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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 11-11-12, Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 11-11-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 11/10/2012 8:33:46 PM PST by Salvation

November 11, 2012

 

Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 1 Kgs 17:10-16

In those days, Elijah the prophet went to Zarephath.
As he arrived at the entrance of the city,
a widow was gathering sticks there; he called out to her,
"Please bring me a small cupful of water to drink."
She left to get it, and he called out after her,
"Please bring along a bit of bread."
She answered, "As the LORD, your God, lives,
I have nothing baked; there is only a handful of flour in my jar
and a little oil in my jug.
Just now I was collecting a couple of sticks,
to go in and prepare something for myself and my son;
when we have eaten it, we shall die."
Elijah said to her, "Do not be afraid.
Go and do as you propose.
But first make me a little cake and bring it to me.
Then you can prepare something for yourself and your son.
For the LORD, the God of Israel, says,
'The jar of flour shall not go empty,
nor the jug of oil run dry,
until the day when the LORD sends rain upon the earth.'"
She left and did as Elijah had said.
She was able to eat for a year, and he and her son as well;
the jar of flour did not go empty,
nor the jug of oil run dry,
as the LORD had foretold through Elijah.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 146:7, 8-9, 9-10

R. (1b) Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD keeps faith forever,
secures justice for the oppressed,
gives food to the hungry.
The LORD sets captives free.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD gives sight to the blind.
The LORD raises up those who were bowed down;
the LORD loves the just.
The LORD protects strangers.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The fatherless and the widow he sustains,
but the way of the wicked he thwarts.
The LORD shall reign forever;
your God, O Zion, through all generations. Alleluia.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.

Reading 2 Heb 9:24-28

Christ did not enter into a sanctuary made by hands,
a copy of the true one, but heaven itself,
that he might now appear before God on our behalf.
Not that he might offer himself repeatedly,
as the high priest enters each year into the sanctuary
with blood that is not his own;
if that were so, he would have had to suffer repeatedly
from the foundation of the world.
But now once for all he has appeared at the end of the ages
to take away sin by his sacrifice.
Just as it is appointed that human beings die once,
and after this the judgment, so also Christ,
offered once to take away the sins of many,
will appear a second time, not to take away sin
but to bring salvation to those who eagerly await him.

Gospel Mk 12:38-44

In the course of his teaching Jesus said to the crowds,
"Beware of the scribes, who like to go around in long robes
and accept greetings in the marketplaces,
seats of honor in synagogues,
and places of honor at banquets.
They devour the houses of widows and, as a pretext
recite lengthy prayers.
They will receive a very severe condemnation."

He sat down opposite the treasury
and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury.
Many rich people put in large sums.
A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents.
Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them,
"Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more
than all the other contributors to the treasury.
For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth,
but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had,
her whole livelihood."

or Mk 12:41-44

Jesus sat down opposite the treasury
and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury.
Many rich people put in large sums.
A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents.
Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them,
"Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more
than all the other contributors to the treasury.
For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth,
but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had,
her whole livelihood."


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 11/10/2012 8:33:54 PM PST by Salvation
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To: All

From: 1 Kings 17:10-16

Miracle of the flour and the oil


[10] So he arose and went to Zarephath; and when he came to the gate of the
city, behold, a widow was there gathering sticks; and he called to her and said,
“Bring me a little water in a vessel, that I may drink.” [11] And as she was going
to bring it, he called to her and said, “Bring me a morsel of bread in your hand.”
[12] And she said, “As the Lord your God lives, I have nothing baked, only a hand-
ful of meal in a jar, and a little oil in a cruse; and now, I am gathering a couple of
stocks, that I may go in and prepare it for myself and my son, that we may eat it,
and die.” [13] And Elijah said to her, “Fear not; go and do as you have said; but
first make me a little cake of it and bring it to me, and afterward make for yourself
and your sun. [14] For thus says the Lord the God of Israel, ‘The jar of meal shall
not be spent, and the cruse of oil shall not fail, until the day that the Lord sends
rain upon the earth.’” [15] And she went and did as Elijah said; and she, and he,
and her household ate for many days. [16] The jar of meal was not spent, neither
did the cruse of oil fail, according to the word of the Lord which he spoke by Eli-
jah.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

17:8-16. Zarephath was 15 km. (9 miles) to the south of Sidon, the area where
Jezebel, Ahab’s wife, came from (cf. 16:31). There, Elijah was certainly outside
the jurisdiction of King Ahab who was persecuting him (cf. 1 Kings 18:10), but it
is interesting that it was a poor widow at death’s door whom God chose to give
the prophet nourishment. Jesus uses the fact that it was a widow and a foreigner
who was chosen, to show that God gives his gifts to whomever he pleases, not
to those who think they have a right to them (cf. Lk 4:25-26).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


2 posted on 11/10/2012 8:34:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Hebrews 9:15, 24-28

The Rites of the Old Covenant Prefigure Those of the New


[24] For Christ has entered, not into a sanctuary made with hands, a copy of the
true one, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God on our be-
half. [25] Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the Holy
Place yearly with blood not his own; [26] for then he would have had to suffer re-
peatedly since the foundation of the world. But as it is, he has appeared once for
all at the end of the age to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. [27] And just
as it is appointed for men to die once, and after that comes judgment, [28] so
Christ, having been offered once to bear the sins of many, will appear a second
time, not to deal with sin but to save those who are eagerly waiting for him.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

23-28. In these verses the sacred writer adds some additional considerations to
the main line of his argument. His thought centers on linking the sanctuary, the
sacrifices which were offered in the Old Testament sanctuary, and the sacrifice
of the New Covenant. It was “necessary” for Christ to shed his blood so that
men might” receive the promised eternal inheritance” (9:15), that is, forgiveness
of their sins (cf. 9:14). This shedding of blood is also necessary for the “purifica-
tion” of the heavenly things (9:23). The sacrifices of the Mosaic liturgy purified the
things of the old sanctuary and, in some way, pointed to forgiveness of sins (9:9,
10). The sacrifice of Christ, on the other hand, really does blot out sin and opens
for us the way to heaven itself, giving us entry into that new sanctuary (7:25; 9:
12). But the parallel is not a perfect one, for the old sacrifices were multiple and
were constantly repeated in petition of forgiveness (9:25). The sacrifice of Christ,
on the contrary, is a unique sacrifice, because it is eternally effective (7:27; 9:
12). Moreover, whereas the high priest offered a sacrifice not with his own blood
but with the blood of animals, Christ offered his own blood in sacrifice. Therefore,
Christ has offered himself “once” (7:28; 9:12, 26, 28) in the same sort of way as
every man has to die only once and then undergoes judgment. Furthermore,
through his sacrifice Christ has passed through the heavens once and for all and
will not return to earth to renew his sacrifice. He will not return until the end of
time, when he will come in glory.

Two truths interweave here a number of times. The first is that Christ entered for-
ever not into a temple made by man but into heaven itself (9:24; 7:26; 8:1). The
second is that Christ also enables us to enter into glory; that is, his sacrifice and
his entry into heaven enable man to attain his last end.

27-28. These verses look at three basic truths of Christian belief about the last
things—1) the immutable decree of death; 2) the fact that there is a judgment im-
mediately after death; 3) the second coming of Christ, in glory.

“Not to deal with sin”: this phrase means that the second coming of Christ or Pa-
rousia, will not be for the purpose of redeeming men from sin but rather to bring
salvation, that is, glory, to those who placed their hope in him. Christ will come
into the world for a second time, but not as Redeemer, for his sacrifice has alrea-
dy eliminated sin once for all; rather, he will come as Judge of all. His coming “is
appointed”: it is as necessary as death and judgment. These three truths are
closely interconnected.

Although man is mortal, “a spiritual element survives and subsists after death, an
element endowed with consciousness and will, so that the ‘human self’ subsists.
To designate this element, the Church uses the word ‘soul’, the accepted term in
the usage of Scripture and Tradition” (SCDF, “Letter on Certain Questions Con-
cerning Eschatology”, 17 May 1979).

Man, then, is made up of a spiritual and immortal soul and a corruptible body.
However, when God originally endowed man with supernatural grace, he gave him
additional gifts, the so-called “preternatural” gifts, which included bodily immorta-
lity. Adam’s disobedience resulted in the loss of his friendship with God and the
loss of this preternatural gift. From that point onwards death is “the wages of sin”
(Rom 6:23), and it is to this divine decision that the text refers when it says that
it “is appointed for men to die” (cf. Gen 3:19, 23; Rom 5:12). The Church has re-
peatedly stressed that death is apunishment; cf., for example, Pius VI, “Aucto-
rem Fidei”, prop. 1, 7: “in our present state (death) is inflicted as a just punish-
ment for sin”; immortality was an “unmerited gift and not a natural condition”.
Verses 27-28 are an implicit exhortation to watchfulness (cf. also 1 Cor 7:29;
Sir 14:12; and “Lumen Gentium”, 48).

Immediately after death everyone will be judged on the conduct of his life. All
“are to give an account of their lives; those who have done good deeds will go in-
to eternal life; those who have done evil will go into everlasting fire” (”Athanasian
Creed”). This is something which reason with the help of God’s Word can disco-
ver, because people with a correct moral sense realize that good deserves to be
rewarded and evil punished, and that it is impossible for this to occur completely
in this life. It is difficult to say whether Hebrews 9:27 is referring to the “particular
judgment”, which happens immediately after death, or to the general judgment,
which will take place on the last day. Both interpretations can be supported, for
the judgment the verse refers to is connected, on the one hand, with death, and
on the other with the second coming of Christ. In any event, it is clear that what
is meant is a “personal” judgment, a trial at which each individual will be judged
by Christ (cf. 2 Cor 5:10; Rom 14:10). The existence of a general judgment does
not conflict with the certainty that there is a particular judgment, for the Church,
in line with Sacred Scripture, although it awaits the glorious revealing of our Lord
Jesus Christ on the last day, sees that event as distinct from and separate in
time from the judgment which every individual will undergo immediately after
death (cf. “Letter on Eschatology, op. cit.”).

The idea of death and judgment, however, should not only inspire fear; it should
also lead us to hope in Christ, for our Lord will come a second time to show him-
self a merciful judge to “those who are eagerly waiting for him”.

Christians, therefore, combine their joyful hope in the establishment of the King-
dom of God, which they wholeheartedly desire, with a desire to make the best
possible use of the time allotted to them in this life. “This urgent solicitude of the
Church, the Spouse of Christ, for the needs of men—for their joys and hopes, their
griefs and labors—is nothing other than her intense desire to share them in full, in
order to illuminate men with the light of Christ and to gather together and unite all
in him who alone is the Savior of each one of them. This solicitude must never be
taken to mean that the Church conforms herself to the things of this world, or that
her longing for the coming of her Lord and his eternal reign grows cold” (Paul VI,
“Creed of the People of God”.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 11/10/2012 8:35:34 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Mark 12:38-44

Jesus Censures the Scribes


[38] And in His (Jesus’) teaching He said, “Beware of the scribes, who like to
go about in long robes, and to have salutations in the market places [39] and the
best seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at feasts, [40] who devour
widow’s houses and for a pretense make long prayers. They will receive the grea-
ter condemnation.”

The Widow’s Mite


[41] And He sat down opposite the treasury, and watched the multitude putting
money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums. [42] And a poor
widow came, and put in two copper coins, which make a penny. [43] And He
called His disciples to Him, and said to them, “Truly, I say to you, this poor wi-
dow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the treasury. [44] For
they all contributed out of their abundance; but she out of her poverty has put in
everything she had, her whole living.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

38-40. Our Lord reproves disordered desire for human honors: “We should notice
that salutations in the marketplace are not forbidden, nor people taking the best
seats if that befits their position; rather, the faithful are warned to avoid, as they
would evil men, those who set too much store by such honors” (St. Bede, “In
Marci Evangelium Expositio, in loc.”). See also notes on Matthew 23:2-3, 5, 11
and 14.

