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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 01-15-13
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 01-15-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 01/14/2013 8:06:18 PM PST by Salvation

January 15, 2013

Tuesday of the First Week in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Heb 2:5-12

It was not to angels that God subjected the world to come,
of which we are speaking.
Instead, someone has testified somewhere:

What is man that you are mindful of him,
or the son of man that you care for him?
You made him for a little while lower than the angels;
you crowned him with glory and honor,
subjecting all things under his feet.


In “subjecting” all things to him,
he left nothing not “subject to him.”
Yet at present we do not see “all things subject to him,”
but we do see Jesus “crowned with glory and honor”
because he suffered death,
he who “for a little while” was made “lower than the angels,”
that by the grace of God he might taste death for everyone.

For it was fitting that he,
for whom and through whom all things exist,
in bringing many children to glory,
should make the leader to their salvation perfect through suffering.
He who consecrates
and those who are being consecrated all have one origin.
Therefore, he is not ashamed to call them “brothers” saying:

I will proclaim your name to my brethren,
in the midst of the assembly I will praise you.


Responsorial Psalm PS 8:2ab and 5, 6-7, 8-9

R. (see 7) You have given your Son rule over the works of your hands.
O LORD, our Lord,
how glorious is your name over all the earth!
What is man that you should be mindful of him,
or the son of man that you should care for him?
R. You have given your Son rule over the works of your hands.
You have made him little less than the angels,
and crowned him with glory and honor.
You have given him rule over the works of your hands,
putting all things under his feet.
R. You have given your Son rule over the works of your hands.
All sheep and oxen,
yes, and the beasts of the field,
The birds of the air, the fishes of the sea,
and whatever swims the paths of the seas.
R. You have given your Son rule over the works of your hands.

Gospel Mk 1:21-28

Jesus came to Capernaum with his followers,
and on the sabbath he entered the synagogue and taught.
The people were astonished at his teaching,
for he taught them as one having authority and not as the scribes.
In their synagogue was a man with an unclean spirit;
he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth?
Have you come to destroy us?
I know who you are–the Holy One of God!”
Jesus rebuked him and said, “Quiet! Come out of him!”
The unclean spirit convulsed him and with a loud cry came out of him.
All were amazed and asked one another,
“What is this?
A new teaching with authority.
He commands even the unclean spirits and they obey him.”
His fame spread everywhere throughout the whole region of Galilee.



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 01/14/2013 8:06:26 PM PST by Salvation
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Alleluia Ping!
 
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2 posted on 01/14/2013 8:23:07 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #3 Removed by Moderator

Comment #4 Removed by Moderator

To: All

From: Hebrews 2:5-12

Jesus, Man’s Brother, was Crowned with Glory and Honor Above the Angel


[5] For it was not to angels that God subjected the world to come, of which we
are speaking. [6] It has been testified somewhere, “What is man that thou art
mindful of him, or the son of man, that thou carest for him? [7] Thou didst make
him for a little while lower than the angels, thou hast crowned him with glory and
honor, [8] putting everything in subjection under his feet.” Now in putting every-
thing in subjection to him, he left nothing outside his control. As it is, we do not
yet see everything in subjection to him. [9] But we see Jesus, who for a little
while was made lower than the angels, crowned with glory and honor because
of the suffering of death, so that by the grace of God he might taste death for
every one.

[10] For it was fitting that he, for whom and by whom all things exist, in bringing
many sons to glory should make the pioneer of their salvation perfect through
suffering. [11] For he who sanctifies and those who are sanctified have all one
origin. That is why he is not ashamed to call them brethren, [12] saying. “I will
proclaim thy name to thy brethren, in the midst of the congregation I will praise
thee.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

5-9. The saving dimension of the Incarnation is being explored here with the
help of quotations from Psalm 2 and other psalms. Christians should stay true
to Christ, because in addition to his being the cause and beginning of salvation
he has been made Lord of the universe; everything is subject to him. God the
Father, in other words, has established Christ—not the angels—as Lord of “the
world to come”.

God has put everything under Christ as man. The words of Psalm 8 are quoted
as applying to Christ as man, for he is the perfection of manhood, the perfect
man, and he merited being crowned with glory and honor because of his obe-
dience, humility, and passion and death (cf. Phil 2:6-11; 1 Pet 2:21-25); even
death itself has become subject to him (cf. 1 Cor 15:22-28). His enemies have
been made his footstool (cf. Ps 8:6; 110:1; Mt 22:44); he will channel every-
thing back to God, and God will be all in all.

5. “The world to come” was a term the Jews used to refer to the period immedia-
tely following the coming of the Messiah. The rabbis distinguished three periods
in the history of the world—the “present world”, the time when they were waiting
for the Messiah; the “day of the Messiah”, the point at which his kingdom would
be established; and the “world to come”, which would begin with the Resurrec-
tion of the dead and the judging of the nations. Many teachers of the Law tended
to confuse the “world to come” in some way with the “day of the Messiah”, which
was its initial stage.

The author of the epistle seems to be saying that the government of the present
world is entrusted by God to angels (cf. Deut 32:8; Dan 10: 13f), but that in the
world to come that is, in the definitive Kingdom—God the Creator’s original plan
will be implemented: Christ, true God and true man, with his glorified manhood,
will be the King of Creation and the holy angels and the blessed will reign with
him. The “world to come”, although it has begun with the Resurrection and glo-
rification of Jesus, will not reach its fullness until the second coming of Christ
and the resurrection of the dead. Until then, there exists a tension between “this
world” and the “world to come”: the former has received a mortal wound but it is
still alive; the latter has begun to exist but it has not yet attained its final full ex-
pression.

6. Psalm 8 is a hymn praising God for creating all things; particularly man,
whom he has made master of all creation. The words of the Psalm quoted here
are those which praise God’s caring love, as shown by his making man, despite
his limitations, lord of Creation.

However, the text of the epistle shows us that the words of the Psalm have a
deeper meaning: they refer to Jesus (cf. 1 Cor 15:27; Eph 1:22) and particularly
to his degradation. “Although these words can be applied to every man,” St John
Chrysostom comments “they do however most properly apply to Christ. For the
words ‘thou hast put everything in subjection under his feet’ (v. 8) are more suita-
ble to him than to us, for the Son of God visited us who were of no account and
having taken and loved our condition, he became higher than us all” (”Hom. on
Heb.”, 4).

The author of Hebrews uses Psalm 8 to demonstrate Christ’s superiority over
angels by giving it a deeply messianic interpretation. Thus, the man “crowned
with glory and honor” is the risen Christ, now seated at the right hand of the
Father; and the one to whom everything has been subjected is also the same
Christ (cf. 1:13), as St Paul proclaims in 1 Cor 15:27; Eph 1:22; Phil 3:21.

8. In keeping with its application to Christ of the words of Psalm 8: 4-6, the
epistle says that God the Father has subjected everything to him. This does not
mean that there is inequality or difference in power or nature between Father and
Son, as if the Son himself were subject to the Father, and the Father had given
him, as he would a subordinate, authority over the world. “Arius argued in this
way,” writes St Thomas: “the Father subjected everything to the Son; therefore,
the Son is less than the Father. I reply that it is true that the Father subjected
everything to the Son according to his human nature, in respect of which he is
less than the Father, as St John says, ‘the Father is greater than I’ (14:28). But
according to his divine nature, Christ himself subjected all things to himself”
(”Commentary on Heb.”, 2, 2).

Christ’s dominion over the universe is something which men cannot see and it
will not become manifest until his second coming as Lord and Judge of the living
and the dead. “Christ, true God and true man, lives and reigns. He is the Lord of
the universe. Everything that lives is kept in existence only through him. Why,
then, does he not appear to us in all his glory? Because his kingdom is ‘not of
this world’ (Jn 18:36), though it is in this world [...]. Those who expected the
Messiah to have visible temporal power were mistaken. [...] When Christ began
to preach on earth he did not put forward a political program. He said, ‘Repent,
for the kingdom of God is at hand’ (Mt 3:2; 4:17). He commissioned his disciples
to proclaim this good news (cf. Lk 10:9) and he taught them to pray for the co-
ming of the Kingdom (cf. Mt 6:10)” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing By”, 180).

9. The words “who for a little while was made lower than the angels” refer to
Jesus in the crisis of his Passion and Death, when he freely humbled himself
and lowered himself to suffer punishment and death — sufferings to which angels
are not subject.

“For a little while” is a translation of the Greek word which the New Vulgate ren-
ders as “paulo minus” (a little less than), and which also occurs in Hebrews 2:7
in the quotation from Psalm 8. The RSV translation in both instances is “for a
little while”.

Every human creature, including Christ as man, can be seen in some sense as
lower than the angels. This inferiority basically has to do with the fact that human
knowledge is inferior to that of angels because it is dependent on sense exper-
ience, and also because angels cannot experience suffering and death. “The an-
gels cannot suffer and are immortal by nature, so that when Christ deigned to
submit to his passion and death he made himself lower than them, not because
he lost his sublimity or in any way was diminished, but because he took on our
weakness. He made himself lower than the angels, not as far as his divinity or
his soul were concerned but only in respect of his body” (”Commentary on Heb.”,
2, 2).

