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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 01-27-13, Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 01-27-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 01/26/2013 8:41:27 PM PST by Salvation

January 27, 2013

 

Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Neh 8:2-4a, 5-6, 8-10

Ezra the priest brought the law before the assembly,
which consisted of men, women,
and those children old enough to understand.
Standing at one end of the open place that was before the Water Gate,
he read out of the book from daybreak till midday,
in the presence of the men, the women,
and those children old enough to understand;
and all the people listened attentively to the book of the law.
Ezra the scribe stood on a wooden platform
that had been made for the occasion.
He opened the scroll
so that all the people might see it
— for he was standing higher up than any of the people —;
and, as he opened it, all the people rose.
Ezra blessed the LORD, the great God,
and all the people, their hands raised high, answered,
“Amen, amen!”
Then they bowed down and prostrated themselves before the LORD,
their faces to the ground.
Ezra read plainly from the book of the law of God,
interpreting it so that all could understand what was read.
Then Nehemiah, that is, His Excellency, and Ezra the priest-scribe
and the Levites who were instructing the people
said to all the people:
“Today is holy to the LORD your God.
Do not be sad, and do not weep”—
for all the people were weeping as they heard the words of the law.
He said further: “Go, eat rich foods and drink sweet drinks,
and allot portions to those who had nothing prepared;
for today is holy to our LORD.
Do not be saddened this day,
for rejoicing in the LORD must be your strength!”

Responsorial Psalm Ps 19:8, 9, 10, 15

R. (cf John 6:63c) Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.
The law of the LORD is perfect,
refreshing the soul;
The decree of the LORD is trustworthy,
giving wisdom to the simple.
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.
The precepts of the LORD are right,
rejoicing the heart;
The command of the LORD is clear,
enlightening the eye.
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.
The fear of the LORD is pure,
enduring forever;
The ordinances of the LORD are true,
all of them just.
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.
Let the words of my mouth and the thought of my heart
find favor before you,
O LORD, my rock and my redeemer.
R. Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life.

Reading 2 1 Cor 12:12-30

Brothers and sisters:
As a body is one though it has many parts,
and all the parts of the body, though many, are one body,
so also Christ.
For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body,
whether Jews or Greeks, slaves or free persons,
and we were all given to drink of one Spirit.

Now the body is not a single part, but many.
If a foot should say,
“Because I am not a hand I do not belong to the body,
“it does not for this reason belong any less to the body.
Or if an ear should say,
“Because I am not an eye I do not belong to the body, “
it does not for this reason belong any less to the body.
If the whole body were an eye, where would the hearing be?
If the whole body were hearing, where would the sense of smell be?
But as it is, God placed the parts,
each one of them, in the body as he intended.
If they were all one part, where would the body be?
But as it is, there are many parts, yet one body.
The eye cannot say to the hand, “I do not need you, “
nor again the head to the feet, “I do not need you.”
Indeed, the parts of the body that seem to be weaker
are all the more necessary,
and those parts of the body that we consider less honorable
we surround with greater honor,
and our less presentable parts are treated with greater propriety,
whereas our more presentable parts do not need this.
But God has so constructed the body
as to give greater honor to a part that is without it,
so that there may be no division in the body,
but that the parts may have the same concern for one another.
If one part suffers, all the parts suffer with it;
if one part is honored, all the parts share its joy.

Now you are Christ’s body, and individually parts of it.
Some people God has designated in the church
to be, first, apostles; second, prophets; third, teachers;
then, mighty deeds;
then gifts of healing, assistance, administration,
and varieties of tongues.
Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers?
Do all work mighty deeds? Do all have gifts of healing?
Do all speak in tongues? Do all interpret?

or 1 Cor 12:12-14, 27

Brothers and sisters:
As a body is one though it has many parts,
and all the parts of the body, though many, are one body,
so also Christ.
For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body,
whether Jews or Greeks, slaves or free persons,
and we were all given to drink of one Spirit.
Now the body is not a single part, but many.
You are Christ’s body, and individually parts of it.

Gospel Lk 1:1-4; 4:14-21

Since many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the events
that have been fulfilled among us,
just as those who were eyewitnesses from the beginning
and ministers of the word have handed them down to us,
I too have decided,
after investigating everything accurately anew,
to write it down in an orderly sequence for you,
most excellent Theophilus,
so that you may realize the certainty of the teachings
you have received.

Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit,
and news of him spread throughout the whole region.
He taught in their synagogues and was praised by all.

He came to Nazareth, where he had grown up,
and went according to his custom
into the synagogue on the sabbath day.
He stood up to read and was handed a scroll of the prophet Isaiah.
He unrolled the scroll and found the passage where it was written:
The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
because he has anointed me
to bring glad tidings to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives
and recovery of sight to the blind,
to let the oppressed go free,
and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.

Rolling up the scroll, he handed it back to the attendant and sat down,
and the eyes of all in the synagogue looked intently at him.
He said to them,
“Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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1 posted on 01/26/2013 8:41:36 PM PST by Salvation
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2 posted on 01/26/2013 8:44:42 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Nehemiah 8:1-4a, 5-6, 8-10

The Law is read out. The Feast of Tabernacles


[2] And Ezra the priest brought the law before the assembly, both men and wo-
men and all who could hear with understanding, on the first day of the seventh
month. [3] And he read from it facing the square before the Water Gate from ear-
ly morning until midday, in the presence of the man and the women and those
who could understand; and the ears of all the people were attentive to the book
of the law. [4] And Ezra the scribe stood on a wooden pulpit which they had
made for the purpose; [5] And Ezra opened the book in the sight of all the peo-
ple, for he was above all the people; and when he opened it all the people stood.
[6] And Ezra blessed the Lord, the great God; and all the people answered, “A-
men, Amen,” lifting up their hands; and they bowed their heads and worshipped
the Lord with their faces to the ground. [8] And they read from the book, from the
law of God, clearly, and they gave the sense, so that the people understood the
reading.

[9] And Nehemiah, who was the governor, and Ezra the priest and scribe, and
the Levites who taught the people said to all the people, “This day is holy to the
Lord your God; do not mourn or weep.” For all the people wept when they heard
the words of the law. [10] Then he said to them, “Go your way, eat the fat and
drink sweet wine and send portions to him for whom nothing is prepared; for this
day is holy to our Lord; and do not be grieved, for the joy of the Lord is your
strength.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

8:1-18 The text of this chapter forms part of the “memoirs of Ezra” which the
sacred writer has moved and positioned here in the account of the rebuilding of
the city. By doing so, he highlights the importance of the Law in the new stage
of the history of the chosen people (as the writer sees it, this stage begins with
the reconstruction of their national and religious life spearheaded by Ezra the
priest and Nehemiah the layman). We do not know the exact year when the e-
vents dealt with here occurred, nor the exact content of the Law proclaimed on
this occasion. It is possible that a substantial part of the present Pentateuch
was read out.