41-44. Our Lord uses this little event to teach us the importance of things which
apparently are insignificant. He puts it somewhat paradoxically; the poor widow
has contributed more than all the rich. In God’s sight the value of such an action
lies more in upright intention and generosity of spirit than in the quantity one gives.
“Didn’t you see the light in Jesus’ eyes as the poor widow left her little alms in the
temple? Give Him what you can: the merit is not in whether it is big or small, but
in the intention with which you give it” (St. J. Escriva, “The Way”, 829).

By the same token, our actions are pleasing to God even if they are not as per-
fect as we would like. St. Francis de Sales comments: “Now as among the trea-
sures of the temple, the poor widow’s mite was much esteemed, so the least lit-
tle good works, even though performed somewhat coldly and not according to the
whole extent of the charity which is in us, are agreeable to God, and esteemed
by Him; so that though of themselves they cannot cause and increase in the ex-
isting love [...] yet Divine Providence, counting on them and, out of His goodness,
valuing them, forthwith rewards them with increase in charity for the present, and
assigns to them a greater Heavenly glory for the future” (St. Francis de Sales,
“Treatise on the Love of God”, Book 3, Chapter 2).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 11/10/2012 8:36:24 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

5 posted on 11/10/2012 8:39:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading 1 Kings 17:10-16 ©
Elijah the Prophet went off to Sidon. And when he reached the city gate, there was a widow gathering sticks; addressing her he said, ‘Please bring me a little water in a vessel for me to drink.’ She was setting off to bring it when he called after her. ‘Please’ he said ‘bring me a scrap of bread in your hand.’ ‘As the Lord your God lives,’ she replied ‘I have no baked bread, but only a handful of meal in a jar and a little oil in a jug; I am just gathering a stick or two to go and prepare this for myself and my son to eat, and then we shall die.’ But Elijah said to her, ‘Do not be afraid, go and do as you have said; but first make a little scone of it for me and bring it to me, and then make some for yourself and for your son. For thus the Lord speaks, the God of Israel:
“Jar of meal shall not be spent,
jug of oil shall not be emptied,
before the day when the Lord sends
rain on the face of the earth.”’
The woman went and did as Elijah told her and they ate the food, she, himself and her son. The jar of meal was not spent nor the jug of oil emptied, just as the Lord had foretold through Elijah.

Psalm Psalm 145:6-10 ©
My soul, give praise to the Lord.
or
Alleluia!
It is the Lord who keeps faith for ever,
  who is just to those who are oppressed.
It is he who gives bread to the hungry,
  the Lord, who sets prisoners free,
My soul, give praise to the Lord.
or
Alleluia!
It is the Lord who gives sight to the blind,
  who raises up those who are bowed down,
the Lord, who protects the stranger
  and upholds the widow and orphan.
My soul, give praise to the Lord.
or
Alleluia!
It is the Lord who loves the just
  but thwarts the path of the wicked.
The Lord will reign for ever,
  Zion’s God, from age to age.
My soul, give praise to the Lord.
or
Alleluia!

Second reading Hebrews 9:24-28 ©
It is not as though Christ had entered a man-made sanctuary which was only modelled on the real one; but it was heaven itself, so that he could appear in the actual presence of God on our behalf. And he does not have to offer himself again and again, like the high priest going into the sanctuary year after year with the blood that is not his own, or else he would have had to suffer over and over again since the world began. Instead of that, he has made his appearance once and for all, now at the end of the last age, to do away with sin by sacrificing himself. Since men only die once, and after that comes judgement, so Christ, too, offers himself only once to take the faults of many on himself, and when he appears a second time, it will not be to deal with sin but to reward with salvation those who are waiting for him.

Gospel Acclamation Rv2:10
Alleluia, alleluia!
Even if you have to die, says the Lord,
keep faithful, and I will give you
the crown of life.
Alleluia!
Or Mt5:3
Alleluia, alleluia!
How happy are the poor in spirit:
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 12:38-44 ©
In his teaching Jesus said, ‘Beware of the scribes who like to walk about in long robes, to be greeted obsequiously in the market squares, to take the front seats in the synagogues and the places of honour at banquets; these are the men who swallow the property of widows, while making a show of lengthy prayers. The more severe will be the sentence they receive.’
  He sat down opposite the treasury and watched the people putting money into the treasury, and many of the rich put in a great deal. A poor widow came and put in two small coins, the equivalent of a penny. Then he called his disciples and said to them, ‘I tell you solemnly, this poor widow has put more in than all who have contributed to the treasury; for they have all put in money they had over, but she from the little she had has put in everything she possessed, all she had to live on.’

Gospel Mark 12:41-44 ©
Jesus sat down opposite the treasury and watched the people putting money into the treasury, and many of the rich put in a great deal. A poor widow came and put in two small coins, the equivalent of a penny. Then he called his disciples and said to them, ‘I tell you solemnly, this poor widow has put more in than all who have contributed to the treasury; for they have all put in money they had over, but she from the little she had has put in everything she possessed, all she had to live on.’

6 posted on 11/10/2012 8:49:57 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

On the Desire for God
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On the Nature of Faith
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A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 11/10/2012 8:53:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 

  PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION

 


Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen

8 posted on 11/10/2012 8:54:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 11/10/2012 8:56:24 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
10 posted on 11/10/2012 8:57:39 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


11 posted on 11/10/2012 9:01:00 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


12 posted on 11/10/2012 9:04:56 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

13 posted on 11/10/2012 9:08:53 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


14 posted on 11/10/2012 9:10:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
St. Teresa of Avila Interceding for the Souls in Purgatory, from the workshop of Peter Paul Reubens, 1577–1640


II Maccabees 12:43-46: "And making a gathering, he [Judas] sent twelve thousand drachms of silver to Jerusalem for sacrifice to be offered for the sins of the dead, thinking well and religiously concerning the resurrection, (For if he had not hoped that they that were slain should rise again, it would have seemed superfluous and vain to pray for the dead,) And because he considered that they who had fallen asleep with godliness, had great grace laid up for them. It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins."

November Devotion: The Holy Souls in Purgatory

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. As a reminder of our duty to pray for the suffering faithful in Purgatory, the Church has dedicated the month of November to the Holy Souls. The Holy Souls are those who have died in the state of grace but who are not yet free from all punishment due to their unforgiven venial sins and all other sins already forgiven for which satisfaction is still to be made. They are certain of entering Heaven, but first they must suffer in Purgatory. The Holy Souls cannot help themselves because for them the night has come, when no man can work (John 9:4). It is our great privilege of brotherhood that we can shorten their time of separation from God by our prayers, good works, and, especially, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

To Help the Holy Souls in Purgatory:

1. Have the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered up for them.

2. Pray the Rosary and or the Chaplet of Divine Marcy for them, or both.

3. Pray the Stations of the Cross.

4. Offer up little sacrifices and fasting.

5. Spread devotion to them, so that others may pray for them.

6. Attend Eucharistic Adoration and pray for them.

7. Gain all the indulgences you can, and apply them to the Holy Souls

8. Visit to a Cemetery

Say here the prayer for the day, click on torch for specific day:

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY


Litany for the Holy Souls in Purgatory

V. The just shall be in everlasting remembrance; 
R. He shall not fear the evil hearing.
 
V. Absolve, O Lord, the souls of the faithful departed from every bond of sin, 
R. And by the help of Thy grace may they be enabled to escape the avenging judgment, 
and to enjoy the happiness of eternal life.  
V. Because in Thy mercy are deposited the souls that departed in an inferior degree of grace, 
R. Lord, have mercy.
V. Because their present suffering is greatest in the knowledge of the pain that their separation from Thee is causing Thee,
R. Lord, have mercy. 
V. Because of their present inability to add to Thy accidental glory, 
R. Lord, have mercy.
V. Not for our consolation, O Lord; not for their release from purgative pain, O God; 
but for Thy joy and the greater accidental honour of Thy throne, O Christ the King,
R. Lord, have mercy.
 
 
V. For the souls of our departed friends, relations and benefactors, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those of our family who have fallen asleep in Thy bosom, O Jesus, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who have gone to prepare our place,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. (For those who were our brothers [or sisters] in Religion,)
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For priests who were our spiritual directors,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For men or women who were our teachers in school,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who were our employers (or employees),
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who were our associates in daily toil,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For any soul whom we ever offended,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For our enemies now departed,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those souls who have none to pray for them,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those forgotten by their friends and kin,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those now suffering the most,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who have acquired the most merit,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For the souls next to be released from Purgatory,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
 V. For those who, while on earth, were most devoted to God the Holy Ghost, to Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament, 
to the holy Mother of God,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all deceased popes and prelates,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all deceased priests, seminarians and religious, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all our brethren in the Faith everywhere, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all our separated brethren who deeply loved Thee, and would have come into Thy household had they known the truth,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those souls who need, or in life asked, our prayers,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those, closer to Thee than we are, whose prayers we need,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
 
 
V. That those may be happy with Thee forever, who on earth were true exemplars of the Catholic Faith, 
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.
V. That those may be admitted to Thine unveiled Presence, who as far as we know never committed mortal sin,     
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be housed in glory, who lived always in recollection and prayer,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be given the celestial joy of beholding Thee, who lived lives of mortification and self-denial and penance,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be flooded with Thy love, who denied themselves even Thy favours of indulgence and who made the heroic act for the souls who had gone before them,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be drawn up to the Beatific Vision, who never put obstacles in the way of sanctifying grace and who ever drew closer in mystical union with Thee,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
 
 
V. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord, 
R. And let perpetual light shine upon them. 
 
Let Us Pray 
Be mindful, O Lord, of Thy servants and handmaids, N. and N., who are gone before us with the sign of faith and repose in the sleep of grace.  To these, O Lord, 
and to all who rest in Christ, grant, we beseech Thee, a place of refreshment, light and peace, through the same Christ Our Lord.
 
Amen


All Saints or All Souls? Differences should be black and white
All Souls' Day [Catholic Caucus]
Why I Am Catholic: For Purgatory, Thank Heavens (Ecumenical)
Q and A: Why Pray for the Dead? [Ecumenical]
“….and Death is Gain” – A Meditation on the Christian View of Death [Catholic Caucus]
99 & 1/2 Won’t Do – A Meditation on Purgatory
The Month of November: Thoughts on the "Last Things"
To Trace All Souls Day (Protestants vs Catholics)

November 2 -- All Souls Day
On November: All Souls and the "Permanent Things"
"From the Pastor" ALL SAINTS & ALL SOULS
Praying for the Dead [All Souls Day] (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
To Trace All Souls Day [Ecumenical]
All Souls Day [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Roots of All Souls Day
The Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed (All Souls)
During Month of Souls, Recall Mystic, St. Gertrude the Great
All Saints and All Souls


15 posted on 11/10/2012 9:23:13 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

November 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: Ministers of the Gospel. That bishops, priests, and all ministers of the Gospel may bear the courageous witness of fidelity to the crucified and risen Lord.

Missionary Intention: Pilgrim Church. That the pilgrim Church on earth may shine as a light to the nations.


16 posted on 11/10/2012 9:24:29 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Arlington Catholic Herald

Leap off a cliff into God’s loving arms
Fr. Jack Peterson, YA

Last Sunday the Gospel addressed the question, “Which is the greatest of all the commandments?” The goal of the Christian life is to experience the love of God poured out in Jesus Christ, be transformed by that love, learn to love God deeply and humbly in return, and allow that love to spill over into every relationship with our neighbor.