Christ’s self-abasement is a permanent example to us to strive to respond to his
love. St John Chrysostom suggests that we draw from it this practical lesson: “If
he whom the angels worship consented, out of love for us, to become for a time
lower than them, you for your part should endure everything out of love for him”
(”Hom. on Heb.”, 4).

One of the results of Christ’s passion was his exaltation and glorification. Be-
cause Christ attained victory on the Cross, to the benefit of all mankind, the Cross
is the only route to heaven: “The holy cross is shining upon us”, the Church says.
“In the cross is victory, in the cross is power. By the cross every sin is overcome”
(”Liturgy of the Hours”, Exaltation of the Cross, Morning Prayer, Ant. 3). But virtue
of Christ’s passion, the Cross is no longer an ignominious scaffold; it is a glorious
throne. Tradition attributes to St Andrew the Apostle these words in praise of the
cross on which he was going to die: “O goodly Cross, glorified by the limbs of our
Lord, O Cross so long desired, so ardently loved, so tirelessly sought and now
offered to me: take me to my Master so that he who redeemed me through thee,
may welcome me through thee” (”Ex Passione S. Andreae”, Reading).

Through his death, Christ has been crowned with glory and honor; moreover he
has died on our behalf. His death and glorification are the cause and model of our
salvation and glorification. Sacrifice, atonement and merit are indissolubly linked
to the redemptive work of Christ and constitute a “grace of God”, that is, a gratui-
tous gift from God. St Thomas Aquinas explains that “the passion of Christ is
here alluded to in three ways. Firstly, its cause is referred to, for the text says
‘by the grace of God’; then, its usefulness, when it says ‘for every one’; thirdly, its
outcome, when it says ‘might taste”’ (”Commentary on Heb.”, 2, 3): Jesus did in-
deed, by the will of the Father, experience or “taste” death. His death is de-
scribed as being like a bitter drink which he chose to take in sips, as if savoring
it. The “cup” or chalice of the agony in the garden comes immediately to mind
(cf. Mt 26:39; Mk 14:26; Lk 22:42; In 18:11; cf. also Mt 20:22f and Mk 10:38f).

Christian tradition has seen these words about “tasting death” as underlining
that Christ underwent a most severe passion voluntarily, accepting it to atone for
all the sins of mankind. These words also show that he accepted death without
ceasing to be Lord of life: “This expression”, St John Chrysostom states, “is very
precise. It does not say ‘that by the grace of God he might die’, for the Lord once
he tasted death delayed there only for a moment and immediately rose [...]. All
men fear death; therefore, to enable us to take death in our stride, he tasted
death even though it was not necessary for him to do so” (”Hom. on Heb.”, 4).

10. After pointing to the results of Christ’s death, the text stresses how appro-
priate it was that he should be abased in this way: he had to make himself in
every way like his brethren in order to help them.

God the Father, who is the beginning and end of all things, desired to bring men
to glory by means of his Son. Christ was to be the author of their salvation and
therefore it was fitting that he should be made perfect through suffering. The Fa-
ther made his Son “perfect” in the sense that by becoming man and therefore
being able to suffer and die, he was fully equipped to be mankind’s representative.
“God has acted in a manner in keeping with his kindness towards us: he has
clothed his first-born in a glory greater than that of all mankind and made him
outstanding as a champion. Suffering is, therefore, a way to attain perfection and
a source of salvation” (”Hom. on Heb.”, 4). By perfectly obeying his Father, of-
fering his life and especially his passion and death, Christ offers a perfect and
superabundant sacrifice for the forgiveness of the sins of mankind and makes full
atonement to the Father. As a reward for his obedience, Christ, as man, is made
Head of the Church and King of the universe. It is in that sense that he is made
“perfect” by the Father.

Ever since the Redemption, human suffering has become a way to perfection: it
acts as expiation for personal sins, it spurs man to assert his spiritual and trans-
cendental dimension, it makes for solidarity with others and links man to Christ’s
sacrifice. “Suffering must serve for conversion, that is, for the rebuilding of good-
ness in the subject, who can recognize the divine mercy in this call to repentance
[...] . But in order to perceive the true answer to the ‘why’ of suffering, we must
look to the revelation of divine love, the ultimate source of the meaning of every-
thing that exists [...]. Christ causes us to enter into the mystery and to discover
the ‘why’ of suffering, as far as we are capable of grasping the sublimity of divine
love” (John Paul II, “Salvifici Doloris”, 12-13).

11. To accomplish the salvation of men Christ needed to be one of them —to
share, with them, a human nature. This is why Christ is the only “true sanctifier”,
that is, the priest who performs rites and sacrifices, taking things stained by sin
and making them pure and pleasing to God, that is, holy. Our Lord said some-
thing similar in the Gospel: “For their sake I consecrate myself, that they also
may be consecrated in truth” (In 17:19).

“Have all one origin”. Various interpretations have been given to these words.
Most have to do with the parallelism between the first man and Christ (cf. Acts
17:26; Rom 5:15-19), seeing this “origin” as Adam—in which case the text would
mean that Christ and other men are children of Adam. A more usual interpreta-
tion sees the “one” origin as being God, thus stressing that Christ’s holy huma-
nity and the humanity of men both stem from the one Creator and derive from
the first man. In either case, Christ and the rest of men can rightly be called
“brethren”. “As to his divine generation he has no brethren or co-heirs, the only-
begotten Son of the Father, while we mortals are the work of his hands. But if
we consider his birth as man, he not only calls many by the name of brethren,
but treats them as such, since he admits them to share with him the glory of
his paternal inheritance” (”St Pius V Catechism”, I, 3, 10).

12. Psalm 22, which begins with the words, “My God, my God, why has thou
forsaken me?”, speaks of the sufferings and exaltation of the Messiah, as per-
fect Servant of Yahweh. Christ prayed this psalm on the Cross, applying it to
himself and thereby revealing it to be a prophecy of his passion (cf. Mt 27:35,
46; Mk 15:34). For this reason it is a psalm which is highly revered and much
used by Christian tradition. It had a special place in divine services in the syna-
gogue and is used by the Church in the liturgical ceremonies of Holy Thursday
and Good Friday.

The Servant of Yahweh, after being freed by God from the suffering and abuse
inflicted on him, expresses his gratitude to his liberator. That is why he wishes
to “proclaim”, that is, extol the name of Yahweh before the faithful who meet in
the congregation and whom he calls “brethren”. The evangelists see this psalm
as being fulfilled in our Lord’s passion (cf. Mt 27:35 and In 19:23-24 compared
with Ps 22:18).

But in Hebrews 2:12 other words of the same Psalm (Ps 22:23) are applied not
so much to our Lord’s passion as to Christ’s revelation of the Father: he proc-
laims the name of the true God, that is, his inner life, his mercy and power. This
passage of Hebrews echoes the words of Jesus in John 17:6, 26: “I have mani-
fested thy name to the men whom thou gavest me out of the world; thine they
are, and thou gavest them to me, and they have kept thy word [...]. I have made
known to them thy name, and I will make it known, that the love with which thou
hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.”

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 01/14/2013 8:29:56 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Mark 1:21-28

Jesus in the Synagogue of Capernaum


[21] And they went into Capernaum; and immediately on the sabbath He entered
the synagogue and taught. [22] And they were astonished at His teaching, for He
taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. [23] And immedia-
tely there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit; [24] and he cried
out, “What have You to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have You come to des-
troy us? I know who You are, the Holy One of God.” [25] But Jesus rebuked him
saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” [26] And the unclean spirit, convulsing
him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him. [27] And they were all
amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A
new teaching! With authority He commands even the unclean spirits, and they
obey Him.” [28] And at once His fame spread everywhere throughout all the sur-
rounding region of Galilee.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

21. “Synagogue” means meeting, assembly, community. It was — and is — used
by the Jews to describe the place where they met to hear the Scriptures read,
and to pray. Synagogues seem to have originated in the social gatherings of the
Jews during their exile in Babylon, but this phenomenon did not spread until much
later. In our Lord’s time there were synagogues, in Palestine, in every city and
town of any importance; and, outside Palestine, wherever the Jewish community
was large enough. The synagogue consisted mainly of a rectangular room built in
such a way that those attending were facing Jerusalem when seated. There was
a rostrum or pulpit from which Sacred Scripture was read and explained.

22. Here we can see how Jesus showed His authority to teach. Even when He
took Scripture as His basis—as in the Sermon on the Mount—He was different
from other teachers, for He spoke in His own name: “But I say to you” (Matthew
7:28-29). Our Lord speaks about the mysteries of God, and about human rela-
tionships; He teaches in a simple and authoritative way because He speaks of
what He knows and testifies to what He has seen (John 3:11). The scribes also
taught the people, St. Bede comments, about what is written in Moses and the
prophets; but Jesus preached to them as God and Lord of Moses himself (St.
Bede, “In Marci Evangelium Expositio”). Moreover, first He does and then He
preaches (Acts 1:1)—not like the scribes who teach and do not do (Matthew 23:
1-5).

23-26. The Gospels give us many accounts of miraculous cures, among the most
outstanding of which are those of people possessed by the devil. Victory over the
unclean spirit, as the devil is usually described, is a clear sign that God’s salva-
tion has come: by overcoming the Evil One, Jesus shows that He is the Messiah,
the Savior, more powerful than the demons: “Now is the judgment of this world,
now shall the ruler of this world be cast out” (John 12:31). Throughout the Gospel
we see many accounts of this continuous and successful struggle of our Lord
against the devil.