The reading and explanation of the Law did not take place inside the temple; the
people gathered around the stage specially set up in front of that building. From
the time of Solomon up to the fall of Jerusalem, religious activity centered on the
temple liturgy. From the exile onwards it was built around the Law by means of
the institution of the synagogue. Because they could not go up to the House of
the Lord, exiles used to meet in private houses or in the open air to listen to the
reading of legal and prophetical texts. The formal meeting described here, held
in a square beside the city wall, shows that in this new stage, with Ezra to the
fore, the Law of the Lord was coming to occupy pride of place in the religious life
of the people, and that it was already more important than the offering of victims
for the purpose of sacrifice.

When they hear the commandments of the Law read out, the people weep be-
cause they have not been keeping some of them and they are afraid that God
will punish them on that account. But Ezra and the Levites make them see that
what they have to do is to start again, on that day, for it is a “holy” day. It was
the festival day of the new civil year (cf. Lev 23:24-25; Num 29:1-6).

The proclamation of the Law seems to be linked to the celebration of the feast
of Booths (or Tents, or Tabernacles). That celebration was already (briefly) men-
tioned in Ezra 3:4-6, but there is a new element here (which must be due to Ez-
ra’s interpretation) – the fact that the booths are made with branches cut in the
hills (cf. Lev 23:39-43). No mention is made of the day of Atonement which was
celebrated on the tenth day of the same month (cf. Lev 23:26-32). During the se-
ven days of the feast of booths Ezra keeps reading out the Law as Deuteronomy
31:9-13 lays down must be done when the year is a sabbatical one. In these ac-
tions of Ezra and the Levites, the teachers of the Laws, we can see the origin of
what will become the “Great Assembly”, the official body which will, in the cen-
turies to come, interpret the Law and identify which books form part of the ca-
non. The reading of the books of the Law will from now on become the most im-
portant way of meeting God and listening to his word.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 01/26/2013 8:50:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: 1 Corinthians 12:12-14, 27-30

Unity and Variety in the Mystical Body of Christ


[12] For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members
of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ. [13] For by one
Spirit we were all baptized into one body — Jews or Greeks, slaves or free —
and all were made to drink of one Spirit.

[14] For the body does not consist of one member but of many. [15] If the foot
should say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body,” that would
not make it any less a part of the body. [16] And if the ear should say, “Because
I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body,” that would not make it any less a
part of the body. [17] If the whole body were an eye, where would be the hearing?
If the whole body were an ear, where would be the sense of smell? [18] But as it
is, God arranged the organs in the body, each one of them, as he chose. [19] If
all were a single organ, where would the body be? [20] As it is, there are many
parts, yet one body. [21] The eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of
you,” nor again the head to the feet, “I have no need of you.” [22] On the contra-
ry, the parts of the body which seem to be weaker are indispensable, [23] and
those parts of the body which we think less honorable we invest with the greater
honor, and our unpresentable parts are treated with greater modesty, [24] which
our more presentable parts do not require. But God has so composed the body,
giving the greater honor to the inferior part, [25] that there may be no discord in
the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another. [26] If
one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice to-
gether.

[27] Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it. [28] And God
has appointed in the church first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then
workers of miracles, then healers, helpers, administrators, speakers in various
kinds of tongues. [29] Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Do
all work miracles? [30] Do all possess gifts of healing? Do all speak with
tongues? Do all interpret?

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

12-13. In Greek and Latin literature, society is often compared to a body: even
today we talk of “corporations”, a term which conveys the idea that all the citi-
zens of a particular city are responsible for the common good. St Paul, starting
with this metaphor, adds two important features: 1) he identifies the Church with
Christ: “so it is with Christ” (v. 12); and 2) he says that the Holy Spirit is its life-
principle: “by one Spirit we were all baptized . . ., and all made to drink of the
Spirit” (v. 13). The Magisterium summarizes this teaching by defining the Church
as the “mystical body of Christ”, an expression which “is derived from and is, as
it were, the fair flower of the repeated teaching of Sacred Scripture and the holy
Fathers” (Pius XII, “Mystici Corporis”).

“So it is with Christ”: “One would have expected him to say, so it is with the
Church, but he does not say that [. . .]. For, just as the body and the head are
one man, so too Christ and the Church are one, and therefore instead of ‘the
Church’ he says ‘Christ”’ (Chrysostom, “Hom. on 1 Cor”, 30, “ad loc.”). This iden-
tification of the Church with Christ is much more than a mere metaphor; it makes
the Church a society which is radically different from any other society: “The com-
complete Christ is made up of the head and the body, as I am sure you know
well. The head is our Savior himself, who suffered under Pontius Pilate and now,
after rising from the dead, is seated at the right hand of the Father. And his body
is the Church. Not this or that church, but the Church which is to be found all over
the world. Nor is it only that which exists among us today, for also belonging to it
are those who lived before us and those who will live in the future, right up to the
end of the world. All this Church, made up of the assembly of the faithful — for all
the faithful are members of Christ—has Christ as its head, governing his body from
heaven. And although this head is located out of sight of the body, he is, however,
joined to it by love” (St Augustine, “Enarrationes In Psalmos”, 56, 1).

The Church’s remarkable unity derives from the Holy Spirit who not only assem-
bles the faithful into a society but also imbues and vivifies its members, exerci-
sing the same function as the soul does in a physical body: “In order that we
might be unceasingly renewed in him (cf. Eph 4:23), he has shared with us his
Spirit who, being one and the same in head and members, gives life to, unifies
and moves the whole body. Consequently, his work could be compared by the
Fathers to the function that the principle of life, the soul, fulfills in the human bo-
dy” (Vatican II, “Lumen Gentium”, 7).

“All were made to drink of one Spirit”: given that the Apostle says this immedia-
tely after mentioning Baptism, he seems to be referring to a further outpouring of
the Spirit, possibly in the sacrament of Confirmation. It is not uncommon for Sa-
cred Scripture to compare the outpouring of the Spirit to drink, indicating that the
effects of his presence are to revive the parched soul; in the Old Testament the
coming of the Holy Spirit is already compared to dew, rain etc.; and St John re-
peats what our Lord said about “living water” (Jn 7:38; cf. 4:13-14).

Together with the sacraments of Christian initiation, the Eucharist plays a spe-
cial role in building up the unity of the body of Christ. “Really sharing in the body
of the Lord in the breaking of the eucharistic bread, we are taken up into commu-
nion with him and with one another. ‘Because the bread is one, we, who are ma-
ny, are one body, for we all partake of the one bread’ (1 Cor 10:17). In this way
all of us are made members of his body (cf. 1 Cor 12:27), ‘and individual mem-
bers of one another’ (Rom 12:5)” (”Lumen Gentium”, 7).