This week the sacred Scriptures help us to reflect upon what that transformation of our lives looks like in the concrete. For our prayerful reflection we are given two examples of generous love. An unsuspecting pair of widows are our teachers this week.

The first of these widows comes from the First Book of Kings. A great drought and resultant famine have overshadowed the land and the people of God are starving, many of them to the point of death. Elijah, the great prophet, arrives after a journey at the house of a widow and asks her for a loaf of bread and a cup of water. She has suffered immensely from the famine and has come to the end of her rope. She has enough flour in the jar for one final loaf for herself and her son. She tells Elijah that after this meager meal, she and her son shall die because there is nothing left to eat. Elijah makes a wonderful promise to her that God will take care of her and her son if only she does as the prophet asks. So, the woman courageously offers her last loaf and drink of water to the prophet. Then, she discovers that her flour and oil last miraculously until the famine is over.

This widow demonstrates a willingness to give everything that she has over to God. She places her trust radically in God in the face of dire circumstances. She is willing to lay it all on the line when common sense would suggest to hold on to what you have. The widow of Zarephath learns what it means, in Blessed Teresa of Kolkata’s words, to give until it hurts.

In our Gospel reading this week from Mark, another widow is presented to us, this time by Jesus. Our Lord notices her as she enters the temple in Jerusalem and makes a meager offering of two small coins. Jesus contrasts her gift with that of some wealthy people who offer rather sizeable sums. Jesus surprisingly proclaims that she gave more than the others. Why? Because she gave “all she had, her whole livelihood.”

Jesus uses her generous gift to teach us what the love of God looks like. Our Lord defines Christian love as the generous gift of self to the other. It generally begins with a reckless abandonment to God. It means placing all of our trust in Him. It demands that we spiritually leap off of a cliff into His strong, loving arms. Once we dwell in the embrace of God, then love becomes a self-emptying for the sake of the other. This concept of love is radical, but radical love is what we all long for in the depths of our hearts. It is what fulfills the human heart.

This week’s passage from the Letter to the Hebrews proclaims why we should take the example of these widows so seriously. They resemble Jesus’ gift of self on the cross. The passage states that Christ came “once for all … to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.” Jesus’ gift of His life on the cross is the supreme example of self-emptying love. Jesus, God’s eternal and only begotten Son, gave it all up to the Father as He hung on a tree in order to demonstrate His love, redeem every human being ever created, heal our broken relationship with the Father, and open the door to eternal life. Jesus gave all He had to live on. He gave His very self.

Two widows and a cross teach us the meaning of faith and love. Go and do the same.

Fr. Peterson is assistant chaplain at Marymount University in Arlington and director of the Youth Apostles Institute in McLean.


17 posted on 11/10/2012 9:48:23 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday Gospel Reflections

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time
1Kings 17:10-16 II: Hebrews 9:24-28
Gospel
Mark 12:38-44

38 In the course of his teaching he said, "Beware of the scribes, who like to go around in long robes and accept greetings in the marketplaces,
39 seats of honor in synagogues, and places of honor at banquets.
40 They devour the houses of widows and, as a pretext, recite lengthy prayers. They will receive a very severe condemnation."
41 He sat down opposite the treasury and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums.
42 A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents.
43 Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them, "Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the other contributors to the treasury.
44 For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth, but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had, her whole livelihood."


Interesting Details
  • "as a pretext recite lengthy prayers ."(NAB) or, "for a show make lengthy prayers." (NIV). Their prayers are directed at human rather than to God.
  • "greetings in the marketplaces ". According to the Talmud, when two people meet in the public, the one who is less knowledgeable of the law should greet the other first.
  • Treasury (or collection box) is most likely, one of the thirteen trumpet-shaped chests placed in the court of the temple. The copper coins when dropped into these receptacles would reverberate and thus will draw attention to both the giver and the amount of coins.
  • The small copper coin that the widow offers is a "lepton", the smallest monetary denomination, which is about 1/8 of a Roman penny, or 1/32 of a "denarius" (a daily wage of a day labor). In Mt 10:29 it is stated that two sparrows is sold for a penny. So, the two coins of the widow cannot even buy one sparrow.
  • The mention of two coins is important: the woman could have kept one for herself. But instead she had let go of her own security and offer herself wholly to God. These words addressed to the disciples are the final words on discipleship at the close of Jesus' ministry.
  • According to some commentators, Jesus does not praise but rather laments this woman's behavior. She has been taught "sacrificial giving" by her religious leaders, and that is the pity.

One Main Point

While we are content to be guided by appearances, to judge people by what they possess and to value presents by how much they cost, Christ measures us by our inner motives and attitudes behind our actions.


Reflections
  1. Why do I do what I do? What benefits do I get from others? What benefits do I expect from God? What really motivates my behavior?
  2. Do I assume that the more I do or contribute, the better? What standard do I use to discern, to decide what I should do and how much? Am I aware of different standards and motivators? How free am I to choose my standard?

18 posted on 11/10/2012 10:01:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

The Paradox of Poverty – A Meditation on the Readings for the 32nd Sunday of the Year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

The first reading in today’s Mass, from 1st Kings, speaks to us of the paradox of poverty. And the paradox is this, that it is often our poverty, our neediness, which provides a doorway for God to bless us with true riches. It is our emptiness that provides room for God to go to work.

Yes, in our riches we have “too much to lose,” and to the rich and worldly minded, the Gospel seems too demanding. But in our poverty, our emptiness and detachment from this world, there comes a strange and unexpected freedom that makes it easier to step out in faith. And stepping out in faith is the only thing that can save us.

Yes, poverty brings freedom. You can’t steal from a man who owns nothing, you can’t threaten a woman who has nothing to lose, and you can’t kill someone who has already died to this world.

Are you poor enough to be free? There’s a strange blessing in poverty. Let’s look at the first reading to see how poverty can usher in strange blessings.

I. The Desire Portrayed – In the first reading, the prophet Elijah encounters a widow at a city named Zarephath, a name which means “refining fire.” In those days, Elijah the prophet went to Zarephath. As he arrived at the entrance of the city, a widow was gathering sticks there; he called out to her

Both of them are hungry, for there is famine in the land. But Elijah, as God’s prophet, speaks not only for himself, but for God when he asks this very poor woman to share her meager food. For, truth be told, God has a desire, a hunger for us. The woman too as many desires, but her desire needs to be purified in this place called “refining fire.”

For her hunger for earthly food must be seen as a mere symbol for a deeper hunger, a hunger for communion with God. At some point out hunger must meet God’s hunger. And that point we call Holy Communion. It is a place where our hunger for God and God’s hunger for us meet and we find serenity. Every other hunger but points to this hunger, and every other “food” is but a cruel and temporary morsel until this hunger is satisfied.

Thus, two people meet at a place called “refining fire.” It is desire that has drawn them, a desire that is ultimately satisfied only in God.

II. The Dimensions  of Poverty. The woman articulates her poverty as he makes his request: Please bring me a small cupful of water to drink.” She left to get it, and he called out after her, “Please bring along a bit of bread.” She answered, “As the LORD, your God, lives, I have nothing baked; there is only a handful of flour in my jar and a little oil in my jug. Just now I was collecting a couple of sticks, to go in and prepare something for myself and my son; when we have eaten it, we shall die.

We may wonder why God allows poverty and suffering. The quick answer is because there is such a grave risk in riches and comfort. The Lord is well aware of how hard it is for the wealthy and comfortable to enter the Kingdom of God. In riches we trust in ourselves, in poverty we can only trust God.

And it is only by trusting faith that we can ever be saved. And, as we have noted there is a kind of freedom in poverty. The poor have less to lose. They can operate in wider dimensions and have a kind of freedom that the wealthy often lack.

Not only is it hard to steal from a poor man, but it also takes little to enrich him. A man who has known a great palace with high cathedral ceilings and marble wainscoting will be little more than discouraged with a humble domicile. Whereas, a poor man may be satisfied with a mere 8 x 12 room to call his own. A man who has had no food may appreciate sardines, whereas a man who is satiated may need caviar to be grateful. The rich miss many of life’s little blessings and suffer boredom whereas the poor never miss the color purple and delight in even small pleasures. The rich man’s world gets ever smaller and unsatisfying, the poor are more likely to have wide appreciation of even the humblest things.

Here again is the paradox of poverty wherein less is more, gratitude is easier to find, and losses are less painful. And, as we shall see, it is her poverty that opens this woman to lasting blessings. Having little to lose, she is free enough to accept the next stage of our story.

III. The Demand that is Prescribed. God’s prophet, Elijah, summons her to trusting faith: “Do not be afraid. Go and do as you propose. But first make me a little cake and bring it to me. Then you can prepare something for yourself and your son. For the LORD, the God of Israel, says, ‘The jar of flour shall not go empty, nor the jug of oil run dry, until the day when the LORD sends rain upon the earth.’”

He tells her not to be afraid to share, and in effect, teaches her that the Lord will not be outdone in generosity. At a merely human level, Elijah’s request may seem almost cruel. But from a spiritual perspective, Elijah is summoning her to the faith that alone can truly save her.

And note, that though she expresses a fear, her fear is easily overcome. Why? Again, she has little to lose. So many of our fears are rooted in a fear of loss. And, have more, we are anxious about more. As we have grown quite wealthy in recent decades what are our chief problems? Fear and anxiety about loss, maintenance and proper securing of our “stuff.” Scripture says, The sleep of a laborer is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of a rich man permits him no sleep (Eccl 5:12). And this is true. The wealthier we have become the more we spend on psychotherapy and psychotropic drugs. We are anxious about many things and sleepiness and stress are common problems.

Too much stuff. Too much to lose. Most of us, hearing Elijah’s request would call him crazy or cruel or both. Funny thing though, this woman is free enough to take him up on his offer. How about you? How about me?

We too must come to realize that merely looking to our own self-interest will only feed us for one extra day. Only in openness to God and to others can we procure a superabundant food, that which will draw us to life eternal.

IV. The Deliverance Produced. Having little to lose, she trusts in God’s word through Elijah and shares her food. She was able to eat for a year, and he and her son as well; the jar of flour did not go empty, nor the jug of oil run dry, as the LORD had foretold through Elijah.

If we learn to trust God, we come to discover that God never fails. Of course it takes faith, and faith involves risk. And here is where poverty can have its advantages. She takes the risk and shares what little she has. For her the risk is immediate but ultimately less since she has less to lose.

And so the woman is free enough to risk it all. He only gamble is to trust God. And God does not fail. Scripture says,

Cast your bread upon the waters, for you will find it after many days. (Eccles 11:1)

Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.” (Luke 6:38)

And if anyone gives even a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because he is my disciple, I tell you the truth, he will certainly not lose his reward.” (Matt 10:42)

Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously. (2 Cor 9:6)

Give generously to him and do so without a grudging heart; then because of this the LORD your God will bless you in all your work and in everything you put your hand to. (Deut 15:10)

He who is kind to the poor lends to the LORD, and he will reward him for what he has done. (Prov 19:17)

A generous man will himself be blessed, for he shares his food with the poor. (Prov 22:9)

He who gives to the poor will lack nothing, but he who closes his eyes to them receives many curses. (Prov 28:27)

Do you believe all this? Or are these just slogans for somebody else? Well, you don’t know until you try. And if you don’t think you can try, maybe you have too much to lose.

Consider this woman who was poor enough to be free, and free enough to try the Lord. And God did not fail. God never fails. I am a witness, how about you?

This songs says, “God never fails. He abides in me, gives me the victory, God never fails.”


