble dwelling,
all thy faithful mercies crown.
Jesus, thou art all compassion,
pure, unbounded love thou art;
visit us with thy salvation,
enter every trembling heart.

Come, almighty to deliver,
let us all thy life receive;
suddenly return, and never,
nevermore thy temples leave.
Thee we would be always blessing,
serve thee as thy hosts above,
pray, and praise thee without ceasing,
glory in thy perfect love.

Finish then thy new creation;
pure and spotless let us be;
let us see thy great salvation
perfectly restored in thee:
changed from glory into glory,
till in heaven we take our place,
till we cast our crowns before thee,
lost in wonder, love, and praise.

“Love divine all loves excelling”; Words: Charles Wesley, 1747. Music: John Zundel, 1870
“Love divine all loves excelling” by Gloucester Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

Psalm 110
The Messiah, king and priest

Christ’s reign will last until all his enemies are made subject to him (1 Corinthians 15:25).

The Lord’s revelation to my Master:
“Sit on my right:
your foes I will put beneath your feet.”

Ant. Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

The Lord will wield from Zion
your scepter of power:
rule in the midst of all your foes.

Ant. Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

A prince from the day of your birth
on the holy mountains;
from the womb before the dawn I begot you.

Ant. Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

The Lord has sworn an oath he will not change.
“You are a priest for ever,
a priest like Melchizedek of old.”

Ant. Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

The Master standing at your right hand
will shatter kings in the day of his great wrath.

Ant. Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

He shall drink from the stream by the wayside
and therefore he shall lift up his head.

Ant. Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Almighty God, bring the kingdom of Christ, your anointed one, to its fullness. May the perfect offering of your Son, eternal priest of the new Jerusalem, be offered in every place to your name, and make all nations a holy people for you.

Ant. Christ our Lord is a priest for ever, like Melchizedek of old, alleluia.

Ant. 2 God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

Psalm 115
Praise of the true God

You have renounced idol worship to serve the living and true God (1 Thessalonians 1:9).

Not to us, Lord, not to us,
but to your name give the glory
for the sake of your love and your truth,
lest the heathen say: “Where is their God?”

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

But our God is in the heavens;
he does whatever he wills.
Their idols are silver and gold,
the work of human hands.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

They have mouths but they cannot speak;
they have eyes but they cannot see;
they have ears but they cannot hear;
they have nostrils but they cannot smell.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

With their hands they cannot feel;
with their feet they cannot walk.
No sound comes from their throats.
Their makers will come to be like them
and so will all who trust in them.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

Sons of Israel, trust in the Lord;
he is their help and their shield.
Sons of Aaron, trust in the Lord;
he is their help and their shield.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

You who fear him, trust in the Lord;
he is their help and their shield.
He remembers us, and he will bless us;
he will bless the sons of Israel.
He will bless the sons of Aaron.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

The Lord will bless those who fear him,
the little no less than the great:
to you may the Lord grant increase,
to you and all your children.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

May you be blessed by the Lord,
the maker of heaven and earth.
The heavens belong to the Lord
but the earth he has given to men.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

The dead shall not praise the Lord,
nor those who go down into the silence.
But we who live bless the Lord
now and for ever. Amen.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, creator and ruler of heaven and earth, you made man in your likeness to subdue the earth and master it, and to recognize the work of your hands in created beauty. Grant that your children, thus surrounded on all sides by signs of your presence, may live continually in Christ, praising you through him and with him.

Ant. God dwells in highest heaven; he has power to do all he wills, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Canticle – See Revelation 19:1-7
The wedding of the lamb

Alleluia.
Salvation, glory, and power to our God:
Alleluia.
his judgments are honest and true.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
Sing praise to our God, all you his servants,
Alleluia.
all who worship him reverently, great and small.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The Lord our all-powerful God is King;
Alleluia.
Let us rejoice, sing praise, and give him glory.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The wedding feast of the Lamb has begun,
Alleluia.
and his bride is prepared to welcome him.
Alleluia (alleluia).

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

READING 2 Thessalonians 2:13-14

We are bound to thank God for you always, beloved brothers in the Lord, because you are the first fruits of those whom God has chosen for salvation, in holiness of spirit and fidelity to truth. He called you through our preaching of the good news so that you might achieve the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.
Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.

His wisdom is beyond compare,
mighty is his power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. The publican went home at peace with God, for everyone who exalts himself shall be humbled, and whoever humbles himself shall be exalted.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The publican went home at peace with God, for everyone who exalts himself shall be humbled, and whoever humbles himself shall be exalted.

INTERCESSIONS

All praise and honor to Christ! He lives for ever to intercede for us, and he is able to save those who approach the Father in his name.
Sustained by our faith, let us call upon him:
Remember your people, Lord.

As the day draws to a close, Sun of Justice, we invoke your name upon the whole human race,
so that all men may enjoy your never failing light.
Remember your people, Lord.

Preserve the covenant which you have ratified in your blood,
cleanse and sanctify your Church.
Remember your people, Lord.

Remember your assembly, Lord,
your dwelling place.
Remember your people, Lord.

Guide travelers along the path of peace and prosperity,
so that they may reach their destinations in safety and joy.
Remember your people, Lord.

Receive the souls of the dead, Lord,
grant them your favor and the gift of eternal glory.
Remember your people, Lord.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Almighty
ever-living God,
increase our faith,
hope and charity,
and make us love what you command,
so that we may merit what you promise.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

30 posted on 10/28/2012 3:53:10 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Oct 28, Night Prayer for Sunday of the 30th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, Page 1172
Vol II, Page 1628
Vol III, Page 1272
Vol IV, Page 1236

Christian Prayer:
Page 1037

Night Prayer after Evening Prayer II on Sundays and Solemnities

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:

We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

Christé, eléison
Christé, eléison

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

HYMN

O radiant Light, O Son divine
Of God the Father’s deathless face
O image of the light sublime
That fills the heavenly dwelling-place

Lord Jesus Christ, as daylight fades
As shine the lights of eventide
We praise the Father with the Son
The spirit blest and with them one.

O Son of God, the source of life
Praise is your due by night and day
Unsullied lips must raise the strain
Of your proclaimed and splendid name.

O Radiant Light by Choir of The Cathedral of the Madeleine & The Madeleine Choir School; Lyrics copyright 1973, Fides Publishers, Inc. Notre Dame, Indiana from “Morning Praise and Evensong”. Used by permission of the publisher for non-profit or devotional purposes.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

Psalm 91
Safe in God’s sheltering care

I have given you the power to tread upon serpents and scorpions (Luke 10:19).

