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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; SumProVita; ...

Ping!


2 posted on 01/04/2013 1:57:20 PM PST by NYer ("Before I formed you in the womb I knew you." --Jeremiah 1:5)
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To: NYer
Often a word gets a conotation that is negative beyond what the denotation would warrant. The French Enlightenment mindset has done that to "tradition."

Kirk in re-formulating his explanation of Conservative Principles in the 90s recognized that and used the words "custom" and "convention." I excerted and posted his Ten Conservative Priciples chapter from the Politics of Prudence here about 8 years ago, but that thread is no longer accessible.

In that article he cited this same concept as the second precept of Conservatism.

Second, the conservative adheres to custom, convention, and continuity. It is old custom that enables people to live together peaceably; the destroyers of custom demolish more than they know or desire. It is through convention—a word much abused in our time—that we contrive to avoid perpetual disputes about rights and duties: law at base is a body of conventions. Continuity is the means of linking generation to generation; it matters as much for society as it does for the individual; without it, life is meaningless. When successful revolutionaries have effaced old customs, derided old conventions, and broken the continuity of social institutions—why, presently they discover the necessity of establishing fresh customs, conventions, and continuity; but that process is painful and slow; and the new social order that eventually emerges may be much inferior to the old order that radicals overthrew in their zeal for the Earthly Paradise.

Conservatives are champions of custom, convention, and continuity because they prefer the devil they know to the devil they don’t know. Order and justice and freedom, they believe, are the artificial products of a long social experience, the result of centuries of trial and reflection and sacrifice. Thus the body social is a kind of spiritual corporation, comparable to the church; it may even be called a community of souls. Human society is no machine, to be treated mechanically. The continuity, the life-blood, of a society must not be interrupted. Burke’s reminder of the necessity for prudent change is in the mind of the conservative. But necessary change, conservatives argue, ought to be gradual and discriminatory, never unfixing old interests at once.

This empiricism. generated by the "tried and true", that is central to conservatism is also cited by Hayek in the 4th Chapter of the Constitution of Liberty entitled Faith and Reason where he describes the difference between the forms of Liberty sought by the English/Scotish Enlightenment versus the French Englightenment's reliance upon Rationalism.
4 posted on 01/04/2013 2:13:14 PM PST by KC Burke (Plain Conservative opinions and common sense correction for thirteen years. RSC)
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To: NYer
I suspect I would get an answer something to the effect: “I dunno, we just do it that way. Why don’t you ask the priest?”

My husband and I joined the Catholic Church in 1993. My father was born in 1936. He once told me that I was the first Catholic he had known who could give him a reasoned answer to his questions about basic beliefs and practices, rather than, "Because my parents said to," or "I don't know, we just do."

If more people in the "glory days" of the Church in the United States had really understood their faith, they wouldn't have thrown it all away for ... contraception.

6 posted on 01/04/2013 2:33:48 PM PST by Tax-chick (The paint is in the basket with the skulls in there. Don't tell me you can't find it!)
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