As time goes on the devil’s opposition to Jesus becomes ever clearer; in the
wilderness it is hidden and subtle; it is noticeable and violent in the case of pos-
sessed people; and radical and total during the Passion, the devil’s “hour and the
power of darkness” (Luke 22:53). And Jesus’ victory also becomes ever clearer,
until He triumphs completely by rising from the dead.

The devil is called unclean, St. John Chrysostom says, because of his impiety
and withdrawal from God. In some ways he does recognize Christ’s holiness, but
this knowledge is not accompanied by charity. In addition to the historical fact of
this cure, we can also see, in this possessed man, those sinners who must be
converted to God and freed from the slavery to sin and the devil. They may have

to struggle for a long time but victory will come: the Evil One is powerless against
Christ (cf. note on Matthew 12:22-24).

27. The same authority that Jesus showed in His teaching (1:22) is now to be
seen in His actions. His will is His command: He has no need of long prayers or
incantations. Jesus’ words and actions already have a divine power which pro-
vokes wonder and fear in those who hear and see Him.

Jesus continues to impress people in this way (Mark 2:12; 5:20-42; 7:37; 15:39;
Luke 19:48; John 7:46). Jesus of Nazareth is the long-awaited Savior. He knows
this Himself and He lets it be known by His actions and by His words; according
to the gospel accounts (Mark 1:38-39; 2:10-11; 4:39) there is complete continui-
ty and consistency between what He says and He does. As Vatican II teaches
(”Dei Verbum”, 2) Revelation is realized by deeds and words intimately connec-
ted with each other: the words proclaim the deeds and clarify the mystery con-
tained in them; the deeds confirm the teaching. In this way Jesus progressively
reveals the mystery of His Person: first the people sense His exceptional autho-
rity; later on, the Apostles, enlightened by God’s grace, recognize the deepest
source of this authority: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matthew
16:16).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


6 posted on 01/14/2013 8:31:10 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Hebrews 2:5-12 ©
God did not appoint angels to be rulers of the world to come, and that world is what we are talking about. Somewhere there is a passage that shows us this. It runs: What is man that you should spare a thought for him, the son of man that you should care for him? For a short while you made him lower than the angels; you crowned him with glory and splendour. You have put him in command of everything. Well then, if he has put him in command of everything, he has left nothing which is not under his command. At present, it is true, we are not able to see that everything has been put under his command, but we do see in Jesus one who was for a short while made lower than the angels and is now crowned with glory and splendour because he submitted to death; by God’s grace he had to experience death for all mankind.
  As it was his purpose to bring a great many of his sons into glory, it was appropriate that God, for whom everything exists and through whom everything exists, should make perfect, through suffering, the leader who would take them to their salvation. For the one who sanctifies, and the ones who are sanctified, are of the same stock; that is why he openly calls them brothers in the text: I shall announce your name to my brothers, praise you in full assembly.

Psalm Psalm 8:2,5-9 ©
You gave your Son power over the works of your hand.
How great is your name, O Lord our God,
  through all the earth!
What is man that you should keep him in mind,
  mortal man that you care for him?
You gave your Son power over the works of your hand.
Yet you have made him little less than a god;
  with glory and honour you crowned him,
gave him power over the works of your hand,
  put all things under his feet.
You gave your Son power over the works of your hand.
All of them, sheep and cattle,
  yes, even the savage beasts,
birds of the air, and fish
  that make their way through the waters.
You gave your Son power over the works of your hand.

Gospel Acclamation Jm1:21
Alleluia, alleluia!
Accept and submit to the word
which has been planted in you
and can save your souls.
Alleluia!
Or cf.1Th2:13
Alleluia, alleluia!
Accept God’s message for what it really is:
God’s message, and not some human thinking.
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 1:21-28 ©
Jesus and his followers went as far as Capernaum, and as soon as the sabbath came he went to the synagogue and began to teach. And his teaching made a deep impression on them because, unlike the scribes, he taught them with authority.
  In their synagogue just then there was a man possessed by an unclean spirit and it shouted, ‘What do you want with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are: the Holy One of God.’ But Jesus said sharply, ‘Be quiet! Come out of him!’ And the unclean spirit threw the man into convulsions and with a loud cry went out of him. The people were so astonished that they started asking each other what it all meant. ‘Here is a teaching that is new’ they said ‘and with authority behind it: he gives orders even to unclean spirits and they obey him.’ And his reputation rapidly spread everywhere, through all the surrounding Galilean countryside.

7 posted on 01/14/2013 8:36:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray with Pope Benedict

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Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
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On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

8 posted on 01/14/2013 8:38:11 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 

  PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION

 


Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen

9 posted on 01/14/2013 8:39:39 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
10 posted on 01/14/2013 8:43:49 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
11 posted on 01/14/2013 8:44:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
12 posted on 01/14/2013 8:45:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


13 posted on 01/14/2013 8:47:14 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  II BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Sorrowful Mysteries
(Tuesdays and Fridays)
1. The Agony in the Garden (Matthew 26:36-46, Luke 22:39-46) [Spiritual fruit - God's will be done]
2. The Scourging at the Pillar (Matthew 27:26, Mark 15:15, John 19:1) [Spiritual fruit - Mortification of the senses]
3. The Crowning with Thorns (Matthew 27:27-30, Mark 15:16-20, John 19:2) [Spiritual fruit - Reign of Christ in our heart]
4. The Carrying of the Cross (Matthew 27:31-32, Mark 15:21, Luke 23:26-32, John 19:17) [Spiritual fruit - Patient bearing of trials]
5. The Crucifixion (Matthew 27:33-56, Mark 15:22-39, Luke 23:33-49, John 19:17-37) [Spiritual fruit - Pardoning of Injuries]

14 posted on 01/14/2013 8:53:54 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

15 posted on 01/14/2013 8:55:46 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


16 posted on 01/14/2013 8:56:40 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Feast of
the Holy Name of Jesus


Luke 2:21 "...Et vocatum est Nomen eius IESUS"
("And His Name was called JESUS")

Psalm 90:14 "Because he hoped in me I will deliver him:
I will protect him because he hath known My Name."

Zacharias 10:12 "I will strengthen them in the Lord,
and they shall walk in His Name, saith the Lord."

Apocalypse 3:8 "I know thy works. Behold, I have given before thee a door opened, which no man can shut: because thou hast a little strength, and hast kept my word, and hast not denied My Name."

Apocalypse 15:4 "Who shall not fear Thee, O Lord, and magnify Thy Name?..."

 

Blessed be the most holy Name of Jesus without end!



January Devotion: The Holy Name of Jesus

The month of January is traditionally dedicated to the Holy Name of Jesus. This feast is also celebrated on January 3. Here is an explanation of the devotion.

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has associated entire months to special devotions. The devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus has been traditionally associated with the month of January, due to its celebration on January 3. The name Jesus was given to the Holy Child at God's command (Luke 1:31). The Holy Name is all-powerful because of the Person who bears it; we honor it because of the command of Christ, that we should pray in His Name and because it reminds us of all the blessings we receive through our Holy Redeemer. Hence St. Paul was able to write to the Philippians: ". . . at the name of Jesus every knee should bend of those in heaven, on earth, and under the earth" (Phil. 2:10). By means of this devotion we also make amends for improper use of the Holy Name.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Prayer/Hymn in Honor of the Most Holy Name of Jesus - Iesu, Dulcis Memoria

Iesu, Dulcis Memoria is a celebrated 12th century hymn attributed to St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153), Doctor Mellifluus. The entire hymn has some 42 to 53 stanzas depending upon the manuscript. Parts of this hymn were used for the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus, which was formerly celebrated on the Sunday between the Circumcision and Epiphany, or failing such a Sunday, on January 2. The part below was used at Vespers. In the liturgical revisions of Vatican II, the feast was deleted, though a votive Mass to the Holy Name of Jesus had been retained for devotional use. With the release of the revised Roman Missal in March 2002, the feast was restored as an optional memorial on January 3.

Jesus, the very thought of Thee
With sweetness fills the breast!
Yet sweeter far Thy face to see
And in Thy presence rest.

No voice can sing, no heart can frame,
Nor can the memory find,
A sweeter sound than Jesus' name,
The Savior of mankind.

O hope of every contrite heart!
0 joy of all the meek!
To those who fall, how kind Thou art!
How good to those who seek!

But what to those who find? Ah! this
Nor tongue nor pen can show
The love of Jesus, what it is,
None but His loved ones know.

Jesus! our only hope be Thou,
As Thou our prize shalt be;
In Thee be all our glory now,
And through eternity. Amen.

---Roman Breviary

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

O Divine Jesus, Thou hast promised that anything we ask of the Eternal Father in Thy name shall be granted.