14-27. The unity of the mystical body, which derives from a single life-principle,
the Holy Spirit, and tends towards a common same goal, that is, the building
up of the Church, means that all its members, whatever their position, have the
same basic dignity and the same importance. St Paul develops this thinking by
a very effective literary device: he personifies the members of the human body
and imagines the nobler members looking down on the lesser ones (vv. 21-24).
This serves to reaffirm the truth of v. 25: “that the members may have the same
care for one another”. The responsibility of each Christian derives from the very
essence of the vocation he or she receives at Baptism and Confirmation: “In the
Church there is a diversity of ministries,” St. Escriva explains, “but there is only
one aim — the sanctification of men. And in this task all Christians participate in
some way, through the character imprinted by the sacraments of Baptism and
Confirmation. We must all feel responsible for the mission of the Church, which
is the mission of Christ. He who does not have zeal for the salvation of souls, he
who does not strive with all his strength to make the name and the teaching of
Christ known and loved, will not understand the apostolicity of the Church.

“A passive Christian has failed to understand what Christ wants from all of us.
A Christian who ‘goes his own way’, unconcerned about the salvation of others,
does not love with the heart of Jesus. Apostolate is not a mission exclusive to
the hierarchy, or to priests and religious. The Lord calls all of us to be, by our
example and word, instruments of the stream of grace which springs up to eter-
nal life” (”In Love with the Church”, 15).

28-30. St Paul concludes this description of the different parts of the body by ap-
plying it to the Church, where variety of functions does not detract from unity. It
would be a serious mistake not to recognize in the visible structure of the Church,
which is so multifaceted, the fact that the Church founded by Christ is “one”, visi-
ble at the same time as it is spiritual. The Second Vatican Council puts this very
clearly: “But the society structured with hierarchical organs and the mystical bo-
dy of Christ, the visible society and the spiritual community, the earthly Church
and the Church endowed with heavenly riches, are not to be thought of as two
realities. On the contrary, they form one complex reality which comes together
from a human element and a divine element. For this reason the Church is com-
pared, not without significance, to the mystery of the incarnate Word. As the as-
sumed nature, inseparably united to Him, serves the divine Word as a living or-
gan of salvation, so, in a somewhat similar way, does the social structure of the
Church serve the Spirit of Christ who vivifies it, in the building up of the body (cf.
Eph 4:15)” “Lumen Gentium”, 8).

The Church is this way because that is the will of its founder, Jesus Christ: “The
Church is by divine will a hierarchical institution. The Second Vatican Council de-
scribes it as a ‘society structured with hierarchical organs’ (”Lumen Gentium”, 8)
in which ‘ministers are invested with a sacred power’ (”ibid., 18). The hierarchy is
not only compatible with freedom: it is at the service of the freedom of the chil-
dren of God (cf. Rom 8:21). [...] ‘Hierarchy’ means holy government and sacred
order. In no way does it imply a merely human arbitrary order or a subhuman
despotism. Our Lord established in the Church a hierarchical order which should
not degenerate into tyranny, because authority is as much a call to serve as is
obedience.

“In the Church there is equality, because once baptized we are all equal, all chil-
dren of the same God, our Father. There is no difference as Christians between
the Pope and someone who has just joined the Church. But this radical equality
does not mean that we can change the constitution of the Church in those things
that were established by Christ. By expressed divine will there are different func-
tions which imply different capacities, an indelible ‘character’ conferred on the sa-
cred ministers by the sacrament of Order. At the summit of this order is Peter’s
successors and with him, and under him, all the bishops with the triple mission
of sanctifying, governing and teaching” (St. J. Escriva, “In Love with the Church”,
30).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 01/26/2013 8:51:38 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 1:1-4; 4:14-21

Prologue


[1:1] Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things
which have been accomplished among us, [2] just as they were delivered to us
by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word,
[3] it seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time
past, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus, [4] that you
may know the truth concerning the things of which you have been informed.

[4:14] And Jesus returned in the power of the Holy Spirit into Galilee, and a re-
port concerning Him went out through all the surrounding country. [15] And He
taught in their synagogues, being glorified by all.

Jesus Preaches in Nazareth


[16] And He came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up; and He went to
the synagogue, as His custom was, on the Sabbath Day. And He stood up to
read; [17] and there was given to Him the book of the prophet Isaiah. He opened
the book and found the place where it was written, [18] “The Spirit of the Lord is
upon Me, because He has anointed Me to preach good news to the poor. He has
sent Me to proclaim release to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind,
to set at liberty those who are oppressed, [19] to proclaim the acceptable year
of the Lord.” [20] And He closed the book, and gave it back to the attendant,
and sat down; and the eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on Him. [21] And
He began to say to them, “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1-4. St. Luke is the only evangelist to give his book a preface or prologue. What
is usually described as the “prologue” to St. John is really a summary of what
the Gospel contains. St. Luke’s prologue, which is very short and very elegantly
written, describes why he has written the book—to provide an orderly, documen-
ted account of the life of Christ, starting at the beginning.

These verses help us realize that Jesus Christ’s message of salvation, the Gos-
pel, was preached before it came to be written down: cf. the quotation from Vati-
can II’s “Dei Verbum”, 19 (p. 21 above). God, then, wanted us to have written
Gospels as a permanent, divine testimony providing a firm basis for our faith. “He
does not tell Theophilus new things, things he did not previously know; he under-
takes to tell him the truth concerning the things in which he has already been in-
structed. This he does so that you can know everything you have been told about
the Lord and His doings” (St. Bede, “In Lucae Evangelium Expositio, in loc.”).

2. The “eyewitnesses” the evangelist refers to would have been the Blessed Vir-
gin, the Apostles, the holy women and others who shared Jesus’ life during His
time on earth.

3. “It seemed good to me”: “When he says ‘it seemed good to me’ this does not
exclude God’s action, because it is God who prepares men’s will [...] . He dedi-
cates his Gospel to Theophilus, that is, to one whom God loves. But if you love
God, it has also been written for you; and if it has been written for you, then ac-
cept this present from the evangelist, keep this token of friendship very close to
your heart” (St. Ambrose, “Expositio Evangelii Sec. Lucam, in loc.”).

16-30. For the Jews the Sabbath was a day of rest and prayer, as God comman-
ded (Exodus 20:8-11). On that day they would gather together to be instructed
in Sacred Scripture. At the beginning of this meeting they all recited the “Shema”,
a summary of the precepts of the Lord, and the “eighteen blessings”. Then a
passage was read from the Book of the Law—the Pentateuch—and another from
the Prophets. The president invited one of those present who was well versed in
the Scriptures to address the gathering. Sometimes someone would volunteer
and request the honor of being allowed to give this address—as must have hap-
pened on this occasion. Jesus avails Himself of this opportunity to instruct the
people (cf. Luke 4:16ff), as will His Apostles later on (cf. Acts 13:5, 14, 42, 44;
14:1; etc.). The Sabbath meeting concluded with the priestly blessing, recited
by the president or by a priest if there was one present, to which the people
answered “Amen” (cf. Numbers 6:22ff).