19 posted on 11/10/2012 10:05:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, November 11, 2012
Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
1 Kings 17:10-16
Psalm 146:7-10
Hebrews 9:24-28
Mark 12:38-44 or 12:41-44

Don't be anxious about what you have, but about what you are!

-- Pope St. Gregory the Great


20 posted on 11/10/2012 10:11:08 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


21 posted on 11/10/2012 10:12:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Saint Martin of Tours, Bishop

Saint Martin of Tours, Bishop
Memorial
November 11th



Unknown Master, German
Saint Martin of Tours and Saint Nicholas of Bari
1450 -Tempera on wood
Art Gallery of South Australia, Victoria

  

Collect:
O God, who are glorified in the Bishop Saint Martin
both by his life and death,
make new, we pray,
the wonders of your grace in our hearts,
that neither death nor life
may separate us from your love.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

 

First Reading: Isaiah 61:1-3
The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me, because the Lord has anointed me to bring good tidings to the afflicted; He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to those who are bound; to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor, and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all who mourn; to grant to those who mourn in Zion -- to give them a garland instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, the mantle of praise instead of a faint spirit; that they may be called oaks of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that He may be glorified.

 

Gospel: Matthew 25:31-40
"When the Son of man comes in His glory, and all the angels with Him, then He will sit on His glorious throne. Before Him will be gathered all the nations, and He will separate them one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, and He will place the sheep at His right hand, but the goats at the left. Then the King will say to those at His right hand, 'Come, O blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me'. Then the righteous will answer him, 'Lord, when did we see thee hungry and feed thee, or thirsty and give thee drink? And when did we see thee a stranger and welcome thee, or naked and clothe thee? And when did we see thee sick or in prison and visit thee?' And the King will answer them, 'Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brethren, you did it to me'".


Excerpt from A Book of Feasts and Seasons, by Joanna Bogle

Saint Martin, the soldier who became bishop
by Joanna Bogle

Martin was a native of Pannonia -- in modern-day Hungary -- and his father was very anxious that he should go into the Army. This was in the days of the Roman Empire, and to be an officer in the Imperial Army was a very fine opportunity for any young man.

As a junior officer, he was sent to Gaul -- that wild land of northwest Europe inhabited by the mostly pagan Frankish people. There were some Christian cities where bishops were established and a Christian civilization was beginning to emerge.

Martin was interested in Christianity and tried to find out about it. Its message attracted him, and he started to obey some of its precepts. He earned himself some notoriety by refusing to join in some of the bawdier songs and more outlandish activities of military life. He gave freely to the poor, was kind to his servants, and liked to pray. But he postponed the actual step of Christian baptism.

His first posting was to Rheims, and from there he was sent to Amiens. One bitterly cold night, as he was striding along in uniform, a shivering beggar cried out to him for alms. Martin was warmly dressed in the standard-issue thick purple-and-white cloak that was the hallmark of the Imperial officer. Looking at the beggar, Martin knew what he ought to do. He took off his warm cloak and, using his gleaming sword, sliced it in two. He gave half to the beggar and retained the other half so that he would still be in regulation uniform.

The night, the beggar appeared to Martin in a dream: but as a figure surrounded with shining glory -- Christ Himself, still wearing the half of Martin's cloak. Our Lord reminded Martin of His words in the Gospel: "I was naked and you clothed me ... in as much as you did it to the least of the little ones, you did it to Me".

Martin got himself baptized as a Christian, and when his term of duty was up, he left the army and decided to become a priest. He lived for many years the life of a hermit, and, attracting others to the rule of prayer and meditation that he followed, founded a small monastic community that grew steadily.

In due course, Martin's holiness led him to be chosen as Bishop of Tours, although he didn't want the job. As Bishop, his influence was immense -- he won many from the Druid religion to Christianity, and was a central figure in laying the foundations of Christian France. We honor him as Saint Martin of Tours, and if you ever go to Amiens you will see that the site of his encounter with the beggar is still marked today.

Martinmas Ideas
There could be a special supper for Martinmas with a hot casserole of beef to commemorate the old feasting traditions, served with hot baked potatoes and butter.

Martinmas is an obvious day for some act of charity that will benefit and cold and poor this coming winter. It might be a good day for running a rummage sale ("give some clothes in honor of Saint Martin and his cloak!" could be your slogan) or some other fundraising event. There are still too many people who suffer from cold and deprivation in wintertime. Contact your nearest group of the Missionaries of Charity, or any other religious order engaged in this work, to find out what they need.

Ideas from Europe for Martinmas
In many parts of Europe, Saint Martin's Day is celebrated in style. In Sweden, roast goose is the traditional dish and goose banquets are served in homes and restaurants. The meal starts with a bowl of svartsoppa, literally "black soup", made of goose blood and spices.

In Germany, goose is also a traditional feature of the day, and they say that this is because when Saint Martin was about to be chosen as Bishop of Tours, he tried to run away and hide in a flock of geese, because he felt he would be no good at being in charge of an important section of the Church. But the geese cackled and the noise gave him away.

Other Saint Martin's Day traditions include the acting out of the meeting between the saint and the beggar to whom he gave half his cloak. This often forms an outdoor pageant with Saint Martin as a splendid figure dressed as a Roman soldier on a horse.

Lanterns
But undoubtedly the main festivity on Saint Martin's Day -- especially in France and Germany -- is that of making paper lanterns and carrying them in procession. Children form groups -- either informally or as part of an official organization -- and walk through the streets with paper lanterns that they have either made or bought. Shops produce a variety of lanterns depicting everything from spacemen to Mickey Mouse for the processions. Undoubtedly, it is as much a celebration of the arrival of winter, with its long dark evenings, as of Saint Martin. There are lantern songs and nonsense rhymes to accompany the processions.

Making a paper lantern
You will need a long strip of strong paper or cardboard, about one foot wide by two feet long. Lay it out flat, and cut out some windows -- star shapes look attractive. Decorate it any way you like. Now bend it around, glue the ends together, and stand it upright. Draw around its base, then add a couple of inches around the circle and cut it out, sticking it in to make a floor. Attach a candle to this -- the easiest sort to use is a "tea light" in a small metal container as this can simply be glued firmly to the base. The lantern will now need a long handle -- a string one like the handle on a bucket is best. This can be hung over a stick -- and the lantern is ready to be taken in procession.


Joanna Bogle is a Catholic writer and journalist living in England. She is a member of the Women for Faith and Family Editorial Board. Joanna broadcasts with the BBC and with Mother Angelica's EWTN radio, on which she has a "Catholic Heritage" series featuring places of pilgrimage and of historic interest in Europe. She is active with the Association of Catholic Women and with pro-life movements in Britain.

22 posted on 11/11/2012 8:10:29 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A saint's day is superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

Becoming Generous Givers: St. Martin of Tours shows us how [Catholic Caucus]
ST. MARTIN OF TOURS
Saint Martin of Tours Bishop, Confessor 316-400 [Patron of Soldiers]

23 posted on 11/11/2012 8:12:42 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information: St. Martin of Tours
Feast Day: November 11
Born: 316, Savaria, Hungary
Died: November 8, 397, Candes, France
Patron of: gainst poverty; against alcoholism; beggars; Beli Manastir; Buenos Aires; Burgenland; cavalry; Dieburg; Edingen equestrians; Foiano della Chiana; France; geese; horses; hotel-keepers; innkeepers; Kortrijk; diocese of Mainz; Olpe; Pietrasanta; Pontifical Swiss Guards; quartermasters; reformed alcoholics; riders; diocese of Rottenburg-Stuttgart; soldiers; tailors; Utrecht; vintners; Virje; wine growers; wine makers; Wissmannsdorf


24 posted on 11/11/2012 8:16:15 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Intneractive Saints for Kids

St. Martin of Tours

St. Martin of Tours
Feast Day: November 11
Born: (around) 316 :: Died: 397

Martin was born at Upper Pannonia, which is called Hungary today. His father was a Roman military officer and tribune. Although his parents were pagans (did not believe in God), he began to study the Christian religion.

Those who study the Christian religion are called catechumens until they are baptized. He joined the Roman imperial army in Italy when he was only fifteen in a unit that served as the emperor's bodyguard that very rarely had to fight in battle.

One very cold winter day, when Martin was on horseback, he and his companions came upon a beggar at the gate of the city of Amiens. The man's only clothes were nothing but rags and he was shaking with cold.

The other soldiers passed by him, but Martin felt that it was up to him to help the beggar. Having nothing with him, he drew his sword and cut his long cloak in half. Some laughed at his funny appearance as he gave one half to the beggar. Others felt ashamed of their own selfishness.

That night, Jesus appeared to Martin. He was wearing the half of the cloak that Martin had given away. "Martin, still a catechumen, has covered me with this garment," Jesus said. Right after this wonderful event, St. Martin went to be baptized at the age of eighteen.

Just before a battle, Martin announced that his faith did not allow him to fight. They called him a coward and put him in jail. His commander planned to put him in the front line in the battle, but when the enemy made peace the battle did not take place.

A few years later, the saint left the army. He became a disciple of St. Hilary, the bishop of Poitiers, France. Because of his strong opposition to the Arian heretics (non-believers) in various cities, Martin had to go into exile. But he was happy to live in the wilderness with other monks.

When the people of Tours asked for him as their bishop, he refused but they would not give up. They got him to come to the city to visit a sick person and when he got there, they took him to the church.

As bishop of Tours, St. Martin did all he could to make the people of France friends of Jesus and give up their unbelief. He prayed, he worked and preached everywhere.

Our Lord let Martin know when his death was near. As soon as his followers heard of it, they began to weep. They begged him not to leave them. So the saint prayed: "Lord, if your people need me yet, I will not refuse the work. Your will be done."

He was still laboring for the Divine Master in a far-off part of his diocese when death finally came in 397. St. Martin's tomb became one of the most famous shrines in all of Europe.


25 posted on 11/11/2012 8:21:29 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 12
38 And he said to them in his doctrine: Beware of the scribes, who love to walk in long robes, and to be saluted in the marketplace, Et dicebat eis in doctrina sua : Cavete a scribis, qui volunt in stolis ambulare, et salutari in foro, και ελεγεν αυτοις εν τη διδαχη αυτου βλεπετε απο των γραμματεων των θελοντων εν στολαις περιπατειν και ασπασμους εν ταις αγοραις
39 And to sit in the first chairs, in the synagogues, and to have the highest places at suppers: et in primis cathedris sedere in synagogis, et primos discubitus in cœnis : και πρωτοκαθεδριας εν ταις συναγωγαις και πρωτοκλισιας εν τοις δειπνοις
40 Who devour the houses of widows under the pretence of long prayer: these shall receive greater judgment. qui devorant domos viduarum sub obtentu prolixæ orationis : hi accipient prolixius judicium. οι κατεσθιοντες τας οικιας των χηρων και προφασει μακρα προσευχομενοι ουτοι ληψονται περισσοτερον κριμα
41 And Jesus sitting over against the treasury, beheld how the people cast money into the treasury, and many that were rich cast in much. Et sedens Jesus contra gazophylacium, aspiciebat quomodo turba jactaret æs in gazophylacium, et multi divites jactabant multa. και καθισας ο ιησους κατεναντι του γαζοφυλακιου εθεωρει πως ο οχλος βαλλει χαλκον εις το γαζοφυλακιον και πολλοι πλουσιοι εβαλλον πολλα
42 And there came a certain poor widow, and she cast in two mites, which make a farthing. Cum venisset autem vidua una pauper, misit duo minuta, quod est quadrans, και ελθουσα μια χηρα πτωχη εβαλεν λεπτα δυο ο εστιν κοδραντης
43 And calling his disciples together, he saith to them: Amen I say to you, this poor widow hath cast in more than all they who have cast into the treasury. et convocans discipulos suos, ait illis : Amen dico vobis, quoniam vidua hæc pauper plus omnibus misit, qui miserunt in gazophylacium. και προσκαλεσαμενος τους μαθητας αυτου λεγει αυτοις αμην λεγω υμιν οτι η χηρα αυτη η πτωχη πλειον παντων βεβληκεν των βαλλοντων εις το γαζοφυλακιον
44 For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want cast in all she had, even her whole living. Omnes enim ex eo, quod abundabat illis, miserunt : hæc vero de penuria sua omnia quæ habuit misit totum victum suum. παντες γαρ εκ του περισσευοντος αυτοις εβαλον αυτη δε εκ της υστερησεως αυτης παντα οσα ειχεν εβαλεν ολον τον βιον αυτης

26 posted on 11/11/2012 11:28:30 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
38. And he said to them in his doctrine, Beware of the Scribes, which love to go in long clothing, and love salutations in the marketplaces,
39. And the chief seats in the Synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts:
40. Which devour widows' houses, and for a pretense make long prayers: these shall receive greater damnation.