O Eternal Father. In the name of Jesus, for the love of Jesus, in fulfillment of this promise, and because Jesus has said it, grant us our petitions for the sake of Jesus, Thy Divine Son. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954


That at the name of Jesus every knee should bend, of those that are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
 
Phil:2:10-11
 

 
 

Litany Of The Holy Name of Jesus
Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus
Jesus, The Name above all Names
Devotion to the Holy Name (of Jesus) [Catholic Caucus]
Lessons In Iconography : The Chi Rho - Christ
St. Francis de Sales on the Most Holy Name of Jesus (Excerpt from a Sermon) (Catholic Caucus)
St. Francis de Sales on the Most Holy Name of Jesus (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

St. Bernard on the Most Holy Name of Jesus [Ecumenical]
Saving the day in His Holy Name: St. Genevieve gets a reprieve [Catholic Caucus]
The Holy Name of Jesus
Holy Name of Jesus [San Bernadino of Siena] Ecumenical
The Holy Name of Jesus
Devotion to the Holy Name [of Jesus]
The Name of Jesus: Its Power in Our Lives
The Holy Name of Jesus
Devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus
The Holy Name of Jesus

17 posted on 01/14/2013 8:59:14 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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JANUARY, 2013, Intentions of the Holy Father

The Faith of Christians. That in this Year of Faith Christians may deepen their knowledge of the mystery of Christ and witness joyfully to the gift of faith in him.

Middle Eastern Christians. That the Christian communities of the Middle East, often discriminated against, may receive from the Holy Spirit the strength of fidelity and perseverance.


18 posted on 01/14/2013 9:00:31 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Tuesday, January 15, 2013
Weekday
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
Hebrews 2:5-12
Psalm 8:2, 5-9
Mark 1:21-28

We always find that those who walked closest to Christ were those who had to bear the greatest trials.

-- St. Teresa of Avila


19 posted on 01/14/2013 9:04:38 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

20 posted on 01/14/2013 9:05:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


21 posted on 01/14/2013 9:07:18 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information:
St. Ita
Feast Day: January 15
Born:

475, County of Waterford, Ireland

Died: 15 January 570
Patron of: Diocese of Limerick, Ireland



22 posted on 01/15/2013 7:38:37 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Paul the Hermit

 
Feast Day: January 15
Born:229 :: Died:342

Paul was born at Lower Thebes, in Egypt. He belonged to an upperclass, Christian family, was well educated and was fluent in Greek and Egyptian.

Paul's parents showed him by their own lives how to love God and worship him with one's whole heart. Paul was very sad as both his parents died when he was just fifteen years old.

A few years later, in 250, Emperor Decius started a cruel persecution of the Church. Paul hid in his friend's house, but he still was not safe. His brother-in-law was after his money and property and could easily betray him.

So Paul ran away to the desert. He found a cave near a palm tree and a spring of fresh water. There he settled. He sewed palm branches together for clothes, and he lived on fruit and water.

Paul had only planned to stay there while the persecution lasted. But by the time it was over, he had fallen in love with the life of prayer. He felt so close to God. How could he give that up?

He decided to stay in the desert and never return to his wealthy city life. Instead, he would spend his life praying daily for the needs of all people and performing penance for sin.

There was another holy hermit at the same time named Anthony. Anthony thought he was the only hermit but God showed Paul to him in a dream and told Anthony to go visit him.

Paul was so happy to see Anthony because he knew he was going to die in a few days. Anthony was sad because he did not want to lose his new friend so soon. But, as Paul had expected, he died on January 15, 342.

Anthony buried him in a cloak that had belonged to St. Athanasius. Then Anthony took home and treasured the garment of palm leaves that Paul had been wearing. He never forgot his wonderful friend. Paul's biography was written by Saint Jerome.

23 posted on 01/15/2013 7:45:06 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic
Almanac:

Tuesday, January 15

Liturgical Color: Green


Today the Church remembers St. Arnold Janssen. In 1875, he founded the Society of the Divine Word, a group of missionary priests. Today the Society has over 6000 members with missions in more than 65 countries.


24 posted on 01/15/2013 5:36:54 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 1
21 And they entered into Capharnaum, and forthwith upon the sabbath days going into the synagogue, he taught them. Et ingrediuntur Capharnaum : et statim sabbatis ingressus in synagogam, docebat eos. και εισπορευονται εις καπερναουμ και ευθεως τοις σαββασιν εισελθων εις την συναγωγην εδιδασκεν
22 And they were astonished at his doctrine. For he was teaching them as one having power, and not as the scribes. Et stupebant super doctrina ejus : erat enim docens eos quasi potestatem habens, et non sicut scribæ. και εξεπλησσοντο επι τη διδαχη αυτου ην γαρ διδασκων αυτους ως εξουσιαν εχων και ουχ ως οι γραμματεις
23 And there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit; and he cried out, Et erat in synagoga eorum homo in spiritu immundo : et exclamavit, και ην εν τη συναγωγη αυτων ανθρωπος εν πνευματι ακαθαρτω και ανεκραξεν
24 Saying: What have we to do with thee, Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come to destroy us? I know who thou art, the Holy One of God. dicens : Quid nobis et tibi, Jesu Nazarene ? venisti perdere nos ? scio qui sis, Sanctus Dei. λεγων εα τι ημιν και σοι ιησου ναζαρηνε ηλθες απολεσαι ημας οιδα σε τις ει ο αγιος του θεου
25 And Jesus threatened him, saying: Speak no more, and go out of the man. Et comminatus est ei Jesus, dicens : Obmutesce, et exi de homine. και επετιμησεν αυτω ο ιησους λεγων φιμωθητι και εξελθε εξ αυτου
26 And the unclean spirit tearing him, and crying out with a loud voice, went out of him. Et discerpens eum spiritus immundus, et exclamans voce magna, exiit ab eo. και σπαραξαν αυτον το πνευμα το ακαθαρτον και κραξαν φωνη μεγαλη εξηλθεν εξ αυτου
27 And they were all amazed, insomuch that they questioned among themselves, saying: What thing is this? what is this new doctrine? for with power he commandeth even the unclean spirits, and they obey him. Et mirati sunt omnes, ita ut conquirerent inter se dicentes : Quidnam est hoc ? quænam doctrina hæc nova ? quia in potestate etiam spiritibus immundis imperat, et obediunt ei. και εθαμβηθησαν παντες ωστε συζητειν προς εαυτους λεγοντας τι εστιν τουτο τις η διδαχη η καινη αυτη οτι κατ εξουσιαν και τοις πνευμασιν τοις ακαθαρτοις επιτασσει και υπακουουσιν αυτω
28 And the fame of him was spread forthwith into all the country of Galilee. Et processit rumor ejus statim in omnem regionem Galilææ. εξηλθεν δε η ακοη αυτου ευθυς εις ολην την περιχωρον της γαλιλαιας

25 posted on 01/15/2013 5:38:51 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
21. And they went into Capernaum; and straight-way on the sabbath day he entered into the synagogue, and taught.
22. And they were astonished at his doctrine: for he taught them as one that had authority, and not as the Scribes.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Mark, arranging the sayings of the Gospel as they were in his own mind, not in themselves, quits the order of the history, and follows the order of the mysteries. Wherefore he relates the first miracle on the sabbath day, saying, And they go in to Capernaum.

THEOPHYL. Quitting Nazareth. Now on the sabbath day, when the Scribes were gathered together, be entered into a synagogue, and taught. Wherefore there follows, And straightway on the sabbath day, having entered into the synagogue, he taught them. For this end the Law commanded them to give themselves up to rest on the sabbath day, that they might meet together to attend to sacred reading.

Again, Christ taught them by rebuke, not by flattery as did the Pharisees; wherefore it says, And they were astonished at his doctrine; for he taught them as one having power, and not as the Scribes. He taught them also in power, transforming men to good, and he threatened punishment to those who did not believe on Him.

BEDE; The Scribes themselves taught the people what was written in Moses and the Prophets: but Jesus as the God and Lord of Moses himself, by the freedom of His own will, either added those things which appeared wanting in the Law, or altered things as He preached to the people; as we read in Matthew, It was said to them of old time, but I say to you.

23. And there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit; and he cried out,
24. Saying, Let us alone; what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art you come to destroy us? I know who you are, the Holy One of God.
25. And Jesus rebuked him, saying, Hold your peace, and come out of him.
26. And when the unclean spirit had torn him, and cried with a loud voice, he came out of him.
27. And they were all amazed, inasmuch that they questioned among themselves, saying, What thing is this? what new doctrine is this? for with authority commands he even the unclean spirits, and they do obey him.
28. And immediately his fame spread abroad throughout all the region round about Galilee.

BEDE; Since by the envy of the devil death first entered into the world, it was right that the medicine of healing should first work against the author of death; and therefore it is said, And there was in their synagogue a man, &c.

PSEUD-CHRYS. The word Spirit is applied to an Angel, the air, the soul, and even the Holy Ghost. Lest therefore by the sameness of the name we should fall into error, he adds, unclean. And he is called unclean on account of his impiousness and far removal from God, and because he employs himself in all unclean and wicked works.

AUG. Moreover, how great is the power which the lowliness of God, appearing in the form of a servant, has over the pride of devils, the devils themselves know so well, that they express it to the same Lord clothed in the weakness of flesh. For there follows, And he cried out, saying, What have we to do with you, Jesus of Nazareth, &c. For it is evident in these words that there was in them knowledge, but there was not charity; and the reason was, that they fear their punishment from Him, and loved not the righteousness in Him.