18-21. Jesus read the passage from Isaiah 61:1-2 where the prophet announces
the coming of the Lord, who will free His people of their afflictions. In Christ this
prophecy finds its fulfillment, for He is the Anointed, the Messiah whom God has
sent to His people in their tribulation. Jesus has been anointed by the Holy Spirit
for the mission the Father has entrusted to Him. “These phrases, according to
Luke (verses 18-19), are His first messianic declaration. They are followed by the
actions and words known through the Gospel. By these actions and words Christ
makes the Father present among men” (John Paul II, “Dives In Misericordia”, 3).

The promises proclaimed in verses 18 and 19 are the blessings God will send
His people through the Messiah. According to Old Testament tradition and
Jesus’ own preaching (cf. note on Matthew 5:3), “the poor” refers not so much to
a particular social condition as to a very religious attitude of indigence and humi-
lity towards God, which is to be found in those who, instead of relying on their
possessions and merits, trust in God’s goodness and mercy. Thus, preaching
good news to the poor means bringing them the “good news” that God has taken
pity on them. Similarly, the Redemption, the release, which the text mentions, is
to be understood mainly in a spiritual, transcendental sense: Christ has come to
free us from the blindness and oppression of sin, which, in the last analysis, is
slavery imposed on us by the devil. “Captivity can be felt”, St. John Chrysostom
teaches in a commentary on Psalm 126, “when it proceeds from physical ene-
mies, but the spiritual captivity referred to here is worse; sin exerts a more severe
tyranny, evil takes control and blinds those who lend it obedience; from this spiri-
tual prison Jesus Christ rescued us” (”Catena Aurea”). However, this passage is
also in line with Jesus’ special concern for those most in need. “Similarly, the
Church encompasses with her love all those who are afflicted by human misery
and she recognizes in those who are poor and who suffer the image of her poor
and suffering Founder. She does all in her power to relieve their need and in them
she strives to serve Christ” (Vatican II, “Lumen Gentium”, 8).

18-19. The words of Isaiah which Christ read out on this occasion describe very
graphically the reason why God has sent His Son into the world — to redeem
men from sin, to liberate them from slavery to the devil and from eternal death. It
is true that in the course of His public ministry Christ, in His mercy, worked ma-
ny cures, cast out devils, etc. But He did not cure all the sick people in the world,
nor did He eliminate all forms of distress in this life, because pain, which entered
the world through sin, has a permanent redemptive value when associated with
the sufferings of Christ. Therefore, Christ worked miracles not so much to release
the people concerned from suffering, as to demonstrate that He had a God-given
mission to bring everyone to eternal salvation.

The Church carries on this mission of Christ: “Go therefore and make disciples
of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the
Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I
am with you always, to the close of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20). These simple
and sublime words, which conclude the Gospel of St. Matthew, point out “the ob-
ligation to preach the truths of faith, the need for sacramental life, the promise of
Christ’s continual assistance to His Church. You cannot be faithful to our Lord if
you neglect these supernatural demands—to receive instruction in Christian faith
and morality and to frequent the sacraments. It is with this mandate that Christ
founded His Church [...] . And the Church can bring salvation to souls only if she
remains faithful to Christ in her constitution and teaching, both dogmatic and mo-
ral.

“Let us reject, therefore, the suggestion that the Church, ignoring the Sermon
on the Mount, seeks a purely human happiness on earth, since we know that her
only task is to bring men to eternal glory in Heaven. Let us reject any purely na-
turalistic view that fails to value the supernatural role of divine grace. Let us reject
materialistic opinions that exclude spiritual values from human life. Let us equally
reject any secularizing theory which attempts to equate the aims of the Church
with those of earthly states, distorting its essence, institutions and activities into
something similar to those of temporal society” (St. J. Escriva, “In Love with the
Church”, 23 and 31).

18. The Fathers of the Church see in this verse a reference to the three persons
of the Holy Trinity: the Spirit (the Holy Spirit) of the Lord (the Father) is upon Me
(the Son); cf. Origen, “Homily 32”. The Holy Spirit dwelt in Christ’s soul from the
very moment of the Incarnation and descended visibly upon Him in the form of a
dove when He was baptized by John (cf. Luke 3:21-22).

“Because He has anointed Me”: this is a reference to the anointing Jesus re-
ceived at the moment of His Incarnation, principally through the grace of the hypo-
static union. “This anointing of Jesus Christ was not an anointing of the body as in
the case of the ancient kings, priests and prophets; rather it was entirely spiritual
and divine, because the fullness of the Godhead dwells in Him substantially” (”St.
Pius X Catechism”, 77). From this hypostatic union the fullness of all graces de-
rives. To show this, Jesus Christ is said to have been anointed by the Holy Spirit
Himself—not just to have received the graces and gifts of the Spirit, like the saints.

19. “The acceptable year”: this is a reference to the jubilee year of the Jews,
which the Law of God (Leviticus 25:8) lays down as occurring every fifty years,
symbolizing the era of redemption and liberation which the Messiah would usher
in. The era inaugurated by Christ, the era of the New Law extending to the end of
the world, is “the acceptable year”, the time of mercy and redemption, which will
be obtained definitively in Heaven.

The Catholic Church’s custom of the “Holy Year” is also designed to proclaim
and remind people of the redemption brought by Christ, and of the full form it will
take in the future life.

20-22. Christ’s words in verse 21 show us the authenticity with which He
preached and explained the Scriptures: “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in
your hearing.” Jesus teaches that this prophecy, like the other main prophecies
in the Old Testament, refers to Him and finds its fulfillment in Him (cf. Luke 24:
44ff). Thus, the Old Testament can be rightly understood only in the light of the
New — as the risen Christ showed the Apostles when He opened their minds to
understand the Scriptures (cf. Luke 24:45), an understanding which the Holy
Spirit perfected on the day of Pentecost (cf. Acts 2:4).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 01/26/2013 8:58:24 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Nehemiah 8:2-6,8-10 ©
Ezra the priest brought the Law before the assembly, consisting of men, women, and children old enough to understand. This was the first day of the seventh month. On the square before the Water Gate, in the presence of the men and women, and children old enough to understand, he read from the book from early morning till noon; all the people listened attentively to the Book of the Law.
  Ezra the scribe stood on a wooden dais erected for the purpose. In full view of all the people – since he stood higher than all the people – Ezra opened the book; and when he opened it all the people stood up. Then Ezra blessed the Lord, the great God, and all the people raised their hands and answered, ‘Amen! Amen!’; then they bowed down and, face to the ground, prostrated themselves before the Lord. And Ezra read from the Law of God, translating and giving the sense, so that the people understood what was read.
  Then Nehemiah – His Excellency – and Ezra, priest and scribe and the Levites who were instructing the people said to all the people, ‘This day is sacred to the Lord your God. Do not be mournful, do not weep.’ For the people were all in tears as they listened to the words of the Law.
  He then said, ‘Go, eat the fat, drink the sweet wine, and send a portion to the man who has nothing prepared ready. For this day is sacred to our Lord. Do not be sad: the joy of the Lord is your stronghold.’