PSEUDO-JEROME; After confuting the Scribes and Pharisees, He burns up as a fire their dry and withered examples; wherefore it is said, And he said to them in his doctrine, Beware of the Scribes, which love to go in long clothing.

BEDE; To walk in long clothing is to go forth into public clad in garments too much ornamented, in which amongst other things, that rich man, who fared sumptuously every day, is said to have sinned.

THEOPHYL. But they used to walk in honorable garments because they wished to be highly esteemed for it, and in like manner they desired other things, which lead to glory. For it goes on: And love salutations in the marketplaces, and the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts.

BEDE; We must observe that He does not forbid that those, to whom it falls by the rule of their office, should be saluted in the marketplace, or have chief seats and places at feasts, but He teaches that those who hove those things unduly, whether they have them or no, are to be avoided by the faithful as wicked men: that is, He blames the intention and not the office; although this too is culpable, that the very men who wish to be called masters of the synagogue in Moses' seat, should have to do with lawsuits in the marketplace. We are in two ways ordered to beware of those who are desirous of vain glory; first, we should not be seduced by their hypocrisy into thinking that what they do is good; nor secondly, should we be excited to imitate them, through a vain rejoicing in being praised for those virtues which they affect.

THEOPHYL. He also especially teaches the Apostles, not to have any communication with the scribes, but to imitate Christ Himself; and in ordaining them to be masters in the duties of life, He places others under them.

BEDE; But they do not only seek for praise from men, but also for gain. Wherefore there follows, Which devour widows' houses, under the pretense of long prayers. For there are men who pretending to be just hesitate not to receive money from persons who are troubled in conscience, as though they would be their advocates in the judgment. A hand stretched out to the poor is always an accompaniment to prayer, but these men pass the night in prayer, that they may take away money from the poor.

THEOPHYL. But the Scribes used to come to women, who were left without the protection of their husbands, as though they were their protectors; and by a pretense of prayer, a reverend exterior and hypocrisy, they used to deceive widows, and thus also devour the houses of the rich. it goes on, These shall receive a greater damnation, that is, than the other Jews, who sinned.

41. And Jesus sat over against the treasury, and beheld how the people cast money into the treasury: and many that were rich cast in much.
42. And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.
43. And he called to him his disciples, and said to them, Verily I say to you, That this poor widow has cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury:
44. For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

BEDE; The Lord, who had warned them to avoid the desire of high place and vain glory, now distinguishes by a sure test those who brought in gifts. Wherefore it is said, And Jesus sat over against the treasury, and beheld how the people cast money into the treasury. In the Greek language, phylassein means to keep, and gaza is a Persian word for treasure; wherefore the word gazophylacium which is here used means a place where riches are kept, which name also was applied to the chest in which the offerings of the people were collected, for the necessary uses of the temple, and to the porch in which they were kept. You have a notice of the porch in the Gospel, These words spoke Jesus in the treasury as He taught in the temple; and of the chest in the book of Kings, But Jehoida the priest took a chest.

THEOPHYL. Now there was a praiseworthy custom amongst the Jews, that those who were able and willing should put something into the treasury, for the maintenance of the priests, the poor, and the widows; wherefore there is added, And many that were rich cast in much. But whilst many people were so engaged, a poor widow came up, and showed her love by offering money according to her ability; wherefore it is said, And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing

BEDE; Reckoners use the word 'quadrans' for the fourth part of anything, be it place, money, or time. Perhaps then in this place is meant the fourth part of a shekel, that is, five pence. It goes on, And he called to him his disciples, and said to them, Verily I say to you, That this poor widow has cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: for God does not weigh the property but the conscience of those who offer; nor did He consider the smallness of the sum in her offering, but what was the store from which it came.

Wherefore He adds, For all they did cast in of their abundance, but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

PSEUDO-JEROME; But in a mystical sense, they are rich, who bring forth from the treasure of their heart things new and old, which are the obscure and hidden things of Divine wisdom in both testaments; but who is the poor woman, if it be not I and those like me, who cast in what I can, and have the will to explain to you, where I have not the power. For God does not consider how much you hear, but what is the store from which it comes; but each at all events can bring his farthing, that is, a ready will, which is called a farthing, because it is accompanied by three things, that is, thought, word, and deed. And in that it is said that she cast in all her living, it is implied that all that the body wants is that by which it lives; wherefore it is said, All the labor of man is for his mouth.

THEOPHYL. Or else; That widow is the soul of man, which leaving Satan to which it had been joined, casts into the temple two mites, that is, the flesh and the mind, the flesh by abstinence, the mind by humility, that so it may be able to hear that it has cast away all its living, and has consecrated it, leaving nothing for the world of all that it possessed.

BEDE; Again, in an allegorical way, the rich men, who cast gifts into the treasury, point out the Jews puffed up with the righteousness of the law; the poor widow is the simplicity of the Church: poor indeed, because she has cast away the spirit of pride and of the desires of worldly things; and a widow, because Jesus her husband has suffered death for her. She casts two mites into the treasury, because she brings the love of God and of her neighbor, or the gifts of faith and prayer; which are looked upon as mites in their own insignificance, but measured by the merit of a devout intention are superior to all the proud works of the Jews. The Jew sends of his abundance into the treasury, because he presumes on his own righteousness; but the Church sends her whole living into God's treasury, because she understands that even her very living is not of her own desert, but of Divine grace.

Catena Aurea Mark 12
27 posted on 11/11/2012 11:29:30 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Basilica di Sant’Apollinare Nuovo

6th century
Ravenna, Italy

28 posted on 11/11/2012 11:30:37 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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Catholic
Almanac:
Sunday, November 11
Liturgical Color: White

Today is the Memorial of St. Martin of Tours, bishop. He became bishop of Tours in 341 A.D. The diocese was mostly pagan, but St. Martin's devotion to God and caring attitude toward the people converted most of the city to Christianity.

29 posted on 11/11/2012 2:13:33 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: November 11, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Almighty and merciful God, graciously keep from us all adversity, so that, unhindered in mind and body alike, we may pursue in freedom of heart the things that are yours. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: November 11th

Thirty-Second Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

He sat down opposite the treasury and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums. A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents. Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them, "Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the other contributors to the treasury. For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth, but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had, her whole livelihood (Mark 12:41-44)."

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the First Book of Kings 17:10-16.In this reading we have one of the many miracles attributed to Elijah, the great prophet who preached in the northern kingdom between 900 and 850 BC.

The second reading is from St. Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews 9:24-28. This epistle continues with its description of Christ as the high priest of the New Testament and his superiority over those of the Old Testament.

The Gospel is from the Gospel of St. Mark 12:38-44. Our Lord's severe condemnation of those Scribes whose exaggerated opinion of their own importance made a mockery of the religion they professed to live, is a serious warning to all his followers not to look for the praise and esteem of their neighbors when doing their good works, but rather to hope for God's praise and esteem in the future world. In another context, he said to his followers: "Because of practicing your piety before men in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven . . . when you give alms do not let your left hand know what your right is doing ... and your Father who sees in secret will reward you .. . when you pray go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father ... who sees in secret and will reward you" (Mt. 6: 1-6).

It is hardly necessary to say that our Lord is not referring to community prayers or services here. What he is condemning is the hypocrisy of the Scribes, who lengthened their garments and their prayers not in order to give glory to God but to earn the glory of their fellowmen for themselves. Pride was their predominant vice—the vice which caused the fall of angels and of man. It so governed their lives that even their best actions were vitiated by it. There is a strong inclination to pride in every one of us. The reason is that we have great gifts from God and great capabilities: but we are tempted to claim the credit for these gifts and capabilities for ourselves—whereas we owe them all to God's generosity.

A proud Christian is surely a contradiction in terms. A Christian is a follower of Christ whose humility can never be equaled. He was God as well as man. While on earth he emptied himself, as St. Paul puts it, of his divine glory so that he could be like one of us. A follower of Christ should not try to make display of gifts which are not his own, nor try to exalt himself above his neighbor because of something he has which was not given to his neighbor. If Christ wanted to be, and indeed was like the least one among us, we must never try to raise ourselves above our neighbor. Love of neighbor is the second of the two essential commandments—there can be no true love of neighbor where there is pride.

The second incident in today's Gospel story highlights true humility and true charity. The poor widow, forgetful of herself and of her own needs gave her all, her last penny, to help others who were in need. She made this sacrifice without publicity and without seeking the praise of her neighbors. It is this deep contrast between her outlook on life and on religion, and that of the Scribes in the first that connects the two incidents. While the Scribes sought to earn the respect and praise of their fellow-Jews—as well as all the financial gain they could come by—from the practice of the externals of their religion, this poor widow's religion was practiced in secret and it was to God alone that she looked for any reward that he might deign to give her.

As we saw in today's first reading we can be sure that she was not left without the reward she deserved. The widow of Zarephath was given a temporal reward. The same generous God did not let the similar act of supreme generosity on the part of the widow in Jerusalem go unnoticed. Christ's judgment on the Scribes implies this: They will receive the greater condemnation for their pride, and abuse of religion for their own temporal gain. On the other hand the widow's religion was an act of complete self-renunciation: "she has put in everything she had, her whole living."

We may never be called on to share our last morsel with a starving neighbor but if we are, we must remember that Christ gave his very life for us and has asked us to do likewise, if necessary. It may never be necessary for us to make this supreme act of self-renunciation. If, however, we are sincerely practicing our religion, we must be ever-ready to help a neighbor in need even if this cuts into our hard-earned reserves. The greater the sacrifice, the greater the reward.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


30 posted on 11/11/2012 2:21:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Word Among Us

Meditation: Mark 12:38-44

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

“This poor widow put in more than all the other contributors.” (Mark 12:43)

Today’s readings give us two illus­trations of extravagant love. First, we have the widow who cared for Elijah, and in the Gospel we see another widow, who put her last two coins in the Temple treasury.

Let’s face it—neither of these women had anything! So what pos­sessed them to give so generously? There can be only one answer: love. With an almost reckless regard for their own lives, one shared her last bit of flour and oil, and one shared her last bit of money—and both did it out of love for the God they worshipped.

Whenever we witness courageous acts of love, our response should be the same reverence that Jesus had. When he saw the widow give her last two coins, he was so moved that he praised her to his apostles. “She, from her poverty, has contributed all she had, her whole livelihood,” he told them (Mark 12:44).

Blessed Mother Teresa understood this type of love, because she saw it every day on the streets of Calcutta. She once observed: “I have found the paradox, that if you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love.” Like the widows in today’s readings, Mother Teresa encountered those who, despite hav­ing barely enough to live on, loved God and neighbor so deeply that they willingly shared the little they had with those who had even less.