BEDE; For the devils, seeing the Lord on the earth, thought that they were immediately to be judged.

PSEUD-CHRYS. Or else the devil so speaks, as if he said, 'by taking away uncleanness, and giving to the souls of men divine knowledge, You allow us no place in men.'

THEOPHYL; For to come out of man the devil considers as his own perdition; for devils are ruthless, thinking that they suffer some evil, so long as they are not troubling men. There follows, I know that you are the Holy One of God.

PSEUD-CHRYS. As if he said, Methinks that You are come; for he had not a firm and certain knowledge of the coming of God. But he calls Him holy not as one of many, for every prophet was also holy, but he proclaims that He was the One holy; by time article in Greek he shows Him to be the One, but by his fear he shows Him to he Lord of all.

AUG. For He was known to them in that degree in which He wished to be known; and He wished as much as was fitting. He was not known to them as to the Holy Angels, who enjoy Him by partaking of His eternity according as He is the Word of God; but as he was to be made known in terror, to those beings from whose tyrannical power He was about to free the predestinate. He was known therefore to the devils, not in that He is eternal Life, but by some temporal effects of His Power, which might be more clear to the angelic senses of even bad spirits than to the weakness of men.

PSEUD-CHRYS. Further, the Truth did not wish to have the witness of unclean spirits; wherefore there follows, And Jesus threatened him, saying, &c. Whence a healthful precept is given to us; let us not believe devils, however they may proclaim the truth. It goes on, And the unclean spirit tearing him, &c. For, because the man spoke as one in his senses and uttered his words with discretion, lest it should be thought that he put together his words not from the devil but out of his own heart, He permitted the man to be torn by the devil, that He might show that it was the devil who spoke.

THEOPHYL. That they might know, when they saw it, from how great an evil the man was freed, and on account of the miracle might believe.

BEDE; But it may appear to be a discrepancy, that he should have gone out of him, tearing him, or, as some copies have it, vexing him, when, according to Luke, he did not hurt him. But Luke himself says, When he had cast him in to the midst, he came out from him, without hurting him. Wherefore it is inferred that Mark meant by vexing or tearing him, what Luke expresses, in the words, When he had cast him into the midst; so that what he goes on to say, And did not hurl him, may be understood to mean, that the tossing of his limbs and vexing, did not weakening him, as devils are wont to come out even with the cutting off and tearing away of limbs.

But seeing the power of the miracle, they wonder at the newness of our Lord's doctrine, and are roused to search into what they had heard by what they had seen. Wherefore there follows, And they all wondered &c. For miracles were done that they might more firmly believe the Gospel of the kingdom of God, which was being preached, since those who were promising heavenly joys to men on earth, were showing forth heavenly things and divine works even on earth. For before (as the Evangelist says) He was teaching them as one who had power, and now, as the crowd witnesses, with power He commands the evil spirits, and they obey Him.

It goes on, And immediately His fame spread abroad, &c.

GLOSS. For those things which men wonder at they soon divulge, for out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks .

PSEUDO-JEROME; Moreover, Capernaum is mystically interpreted the town of consolation, and the sabbath as rest. The man with an evil spirit is healed by rest and consolation, that the place and time may agree with his healing. This maim with an unclean spirit is the human race, in which uncleanness reigned from Adam to Moses; for they sinned without law, and perished without law. And he, knowing the Holy One of God, is ordered to hold his peace, for they knowing God did not glorify him as God, but rather served the creature than the Creator. The spirit tearing the man came out of him. When salvation is near, temptation is at hand also. Pharaoh, when about to let Israel go, pursues Israel; the devil, when despised, rises up to create scandals.

Catena Aurea Mark 1
26 posted on 01/15/2013 5:39:32 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Christ the Healer

by Mary Katsilometes

27 posted on 01/15/2013 5:40:12 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: January 15, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Attend to the pleas of your people with heavenly care, O Lord, we pray, that they may see what must be done and gain strength to do what they have seen. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: January 15th

Tuesday of the First Week of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: St. Paul, confessor, the first Hermit; St. Maurus, abbot; St. Claude de la Colombiere, religious; Our Lady of Prompt Succor

It was from St. Jerome (+ 420) that the west learned of the life of St. Paul; the book, which he devoted to the life of the first Christian hermit, charmed and instructed generations of the faithful and formed the inspiration of many artists. St. Paul is said to have died in 341, in a hermitage in the region of Thebes in Egypt after having received at the age of 113 a visit from St. Antony.

St. Maurus was one of the first disciples of St. Benedict. In this son of a patrician Roman family, entrusted by his parents to the father of western monasticism, Benedictine tradition celebrates the perfect monk, and the model of childlike obedience. Many monasteries, particularly in France, adopted him as patron. He died about A.D. 580.

The Jesuit Priest St. Claude de la Colombière was the first to believe in the mystical revelations of the Sacred Heart given to St. Margaret Mary in Paray le Monial Convent, France. Thanks to his support, St. Margaret Mary’s superior also believed, and propagation of the devotion to the Sacred heart was started.

In some places today is the feast of Our Lady of Prompt Succor, Patroness of the State of Louisiana.


St. Paul, the first hermit
St. Paul is called "the first hermit" in the Missal and Breviary, a rare distinction, for such titles are seldom appended. Our saint was the standard-bearer of those courageous men who for the love of Christ left the world and entered the wilderness to dedicate themselves wholly to contemplation amid all the privations of desert life. The hermits were the great men of prayer in those difficult times when the Church was locked in fierce struggle with heresy after heresy. For centuries the example of their lives served as the school of Christian perfection. Their action set the background for the rise of monasticism and religious orders in the Church.

The Breviary retains an edifying legend concerning today's saint. One day St. Anthony, then ninety, was divinely inspired to visit the hermit Paul. Though they had never met previously, each greeted the other correctly by name. While they were conversing at length on spiritual matters, the raven that had always brought Paul half a loaf of bread, came with a whole loaf. As the raven flew away, Paul said: "See, the Lord, who is truly good and merciful, has sent us food. Every day for sixty years I have received half a loaf, but with your arrival Christ sent His servants a double ration." Giving thanks, they ate by a spring.

After a brief rest, they again gave thanks, as was their custom, and spent the whole night praising God. At daybreak Paul informed Anthony of his approaching death and asked him to fetch the cloak he had received from St. Athanasius, that he might wrap himself in it. Later, as Anthony was returning from his visit, he saw Paul's soul ascending to heaven escorted by choirs of angels and surrounded by prophets and apostles. Further traditional matter may be found in The Life of Paul the Hermit, written by St. Jerome about the year 376.

Patron: Clothing industry; weavers.

Symbols: Dead man whose grave is being dug by a lion; man being brought food by a bird; man clad in rough garments made of leaves or skins; old man, clothed with palm-leaves, and seated under a palm-tree, near which are a river and loaf of bread; with Saint Anthony the Abbot.

Things to Do:

  • Bake a loaf of bread to celebrate this feast, as it is recounted in the Golden Legend how St. Paul received his daily bread every day from God.

  • Read St. Jerome's account of the Life of St. Paul.

  • The Order of St. Paul the Hermit (Paulines) runs the Shrine of Our Lady of Chestochowa in Doylestown, PA. Read more about the order and if in the neighborhood pay a visit (or a virtual visit) to the Shrine.

St. Maurus
In Benedictine history Maurus holds a distinguished place, taught and trained by St. Benedict himself. While still very young, Maurus and another youth, Placid, were brought by their parents to be reared in monastic life by the Patriarch of Monks. An incident reveals Maurus' spirit of childlike obedience. One day Placid was sent to a near-by lake to draw water. Soon he was at the shore, where, boy that he was, he fell victim to his own heedlessness. Eager to fill the vessel quickly, he reached out too far and was dragged in by the rapidly filling jar. He was being borne along by the waves when from his cell St. Benedict realized what had happened. "Hurry, run to the lake! Placid has fallen in!" he called to Maurus. Stopping only for his spiritual father's blessing, Maurus sped to the lake, seized Placid by the hair and brought him ashore.

Imagine his shock and amazement when he realized that he had run some distance on water! His explanation? Such a miracle could not have happened save by virtue of his master's command! St. Gregory relates the incident in his Second Book of Dialogues along with much other interesting detail from the life of St. Benedict. The Martyrology makes this comment on the miracle: How greatly he advanced in faith under his teacher (St. Benedict) is attested by an occurrence unheard of since the days of St. Peter; for, on one occasion he walked upon water as though it were dry land. The tradition that Maurus later became abbot at Glanfeuil in France lacks historical support.

Patron: Against cold; against gout; against hoarseness; charcoal burners; cobblers; cold; coppersmiths; gout; hoarseness; shoemakers.

Symbols: Monk saving Saint Placid from drowning while a cowl floats above him; abbot with crozier; abbot with book and censer; holding the weights and measures of food and drink given him by Saint Benedict.