Psalm Psalm 18:8-10,15 ©
Your words are spirit, Lord, and they are life.
The law of the Lord is perfect,
  it revives the soul.
The rule of the Lord is to be trusted,
  it gives wisdom to the simple.
Your words are spirit, Lord, and they are life.
The precepts of the Lord are right,
  they gladden the heart.
The command of the Lord is clear,
  it gives light to the eyes.
Your words are spirit, Lord, and they are life.
The fear of the Lord is holy,
  abiding for ever.
The decrees of the Lord are truth
  and all of them just.
Your words are spirit, Lord, and they are life.
May the spoken words of my mouth,
  the thoughts of my heart,
win favour in your sight, O Lord,
  my rescuer, my rock!
Your words are spirit, Lord, and they are life.
EITHER:
Second reading 1 Corinthians 12:12-30 ©
Just as a human body, though it is made up of many parts, is a single unit because all these parts, though many, make one body, so it is with Christ. In the one Spirit we were all baptised, Jews as well as Greeks, slaves as well as citizens, and one Spirit was given to us all to drink.
  Nor is the body to be identified with any one of its many parts. If the foot were to say, ‘I am not a hand and so I do not belong to the body’, would that mean that it stopped being part of the body? If the ear were to say, ‘I am not an eye, and so I do not belong to the body’, would that mean that it was not a part of the body? If your whole body was just one eye, how would you hear anything? If it was just one ear, how would you smell anything?
  Instead of that, God put all the separate parts into the body on purpose. If all the parts were the same, how could it be a body? As it is, the parts are many but the body is one. The eye cannot say to the hand, ‘I do not need you’, nor can the head say to the feet, ‘I do not need you.’
  What is more, it is precisely the parts of the body that seem to be the weakest which are the indispensable ones; and it is the least honourable parts of the body that we clothe with the greatest care. So our more improper parts get decorated in a way that our more proper parts do not need. God has arranged the body so that more dignity is given to the parts which are without it, and that there may not be disagreements inside the body, but that each part may be equally concerned for all the others. If one part is hurt, all parts are hurt with it. If one part is given special honour, all parts enjoy it.
  Now you together are Christ’s body; but each of you is a different part of it. In the Church, God has given the first place to apostles, the second to prophets, the third to teachers; after them, miracles, and after them the gift of healing; helpers, good leaders, those with many languages. Are all of them apostles, or all of them prophets, or all of them teachers? Do they all have the gift of miracles, or all have the gift of healing? Do all speak strange languages, and all interpret them?
OR:
Second reading 1 Corinthians 12:12-14,27 ©
Just as a human body, though it is made up of many parts, is a single unit because all these parts, though many, make one body, so it is with Christ. In the one Spirit we were all baptised, Jews as well as Greeks, slaves as well as citizens, and one Spirit was given to us all to drink.
  Nor is the body to be identified with any one of its many parts. Now you together are Christ’s body; but each of you is a different part of it.

Gospel Acclamation Lk4:18
Alleluia, alleluia!
The Lord has sent me to bring the good news to the poor,
to proclaim liberty to captives.
Alleluia!

Gospel Luke 1:1-4,4:14-21 ©
Seeing that many others have undertaken to draw up accounts of the events that have taken place among us, exactly as these were handed down to us by those who from the outset were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word, I in my turn, after carefully going over the whole story from the beginning, have decided to write an ordered account for you, Theophilus, so that your Excellency may learn how well founded the teaching is that you have received.
  Jesus, with the power of the Spirit in him, returned to Galilee; and his reputation spread throughout the countryside. He taught in their synagogues and everyone praised him.
  He came to Nazara, where he had been brought up, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day as he usually did. He stood up to read and they handed him the scroll of the prophet Isaiah. Unrolling the scroll he found the place where it is written:
The spirit of the Lord has been given to me,
for he has anointed me.
He has sent me to bring the good news to the poor,
to proclaim liberty to captives
and to the blind new sight,
to set the downtrodden free,
to proclaim the Lord’s year of favour.
He then rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the assistant and sat down. And all eyes in the synagogue were fixed on him. Then he began to speak to them, ‘This text is being fulfilled today even as you listen.’

6 posted on 01/26/2013 9:01:33 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray with Pope Benedict

Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 01/26/2013 9:03:26 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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  PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION

 


Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen

8 posted on 01/26/2013 9:04:36 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 01/26/2013 9:05:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
10 posted on 01/26/2013 9:06:42 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
11 posted on 01/26/2013 9:07:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


12 posted on 01/26/2013 9:08:17 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


13 posted on 01/26/2013 9:17:47 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

14 posted on 01/26/2013 9:18:36 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


15 posted on 01/26/2013 9:20:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Feast of
the Holy Name of Jesus


Luke 2:21 "...Et vocatum est Nomen eius IESUS"
("And His Name was called JESUS")

Psalm 90:14 "Because he hoped in me I will deliver him:
I will protect him because he hath known My Name."

Zacharias 10:12 "I will strengthen them in the Lord,
and they shall walk in His Name, saith the Lord."

Apocalypse 3:8 "I know thy works. Behold, I have given before thee a door opened, which no man can shut: because thou hast a little strength, and hast kept my word, and hast not denied My Name."

Apocalypse 15:4 "Who shall not fear Thee, O Lord, and magnify Thy Name?..."

 

Blessed be the most holy Name of Jesus without end!



January Devotion: The Holy Name of Jesus

The month of January is traditionally dedicated to the Holy Name of Jesus. This feast is also celebrated on January 3. Here is an explanation of the devotion.