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
and abides in the shade of the Almighty
says to the Lord: “My refuge,
my stronghold, my God in whom I trust!”

It is he who will free you from the snare
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night
nor the arrow that flies by day,
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon.

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach;
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.

Your eyes have only to look
to see how the wicked are repaid,
you who have said: “Lord, my refuge!”
and have made the Most High your dwelling.

Upon you no evil shall fall,
no plague approach where you dwell.
For you has he commanded his angels,
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you upon their hands
lest you strike your foot against a stone.
On the lion and the viper you will tread
and trample the young lion and the dragon.

Since he clings to me in love, I will free him;
protect him for he knows my name.
When he calls I shall answer: “I am with you,”
I will save him in distress and give him glory.

With length of life I will content him;
I shall let him see my saving power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

READING Revelation 22:4-5

They shall see the Lord face to face and bear his name on their foreheads. The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

GOSPEL CANTICLE

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
we have celebrated today
the mystery of the rising of Christ to new life.
May we now rest in your peace,
safe from all that could harm us,
and rise again refreshed and joyful,
to praise you throughout another day.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Blessing

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

31 posted on 10/28/2012 3:53:19 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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WDTPRS 30th Ordinary Sunday: In His will is our peace.

Let’s look at the Collect for the 30th Ordinary Sunday, a prayer also in the 1962 Missale Romanum for the 13th Sunday after Pentecost.  It was in the ancient Veronese and the Gelasian Sacramentary.

Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, da nobis fidei spei et caritatis augmentum, et ut mereamur assequi quod promittis, fac nos amare quod praecipis.

This is a prayer for peace.

LITERAL VERSION:
Almighty eternal God, grant us an increase of faith, hope and charity, and, so that we may merit to obtain what You promise, cause us to love what You command.

This Sunday Father asks God to increase in us the theological virtues: faith, hope and charity, bestowed on us in baptism.

The German writer Josef Pieper (d 1997) wrote that the supernatural life can be described as having three main currents.   First, we have some knowledge of God surpassing what we can know about Him naturally because He reveals it to us (faith).  Second, we live in the patient expectation that what we learn and believe God promises will indeed be fulfilled (hope).  Third, we make an affirmative response of love of God, whom we have come to know by faith, and also love of our neighbor (charity).

Natural human virtues are acquired through education and discipline and elbow grease. The three theological virtues faith, hope and charity are given to us by God.  They are infused into us with grace at baptism. They perfect and elevate everything virtuous thing man can do naturally.

Looking at the positive development of the theological virtues, faith logically precedes hope and charity, and hope precedes charity.  Considering their negative unraveling and loss, we lose charity first of all, and then hope and, last of all, faith.

Faith is the starting point for all salvation and meritorious actions.  “The righteous shall live by faith” (Habakkuk 2:4; Rom 1:17; Gal 3:11; Heb 10:38).  Living faith works through charity.  Furthermore, “faith apart from works is dead” (cf James 2:14-26).  “When faith is deprived of hope and love, it does not fully unite the believer to Christ and does not make him a living member of his Body (Catechism of the Catholic Church 1814).”  “The virtue of hope responds to the aspiration to happiness which God has placed in the heart of every man; it takes up the hopes that inspire men’s activities and purifies them so as to order them to the Kingdom of heaven; it keeps man from discouragement; it sustains him during times of abandonment; it opens up his heart in expectation of eternal beatitude. Buoyed up by hope, he is preserved from selfishness and led to the happiness that flows from charity (CCC 1818).”  “The practice of all the virtues is animated and inspired by charity, which ‘binds everything together in perfect harmony’” (CCC 1827).

The theological virtues can be considered individually, but they are intimately woven together.  St Augustine (d 430) says, “There is no love without hope, no hope without love, and neither love nor hope without faith” (enchir 8).  The goal of the virtuous life is to become like God (CCC 1803).  We are all called be saints.  Living the theological virtues concretely reveals God’s image in us, as well as the grace He gives us as His adopted children.

This Sunday Father also prays that we will love what God wills.

Doing what another commands is not always pleasant.  Our will and passions rebel.  We want to command rather than be commanded.   “The lust of rule”, libido dominandi, as the late Fr Richard John Neuhaus (d 2009) puts it, shouts, “My way or no way!”  Frank Sinatra got it wrong.

In Canto III of the Paradiso of the Divine Comedy Dante (d 1321) meets the soul of Piccarda.  He asks her if the blessed in heaven are disappointed that they do not have a higher place in the celestial realm. In response, Piccarda utters one of the greatest phrases ever penned (l. 85):

In His will is our peace. / It is that sea to which all things move, / both what it creates and what nature makes…

Souls in heaven desire only what God wants for them.  They are perfectly happy with His plan.

During our lives, if we try, we can discern something of what God wills for us.  When we obey Him we act in accordance with the way He made us and what He intends for us to do.  Even amidst the vicissitudes of this troubling and passing world, we find happiness and peace in obedience to God and His Church.

CURRENT ICEL (2011):
Almighty ever-living God, increase our faith, hope and charity, and make us love what you command, so that we may merit what you promise.

E ‘n la sua volontade è nostra pace.  In His will is our peace.

32 posted on 10/28/2012 3:53:28 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: All
Saints Simon and Jude, Apostles

Saints Simon and Jude, Apostles
Feast Day
October 28th


El GRECO
Apostle Saint Simon
1606 - Oil on canvas
Museo del Greco, Toledo

El GRECO
Apostle Saint Thaddeus (Jude)
1606 - Oil on canvas
Museo del Greco, Toledo

Saint Simon is usually called "the Zealot" (Lk 6:15), probably because he belonged to the Jewish party of the "Zealous of the Law". Jude, also called Thaddeus or "Courageous", is the disputed author of a short epistle in the New testament. Tradition has it that they preached in Mesopotamia and Persia and there were martyred. Their names appear in the Roman Canon.

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003


Collect:
O God, who by the blessed Apostles
have brought us to acknowledge your name,
graciously grant,
through the intercession of Saints Simon and Jude,
that the Church may constantly grow
by increase of the peoples who believe in you.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: Ephesians 2:19-22
So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord; in whom you also are built into it for a dwelling place of God in the Spirit.