What a high and beautiful goal these women have set for us! No matter where we are on the spectrum of earthly riches, we all have our own sense of what it means to give and to love until it hurts. Each of us can experience the great paradox that when we give of ourselves so deeply, we will encounter a love that will never be outdone in its generosity.

“Lord, I long for just a glimmer of the love that these widows had for you. Open my eyes to those who need your love, so that I can love them as extravagantly as you do.”

1 Kings 17:10-16; Psalm 146:7-10; Hebrews 9:24-28

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the First Reading, we meet a widow whose great faith in God allowed her to trust that what Elijah told her was true. “For the Lord, the God of Israel says, ‘The jar of flour shall not go empty, nor the jug of oil run dry until the day when the Lord sends rain upon the earth.’” Share a time when you were obedient to what you believed the Lord wanted you to do. What was the fruit of this obedience?

2. The Responsorial Psalm speaks of the Lord’s faithfulness to the most needy -- the oppressed, hungry, captives, blind, fatherless, widows, and those who are bowed down. What are some ways you can imitate the Lord by reaching out to others less fortunate than you?

3. The Second Reading speaks of Jesus’ first coming, and his sacrifice on the cross, and his second coming, when he will “bring salvation to those who eagerly await him.” Are you joyful and expectant when you think of the Jesus’ second coming? Why or why not? Should you be?

4. In the Gospel, Jesus contrasts the difference between the behavior of the scribes and that of the poor widow. Why do you think Jesus did this? How would you describe the difference? How does it apply to your own life?

5. In the meditation, these words of Blessed Mother Teresa are quoted: “I have found the paradox, that if you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love.” What do these words mean to you? What steps can you take to live these words out more fully in your life?

6. Take some time now to pray and ask for the grace to know and experience more deeply God’s great love for you, and the grace to give it away to others. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.


31 posted on 11/11/2012 3:43:55 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Christian Pilgrim

THE POOR WIDOW’S OFFERING

(A biblical refection on THE 32nd SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 11 NOVEMBER, 2012) 

Gospel Reading: Mark 12:38-44 

First Reading: 1Kings 17:10-16; Psalms: Ps 146:7-10; Second Reading: Heb 9:24-28 

The Scripture Text

And in His teaching He said, “Beware of the scribes, who like to go about in long robes, and to have salutations in the market places and the best seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at feasts, who devour widows’ houses and for a pretense make long prayers. They will receive the greater condemnation.” 

And He sat down opposite the treasury, and watched the multitude putting money into the treasury, and watched the multitude putting money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums. And a poor widow came, and put in two copper coins, which make a penny. And He called His disciples to Him, and said to them, “Truly, I say to you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the treasury. For they all contributed out of their abundance; but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, her whole living.”  (Mk 12:38-44 RSV) 

The worshipers calmly entered the Temple, depositing their donations into the venerable-looking container near the door. Sitting in a chair nearby, Jesus noted the amounts of money each dropped into the treasury. Then He called His disciples over to share His insights about the wealthy and the poor, the big checks and the small coins.

One person had deeply impressed Him – a poor widow, who had given a mere pittance, compared to most of the others. No doubt, He prefaced His remarks with the reminder that He was not condemning the big gifts by praising the small ones. That would have been foolish, for the Temple needed large donations to continue as a place of worship.

Although the widow gave only two paltry coins, worth but a few cents, Jesus was impressed. He praised her because it was a high percentage gift. The others, He said, “gave from their surplus wealth, but she gave from her want ……” The wealthy gave a tiny fraction of what they possessed, but she gave nearly everything she had. The value of the gift was practically nothing but Jesus saw the value of the giver.

Today, many people feel that money is a forbidden topic in the pulpit, that it is unspiritual and unworthy to be associated with worship. Some even say that’s why they avoid church. However, Jesus apparently saw no conflict between scrutinizing the collection basket and preaching the Kingdom of God.

Granted that “money sermons” are overdone by some preachers, generosity is still a valuable virtue. Furthermore, if religion is to speak to our needs, hopes and worries, we must talk of money – which is at the heart of many of our dilemmas. “How much does it cost?” is a phrase continually on our minds and lips. The cost of “running the church” is a heavy burden for all pastors.

Today’s Gospel reading is not trying to embarrass the rich to donate more to the church and charity but is a call for all of us to be generous. Being poor does not absolve one from this. “Two small copper coins” are very pleasing to God if that’s all we can afford. Regardless of the amount, each should make some offering, and it will be valuable if it flows from a spirit of sincere generosity.

Short Prayer: Lord, we are all poor before You. Why should we be afraid to share of what we have received? Please forgive us because sometimes we fail to trust You, even though we know Your return is always more than our small gift. Amen.


32 posted on 11/11/2012 3:55:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
A Christian Pilgrim

THE MIGHTY WIDOW

(A biblical refection on THE 32nd SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 11 November, 2012) 

First Reading: 1Kings 17:10-16; Psalms: Ps 146:7-10; Second Reading: Heb 9:24-28; Gospel Reading: Mk 12:38-44 

 

Prosecution. Hugo Black, US politician and Supreme Court justice, was attending the funeral of a dignitary whom he had heartily disliked and whose funeral he would have happily avoided had it not been expected of him. The service began with the invocation of God’s blessing on the deceased with so many gifts throughout his distinguished life. While this was happening, another judge, arriving late, tiptoed into his place next to Justice Black and whispered, “How far has the service got?” Black whispered back, “They have just opened for the defence.”

The dignitaries in today’s Gospel need more than a defence counsel, for Jesus is putting His case for the prosecution. The scribes were expert lawyers, who interpreted and applied the written Law through a complicated system of traditions. They were respected teachers, both in the schools and in the courts, and had become accustomed to the honor shown them by the ordinary people. Many of them were devoted and selfless scholars, anxious to save people from transgressing the Law; others were ambitious for their own advancement, anxious only for their vanity to be satisfied. It is the latter group that Jesus confronts in today’s Gospel. He reverses the roles: the lawyers become the accused.

Jesus makes a series of charges against the scribes. He criticizes their habit of wearing distinctive dress, which marks them as different from others and is calculated to win people’s deference. He criticizes their habit of taking the places of honor at religious and civil functions. He criticizes their habit of long-winded prayers, made not to God but to their immediate audience. Finally, He denounces their practice of exploiting helpless widows by living off their savings. Jesus says that religious leaders who behave like this will face a more severe sentence than the sinners they readily condemn.

The mighty widow. In contrast to the counterfeit piety of the scribes, Jesus honors true pity in the generosity of the poor widow. The pious frauds who abused their religious status by devouring the property of widows could take a lesson from a woman who had no status in religion or society, a poor widow.

The scene is set in the Temple area. Around the walls of the court of women there were thirteen collecting boxes, known from their shape as trumpets. They were  set up for people’s contributions towards the costs of the sacrifices and running expenses of the Temple. Many rich people put in large sums of money – some, no doubt, trumpeting the size of their contribution. A poor widow puts in two of the smallest coins on circulation. In the arithmetic of the Kingdom the widow’s offering is worth more than all the other contributions. Whereas the others give from their surplus, she gives everything.

The two small coins make up the total of her resources. She could have kept one. She doesn’t. Her reckless generosity cannot be bettered. For Jesus, true generosity is measured not by what people give but by what they have left after they give. The poor widow leaves herself with nothing. She cannot give more, for she has nothing more to give. In Jesus’ estimation she is a mighty widow.

Real pity. The story of the widow’s generosity is well placed at this stage in Mark’s Gospel. The poor widow typifies what Jesus will do Himself – give everything as an offering to God. When Jesus is finished giving, their will be nothing left for Him to give. He gives His all. That is the reality of His piety.

Jesus hopes that His own disciples will take their cue from that example of real piety, not from the scribes hungry for status and honor. He hopes that we, His followers, will be equally generous with our own resources. Those resources are not always measured in money. We are called on to give of our time, our talent, our understanding. We are asked to give not just from our abundance but from our substance. That kind of giving always hurts, because we feel all spent after it. Like the widow, we might feel that we have nothing more to give; but it’s that kind of giving that counts with Jesus.

Every day demands are made on us. We are called on to be generous with our love, our forgiveness, our patience, our resources. And the Good News is that when we do that out of love, Jesus will be our constant support. No matter who the prosecuting counsel turns out to be when our case comes up, Jesus will be leading for the defense.

Note: Taken from Fr. Denis McBride CSsR, SEASONS OF THE WORD – Reflections on the Sunday Readings, Chawton, Alton, Hants.: Redemptorist Publications


33 posted on 11/11/2012 3:57:15 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for November 11, 2012:

“Elijah said to [the widow] “Do not be afraid.” (1 Kings 17:13) Do you have money worries? Have you ever? Do you or your spouse worry more about money? If you don’t have true worries about money, it’s time to give some away.


34 posted on 11/11/2012 4:02:54 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday Scrpture Study

Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle B

November 11, 2012

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: 1 Kings 17:10-16

Psalm: 146:7-10

Second Reading: Hebrews 7:23-28

Gospel Reading: Mark 12:38-44

  • As we saw last Sunday, Jesus is now in Jerusalem and in the midst of his opponents, the scribes, Pharisees, and Saducees; it is after his triumphal entry (on Palm Sunday, Mark 11:1-10) and before his Passion (Holy Thursday, Mark 14:12ff). This Sunday finds him in the Temple precincts near the “Court of the Women,” where there were thirteen trumpet-shaped chests in which to place offerings.
  • The scribes (often translated as “scribes of the law” or “lawyers”) were the scholars and intellectuals of Judaism. As do lawyers today, they could serve as trustees for the property of widows and other powerless people, sometimes receiving as their fee a share of the estate.
  • Widows, as we heard in our first reading, were among the most powerless of ancient society, most of her rights coming from her closest male relative. Left on her own, the widow often had no means of support. The Bible often singles out poor widows as those who are to be the special concern of those who are more fortunate (Psalm 68:5; Isaiah 10:2; Acts 6:1; 1 Timothy 5:3; James 1:27).
  • Jesus contrasts the attitudes of the mighty and powerful religious specialists, with the poor widow who displays humble confidence in her God.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • How would you describe the lifestyle of many of the scribes of Jesus’ time (vv 38-40)? By contrast, what should the attitude of a Christian leader be (see Mark 10:42-45)?
  • What is Jesus’ point in contrasting the situation of the scribes with that of the poor widow?
  • When is “more” actually” less”?
  • What does Jesus say about how we should give alms (see Matthew 6:1-4).
  • How do people use religion to make themselves look good? How have you been tempted to do so?
  • Why do you give to God’s work? What do you give besides money?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 678, 2444, 2544-2547

 

The poor widow cast only two pennies into the treasury; yet because she gave all she had it is said of her that she surpassed all the rich in offering gifts to god. Such gifts are valued not by their weight but by the good will with which they are made.    --St. Jerome


35 posted on 11/11/2012 4:06:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Putting Our Two Cents Worth In
Pastor’s Column
32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time
November 11, 2012
 
“A poor widow also came in and put in two small coins worth a few cents. Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them, ‘Amen I say to you, this poor widow has put in more than all the rest; for the others contributed from their surplus wealth,
but she put in all she had.”
                                                                                          Mark 12:42-44
 
          Between the courtyard of the women and of the men outside the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem was a passage called the beautiful gate. At this gate were 13 trumpet-shaped containers where temple visitors could throw in coins for various causes. These vessels, called “trumpets” were designed to make noise when a contribution was made to encourage others to do likewise. Perhaps part of the appeal of making a large donation was the hefty sound this made on the way down! 
 