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has associated entire months to special devotions. The devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus has been traditionally associated with the month of January, due to its celebration on January 3. The name Jesus was given to the Holy Child at God's command (Luke 1:31). The Holy Name is all-powerful because of the Person who bears it; we honor it because of the command of Christ, that we should pray in His Name and because it reminds us of all the blessings we receive through our Holy Redeemer. Hence St. Paul was able to write to the Philippians: ". . . at the name of Jesus every knee should bend of those in heaven, on earth, and under the earth" (Phil. 2:10). By means of this devotion we also make amends for improper use of the Holy Name.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Prayer/Hymn in Honor of the Most Holy Name of Jesus - Iesu, Dulcis Memoria

Iesu, Dulcis Memoria is a celebrated 12th century hymn attributed to St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153), Doctor Mellifluus. The entire hymn has some 42 to 53 stanzas depending upon the manuscript. Parts of this hymn were used for the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus, which was formerly celebrated on the Sunday between the Circumcision and Epiphany, or failing such a Sunday, on January 2. The part below was used at Vespers. In the liturgical revisions of Vatican II, the feast was deleted, though a votive Mass to the Holy Name of Jesus had been retained for devotional use. With the release of the revised Roman Missal in March 2002, the feast was restored as an optional memorial on January 3.

Jesus, the very thought of Thee
With sweetness fills the breast!
Yet sweeter far Thy face to see
And in Thy presence rest.

No voice can sing, no heart can frame,
Nor can the memory find,
A sweeter sound than Jesus' name,
The Savior of mankind.

O hope of every contrite heart!
0 joy of all the meek!
To those who fall, how kind Thou art!
How good to those who seek!

But what to those who find? Ah! this
Nor tongue nor pen can show
The love of Jesus, what it is,
None but His loved ones know.

Jesus! our only hope be Thou,
As Thou our prize shalt be;
In Thee be all our glory now,
And through eternity. Amen.

---Roman Breviary

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

O Divine Jesus, Thou hast promised that anything we ask of the Eternal Father in Thy name shall be granted.

O Eternal Father. In the name of Jesus, for the love of Jesus, in fulfillment of this promise, and because Jesus has said it, grant us our petitions for the sake of Jesus, Thy Divine Son. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954


That at the name of Jesus every knee should bend, of those that are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
 
Phil:2:10-11
 

 
 
What does IHS stand for? The meaning of the Holy Name of Jesus [Catholic Caucus]

Litany Of The Holy Name of Jesus
Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus
Jesus, The Name above all Names
Devotion to the Holy Name (of Jesus) [Catholic Caucus]
Lessons In Iconography : The Chi Rho - Christ
St. Francis de Sales on the Most Holy Name of Jesus (Excerpt from a Sermon) (Catholic Caucus)
St. Francis de Sales on the Most Holy Name of Jesus (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

St. Bernard on the Most Holy Name of Jesus [Ecumenical]
Saving the day in His Holy Name: St. Genevieve gets a reprieve [Catholic Caucus]
The Holy Name of Jesus
Holy Name of Jesus [San Bernadino of Siena] Ecumenical
The Holy Name of Jesus
Devotion to the Holy Name [of Jesus]
The Name of Jesus: Its Power in Our Lives
The Holy Name of Jesus
Devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus
The Holy Name of Jesus

16 posted on 01/26/2013 9:21:58 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

JANUARY, 2013, Intentions of the Holy Father

The Faith of Christians. That in this Year of Faith Christians may deepen their knowledge of the mystery of Christ and witness joyfully to the gift of faith in him.

Middle Eastern Christians. That the Christian communities of the Middle East, often discriminated against, may receive from the Holy Spirit the strength of fidelity and perseverance.


17 posted on 01/26/2013 9:23:20 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY LK 1:1-4; 4:14-21
Hearth, home and holiness

Fr. Paul Scalia

The ancient Romans prized the virtue of piety — that simple devotion to one’s family, country and gods, to all that bestows and shapes one’s life. The poet Virgil knew this and repeatedly described Aeneas, Rome’s legendary founder, as pious. This sturdy virtue served Rome well and provided the basis for a nation that would shape the world for centuries.

At the Incarnation, God takes on the virtue of piety. For the pagans the pious man was devoted to the gods. For Christians, God Himself is pious — devoted to His mother, family, town and country, to the religion, customs, and traditions of His people. Jesus is both the Lord of Israel and her devoted Son. The “Te Deum” praises Jesus, saying, “You did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.” Nor did He spurn Mary’s modest home, Joseph’s workshop, Nazareth, Galilee or even the troublesome, backward Galileans.

We see Our Lord’s piety especially in His 30 years of “hidden life” with Joseph and Mary. But He did not set aside this virtue when He began His public life. After His manifestation at the Jordan and His victory over the devil in the desert, we would think He was ready for the big time — for Jerusalem, and then perhaps Athens, and Rome and then. … But no. “Jesus returned to Galilee … to Nazareth, where he had grown up” (Lk 4:14, 16). He willed to begin the work of salvation in His hometown, in the old neighborhood, in the synagogue, that old familiar building He visited every Sabbath, “according to His custom” (Lk 4:16).

Christ teaches us what it means to be human — and then divine. And so it is with the virtue of piety. He has taken this earthy, sturdy, unsophisticated quality and made it His own. In so doing He teaches us its importance and gives it eternal value. In our work of sanctification we should not consider piety beyond us. As we strive for the higher virtues, we do not spurn this humble one. Devotion to God as Father and the church as mother come more easily for those who first have piety toward Mom and Dad. “Charity begins at home,” the saying goes. Indeed it does, because incarnate love Himself began at home. So must we.

Unfortunately, the American mindset of “striking out on your own” can work against piety. Instead of being devoted to kith and kin we grow tired of them and of all things familiar. We see them as things to depart from and leave behind as we “make it big.” Our technology and media detach us even more. We give less attention to where we are and with whom than we do to some event or person miles away. A culture that uses the absurd phrase “virtual community” will not have the virtue of piety but only virtual piety.

Good old George Bailey proclaimed, “I'm shakin’ the dust of this crummy little town off my feet and I’m gonna see the world!” He learned his lesson eventually. Our Lord, however, never had such a desire. He loved His family and town. He chose fellow Galileans as His apostles. He did not shake the dust of His little town off His feet but brought it with Him. He went up to Jerusalem not to “make it big” but to complete the humble work — and the work of humility — begun in Nazareth. May we likewise devote ourselves to the simplicity of those household goods — of hearth and home — that we may in turn find a dwelling in God’s house.

Fr. Scalia is pastor of St. John the Beloved Parish in McLean.


18 posted on 01/27/2013 7:36:40 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me. Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year C

 -  3rd Sunday in ordinary time

The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me.

The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me. Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Luke 1:1-4 4:14-21

1 Since many have undertaken to set down an orderly account of the events that have been fulfilled among us,
2 just as they were handed on to us by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and servants of the word,
3 I too decided, after investigating everything carefully from the very first, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus,
4 so that you may know the truth concerning the things about which you have been instructed.
Luke 4:14-21 Then Jesus, filled with the power of the Spirit, returned to Galilee, and a report about him spread through all the surrounding country.
15 He began to teach in their synagogues and was praised by everyone.
16 When he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, he went to the synagogue on the sabbath day, as was his custom. He stood up to read,
17 and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written:
18 "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free,
19 to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor."
20 And he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant, and sat down. The eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him.
21 Then he began to say to them, "Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing." (NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

3rd  Sunday in ordinary time - The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me. After my Baptism I returned to Galilee filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. I went to the temple on the Sabbath and started to read from the scroll of the prophet Isaiah. At the end I told them that the passage of Scripture was fulfilled as I read it.