Gospel Reading: Luke 6:12-19
In these days he went out to the mountain to pray; and all night he continued in prayer to God. And when it was day, he called his disciples, and chose from them twelve, whom he named apostles; Simon, whom he named Peter, and Andrew his brother, and James and John, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon who was called the Zealot, and Judas the son of James, and Judas Iscariot, who became a traitor.

And he came down with them and stood on a level place, with a great crowd of his disciples and a great multitude of people from all Judea and Jerusalem and the seacoast of Tyre and Sidon, who came to hear him and to be healed of their diseases; and those who were troubled with unclean spirits were cured. And all the crowd sought to touch him, for power came forth from him and healed them all.


BENEDICT XVI GENERAL AUDIENCE, Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Simon and Jude
Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Today, let us examine two of the Twelve Apostles: Simon the Cananaean and Jude Thaddaeus (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot). Let us look at them together, not only because they are always placed next to each other in the lists of the Twelve (cf. Mt 10: 3, 4; Mk 3: 18; Lk 6: 15; Acts 1: 13), but also because there is very little information about them, apart from the fact that the New Testament Canon preserves one Letter attributed to Jude Thaddaeus.

Simon is given a nickname that varies in the four lists: while Matthew and Mark describe him as a "Cananaean", Luke instead describes him as a "Zealot".

In fact, the two descriptions are equivalent because they mean the same thing: indeed, in Hebrew the verb qanà' means "to be jealous, ardent" and can be said both of God, since he is jealous with regard to his Chosen People (cf. Ex 20: 5), and of men who burn with zeal in serving the one God with unreserved devotion, such as Elijah (cf. I Kgs 19: 10).

Thus, it is highly likely that even if this Simon was not exactly a member of the nationalist movement of Zealots, he was at least marked by passionate attachment to his Jewish identity, hence, for God, his People and divine Law.

If this was the case, Simon was worlds apart from Matthew, who, on the contrary, had an activity behind him as a tax collector that was frowned upon as entirely impure. This shows that Jesus called his disciples and collaborators, without exception, from the most varied social and religious backgrounds.

It was people who interested him, not social classes or labels! And the best thing is that in the group of his followers, despite their differences, they all lived side by side, overcoming imaginable difficulties: indeed, what bound them together was Jesus himself, in whom they all found themselves united with one another.

This is clearly a lesson for us who are often inclined to accentuate differences and even contrasts, forgetting that in Jesus Christ we are given the strength to get the better of our continual conflicts.

Let us also bear in mind that the group of the Twelve is the prefiguration of the Church, where there must be room for all charisms, peoples and races, all human qualities that find their composition and unity in communion with Jesus.

Then with regard to Jude Thaddaeus, this is what tradition has called him, combining two different names: in fact, whereas Matthew and Mark call him simply "Thaddaeus" (Mt 10: 3; Mk 3: 18), Luke calls him "Judas, the son of James" (Lk 6: 16; Acts 1: 13).

The nickname "Thaddaeus" is of uncertain origin and is explained either as coming from the Aramaic, taddà', which means "breast" and would therefore suggest "magnanimous", or as an abbreviation of a Greek name, such as "Teodòro, Teòdoto".

Very little about him has come down to us. John alone mentions a question he addressed to Jesus at the Last Supper: Thaddaeus says to the Lord: "Lord, how is it that you will manifest yourself to us and not to the world?".

This is a very timely question which we also address to the Lord: why did not the Risen One reveal himself to his enemies in his full glory in order to show that it is God who is victorious? Why did he only manifest himself to his disciples? Jesus' answer is mysterious and profound. The Lord says: "If a man loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him" (Jn 14: 22-23).

This means that the Risen One must be seen, must be perceived also by the heart, in a way so that God may take up his abode within us. The Lord does not appear as a thing. He desires to enter our lives, and therefore his manifestation is a manifestation that implies and presupposes an open heart. Only in this way do we see the Risen One.

The paternity of one of those New Testament Letters known as "catholic", since they are not addressed to a specific local Church but intended for a far wider circle, has been attributed to Jude Thaddaeus. Actually, it is addressed "to those who are called, beloved in God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ" (v. 1).

A major concern of this writing is to put Christians on guard against those who make a pretext of God's grace to excuse their own licentiousness and corrupt their brethren with unacceptable teachings, introducing division within the Church "in their dreamings" (v. 8).

This is how Jude defines their doctrine and particular ideas. He even compares them to fallen angels and, mincing no words, says that "they walk in the way of Cain" (v. 11).

Furthermore, he brands them mercilessly as "waterless clouds, carried along by winds; fruitless trees in late autumn, twice dead, uprooted; wild waves of the sea, casting up the foam of their own shame; wandering stars for whom the nether gloom of darkness has been reserved for ever" (vv. 12-13).

Today, perhaps, we are no longer accustomed to using language that is so polemic, yet that tells us something important. In the midst of all the temptations that exist, with all the currents of modern life, we must preserve our faith's identity. Of course, the way of indulgence and dialogue, on which the Second Vatican Counsel happily set out, should certainly be followed firmly and consistently.

But this path of dialogue, while so necessary, must not make us forget our duty to rethink and to highlight just as forcefully the main and indispensable aspects of our Christian identity. Moreover, it is essential to keep clearly in mind that our identity requires strength, clarity and courage in light of the contradictions of the world in which we live.

Thus, the text of the Letter continues: "But you, beloved" - he is speaking to all of us -, "build yourselves up on your most holy faith; pray in the Holy Spirit; keep yourselves in the love of God; wait for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life. And convince some, who doubt..." (vv. 20-22).

The Letter ends with these most beautiful words: "To him who is able to keep you from falling and to present you without blemish before the presence of his glory with rejoicing, to the only God, our Saviour through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and for ever. Amen" (vv. 24-25).

It is easy to see that the author of these lines lived to the full his own faith, to which realities as great as moral integrity and joy, trust and lastly praise belong, since it is all motivated solely by the goodness of our one God and the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Therefore, may both Simon the Cananaean and Jude Thaddeus help us to rediscover the beauty of the Christian faith ever anew and to live it without tiring, knowing how to bear a strong and at the same time peaceful witness to it.

© Copyright 2006 - Libreria Editrice Vaticana


from A Book of Feasts and Seasons, by Joanna Bogle

Saint Jude Novena
To Saint Jude, Holy Saint Jude, Apostle and Martyr, great in virtue and rich in miracles, near kinsman of Jesus Christ, faithful intercessor of all who invoke your special patronage in time of need. To you I have recourse from the depths of my heart and humbly beg to whom God has given such great power to come to my assistance. Help me in my present and urgent petition. In return I promise to make your name known and cause you to be invoked. Saint Jude, pray for us and all who invoke your aid. Amen.