          Not so with this poor widow. No doubt she very carefully placed these two small pennies—all she had—in very carefully so as to not draw attention to her small donation—but Jesus noticed it! In fact, Jesus deliberately sat and watched the collection box! One conclusion we can draw from this is that while the Lord doesn’t want us advertising our giving to others, the Lord himself pays attention to what we give him of our time and treasure. Here are some conclusions we can draw from this parable:
 
  • ·         Jesus looks at the heart.
  • ·         Jesus does not judge us by appearances as we tend to do.
  • ·         Instead, he looks at our motives.
  • ·         Jesus is impressed by humility and put off by pride and “showy-ness.”
  • ·         Jesus loves the gifts we give him, especially the ones that others don’t notice.
  • ·         Jesus is attracted by our poverty.
  • ·         Jesus is attracted by those who give everything they have.
  • ·         Our offerings do not have to be perfect to be pleasing to God, as long as we are truly giving from our hearts.
  • ·         A real gift to the Lord must somehow be sacrificial!
  • ·         This was a very small gift in real terms, but for this woman it was a lot of money. 
  • ·         What do I give God in prayer, or money, or sacrifice? Is it just spare change? This is a woman who holds nothing back!
  • ·         This is a woman who has a radical trust in God! And she is the richest one of all!
  • ·         And isn't this a description of Jesus himself?
                                                                                          Father Gary

36 posted on 11/11/2012 4:23:07 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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St. Paul Center Blog

The Widows’ Faith: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 11.09.12 |

Elijah's Widow 2

We must live by the obedience of faith, a faith that shows itself in works of charity and self-giving (see Galatians 5:6). That’s the lesson of the two widows in today’s liturgy.

The widow in the First Reading isn’t even a Jew, yet she trusts in the word of Elijah and the promise of his Lord. Facing sure starvation, she gives all that she has, her last bit of food—feeding the man of God before herself and her family.

The widow in the Gospel also gives all that she has, offering her last bit of money to support the work of God’s priests in the Temple.

In their self-sacrifice, these widows embody the love that Jesus last week revealed as the heart of the Law and the Gospel. They mirror the Father’s love in giving His only Son, and Christ’s love in sacrificing himself on the cross.

Readings:
1 Kings 17:10-16
Psalm 146:7-10
Hebrews 9:24-28
Mark 12:38-44

Again in today’s Epistle, we hear Christ described as a new high priest and the suffering servant foretold by Isaiah. On the cross, He made sacrifice once and for all to take away our sin and bring us to salvation (see Isaiah 53:12).

And again we are called to imitate His sacrifice of love in our own lives. We will be judged, not by how much we give—for the scribes and wealthy contribute far more than the widow. Rather, we will be judged by whether our gifts reflect our livelihood, our whole beings, all our heart and soul, mind and strength.

Are we giving all that we can to the Lord—not out of a sense of forced duty, but in a spirit of generosity and love (see 2 Corinthians 9:6-7)? 

Do not be afraid, the man of God tells us today. As we sing in today’s Psalm, the Lord will provide for us, as he sustains the widow.

Today, let us follow the widows’ example, doing what God asks, confident that our jars of flour will not grow empty, nor our jugs of oil run dry.


37 posted on 11/11/2012 4:45:57 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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32nd Sunday: "Put in your two cents"
 
"Two small coins . . .
Kg 17:10-16
Hb 9: 24-28
Mk 12: 38-44

There is a well-known expression that goes: “Put your two cents in.”  It essentially means that I have an opinion about something that I would like to share. My “two cents” is that belief.  It may be worth hearing and contributes positively to the conversation at hand or it may be just blowing off steam or a bit of conceit on my part. Talk is cheap but actions speak louder.

The Gospel (Mk 12: 38-44) this Sunday is a story about an observation Jesus made in the Temple. As he comments on the bombastic arrogance of the scribes who, “. . . like to go around in long robes and accept greetings in the marketplaces, seats of honor in synagogues, and places of honor at banquets. They devour the houses of widows . . .” Such an overt attempt at self-promotion is to be rejected as a warning to Jesus’ crowds.

Meanwhile, at the treasury, Jesus notices a scene that likely went unnoticed by most of the crowd.  A poor widow, whom most would have simply ignored, stands in line behind the rich people who put in “large sums” of money.  This anonymous woman puts in “two small coins” and moves on. Her action spoke to Jesus.

Our Lord uses this as a teachable moment about the true value of generosity: “this poor widow put in more than all the other” since she contributed “from her poverty . . . her whole livelihood.” Her two cents was not an opinion about politics, religion, culture or anything in particular. She said nothing but became a powerful contrast between those who give for public notice and those who give out of trust.

The scribes who Jesus criticized were not bad men as such. Their position was both religious and civil among the Jewish population.  They wore distinctive clothing that would reflect their position of responsibility among the people.  It isn’t the clothing they wear that Jesus warns against.  It is their love for power and prestige that becomes detrimental to their spiritual health and makes them poor examples for the people they serve. Let’s face it – they loved being who they were and they attempted to soak it for all it was worth.  It brings to mind the famed saying of the fun loving Pope Leo X (1513): “God has given us the Papacy so let us enjoy it!”  And he did indeed. We don’t need leaders like that! Such poor example of responsibility is scandalous.

So, Jesus uses the occasion of a simple anonymous widow, who clearly gave more due to her sacrifice, to teach about generous trust of the Lord.  The widow, frankly, had nothing to lose. The bit of money she had remaining was nothing compared to her needs. Perhaps Our Lord read her heart as to what may have been an act of faith. “No one is here to provide for me so why not just give it all to God and trust in him” she may have thought.  

The scribes loved to be noticed for their generosity.  Putting in many coins one by one and slowly as to linger as people passed by. The widow gave her two cents quickly and walked on ignored by the crowd while Jesus knew that this put her in an even more vulnerable position. But her action was used to speak a lesson to all Christians.

Jesus criticizes the brightest, the most knowledgeable, and the most influential leaders of the people in a way that likely stunned the crowd.  It often doesn’t take long to see though a person’s hypocrisy or love for prestige.  Yet, the crowds didn’t dare say anything publicly about their true feelings. There might have been a few “right on Jesus!” comments under the breath of the powerless when they heard of Jesus’ comparison. We too need to remind ourselves.

That God and the poor, dependent, helpless, vulnerable, and truly humble have a special relationship of love. That when we voluntarily swallow our pride or our own desire to be noticed and recognized and turn to the Lord, we are heard and loved in return.  

For myself as Pastor and Priest, despite the scandals of the last few years, there is still a certain innate respect among most Catholic people for their priest. Any priest could be tempted to seek special “seats of honor.”  After all, we do on occasion wear long robes and sit in a special place of honor during our Eucharistic liturgies.  If I take myself too seriously, I would be no better than those Jesus criticizes. Just slap me (gently) if I appear a bit over the top now and then. It is ultimately the self-giving of the widow and the ultimate example of that self-sacrifice in Jesus’ death and resurrection that is the model for all Christian disciples. Try praying for your enemies or someone who simply doesn’t like you for whatever reason.  That can be true humility. Such an action would not go unnoticed by a merciful God.

Like the widow in our first reading from the Book of Kings, who showed honor to the prophet Elijah with the little she had, so too do we bring whatever we have not for our own glory but for deeper trust that our reward from God will come in ways we may not expect.

These readings are good as we have just come off of a very contentious political battle for the American Presidency.  No candidate for that exalted position can remain silent but he/she must likewise realize that the authority to govern is ultimately from God alone. The ugly word spoken in political commercials or between candidates is an unfortunate part of the political game. And we may wonder, “Does he really believe that about the other guy or is this just to make himself look better?” 

In the end, the call of the serious Christian must shame the proud, the bombastic, the power seekers and self-promoters in favor of a life that contributes to society in a way that is positive, humble, and in right perspective with our God.

So, the next time you feel like putting in your two cents it might be good to ask just exactly why.  Is this honor for God or honor for me?

“So let us give back to the Lord the gifts he has given us. Let us give to him who receives in the person of every poor man and woman. Let us give gladly, I say, and great joy will be ours . . .” 

St. Paulinus of Nola (355-431)
 
Fr. Tim

38 posted on 11/11/2012 4:59:40 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

Widows and Scribes, Substance and Style

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, November 11, 2012 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• 1 Kngs 17:10-16
• Ps 146:7, 8-9, 9-10
• Heb 9:24-28
• Mk 12:38-44

“Substance over style.” This phrase is a good reminder that a culture filled with empty rhetoric, flashing lights, endless entertainment, and the promise of bigger and better cannot satisfy our ultimate needs and desires.

It also raises the question: What substance? How to identify it? Today’s guide to the answer is the widow.

Widows are mentioned close to a hundred times in the Bible. They have a special place, along with orphans, the fatherless, and the oppressed, within the Law and the Prophets; they represent those who are afflicted, vulnerable, and deserted. “You shall not afflict any widow or orphan,” the Lord told the Israelites, “If you do afflict them, and they cry out to me, I will surely hear their cry…” (Ex. 22:22-3). They were reminded that Yahweh is “the great, the mighty, and the terrible God, who is not partial and takes no bribe. He executes justice for the fatherless and the widow, and loves the sojourner, giving him food and clothing” (Deut. 10:17-18).

The widow met by the prophet Elijah was not only destitute, she was not an Israelite; Zarephath was a Phoenician town on the Mediterranean coast. Seeking shelter and safety from King Ahab, Elijah had been told by the Lord that the widow would be waiting for him (1 Kgs. 17:9). Both of them were in desperate straits, abandoned and isolated from any sort of earthly support. She, in fact, was resigned to death by starvation. But she did as the prophet of God directed her. Even in the face of death, she was willing to listen to voice of God, and so she and her son were blessed with a miraculous source of flour and oil.

The scribes were experts in the Law whose theological judgments carried great influence and authority. Jesus did not condemn them en masse, for in the passage prior to today’s Gospel reading he told a scribe, “You are not far from the kingdom of God” (Mk. 12:34). Yet he strongly criticized the conduct of many scribes, those who chose style over substance. They were more concerned with looking good, getting attention, and receiving honors than they were with the things of God and the plight of widows.

Some of them “devoured the houses of widows,” likely a reference to financial fleecing. Reliant on private donations, some scribes would say prayers meant for human ears and not for God. Rather than pleading for the widows (cf. Isa. 1:17), these scribes were taking advantage of them, something condemned strongly by the Law and the prophets.

This sinful behavior, an injustice to the widows and a denial of God’s commandments, is contrasted with the humility and trust of the poor widow, who came to the Temple and “put in two small coins worth a few cents.” Those coins were the smallest units of monetary currency, each worth about 1/64 of a laborer’s daily wage. The monetary value was small, but it was all that the widow possessed. She gave everything, “from her poverty … her whole livelihood.”

The widow’s physical poverty was real, and she had little or no control over it. But her spiritual poverty—that is, her humility and devotion to God—was also real, and it was the result of her will and her choosing. She embodied the first of the Beatitudes: “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” (Matt. 5:3).

“She had given not out of her surplus, but out of her substance,” notes Dr. Mary Healy in her commentary on The Gospel of Mark (Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture, Baker, 2008), “Her gift meant that she would have to rely on God even to provide her next meal. Such reckless generosity parallels the self-emptying generosity of God himself, who did not hold back from us even his beloved Son (Mk. 12:6).”