St. Claude de la Colombière
Missionary and ascetical writer, born of noble parentage at Saint-Symphorien-d'Ozon, between Lyons and Vienne, in 1641; died at Paray-le-Monial, 15 February, 1682. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1659. After fifteen years of religious life he made a vow, as a means of attaining the utmost possible perfection, to observe faithfully the rule and constitutions of his order under penalty of sin. Those who lived with him attested that this vow was kept with great exactitude. In 1674 Father de la Colombière was made superior at the Jesuit house at Paray-le-Monial, where he became the spiritual director of Blessed Margaret Mary and was thereafter a zealous apostle of the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. In 1676 he was sent to England as preacher to the Duchess of York, afterwards Queen of Great Britain. He lived the life of a religious even in the Court of St. James and was as active a missionary in England as he had been in France. Although encountering many difficulties, he was able to guide Blessed Margaret Mary by letter. His zeal soon weakened his vitality and a throat and lung trouble seemed to threaten his work as a preacher. While awaiting his recall to France he was suddenly arrested and thrown into prison, denounced as a conspirator. Thanks to his title of preacher to the Duchess of York and to the protection of Louis XIV, whose subject he was, he escaped death but was condemned to exile (1679). The last two years of his life were spent at Lyons where he was spiritual director to the young Jesuits, and at Paray-le-Monial, whither he repaired for his health. His principal works, including "Pious Reflections", "Meditations on the Passion", "Retreat and Spiritual Letters", were published under the title, "Oeuvres du R. P. Claude de la Colombière" (Avignon, 1832; Paris, 1864). His relics are preserved in the monastery of the Visitation nuns at Paray-le-Monial. (Catholic Encyclopedia) He was canonized by Pope John Paul II on May 31, 1992.

Patron: Toy makers; turners.

Things to Do:


Our Lady of Prompt Succor
Devotion to Our Lady of Prompt Succor dates back to 1802, when the Ursuline Order in New Orleans pleaded for help in sustaining the Order with new sisters from France. Their prayers were answered with papal permission for sisters to be transferred from France to New Orleans. In thanksgiving for this favor, the Ursulines dedicated a statue in their convent chapel to Our Lady of Prompt Succor in 1810.

In 1812, a terrible fire broke out in New Orleans, and the wind was blowing the flames toward the convent. Prayers before the statue of Our Lady were answered with a reversal of the wind direction and the convent was spared.

During the Battle of New Orleans, in 1815, the sisters again invoked the assistance of Our Lady of Prompt Succor. As the sound of guns and cannons thundered around the chapel during Mass, they vowed to have a Mass of Thanksgiving sung every year if the Americans were victorious. At Communion time, a messenger arrived with the news that Gen. Andrew Jackson's overmatched army had successfully driven the British from the city. Once again Our Lady had responded promptly.

In 1928, the Holy See approved the selection of Our Lady of Prompt Succor as the Patroness of the city of New Orleans and the state of Louisiana. The Mass of Thanksgiving is offered each January 8 at the Shrine of Our Lady of Prompt Succor in New Orleans.

Patron: State of Louisiana; the Archdiocese of New Orleans; City of New Orleans

Things to Do:



28 posted on 01/15/2013 5:43:19 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Hebrews 2:5-12

1st Week in Ordinary Time

He is not ashamed to call them brothers and sisters. (Hebrews 2:11)

What’s in your newspaper today? Wars and uprisings? Murders and robberies? Celebrity marriages, divorces, and remarriages? “Bad news” seems to sell so much better than “good news,” doesn’t it? Well, let’s look at some good news instead: Jesus is your brother!

It’s easy to forget that Jesus is completely human and that he shares kinship with us. In fact, he is willing—indeed, happy—to be so closely connected with us. As today’s reading tells us, the One who makes us holy and we ourselves have the same origin (Hebrews 2:11). We are of the same stock. Yes, he is our brother!

Jesus knows our struggles. Not just because he’s God and he knows everything but because he shared our humanity (Hebrews 4:15). He knows firsthand our human limitations. He knows the tiredness and weakness and incessant whispering of the devil that we all face. He knows our grief, our fear, and our reluctance to do what the Father asks sometimes. None of these pulled him down, but he is our brother, full of compassion for us, even when we do fall.

As your brother, Jesus wants to strengthen you. He wants to speak truth to you. He wants to teach and encourage and protect you; to walk right with you through everything you face in life. What’s more, he is not ashamed to be called your brother. Rather, he is proud to have you. He loves you, understands you, and is deeply concerned for you. And more than anything, Jesus wants to pour the love, confidence, joy, and peace that are in his heart into your heart so that you can stand strong in this world, just as he did.

It may be hard to believe such good news, but genuine news has a way of surprising us. Just ask him to teach you. Sit quietly, and let him show you what it means that he is your brother. He may speak to you through Scripture, in a song, in a quiet voice in your heart, or through something a friend said to you yesterday. Write down whatever you sense him saying, and take it with you all day. After all, it’s the best news you could ever hear!

“Jesus, I want to know you as my brother. Open my eyes and my heart so that I can experience that closeness with you today.”

Psalm 8:2, 5-9; Mark 1:21-28


29 posted on 01/15/2013 5:46:48 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for January 15, 2013:

The early years of marriage require adjustments and compromises. “My way is the right way” will only lock you into fights. Make sure it’s not always the same spouse yielding to the will of the other.


30 posted on 01/15/2013 5:52:27 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

Our Oblates: One Year Later

 on January 15, 2013 9:33 AM |
s1benedi.jpg

One year ago today, on the the feast of Saints Maurus and Placid, I received three men and four women into the year of noviceship that has prepared them to become Oblates of our monastery. I also received two other men and one other woman in February. Investiture in the black Benedictine scapular and the imposition of a new name, placing the novice under the protection of a particular saint, marked the beginning of the noviceship. Following the lesson from Ecclesiasticus 2:1-21, I addressed them in these words, which I am happy to share again with the readers of Vultus Christi, one year later:

Newness of Life

My dear sons and daughters, a novice is one who is embarking on newness of life. My first word to you today, then, is an invitation to throw yourselves into the embrace of the One who says, "Behold, I make all things new" (Ap 21:5), our Lord Jesus Christ.

In the Likeness of the Son

One comes to the monastic life, be it as a monk or as an Oblate living in the world, in order to be refashioned in the likeness of the Beloved Son in whose image we were created. "But we all beholding the glory of the Lord with open face, are transformed into the same image from glory to glory, as by the Spirit of the Lord" (2 Cor 3:18).

Spiritual Childhood

One comes to the monastic life, be it as a monk or as an Oblate living in the world, to be made new again in the newness of the grace of Baptism; one comes to recover the innocence lost by sin, and to take one's first steps in the path of spiritual childhood, mindful of the word of the Lord: "Amen I say to you, unless you be converted, and become as little children, you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven" (Mt 18:3).

Leaving Former Things Behind

One comes to the monastic life, be it as a monk or as an Oblate living in the world, desiring to leave behind those former things that made our lives burdensome to ourselves and to others, the things that clouded our spiritual vision, stopped up the ears of our hearts, and so congested our spiritual nostrils that we could barely, if at all, catch a whiff of what Saint Paul calls "the good fragrance of Christ unto God" (1 Cor 2:15).

A New Heart and a New Spirit

One comes to the monastic life, be it as a monk or as an Oblate living in the world, because one has grown weary of what is old, and stale, and lifeless, and because one believes in the promise of Him who says, through the mouth of His prophet, "And I will give you a new heart, and put a new spirit within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and will give you a heart of flesh" (Ex 36:26).

The Sweet Yoke of Christ

One comes to the monastic life, be it as a monk or as an Oblate living the world, because one has heard the invitation of the Heart of Jesus, "Come to me, all you that labour, and are burdened, and I will refresh you. Take up my yoke upon you, and learn of me, because I am meek, and humble of heart: and you shall find rest to your souls. For my yoke is sweet and my burden light" (Mt 11:28-30).

Christ's Oblation to the Father

One comes to the monastic life, be it as a monk or as an Oblate living the world, because Jesus has drawn one's soul into the upward movement of His oblation to the Father. "And I," says Our Lord, "if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all things to myself" (Jn 12:32). Magnetized by the Cross and by the altar, one is compelled by the Holy Ghost to enter into the immolation of the Lamb. "Christ our Pasch is sacrificed. Therefore let us keep the feast" (1 Cor 5:6-7) by presenting "our bodies a living sacrifice, holy, pleasing unto God, our reasonable service" (Rom 12:1), that is, our mystic liturgy patterned after what God has revealed through His Word, our "adoration in spirit and in truth" (Jn 4:23).

In All of Life

The immolation of the Benedictine monk or Oblate, his participation in the victimhood of the Lamb, begins at the altar and returns to the altar, but it is played out in the most ordinary circumstances of daily life. For a monk, this encompasses his relationship to the Father of the monastery and to his brethren. For an Oblate, it encompasses one's relationship to one's spouse, one's children, one's grandchildren, and one's neighbours. It encompasses one's relationship to the guest who arrives announced or unannounced; one's relationship to the sick, the weak, and those in need of consolation, to little children to the elderly, the lonely and the poor. Finally, it encompasses the context of one's profession, employment, or state of life.

Never Despairing of the Mercy of God

There is nothing that cannot be brought to the altar. There is nothing that cannot be united to Christ's oblation. There are no circumstances in which we, monks and Oblates, are dispensed from owning our weaknesses, being humbled by our frailty, and uniting our wounds to the wounds, the weakness, and the frailty of the immolated Lamb -- and all of this, while never despairing of the mercy of God. This goes to the heart of what it means to be a Benedictine Oblate.