33 posted on 10/28/2012 7:06:33 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A saint's day is always superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

Novena to St. Jude, Patron of Desperate Situations and Hopeless Cases
About Saint Jude: Apostle, October 28 [Catholic Caucus]
St. Simon the Apostle, Feast Day: October 28, [Catholic Caucus]
Saints Simon and Jude
Who Is Saint Jude Thaddeus?/ST SIMON, SURNAMED THE ZEALOT, APOSTLE

34 posted on 10/28/2012 7:08:28 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation


Information:
St. Simon
Feast Day: October 28
Born:

Cana or Canaan

Died: Abyssinians claim he was crucified in Samaria; Lipsius says he was sawn in half at Suanir, Persia; Moses of Chorene writes that he was martyred at Weriosphora in Iberia; many locations claim to have relics including Toulouse, France, and Saint Peter's Basilica, Rome, Italy
Major Shrine: relics claimed by many places, including Toulouse; Saint Peter's Basilica
Patron of: curriers; sawyers; tanners


35 posted on 10/28/2012 7:09:31 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 



Information: St. Jude

Feast Day: October 28
Major Shrine: Saint Peter's, Rome, Rheims, Toulouse, France
Patron of: lost causes, desperate situations, hospitals


36 posted on 10/28/2012 7:12:47 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Simon and St. Jude

 
Feast Day: October 28
Born / Died: around the same time as Jesus

The Church celebrates the feast of these two apostles of Jesus on the same day.

St. Simon was called "the zealous one" because he had so much devotion to the Jewish law. Once he was called by Jesus to be an apostle, he gave his heart and his energy to preaching the Gospel.

With the other apostles, he received the Holy Spirit on the first Pentecost. He first went to Egypt to spread the good news. Then he went to Persia with the apostle St. Jude.

Both of them gave their lives for God when they were martyred there.

St. Jude is sometimes called Thaddeus, which means "the brave one."

At the Last Supper, Jesus said: "He who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and show myself to him."

And St. Jude asked: "Lord, how is it that you are about to show yourself to us and not to the world?"

Jesus answered him: "If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him."

St. Jude is also called the saint of "desperate or impossible cases." People pray to him when things seem hopeless. Often God answers their prayers through the intercession of this beloved apostle.


37 posted on 10/28/2012 7:16:03 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, October 28

Liturgical Color: Red


Today is the Feast of Sts. Simon and Jude, Apostles. St. Simon is usually depicted in religious art with a saw referring to the method of his martyrdom. Records indicate he may have been sawn in half for preaching the Gospel.


38 posted on 10/28/2012 2:09:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 10
46 And they came to Jericho: and as he went out of Jericho, with his disciples, and a very great multitude, Bartimeus the blind man, the son of Timeus, sat by the way side begging. Et veniunt Jericho : et proficiscente eo de Jericho, et discipulis ejus, et plurima multitudine, filius Timæ Bartimæus cæcus, sedebat juxta viam mendicans. και ερχονται εις ιεριχω και εκπορευομενου αυτου απο ιεριχω και των μαθητων αυτου και οχλου ικανου υιος τιμαιου βαρτιμαιος ο τυφλος εκαθητο παρα την οδον προσαιτων
47 Who when he had heard, that it was Jesus of Nazareth, began to cry out, and to say: Jesus son of David, have mercy on me. Qui cum audisset quia Jesus Nazarenus est, cœpit clamare, et dicere : Jesu fili David, miserere mei. και ακουσας οτι ιησους ο ναζωραιος εστιν ηρξατο κραζειν και λεγειν ο υιος δαυιδ ιησου ελεησον με
48 And many rebuked him, that he might hold his peace; but he cried a great deal the more: Son of David, have mercy on me. Et comminabantur ei multi ut taceret. At ille multo magis clamabat : Fili David, miserere mei. και επετιμων αυτω πολλοι ινα σιωπηση ο δε πολλω μαλλον εκραζεν υιε δαυιδ ελεησον με
49 And Jesus, standing still, commanded him to be called. And they call the blind man, saying to him: Be of better comfort: arise, he calleth thee. Et stans Jesus præcepit illum vocari. Et vocant cæcum, dicentes ei : Animæquior esto : surge, vocat te. και στας ο ιησους ειπεν αυτον φωνηθηναι και φωνουσιν τον τυφλον λεγοντες αυτω θαρσει εγειραι φωνει σε
50 Who casting off his garment leaped up, and came to him. Qui projecto vestimento suo exiliens, venit ad eum. ο δε αποβαλων το ιματιον αυτου αναστας ηλθεν προς τον ιησουν
51 And Jesus answering, said to him: What wilt thou that I should do to thee? And the blind man said to him: Rabboni, that I may see. Et respondens Jesus dixit illi : Quid tibi vis faciam ? Cæcus autem dixit ei : Rabboni, ut videam. και αποκριθεις λεγει αυτω ο ιησους τι θελεις ποιησω σοι ο δε τυφλος ειπεν αυτω ραββουνι ινα αναβλεψω
52 And Jesus saith to him: Go thy way, thy faith hath made thee whole. And immediately he saw, and followed him in the way. Jesus autem ait illi : Vade, fides tua te salvum fecit. Et confestim vidit, et sequebatur eum in via. ο δε ιησους ειπεν αυτω υπαγε η πιστις σου σεσωκεν σε και ευθεως ανεβλεψεν και ηκολουθει τω ιησου εν τη οδω

39 posted on 10/28/2012 2:11:45 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
46. And they came to Jericho: and as he went out of Jericho with his disciples and a great number of people, blind Bartimaeus, the son of Timaeus, sat by the highway side begging.
47. And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out, and say, Jesus, you Son of David, have mercy on me.
48. And many charged him that he should hold his peace: but he cried the more a great deal, You Son of David, have mercy on me.
49. And Jesus stood still, and commanded him to be called. And they call the blind man, saying to him, Be of good comfort, rise; he calls you.
50. And he, casting away his garment, rose, and came to Jesus.
51. And Jesus answered and said to him, What will you that I should do to you? The blind man said to him, Lord, that I might receive my sight.
52. And Jesus said to him, Go your way; your faith has made you whole. And immediately he received his sight, and followed Jesus in the way.