“The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because He has anointed me.”
In Baptism I received the fullness of the Holy Spirit, I had the power, the wisdom and the love of God in me. I was the God Man empowered to carry out the work of Salvation.

I came to announce the Good News; that the Kingdom of Heaven is very near to those who repent. I came to free the captives of sin by making my Mercy available to all sinners who acknowledge their guilt and ask for pardon. I came to heal the sick not only in their bodies but also in their souls. I came to open the eyes of the blind not just physically but spiritually, to bring them from darkness into the light. I came to free those oppressed by the evil one, those who are totally lost except for my intervention. I came to proclaim the goodness, the mercy and the grace of God.

I came to change the world for good. I am still here to transform the hearts of all those who listen to my word and believe that I am the same: yesterday, today and forever. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end of every thing, the One with the power to save what is lost, to give life to what is dead, the One who paid the ransom for your Salvation.

I am the Lord your God, I am Spirit. I have come to offer you my Holy Spirit so that you partake of my gifts, that you may open your eyes and see what I am offering you. I give you everything in proportion to your faith. You see it is by believing in me that you acknowledge who I am. It is by trusting in me, that you come to enjoy the physical and spiritual healing that I give. My miracles are still available to the believers. I am the Son of God, the only way to Him, sent to give testimony of His Power, Wisdom and Love.

Everyone who is baptised is anointed with the Holy Spirit, he is a living temple of the Presence of God, he is invited to grow in the faith, to achieve knowledge of God and to become like Him.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


19 posted on 01/27/2013 7:40:55 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Archdiocese of Washington

On The Wonder of The Word of God – A Homily for the Third Sunday of the Year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

The Gospel for this Sunday is continued next week and so perhaps we can await an analysis of it until then. The First reading from Nehemiah 8 is a wonderful meditation on the glory and wonder of the Word of God and it deserves our attention.

The background of the text is that Israel, in 587 BC had been conquered by the Babylonians and the survivors of that war were led into exile in Babylon. After 80 years the Persians conquered the Babylonians and Cyrus, King of Persia, permitted the Jews to return to the Promised Land. Sadly, only a small number chose to return and rebuild the ruined land and city. Among them was Nehemiah, a Royal official and Jew who led the small band back and oversaw the rebuilding of Jerusalem.

He. along with Ezra, the priest, also led a spiritual renewal which was spurred on not only by the purification of exile, but also by the rediscovery of certain “lost” or forgotten sacred Books. On one occasion the people gathered to hear the proclamation of one of the lost books and that is where we pick up the text today.

I. HUNGER for the Word of God - The text says, And all the people gathered as one man into the square before the Water Gate; and they told Ezra the scribe to bring the book of the law of Moses which the LORD had given to Israel.

Note then that the people are hungry for the Word of God. They have gathered and now make the unified request (as one man) that the Book of the Law be brought and proclaimed to them.

The likely “book” referred to here is the Book of Deuteronomy. It would seem that the book had either been “lost” or at least severely neglected in the preaching of the time prior to the Babylonian exile of Israel. In Deuteronomy was contained not only a development of the Law but also a list of blessings for following it, and also of grave warnings for not following it. After the painful experience of exile the people gathered (as we shall see) are aware that, had they heard and heeded Deuteronomy, they could have avoided the terrible events of the Babylonian conquest and captivity of Israel.

So now, chastised and sober they are hungry for this Word from God. As the Book of Psalms says, Before I was afflicted I went astray, but now I obey your word (Psalm 119:67).

Are you hungry for the Word of God? More than for money? More than for bodily food? Scripture says,

  1. Psalm 19:9 the ordinances of the LORD are true, and righteous altogether. More to be desired are they than gold, even much fine gold; sweeter also than honey and drippings of the honeycomb.
  2. Deut 8:3 Man does not live by bread alone, but that man lives by everything that proceeds out of the mouth of the LORD.
  3. Job 23:12 – I have esteemed the words of his mouth more than my necessary food.
  4. Ps 119:162 I rejoice at thy word like one who finds great spoil.

Are we hungry for the Word like this? Well, we won’t miss a meal for our bodies, but we’ll go days without the Word. Our bodies gain weight and obesity is pandemic in our culture. But our souls too easily languish and endure famine from the Word of God and the Sacrament of Holy Communion.

E.Are you hungry for his Word? An old song says, More about Jesus in his word, holding communion with my Lord, hearing his voice in every line, making each faithful saying mine. More more about Jesus, more of his saving fulness see more of his love who died for me.

II. HEARING of the Word of God - The text says, And Ezra the priest brought the law before the assembly, both men and women and all who could hear with understanding, on the first day of the seventh month. And he read from it facing the square before the Water Gate from early morning until midday, in the presence of the men and the women and those who could understand; and the ears of all the people were attentive to the book of the law. And Ezra the scribe stood on a wooden pulpit which they had made for the purpose

Notice two things here:

ASSEMBLY – There is a communal dimension to the celebration of God’s word here. It’s not just a private celebration or reading. And while their is today in a more literate culture the possibility to read the Scriptures alone, we cannot neglect to gather with the Church and be taught the Word of God by others, especially the clergy who are trained and anointed unto this task. Scripture says,  And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near (Heb 10:24). Too many think that all they need is the Bible alone. But notice the proclamation of the Word is communal here. We’ll develop more of this is a future verse.

AMOUNT of time – The text says that the proclamation and explanation of this Word took place from “morning to mid-day!” This is no “say it in seven minutes sermon.” This is an extended time spent studying, praying and hearing the word of God. Many today consider a Mass that runs longer than 45 minutes to be counter-productive. Funny how we get thrilled when a three hour football game goes into overtime, but we complain when a sermon is longer than the regular time. We find so much time for other things, and our attention span is for them is long, and so little time for the Word of God and such impatience that the reflection be over sooner rather than later. Yes, we find time for everything else. Blame the preacher, and we may deserve it. But there’s usually more to the picture than just the preacher. Note what comes next.

III. HONOR for the Word of God - The text says, And Ezra opened the book in the sight of all the people, for he was above all the people; and when he opened it all the people stood. And Ezra blessed the LORD, the great God; and all the people answered, “Amen, Amen,” lifting up their hands; and they bowed their heads and worshiped the LORD with their faces to the ground.