To be sure, one will also want to pray, insofar as possible, some parts of the Divine Office, the Opus Dei in communion with the choral prayer of the monks. One will want to open the ear of one's heart to the Word of God in lectio divina. One will want to adore the Eucharistic Face of Jesus, concealed and revealed in the Sacrament of His Love. One will want to cultivate a knowledge and holy enthusiasm for the Sacred Liturgy of the Church, for her Chant, her rites, her feasts, her fasts, and her seasons. In a word, one will want to submit to gentle yoke of the Rule of Saint Benedict, by receiving its wisdom, and by allowing it to shape the way one journeys through life, seeking God.

A Plan for the Noviceship

With all of this in mind, I am proposing a plan of study, reflection, and prayer in twelve points that will guide you through this year of your noviceship, and prepare you, by God's grace, for your Oblation in a year's time. Each of the twelve points corresponds to a month of your noviceship.

1. Listening With the Ear of the Heart

The first point has to do with learning to listen to the voice of God, to the gentle murmurings of the Holy Ghost, with the ear of your heart. Read and meditate the Prologue of the Holy Rule. In Luke 1:26-38 contemplate the Blessed Virgin Mary, the model of all fruitful listening. So well did Our Lady listen to the Word of God, that she conceived the Word in her virginal womb, and offered Him to the Father, and to us.

2. Obedience

The second point has to do with the practice of obedience, with learning to say "Yes" to God in all the circumstances of life, and with learning to say "No" to those things that pollute our minds, chill our hearts, and turn us aside from the royal way of the Cross, taken by Jesus before us. Read and meditate Philippians 2:5-15 and Chapter 5 of the Holy Rule.

3. Silence

The third point has to do with cultivating in us and around us the spirit of silence. It has to do with fasting from every form of speech that is self-serving, insincere, unkind, untrue, or lacking in mercy. It has to do with knowing how to abide in silence for God's sake, content to listen, to say nothing, to seek Him in faith, to desire Him with an irrepressible hope, and to cleave to Him in love. It has to do with moderation in the use of the tools of social communication, lest one become dependent on sounds and sights that distract us from The One Thing Necessary. For this you will want to meditate on Luke 10:38-42 and Chapter 6 of the Holy Rule.

4. Humility

The fourth point has to do with the practice of humility, with acknowledging and owning one's weaknesses, one's failures, and one's sins. It has to do with a willingness to learn from others who are wiser than ourselves, especially from the teachings of the Church, the writings of the saints, and from the whole monastic tradition. For this you will want to meditate Ecclesiasticus 2, Hebrews 11 and Chapter 7 of the Holy Rule.

5. The Divine Office

The fifth point has to do with the Divine Office and the Sacred Liturgy as a whole. You will apply yourself, before all else, to a sapiential knowledge of the Psalms. You will learn to find in them the very prayer inspired by the Holy Ghost and entrusted to Israel in view of the day when it would become the prayer of Jesus to the Father, the prayer that He bequeathed to His Bride, the Church. You will want meditate Christ in the Psalms by Father Patrick Reardon (Conciliar Press), The Spirit of the Liturgy by Pope Benedict XVI, and Chapters 19 and 20 of the Holy Rule.

6. Discipline and Penitence

The sixth point has to do with understanding the value of discipline and penitence, not as ends in themselves, still less as punitive practices, but as a means of growing in freedom of heart, and as the application of tried and tested spiritual remedies to the sin-sick soul. For this you will want to read the Seven Penitential Psalms (6, 31, 37, 50, 101, 129 and 142) and Chapters 23 through 30 of the Holy Rule.

7. Created Things

The seventh point has to do the practice of a responsible stewardship of material things. It has to so also with reverence for the good things created by God, seeing in all things matter with Eucharistic potential, matter to be lifted up and returned to the Father of lights from all good gifts descend. For this you will want to meditate Chapters 31 through 34 of the Holy Rule.

8. Hospitality

The eighth point has to do with gentleness, compassion and mercy, and with the recognition of the Face of Christ in the sick, in the old, in children, and in guests. It has to do also with the Benedictine tradition of hospitality by which all guests are welcomed as Christ Himself. For this you will want to meditate Chapters 36, 37, and 53 of the Holy Rule.

9. The Communion of the Saints

The ninth point has to do with the friendship of the saints who surround us like "a great cloud of witnesses over our head" (Heb 12:1), and who intercede for us in the glory of heaven. Consider Chapter 14 of the Holy Rule. Acquaint yourselves with the lives of Saint Benedict and Saint Scholastica, Saint Henry the Emperor and Saint Francesca of Rome, Saint Gertrude, Mother Mectilde de Bar, Blessed Columba Marmion, your patron saints as Oblates, and the other saints of our Benedictine family.

10. The Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar

The tenth point has to do with adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, for this is the distinctive charism of the Monastery of Our Lady of the Cenacle. It has to do with the quality and generosity of your response to Our Lord who waits for you in the Sacrament of His Love, who offers you His friendship, and who invites you to make reparation for those who do not believe in Him, do not hope in Him, do not love Him, and for those who have grown cold and indifferent to the mystery of His real presence in the tabernacles of our churches. For this you will want to meditate the teachings of Blessed John Paul II in Ecclesia de Eucharistia and in Mane Nobiscum Domine, the translated texts of Mother Mectilde de Bar, my own conference on Eucharistic Adoration given at Adoratio 2011 in Rome, and Chapter 52 of the Holy Rule.

11. The Instruments of Good Works

The eleventh point will be a summary of all the rest. You will meditate Chapter 4 of the Holy Rule, the Instruments of Good Works, dwelling on the most important one of all: Never to despair of God's Mercy.

12. A Benedictine Ethos in All of Life

The twelfth and last point will be the ethos of Benedictine life that you, as Oblates, will want to bring into every area of your lives. For this you will want to meditate Chapters 72 and 73 of the Holy Rule.

The Bond of the Oblation

I have spoken to you today, my dear sons and daughters, as a father who loves you in Christ and who desires, above all else, that you may, as Saint Benedict says, "run, with expanded hearts in the way of God's commandments, with an unspeakable sweetness of love." The bond that your Oblation will establish between yourselves and us will be, I am certain, a consolation here on earth, and a cause of thanksgiving and praise forever in heaven.


31 posted on 01/15/2013 6:00:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

Become Like a Consuming Fire

 on January 15, 2013 9:47 AM |
fralippi5.JPG

The First Benedictine Oblates

In the Benedictine tradition, January 15th is the feast of the young disciples of Our Father Saint Benedict, Maur and Placid. Who are Maur and Placid and how do we know them? Saint Gregory the Great introduces them in his Life of Saint Benedict. He explains that after the holy Benedict had established his twelve monasteries at Subiaco, noble Christians came from Rome, presenting their sons to be raised and educated among the monks. These boys, offered by their parents to God, were the first "Oblates." Among them were Maur, an adolescent, the son of Euthicus, and Placid -- practically a toddler -- son of the patrician Tertullus. Maur quickly became Abbot Benedict's helper whereas Saint Gregory specifies that Placid was in "early childhood."

A Little Hand Wrapped in the Corporal

Picture for a moment the rite of their Oblation. It is intimately tied into the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. We know exactly what was done from Chapter 59 of the Rule.

If it happens that a nobleman offers his son to God as a monk, and the child is still of tender age, the parents should make out the petition. . . . They should wrap this petition and the boy's hand together with the Mass offering in the altar cloth (the corporal) and offer him in that way" (RB 59:1).

I see Maur, a serious lad, conscious of what is happening when his hand is wrapped together with the offerings of bread and wine in the altar cloth. And I see, little Placid; his father probably had to lift him up in his arms to reach the altar. The poor little fellow must have been in awe of the solemn fuss being made of him.

A Eucharistic Vocation

The vocation of the Benedictine Oblate is essentially Eucharistic. The very word "oblate" is used to refer to the bread and wine placed upon the altar, the oblata, as well as to those who are ritually identified with the offering, the Oblates themselves. The Benedictine Oblate lives from the altar, and returns to the altar. Like the bread and wine destined to become the Body and Blood of Christ, the Oblate is offered at the altar and then given from the altar to live out his mystical identification with Christ, the hostia perpetua, by a life of conversion and obedience.

When Saint Benedict Prayed By Night

Saint Benedict obviously recognized the potential in Placid and Maur. Saint Gregory tells us that he chose the boy Placid to accompany him in a long nocturnal prayer on the mountain. "Accompanied by the little Placid," he says, "Benedict climbed the mountain. Once at the summit, he prayed for a long time." The solitary prayer of Saint Benedict imitates that of Jesus. "Jesus, rising early before dawn, went off to a deserted place where he prayed" (Mk 1:35). It is worth pondering how Placid's experience of seeing Saint Benedict pray by night must have marked him for life. Little boys are sensitive to such things.

Placid Rescued From the Water

The most famous story of Maur and Placid has to do with the little fellow going to fetch water in the lake. He falls into the water. Saint Benedict is made aware of the situation by a kind of charismatic clairvoyance. He sends Brother Maur to rescue the child Placid. Maur, having received his abbot's blessing, runs over the surface of the water, grabs Placid by the hair, pulls him out, and then runs back over the water to dry land, carrying the little one in his arms. Saint Benedict attributes the miracle to Maur's obedience. Maur says it was due to the virtue of Saint Benedict. Then the little Placid pipes up and settles the debate. "When you pulled me out of the water, he says, I saw over my head Father Abbot's hood, and I saw that it was he who pulled me from the water."