JEROME; The name of the city agrees with the approaching Passion of our Lord; for it is said, And they came to Jericho. Jericho means moon or anathema; but the failing of the flesh of Christ is the preparation of the heavenly Jerusalem. It goes on: And as he went out of Jericho with his disciples, and a great number of people, blind Bartimaeus, the son of Timaeus, sat by the wayside begging.

BEDE; Matthew says, that there were two blind men sitting by the wayside, who cried to the Lord, and received their sight; but Luke relates that one blind man was enlightened by Him, with a like order of circumstances, as He was going into Jericho; where no one, at least no wise human, will suppose that the Evangelists wrote things contrary to one another, but that one wrote more fully, what another has left out. We must therefore understand that one of them was the more important, which appears from this circumstance, that Mark has related the name and the name of his father.

AUG. It is for this reason that Mark wished to relate his case alone, because his receiving his sight had gained for the miracle a fame, illustrious in proportion to the extent of the knowledge of his affliction. But although Luke relates a miracle done entirely in the same way nevertheless we must understand that a similar miracle was wrought on another blind man, and a similar method of the same miracle. It goes on: And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out, and say, Jesus, you Son of David, have mercy upon me.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; The blind man calls the Lord, the Son of David, hearing the way in which the passing multitude praised Him, and feeling sure that the expectation of the prophets was fulfilled There follows And many charged him that he should hold his peace.

ORIGEN; As if he said, Those who were foremost in believing rebuked him when to He cried, You Son of David, that he might hold his peace, and cease to call Him by a contemptible name, when he ought to say, Son of God, have pity upon me. He however did not cease; wherefore it goes on: But he cried the more a great deal, You Son of David, have mercy upon me; and the Lord hearth his cry; wherefore there follows:

And Jesus stood still, and commanded him to be called. But observe, that the blind man, of whom Luke speaks, is inferior to this one; for neither did Jesus call him, nor order him to be called, but He commanded him to be brought to Him, as though unable to come by himself; but this blind man by the command of our Lord is called to Him. Wherefore it goes on: And they call the blind man, saying to him, Be of good comfort, rise, he calls you; but he casting away his garment, comes to Him.

It goes on: And he casting away his garment, rose, and came to Jesus. Perchance, the garment of the blind man means the veil of blindness and poverty, with which he was surrounded, which he cast away and came to Jesus; and the Lord questions him, as he is approaching.

Wherefore there follows: And Jesus answered and said to him, What will you that I should do to thee.

BEDE; Could He who was able to restore sight be ignorant of what the blind man wanted? His reason then for asking is that prayer may be made to Him; He puts the question, to stir up the blind man's heart to pray.

CHRYS. Or He asks, lest men should think that what He granted the man was not what he wanted. For it was His practice to make the good disposition of those who were to be cured known to all men, and then to apply the remedy, in order to stir up others to emulation, and to show that He who was to be cured was worthy to obtain the grace. It goes on: The blind man said to him, Lord, that I may receive my sight.

BEDE; For the blind man looks down upon every gift except light, because, whatever a blind man may possess, without light he cannot see what he possesses.

PSEUDO-JEROME; But Jesus, considering his ready will, rewards him with the fulfillment of his desire.

ORIGEN; Again, it is more worthy to say Rabboni, our, as it is in other places, Master, than to say Son of David; wherefore He gives him health, not on his saying, Son of David, but when he said Rabboni. Wherefore there follows: And Jesus said to him, Go your way; your faith has made you whole. And immediately he received his, sight, and followed him in the way.

THEOPHYL. The mind of the blind man is grateful, for when he was made whole, he did not leave Jesus, but followed Him.

BEDE; In a mystical sense, however, Jericho, which means the moon, points out the waning of our fleeting race. The Lord restored sight to the blind man, when drawing near to Jericho, because coming in the flesh, and drawing near to His Passion, He brought many to the faith; for it was not in the first years of His Incarnation, but in the few years before He suffered, that He showed the mystery of the Word to the world.

PSEUDO-JEROME; But the blindness in part, brought upon the Jews, will in the end be enlightened when He sends to them the Prophet Elias.

BEDE; Now in that on approaching Jericho, the restored sight to one man, and on quitting it to two, He intimated, that before His Passion He preached only to one nation, the Jews, but after His resurrection and ascension, through His Apostles He opened the mysteries both of His Divinity and His Humanity to Jews and Gentiles. Mark indeed, in writing that one receives his sight, refers to the saving of the Gentiles, that the figure might agree with the salvation of those, whom He instructed in the faith; but Matthew, who write His Gospel to the faithful among the Jews, because it was all so to reach the knowledge of the Gentiles, fitly says that two receive their sight, that He might teach us that the grace of faith belonged to each people.

Therefore, as the Lord was departing with His disciples and a great multitude from Jericho, the blind man was sitting, begging by the wayside; that is, when the Lord ascended into heaven, and many of the faithful followed Him, yes when all the elect from the beginning of the world entered together with Him the gate of heaven, presently the Gentile people began to have hope of its own illumination; for it now sits begging by the wayside, because it has not entered upon and reached the path of truth.

PSEUDO-JEROME; The people of the Jews also, because it kept the Scriptures and did not fulfill them, begs and starves by the wayside; but he cries out Son of David, have mercy upon me, because the Jewish people is enlightened by the merits of the Prophets. Many rebuke him that He may hold his peace that is sins and devils restrain the cry of the poor; and He cried out more because when the battle waxes great, hands are to be lofted up with crying to the Rock of help that is Jesus of Nazareth.

BEDE; Again, the people of the Gentiles having heard of the fame of the name of Christ, sought to be made a partaker of Him, but many spoke against Him, first the Jews, then also the Gentiles, but the world which was to be enlightened should call upon Christ. The furry of those who attacked Him, however, could not deprive of salvation those who where fore-ordained to life.

And He heard the blind man's cry as He was passing, but stood when He restored his sight, because by His Humanity He pitied him, who by the power of His Divinity has driven away the darkness from our mind; for in that Jesus was born and suffered for our sakes, He as it were passed by, because this action is temporal; but when God is said to stand, it means, that, Himself without change, He sets in order all changeable things.