This sort of sacrificial giving and living is not, of course, much in style. But serving God is not about style. It is about substance.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the November 8, 2009, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


39 posted on 11/11/2012 5:02:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Regnum Christi

A Call to Authenticity
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time



Father Paul Campbell, LC

Mark 12:38-44

In the course of his teaching Jesus said, "Beware of the scribes, who like to go around in long robes and accept greetings in the marketplaces, seats of honor in synagogues, and places of honor at banquets. They devour the houses of widows and, as a pretext, recite lengthy prayers. They will receive a very severe condemnation." He sat down opposite the treasury and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums. A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents. Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them, "Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the other contributors to the treasury. For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth, but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had, her whole livelihood."

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe in you. I believe that you are here with me, within me as the life of my soul. I place all of my trust in you, for without you I can do nothing. I love you. Thank you for revealing your loving mercy to me. I offer you all I do in return.

Petition: Lord, help me to be coherent and sincere in my decision to follow your will in my life.

1. Religion for Show: The Gospel passage presents us with the stark contrast between the scribes and a poor widow. The scribes were driven by appearances. They were slaves to their vanity. Their interior security lasted only as long as praise flowed from the mouths of those around them. They were more driven by the applause of men than the approval of God. Since their piety was mere show, it left no deep mark in their soul and could not free them from their disordered passions. Externally they appeared religious, but within they were a seething mass of vice. In their greed, they “devoured the houses of widows.” Is my piety for show or for God alone?

2. Generosity Means Giving All: The poor widow went unnoticed by the crowd, but Jesus saw her. While the rich made a great show of their gifts, she had only two small coins to give. She quietly slipped in among the crowd, seeking no one’s notice; but she was noticed by Christ. This is our choice: the applause of men or the praise of God.

3. Drawing Comparisons: Sometimes it is easy for us to get caught up in what others have -- what they are doing or saying. We fall into the trap of comparing ourselves with others, and probably most of the time we don’t measure up! It causes nothing but anguish. Yet, God doesn’t compare us to others. He loves us. He made us as we are, with our own unique combination of talents and abilities. He measures our generosity not by what we give, but by what we hold back for ourselves. Remember, the happiest are not those who have everything but those who give everything they have.

Conversation with Christ: Lord, help me to stop comparing myself to others. Help me to see the good you want me to do today. Let me see the things I’m holding on to and that which is keeping me from you. You have given me everything. I want to return your gifts in full with interest.

Resolution: I will trust in God’s providence and give him something today that I’ve been holding back.


40 posted on 11/11/2012 5:25:13 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus Does Not Want a Little, He Wants All

by Food For Thought on November 11, 2012 ·

Responsorial Psalm Ps 146:7, 8-9, 9-10

Reading 2 Heb 9:24-28

Gospel Mk 12:38-44

In today’s readings we are confronted with two pious Jewish widows. Both terribly poor, yet each gives all she has to godly cause. One gives from her last handful of meal and her last drops of oil to a prophet; the other puts her precious two copper coins in the temple collection box. One profits from a miracle; the other is praised by the Lord.

“Many rich people put in large sums.” The “poor widow … put in two copper coins.” She put in the smallest Greek coins in circulation. You need 128 such coins to make up the daily wage of a laborer. Still Jesus can tell his disciples: “Truly, I say to you, this poor widow has put in more than all” the rest. Why? Because they were tossing into the treasury “out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, her whole living.”

Remember, Jesus is not castigating the wealthy parishioners; he is not even accusing them of outward show. He is praising the widow. And his praise tells us something rich about human living, about the risk in giving. The widow’s gift was greater than all because in giving the coins she gave up her security; she “put in her whole living.” The others gave, and it was good; but they leave the temple without anxiety, without worry. They had given a good deal, but there was more where that came from. For the widow, nothing left but to cast all her cares to the Lord.

Likewise, for the widow in 1 Kings. A handful of flour and a spot of oil – enough to bake a cake for herself and her son before they lie down to die. And a stranger says: “First make me a little cake …!” Not that she was giving up her security; she had none, even if Elijah had not dropped in on her. But to give the last cake of your life to a stranger because he says, “Don’t be afraid”? What would you have answered? Jesus enters into Mark’s story of the widow not as a commentator or judge. Jesus was on his way to Jerusalem to meet his passion and death. The letter to the Hebrews tells us: “Christ came once for all … to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.” What made the widow’s gift supremely human was that she gave everything she had: her last two coins. What made it splendidly religious was that it resembled what Jesus himself would offer on the cross: himself.

Like the widow, Jesus gave all he had. With nothing left to give, he gave himself: “This is my body, which is given for you.” Out of this poverty, he put in the treasury of the Father everything he had, his whole living, his whole dying. No security… total risk…trust in God alone. The result? Redemption. You and I, the whole of humanity, have our sins taken away.

The story of the widow, and even more, the deed of Christ, suggests strongly that the new thing he brought into the world is summed up in his phrase, “out of her poverty.” This means we are most Christian, most Christlike, when our giving affects our existence, when it threatens our security, when it is ultimately ourselves we are giving away. How could it be ourselves? Like it or not, it is the crucified Christ, who is the supreme pattern, the model for Christian living, for Christian giving. And the crucified Christ gives himself.

Christ speaks to you not in an impersonal form letter addressed to “All Christians everywhere.” He speaks to you where you’re at. You and he know who you are, where your gifts lie, what keeps you from risking, why you keep giving out your surplus. Christ alone can tell you at what point, and in what way, you have to surrender what lends you security; what keeps you from going out to your brothers and sisters with trust only in the power of a loving God.

Has Jesus Christ really gotten hold of you? How dearly do I love him? Isn’t it surprising how little he moves most of us, how rarely he excites us? Why doesn’t Jesus turn more of us on? Perhaps he will, if we take him more seriously.

41 posted on 11/11/2012 7:14:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Scripture Speaks

Scripture Speaks: 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gayle Somers

by Gayle Somers on November 9, 2012 ·

 

Jesus gives the disciples a lesson in true religion; the example He uses must have surprised them.

Gospel (Read Mk 12:38-44)

Jesus often warned His disciples of the dangers of false, empty religion.  His strongest words of condemnation in the Gospels are always directed to those who make a showy pious flourish while, at the same time, pervert the meaning of God’s covenant with the Jews.  There were scribes in His day whose goal was their reputation.  They loved “seats of honor in synagogues, and places of honor at banquets,” but they used their public show of religion to wrest contributions to the Temple (their source of income) from widows with the pretext of reciting “lengthy prayers.”  Anyone who uses religion and reputation this way faces a “very severe condemnation.”

As it happened, when Jesus “sat down opposite the treasury,” He saw someone who was the living example of true religion.  He pointed out that “many rich people put in large sums,” but a “poor widow…put in two small coins worth a few cents.”  Nevertheless, Jesus teaches His disciples that she had contributed “more than all” the others.  Why?  She had given “all she had, her whole livelihood,” whereas the others gave “from their surplus.”  The woman’s contribution issued from faith and gratitude.  By that one simple act, she demonstrated unreserved trust in the goodness of God and His promises to care for His people.  She was not afraid to let go of everything and to cast herself completely on the loving mercy of God.  The large sums given by the rich, although not rejected by God, did not equal the value of the widow’s few cents.  Their offering cost them nothing; hers required everything.

The widow at the Temple was a living example of what Jesus taught about the kingdom of God:  “Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth…but…treasures in heaven.  For where your treasure is, there will your hearts be also” (see Mt 6:19-21).

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, please teach me to be as generous as this widow, with her simple trust in the Father’s care.

First Reading (Read 1 Kings 17:10-16)

In this reading, we have another surprising example of the kind of faith God desires in His people—again a widow, again someone we would not expect to teach us about true religion.  Elijah was the prophet sent by God to the rebellious ten tribes who broke away from Jerusalem and the throne of David to establish their own kingdom in the north (about 980 B.C.).  In doing so, they sank into idolatry and covenant unfaithfulness.  Through Elijah, God sent a drought on the land to punish them.  Elijah could find no open, willing hearts to respond to his preaching of repentance.  Therefore, God sent him into Gentile country, and, specifically, to this widow in Zarephath.  Although she was not a Jew, when Elijah assured her that the Lord God of Israel would miraculously keep her and her son alive if she would give him some food from the last of her supplies, she believed him.  A Gentile woman had greater faith than anyone is Israel!  She gave all the food she had to the prophet (as the widow in the Gospel contributed all her money to the Temple treasury), and God did exactly as Elijah had promised.

We simply can’t miss the meaning of these readings.  Whenever God asks us for everything (as He did of Jesus, Mary, and the apostles), we need not fear our loss.  God will keep His word:  “Give, and it will be given to you; good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over will be put into your lap.  For the measure you give will be the measure you get back” (see Lk 6:38).

Possible response:  Heavenly Father, each day I need to learn that it is in losing my life that I find it.

Psalm (Read Ps 146:7-10)

The psalmist is full of praise for God’s trustworthiness in caring for all those in great need who trust in Him—the oppressed, the captives, the blind, those who are bowed down with the heaviness of life, the strangers.  In particular, “the fatherless and the widow He sustains.”  These were the people who, in the psalmist’s day (and in Jesus’ day as well) were most likely to be overlooked and without protection.  God’s people can count on Him.  Therefore, we sing, “Praise the Lord, my soul.”

Possible response:  The psalm is, itself, a response to our other readings.  Read it again prayerfully to make it your own.

Second Reading (Read Heb 9:24-28)

Why is it that we can, without any fear at all, count on God to care for us when we must give our all to Him, whether it’s our money, our bodies, or our wills?  The author of Hebrews reminds us that God’s love for us is so enormous and endless that He sacrificed His own Son on our behalf, to free us of our sins.  Having offered Himself, Jesus is now in heaven, “that He might appear before God on our behalf.”  Why should we ever fear letting go of everything, should God ask it of us?  What reason could we give to have anything other than generous hearts toward Him?

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, You are now in heaven, appearing before our Father on my behalf.  I have nothing to fear.


42 posted on 11/11/2012 7:16:17 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, November 11, 2012 >> 32nd Sunday Ordinary Time
 
1 Kings 17:10-16
Hebrews 9:24-28

View Readings
Psalm 146:6-10
Mark 12:38-44

 

LEARNING MULTIPLICATION

 
"She was able to eat for a year, and he and her son as well; the jar of flour did not go empty, nor the jug of oil run dry, as the Lord had foretold through Elijah." —1 Kings 17:15-16
 

For the widow of Zarephath, the Lord made less than a handful of flour and a few drops of oil last for a year. How can you get the Lord to do the same miracle in your life?

First, you must need a multiplication of something (i.e. food, money, time, or energy). You should be responsible but not try to control everything in your life. Then the Lord will put you in situations where you need a multiplication-miracle.

Second, give from your want, all that you have to live on (Mk 12:44). The miracle of total giving always precedes the miracle of multiplication.

Third, believe that Jesus will do this miracle for you. In our secular society, many Christians don't believe that Jesus still does the multiplication-miracle. Read God's Word and ask for deeper faith.

If you need a multiplication, give your all, believe in the Lord, and you will receive the miracle of multiplication. The Lord works this miracle most often in the context of Mass.

 
Prayer: Jesus, I believe You will do miracles I've never believed before.
Promise: "Christ was offered up once to take away the sins of many; He will appear a second time not to take away sin but to bring salvation to those who eagerly await Him." —Heb 9:28
Praise: Praise You, Jesus, risen Redeemer and Lord! You are enthroned in power, exalted in majesty, and glorified in splendor. I worship You forever!

43 posted on 11/11/2012 7:18:33 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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18" x 24' Full Color Signs
44 posted on 11/11/2012 7:19:38 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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http://resources.sainteds.com/showmedia.asp?media=../sermons/homily/2012-11-11-Homily%20Deacon%20James%20Herrera.mp3&ExtraInfo=1&BaseDir=../sermons/homily


45 posted on 11/18/2012 6:28:36 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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