They Persevered

What is most significant, I think, in the story of Maur and Placid is that these two lads persevered in seeking God. If Maur and Placid persevered over a lifetime in seeking God, they surely suffered temptation and darkness, never despairing of the mercy of God. Maur and Placid, tested by suffering, became able to help those who are being tested. Perhaps this is why they became patrons of Benedictine novitiates everywhere.

Two Wise Old Nonni

The sign of the mature monk -- the nonnus, to use Saint Benedict's word for a senior in the monastery -- or of the mature nun -- the nonna -- is in their capacity for compassion, in their ability to identify with weakness, to sympathize with suffering, and above all in their refusal to judge.

We know nothing of the old age of Saints Maur and Placid but I see them as two wise old nonni. I see their youthful faces grown wrinkled and their beards white but in their eyes dances the flame of their first love, the interior fire kindled from the altar, set ablaze by the mystery of the Most Holy Eucharist on the day of their Oblation. It is the fire of the Eucharist that, burning in us, will consume all that is harsh, unbending, and ready to judge, leaving only the pure flame of a mercy that gives warmth and light. The Eucharistic vocation of Saints Placid and Maur bears witness to what Abba Joseph said to Abba Lot: "You cannot be a monk unless you become like a consuming fire."


32 posted on 01/15/2013 6:01:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Regnum Christi

The Steep and Thorny Road of Truth
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Tuesday of the First Week in Ordinary Time

 

Mark 1:21-28

Jesus came to Capernaum with his followers, and on the sabbath he entered the synagogue and taught. The people were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one having authority and not as the scribes. In their synagogue was a man with an unclean spirit; he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are -- the Holy One of God!” Jesus rebuked him and said, “Quiet! Come out of him!” The unclean spirit convulsed him and with a loud cry came out of him. All were amazed and asked one another, “What is this? A new teaching with authority. He commands even the unclean spirits and they obey him.” His fame spread everywhere throughout the whole region of Galilee.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I long to put you first in my life. It is easy to get caught up in daily activities. But you are not just another activity: you are my Lord and my God. I do believe in you, but I know that I need to believe in you more strongly. I do love you, but I must still strive to love you more than I love myself and my plans. I wish to offer you the best of myself right now in this time of conversation with you.

Petition: Lord, may I understand that you are the truth. May I love you as Truth-made-incarnate in my heart.

1. Truth and the Good Interwoven: “For he taught them as one having authority and not as the scribes.” In his encyclical The Splendor of Truth, Pope John Paul II reminded us of the necessary link between freedom, truth and the good. He went so far as to say that a correct understanding of this link is essential for the salvation of the world. Jesus taught with authority because he was both the Truth and the Good. Our freedom consists in recognizing this and living accordingly. Do I sincerely seek the truth in my life? Do I sincerely seek what is truly good, or am I conforming myself in some way to the hedonistic and self-seeking standards of the world?

2. Multiplying Our Good: “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us?” When our freedom refuses to recognize that Jesus is the Truth and that our greatest good consists in loving and following him, we feel threatened. We try to hold on to the good we imagine that we have apart from him. He does not want to take away the good we have, but rather he wishes to increase and multiply it. But to do so we must allow lesser goods we now have to die so that greater goods might rise with strength. Unless the seed falls to the ground and dies, it remains just a seed. But if it dies it rises to new life (cf. John 12:24).

3. The Demands of Truth:All were amazed and asked one another, ‘What is this? A new teaching with authority.’” Today we live in a relativistic world, where truth is whatever we want it to be. “Whatever makes you comfortable” is the motto of the day. We are amazed when Jesus breaks the mold of relativism, revealing the lie hidden within it and proclaims that he is the Truth. When the Gospel makes demands on my life, do I shift into relativism and believe that it makes no difference how or if I respond? If the Gospel makes me comfortable I will obey, but if not…. Truth can be demanding, but what a blessing it is that, in the person of Christ, truth is also love, mercy, goodness and joy. Do I love the truth and strive to live in the light?

Conversation with Christ: Lord, you know how easily I excuse myself from meeting your demands for my life. I do so even while knowing that when I fulfill them I always discover new strength, hidden energy and untapped resources of love within me. Help me to give myself to you in love, to meet your demands, and to experience the power of grace unleashed within me.


Resolution:
Today I will offer Christ something that is good but not necessary. By doing this, I will show my love for him and grow in self-detachment, so I can be more open to the good that he wishes to give.


33 posted on 01/15/2013 6:07:23 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Freedom From Evil Spirits

 

by Food For Thought on January 15, 2013 · 

It is clear that Jesus has authority over all the evil spirits. Evil spirits make people unhappy and slaves of all the concupiscence of the flesh. This gospel shows the great power of the Lord, God in the simple son of a carpenter who in his lowliness has victory over the pride of devils. The devils submit to Jesus of Nazareth. Capernaum has been known as a town of consolation which coincided with his healing of the man possessed by the evil spirit. Humanity now has a fighting chance to be rescued from our poverty of sin and elevated to the divinity brought about by the resurrection of the new Adam – Christ – who, representing the human race, found a way out of our miserable state. Heaven is now opened for us, freedom from the evil spirits awaits all those who believe Christ as the Holy One of God.


34 posted on 01/15/2013 6:12:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Tuesday, January 15, 2013 >>
 
Hebrews 2:5-12
View Readings
Psalm 8:2, 5-9 Mark 1:21-28
 

SPOTLIGHT ON THE EUCHARIST

 
"At present we do not see all things thus subject, but we do see Jesus." —Hebrews 2:8-9
 

I walked to Mass today amid dark clouds and a blustery wind. Because of the cloud cover, the Church was relatively dark for a noon Mass. As the priest lifted the Holy Eucharist at the moment of consecration, a shaft of bright sunlight shone through the stained glass directly onto the altar, flooding the Eucharist in brilliant light. The beam of light continued during the elevation of the Precious Blood. Following the consecration, the clouds again covered the sky. The sun broke through once more, at the instant the consecrated host and cup were lifted at the doxology to close the Eucharistic prayer. After the priest lowered the host and cup, the clouds covered the sun the rest of the day.

We often "walk in the dark valley" (Ps 23:4). We know "all things" are subject to King Jesus, but often we can't see this (Heb 2:8). Instead, what we see is that at least half of the registered Catholics are so uninspired by His eucharistic presence that they can't manage to spend an hour with Him at Sunday Mass (cf Mt 26:40). If we aren't diligent, we might soon join this "other half."

The Eucharist is a "mystery of light" (Ecclesia de Eucharistia, Pope John Paul II, 6). "We do see Jesus" in the Eucharist (Heb 2:9), yet we must fix our eyes ever more earnestly on Him (Heb 3:1). The more we look at Jesus present in the Eucharist, the more we are able to see His brightness (Jn 8:12). The less attention we pay to Jesus in the Eucharist, the more we focus on the darkness and forget Him (see Jn 3:19-20). Go to Mass frequently, daily if possible. Devote your life to Jesus in the Eucharist.

 
Prayer: Jesus, Bread of Life (Jn 6:35), fill me with "eucharistic amazement" (Ecclesia de Eucharistia, Pope John Paul II, 6).
Promise: "He gives orders to unclean spirits and they obey!" —Mk 1:27
Praise: Josephine spends one or two hours per week in the quiet of God's presence in eucharistic adoration.

35 posted on 01/15/2013 6:26:33 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

PRAYER FOR THE UNBORN CHILD


Almighty God, our Father, you who have given us life and intended us to have it forever, grant us your blessings. 
Enlighten our minds to an awareness and to a renewed conviction that all human life is sacred because it is created 
in your image and likeness.  Help us to teach by word and the example of our lives that life occupies the first place, 
that human life is precious because it is the gift of God whose love is infinite.  Give us the strength to defend human life 
against every influence or action that threatens or weakens it, as well as the strength to make every life more human 
in all its aspects.  

Give us the grace...

When the sacredness of life before birth is attacked, to stand up and proclaim that no one ever has the authority 
to destroy unborn life.

When a child is described as a burden or is looked upon only as a means to satisfy an emotional need, to stand up 
and insist that every child is a unique and unrepeatable gift of God,  a gift of God with a right to a loving and united family.

When the institution of marriage is abandoned to human selfishness or reduced to a temporary conditional arrangement 
that can easily be terminated, to stand up and affirm the indissolubility of the marriage bond.

When the value of the family is threatened because of social and economic pressure, to stand up and reaffirm that the family is necessary 
not only for the private good of every person, but also for the common good of every society, nation and state.

When freedom is used to dominate the weak, to squander natural resources and energy, to deny basic necessities to people, 
to stand up and affirm the demands of justice and social love.

Almighty Father, give us courage to proclaim the supreme dignity of all human life and to demand that society itself give its protection.  
We ask this in your name, through the redemptive act of your Son and in the Holy Spirit.

Amen.

(From Pope John Paul II's homily of October 7, 1979.)

36 posted on 01/15/2013 7:38:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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