But the Lord calls the blind man, who cries to Him, which He sends the word of faith to the people of the Gentiles by preachers; and they call on the blind man to be of good cheer and to rise, and bid him come to the Lord, when by preaching to the simple, they bid him have hope of salvation, and rise from the sloth of vice, and gird themselves for a life or virtue. Again, he throws away his garment and heaps, who, throwing aside the bands of the world, with unencumbered pace hastens to the Giver of eternal light.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Again, time Jewish people comes leaping, stripped of the old man, as a hart leaping on the mountains, that is, laying aside sloth, it meditates on Patriarchs, Prophets, and Apostles on high, and raises itself to heights of holiness. How consistent also is the order of salvation. First we heard by the Prophets, then we cry aloud by faith, next we are called by Apostles, we rise u by penitence, we are stripped of our old garment by baptism, and of our choice we are questioned. Again, the blind man when asked requires, that he may see the will of the Lord.

BEDE; Therefore let us also imitate him, let us not seek for riches, earthly goods, or honors from the Lord, but for that Light, which we alone with the Angels can see, the way to which is faith; wherefore also Christ answers to the blind man, Your faith has saved you. But he sees and follows who works what his understanding tells him is good; for he follows Jesus, who understands and executes what is good, who imitates Him, who had no wish to prosper in this world, and bore reproach and derision. And because we have fallen from inward joy, by delight in the things of the body, He shows us what bitter feelings the return thither will cost us.

THEOPHYL. Further, it says that he followed the Lord in the way, that is, in this life, because after it all are excluded who follow Him not here, by working His commandments.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Or, this is the way of which He said, I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. This is the narrow way, which leads to the heights of Jerusalem, and Bethany, to the mount of Olives, which is the mount of light and consolation.

Catena Aurea Mark 10
40 posted on 10/28/2012 2:12:22 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


The healing of blind son of Timaeus

Decani
17c.
Serbia

41 posted on 10/28/2012 2:12:52 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: October 28, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Almighty ever-living God, increase our faith, hope and charity, and make us love what you command, so that we may merit what you promise. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: October 28th

Thirtieth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Feast of Christ the King

And they came to Jericho; and as he was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a great multitude, Bartimae'us, a blind beggar, the son of Timae'us, was sitting by the roadside. And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!" (Mk 10:46-52).

Today is the Feast of Sts. Simon and Jude which is superseded by the Sunday Liturgy.

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading, from the book of the Prophet Jeremiah, 31:7-9, "Behold I will bring them back from the land of the north; I will gather them from the ends of the world, with the blind and the lame in their midst, the mothers and those with child; they shall return as an immense throng." Today's reading talks about the restoration of Israel and the new exodus.

The second reading, from St. Paul's Letter to the Hebrews, 5:1-6, "You are a priest forever according to the order of Melchizedek." Paul develops the figure of Melchisedech as a type of Christ, the eternal High Priest of the New Covenant. Unlike the Levitical priests, Melchisedech is given no genealogy in Scripture. Paul sees in this fact the intention of the Holy Spirit to prefigure Christ's eternal priesthood.

We read in this Sunday's Gospel (Mark 10:46-52) that, while the Lord passes through the streets of Jericho, a blind man named Bartimaeus addresses him, crying out loudly: "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!" This entreaty moves Christ's heart, who pauses, has him called and cures him.

The decisive moment was the personal, direct encounter between the Lord and that man who was suffering. They are before one another -- God with his will to cure and the man with his desire to be cured. Two liberties, two converging wills, "What do you want me to do for you?" the Lord asks him. "Let me receive my sight," replies the blind man. "Go your way; your faith has made you well."

With these words, the miracle is realized -- God's joy, man's joy. And Bartimaeus, who had recovered his sight — recounts the Gospel — "followed him on the way": That is, he becomes his disciple and goes up with the Master to Jerusalem to take part with him in the great mystery of salvation. In the essential of its passages, this account evokes the itinerary of the catechumen toward the sacrament of baptism, which in the early Church was also called "lllumination."

Faith is a path of illumination; it starts from the humility of acknowledging one's need of salvation and arrives at the personal encounter with Christ, who calls [one] to follow him on the way of love. On this model the itineraries of Christian initiation have been established in the Church, which prepare for the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and the Eucharist.

In places of past evangelization — where the baptism of children is widespread — catechetical and spiritual experiences are proposed to young people and adults which enable them to undertake a path of rediscovery of the faith in a mature and conscious way, in order to assume later a coherent commitment to witness. How important is the work that pastors and catechists carry out in this field!

The rediscovery of the value of one's baptism is the basis of the missionary commitment of every Christian, because we see in the Gospel that he who lets himself be fascinated by Christ cannot do without witnessing the joy of following in his footsteps. In this month of October, especially dedicated to the mission, we understand even more that, in virtue of baptism, we have an inherent missionary vocation.

We invoke the intercession of the Virgin Mary so that missionaries of the Gospel will multiply. Intimately united to the Lord, may every baptized person hear that he is called to proclaim the love of God to all, with the testimony of his own life.

Angelus Address, Pope Benedict XVI, October 29, 2006


42 posted on 10/28/2012 3:25:20 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Word Among Us

Meditation: Mark 10:46-52

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

“Get up, he is calling you.” (Mark 10:49)

Today’s readings all involve a call from God. In the first reading, the Lord makes a joyful announcement, calling his people out of captivity and back to Jerusalem. He prom­ises to rescue them and accompany them along the way, leaving no one behind. He is preparing the way for a new covenant, and he wants all his people to join him. In the second reading, God calls his Son to the high priesthood as the One who offers forgiveness and whose self-offering shows us the way to our heavenly Jerusalem.

Finally, in the Gospel, Jesus makes another announcement of hope on the road to Jerusalem. He calls Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, to his side. Jesus has come to res­cue his people. He will leave no one behind, not even this blind man— and not even us! Finally, the hour has come as Jesus, the great high priest, walks to the place of his Passover sacrifice and offers a new covenant in his own blood.

As their paths converge, Jesus asks Bartimaeus: “What do you want me to do for you?” (Mark 10:51). Likewise, Jesus asks you: “What do you want of me?” He longs to see you throw aside any­thing that limits your vision and your expectations. Jesus has mar­velous plans for your life. He wants to heal your heart and fill it with the fire of his love.

Are your aspirations limited, or are they worthy of a royal des­tiny? If not, toss them aside and cry out, Son of David, have pity on me! Don’t give up because of obstacles and difficulties. Persist. Jesus will remove what needs to be removed, strengthen what needs to be strengthened, and give you the grace to get up and follow.

It’s not where you’ve come from but where you are heading that counts—the heavenly Jerusalem! If you only knew how much he loves you! So take courage and get up. He is calling you!

“Jesus, Son of David, have pity on me! I want to see!”

Jeremiah 31:7-9; Psalm 126:1-6; Hebrews 5:1-6

 

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the first reading, the prophet Jeremiah urged the people of God to exult and shout joyfully over what God had accomplished for them: “The Lord has delivered his people” (Jeremiah 31:7). What has the Lord done in your life that causes you to gratefully and joyfully exalt Him?

2. The Responsorial Psalm again repeats the theme that God’s people should be filled with joy - more than joy, laughter - because the Lord has delivered his people from captivity and “has done great things for us.” St. Augustine said that a Christian should be an alleluia “from head to foot”. In what way is your relationship with Jesus Christ a source of joy for you? What steps can you take to deepen that relationship?

3. The second reading from the Letter to the Hebrews describes the difference between the Jewish high priest and Jesus Christ, our High Priest. What are some of these differences? Why do these differences have such an impact on the effect of the sin offering of the Jewish high priests compared to Jesus’ offering of himself for our sins (see Hebrews 9:13-14)? Do you believe reflecting on these truths, as you prepare to receive the Eucharist at Mass, can make a difference in its impact on your life? Why or why not?

4. In the Gospel, we hear of Bartimaeus the blind man, who “kept calling out” beseeching help from Jesus even when advised by the disciples to keep quiet? How persistent (and consistent) are you in prayer? What can you do to eliminate those things that keep you from a time of prayer each day? How can you deepen your expectancy?

5. Also in the Gospel, Jesus says to Bartimaeus, “What do you want me to do for you?” How would you respond if Jesus asked you this same question? Would you be able to respond with the same expectant faith that Bartimaeus had? When you call out to God in prayer for your needs do you believe that he will answer you? Why or why not?

6. The meditation ends with these words: “Are your aspirations limited, or are they worthy of a royal destiny? If not, toss them aside and cry out, Son of David, have pity on me! Don’t give up because of obstacles and difficulties. Persist. Jesus will remove what needs to be removed, strengthen what needs to be strengthened, and give you the grace to get up and follow. It’s not where you’ve come from but where you are heading that counts—the heavenly Jerusalem! If you only knew how much he loves you! So take courage and get up. He is calling you!” How would you describe the “obstacles and difficulties” that keeps you from wholeheartedly saying yes to the Lord’s call and plan for your life? What steps can you take to overcome them?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord to open your eyes to see more clearly his great love for you, and his “marvelous plans for your life.” Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.


43 posted on 10/28/2012 3:31:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

JESUS, SON OF DAVID, HAVE MERCY ON ME!

(A biblical refection on THE 30th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 28 October, 2012) 

Gospel Reading: Mark 10:46-52 

First Reading: Jer 31:7-9; Psalms: Ps 126:1-6; Second Reading: Heb 5:1-6 

The Scripture Text

And they came to Jericho; and as He was leaving Jericho with His disciples and a great multitude, Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, the son of Timaeus, was sitting by the roadside. And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent; but he cried out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” And Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; rise, He is calling you.” And throwing off his mantle he sprang up and came to Jesus. And Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” And the blind man said to Him, “Master, let me receive my sight.” And Jesus said to him, “Go your way; your faith has made you well.” And immediately he received hi sight and followed Him on the way. (Mk 10:46-52 RSV) 

The blind man calls on the name of Jesus and receives his sight. What power in the Name of Jesus! He obediently accepted death on a cross, and because of this God “has highly exalted Him and bestowed on Him the name which is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on the earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Phil 2:6-11 RSV).

This is the name of which St. Peter wrote, “There is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved” (Acts 4:12 RSV).

The name of Jesus is most dear to every true Christian. The name of Jesus is, in the words of St. Bernard, “honey to the mouth, music to the ear, a shout of gladness in the heart. Behold with the dawning of that name every cloud scatters and clear day returns. Has anyone fallen into sin, and does he run despairingly towards the toils of death? If he but invokes the name of Life, will not life be renewed within him?” (Sermon 15 on the Canticles)

When the blind beggar hard that Jesus was in the crowd, he began to call out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” See the loving response of Jesus: He stops and says to the crowd, “Call him over.” And the people tell the blind man, “Take heart; rise, He is calling you.” What an invitation to each of us to call upon the name of Jesus in every need!

Few have written so beautifully on the healing power of the Name of Jesus, as St. Bernard. Meditating on the Canticle’s praise of the beloved’s name, Bernard says, “Not without reason does the Holy Spirit compare the name of the Bridegroom to oil, when He inspires the bride to say to the Bridegroom: Your Name is as oil poured out. For oil gives light, it nourishes, it anoints. It kindles fire; it renews the flesh; it assuages pain. It is light, food, medicine. See how like to this is the name of the true Bridegroom. It is light when it is preached; it is food in meditation; it is balm and healing when it is invoked for aid.” 

Short Prayer: Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me! 


44 posted on 10/28/2012 3:48:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

TRANSFORMATIONS

(A biblical refection on THE 30th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 28 October, 2012) 

First Reading: Jer 31:7-9; Psalms: Ps 126:1-6; Second Reading: Heb 5:1-6; Gospel Reading: Mk 10:46-52 

The musical Les Misérables is based on the epic novel by Victor Hugo and dramatizes the adventures of Jean Valjean. After serving nineteen years in prison for stealing some bread to help his sister’s starving child, Jean Valjean is paroled.

Unable to find work, Valjean steals from a priest, who in turn lies to save him from being sent back to prison. Given a second chance, Jean Valjean undergoes a moral and social transformation: he takes a new name, becomes wealthy, befriends a dying prostitute, raises her orphan and twice risks everything he’s gained to save others.

What the Lord did through the priest for Jean Valjean is similar to what He did for Bartimaeus in the Gospel. Both Valjean and Bartimaeus were nobodies – social outcasts. But when Jesus entered their lives, they became somebodies – His disciples.

Mark’s story about Bartimeus is like a dramatic one-act play with seven scenes, namely, the seven verses.

In the first verse, Jesus is leaving Jericho for His final journey to Jerusalem, where He will die. There is an immediate contrast between the sizable crowd tagging along behind Jesus and the isolated blind beggar sitting by the road.

In the second verse, Bartimaeus hears that Jesus of Nazareth, the miracle worker, is passing by. Realizing that this was the chance of a lifetime, he cries out for help.

In the third verse, the people callously rebuke him for bothering the Master and for making himself a public nuisance. But Bartimaeus refuses to be intimidated by them and he shouts after Jesus all the louder.

In the fourth verse, Jesus stops and calls for him. Here Jesus is on His way to die, and yet He stops to help a nobody. Perhaps Jesus takes time to stop to show that this blind beggar is really a somebody, a person worthy of our respect and care.

Do we stop sometimes when we are doing what seems so urgent to assist somebody who is hurting? Or who just needs a little attention? Or who only wants to be appreciated?

In the fifth verse, Bartimaeus responds to our Lord’s call with abandon and enthusiasm. He doesn’t pile up his cloak neatly – he throws it away! He doesn’t get up hesitantly – he jumps with joy!

Compare that with our own response to the Lord. Too often our response is lazy and lethargic instead of being done with energy and alacrity, or with expectation and anticipation.

In the sixth verse, Jesus asks Bartimaeus: “What do you want Me to do for you?” It is a key question that is asked of all of us whenever we approach Jesus in prayer. May our answer always be: “lord, that we may see in areas where we are blind because of selfishness; or hear where we are deaf to the cries of pain around us.”

Finally, in the seventh verse, Jesus confirms the blind man’s faith with a cure. But instead of going his own way as Jesus instructed, Bartimaeus follows Jesus up the road. What a challenge to us!

When we receive a gift from the Lord, do we go our own way and use it only for ourselves? Or do we sometimes go up the road with Jesus to share it with other people who may need more help than we do?

Many are the times Jesus has stopped to take notice of us and to transform us. When we were nobodies, He made us somebodies. When we were sick spiritually, He made us whole. When we were down, He lifted us up.

Can we in turn stop more often to ask people: “What can I do for you? How can I be of help?”

Note: Taken from Albert Cylwicki, CSB, HIS WORD RESOUNDS, Makati, Philippines: St. Paul Publications, 1991, pages 190-192.


45 posted on 10/28/2012 3:49:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Ideas for celebrating Priesthood Sunday

http://www.priestsunday.org/


46 posted on 10/28/2012 4:00:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


47 posted on 10/28/2012 4:01:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for October 28, 2012:

The blind man Bartimaeus asked Jesus to cure him and Jesus did. Handicaps can be spiritual and emotional as well as physical. Ask Jesus to cure you.


48 posted on 10/28/2012 4:04:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle B

October 28, 2012

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Jeremiah 31:7-9

Psalm: 126:1-6

Second Reading: Hebrews 5:1-6

Gospel Reading: Mark 10:46-52

  • Jesus is on the last leg of his final journey to Jerusalem. He has spent the entire journey trying to break through the spiritual blindness of his disciples and to show them who and what the Messiah really is and what it means to be his disciple.
  • He passes through Jericho, an oasis city about 18 miles northeast of Jerusalem. It was a major administrative center for the Roman occupiers and the site of King Herod’s luxurious winter retreat. On his way out of the city, the crowd is embarrassed by the cries of a blind man begging by the road. Matthew’s version of this story (Matthew 20:29-34) tells of two blind men. Perhaps Mark mentions only one because Bartimaeus was the bolder of the two and the one who displayed the most faith.
  • Bartimaeus (the name means “son of Timaeus”) addresses Jesus as “son of David,” a messianic title related to salvation, as in Luke 1:69.
  • Blindness and other physical ailments were thought to be a result of sin, either the persons or their parents (John 9:1-7). These people were often outcasts who were reduced to begging. Jesus, however, stops and delivers an object lesson on blindness—both physical and spiritual.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • In the 1st Reading, what is God doing for his people as they return from Exile in a foreign land? What does he want to do for us when we return to him in humility and repentance?
  • In the 2nd Reading, what qualities does Jesus possess as high priest of the New Covenant that enables him to respond to Bartimaeus as he does? How can we imitate these qualities of Jesus?
  • What is significant about the way that Bartimaeus addresses Jesus (verses 47, 48)? See also       1 Samuel 2:10, 2 Samuel 7:8-16.
  • How does he show his faith while the crowd does not? How is he different from the rich young man in Mark 10:17-22? How is his request different from that of James and John in Mark 10: 36-37?
  • What can you learn about prayer from the attitude and approach of Bartimaeus?
  • If Jesus asked you, “What do you want me to do for you?” what would you say?
  • Bartimaeus sees with the eyes of faith and is healed. Do you think God still works miracles in individual peoples lives today? Does your faith enable you to see God’s work in your life?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 439, 548, 2616, 2666-67

 

So let us follow Him as our pattern: offering Him for our ransom, receiving Him as our Eucharistic food and waiting for him as our endless and exceeding great reward.       -St. Augustine


49 posted on 10/28/2012 4:07:57 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center Blog

Seeing the Son of David: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 10.25.12 |


Bartimaeus

Today’s Gospel turns on an irony—it is a blind man, Bartimaeus, who becomes the first besides the apostles to recognize Jesus as the Messiah. And His healing is the last miracle Jesus performs before entering the holy city of Jerusalem for His last week on earth.

The scene on the road to Jerusalem evokes the joyful procession prophesied by Jeremiah in today’s First Reading. In Jesus this prophecy is fulfilled. God, through the Messiah, is delivering His people from exile, bringing them back from the ends of the earth, with the blind and lame in their midst.

Jesus, as Bartimaeus proclaims, is the long-awaited Son promised to David (see 2 Samuel 7:12-16; Isaiah 11:9; Jeremiah 23:5). Upon His triumphal arrival in Jerusalem, all will see that the everlasting kingdom of David has come (see Mark 11:9-10).

Readings:
Jeremiah 31:7-9
Psalm 126:1-6
Hebrews 5:1-6
Mark 10:46-52

As we hear in today’s Epistle, the Son of David was expected to be the Son of God (see Psalm 2:7). He was to be a priest-king like Melchizedek (see Psalm 110:4), who offered bread and wine to God Most High at the dawn of salvation history (see Genesis 14:18-20).

Bartimaeus is a symbol of his people, the captive Zion which we sing of in today’s Psalm. His God has done great things for him. All his life has been sown in tears and weeping. Now, he reaps a new life.

Bartimaeus, too, should be a sign for us. How often Christ passes us by—in the person of the poor, in the distressing guise of a troublesome family member or burdensome associate (see Matthew 25:31-46)—and yet we don’t see Him.

Christ still calls to us through His Church, as Jesus sent His apostles to call Bartimaeus. Yet how often are we found to be listening instead to the voices of the crowd, not hearing the words of His Church.


50 posted on 10/28/2012 4:28:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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