One will note here a remarkable honor given the word through active listening. While it is true that many today, especially in the more traditional Catholic fashion see silent and passive listening as the proper, pious and respectful demeanor for the readings and sermon, this is not the cultural setting described here. Neither is this quiet demeanor the ubiquitous norm in the Church today. It is not a question of which is right or wrong, but of whether the Word of God is being honored.

Thus note that the listeners here that morning 2,500 years ago: Stood, said “Amen, Amen!” Lifted up their hands, and even prostrated themselves on the ground while the word was read. They are engaged in active listening, giving the Word undivided attention and interacting with its sounds as it resonates in their being. This is a listening that is attentive, reflective and responsive, a hearing with thoughtful attention.

Again it will be granted there are different cultural expression of attentiveness,  but you can tell a lot by looking at peoples faces. But even in cultures that exhibit a prayer silence it will be noted that these same people get excited at the football game and even jump to their feet. So excitement and exuberant joy are not unknown even in cultures where religious reserve in the norm. Thus one would hope to rule out, even among the more reserved, that such reservation is a mere boredom. We want to be sure that we are simply dealing with sour-faced saints, bored believers, distracted disciples, or merely cold Christians. Thus, while reverence is expressed by many with prayerful and attentive silence, we want to be sure it is not simply the face of the “frozen chosen.”

And for those who are more demonstrative, we also want to be sure it is not a mere formulaic recitations of “amens” etc. or a sort of ego-centric, theatrical acting. Neither should one simply seek to exalt the preacher or the pew just in order to get everyone pumped up. The “amen-corner,” where it exists should be sincere.

The key point is to honor the word of God either by reverent silence or exuberant response. But in no way should the Word of God leave one bored and unmoved.

IV. HELP unto the Word of God -  The text says, The Levites also, helped the people to understand the law, while the people remained in their places. And they read from the book, from the law of God, clearly; and they gave the sense, so that the people understood the reading.

So, the Word is not alone. It is explained and interpreted. We need the Church to properly understand the Word of God, to have it authentically interpreted. And while devotional reading is to be encouraged, the Word of God is not meant to be read apart from the Church. As the Protestant experiment has shown, an attempt to have the Scriptures without the Church and Magisterium from whence the Holy Spirit uttered them, is to usher in a disastrous and never-ending division. And this truth is expressed well in the story about the Ethiopian official:  So Philip ran to him, and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet, and asked, “Do you understand what you are reading?” And he said, “How can I, unless some one guides me?” And he invited Philip to come up and sit with him. (Acts 8:30)

And thus the authoritative preachers of God’s word, the Bishops priests and deacons, have the task to read, analyze, organize, illustrate and apply the Word of God in the liturgical setting.

Beyond the need for authoritative teachers, there is also the pastoral assistance provided by others in the task of proclaiming the Word of God. In my own community there are excellent lectors who often read the word with such power and inflection that I hear it as I have never heard it before. Further I have a wonderful choir that often sings songs and passages rooted in the Scripture and I come to know it as never before. It’s really pressed to my heart. The congregation too, by its vivid response to the proclaimed word and the preached Words also brings forth insight and makes the Word of God an experienced reality.

V. HEARTFELT reaction to the Word of God – The text says, And Nehemiah, who was the governor, and Ezra the priest and scribe, and the Levites who taught the people said to all the people, “This day is holy to the LORD your God; do not mourn or weep.” For all the people wept when they heard the words of the law. Then he said to them, “Go your way, eat the fat and drink sweet wine and send portions to him for whom nothing is prepared; for this day is holy to our Lord; and do not be grieved, for the joy of the LORD is your strength.” So the Levites stilled all the people, saying, “Be quiet, for this day is holy; do not be grieved.”

Note how moved they are at what is proclaimed, they weep. And their weeping is born on the fact that they realize what their past stubbornness has gotten them and how it brought disaster, decline and exile. Had they but heard and heeded God’s Law this terrible period of Israel’s history could have been avoided.

True listening to the word of God and the desired outcome of preaching it is to bring for a response. The word of God is not only inform, its purpose is to transform. It might make you mad, sad or glad, but if you are listening to the authentic Word of God, you cannot remained unmoved. Scripture says,

For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and spirit, of joints and marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And before him no creature is hidden, but all are open and laid bare to the eyes of him with whom we have to do (Heb 4:12).

VI. Heeding of the Word of God - The text that extends beyond what the lectionary appoints to today, goes on to say: On the second day the heads of fathers’ houses of all the people, with the priests and the Levites, came together to Ezra the scribe in order to study the words of the law. And they found it written in the law that the LORD had commanded by Moses that the people of Israel should dwell in booths during the feast of the seventh month, and that they should publish and proclaim in all their towns and in Jerusalem, “Go out to the hills and bring branches of olive, wild olive, myrtle, palm, and other leafy trees to make booths, as it is written.” So the people went out and brought them and made booths for themselves, each on his roof, and in their courts and in the courts of the house of God, and in the square at the Water Gate and in the square at the Gate of Ephraim. And all the assembly of those who had returned from the captivity made booths and dwelt in the booths; for from the days of Jeshua the son of Nun to that day the people of Israel had not done so. And there was very great rejoicing. And day by day, from the first day to the last day, he read from the book of the law of God. They kept the feast seven days; and on the eighth day there was a solemn assembly, according to the ordinance.

Thus, among the things they discovered is that Israel had not been celebrating an important and appointed feast day, the Feast of Tabernacles (or Booths) which, while a harvest festival, was also a celebration that acknowledged the gift of the Law on Mt. Sinai. That’s a pretty symbolic thing that they had stopped celebrating that particular feast. And thus the leaders, having studied the Word of God reestablish it and command the people to observe it carefully. In this is illustrated a heeding of the Word of God.

So, notice all the respect we’ve seen for the word of God: they hungered for it, heard it, honored it, helped in it proclamation, and had a heartfelt reaction. But here’s where the real honor is given, for now they HEED it. There’s a lot of “lip service” to the word of God, a lot of praise, some even shout “Amen” in Church. But the real acid test is if we heed the Word. And old spiritual says,  Some go to Church for to sing and shout. Before six months they’s all turned out. Another says,  Some seek God don’t seek him right, they fool all day and pray at night.

We are warned of the danger of failing to heed:

  1. Mat 7:26 And every one that hears these sayings of mine, and does them not, shall be likened unto a foolish man, who built his house upon the sand: And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it.
  2. Luke 12:47 And that servant who knew his master’s will, but did not make ready or act according to his will, shall receive a severe beating. But he who did not know, and did what deserved a beating, shall receive a light beating. Every one to whom much is given, of him will much be required; and of him to whom men commit much they will demand the more.
  3. John 5:25 An hour is coming, has indeed come, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God, and those who have heeded it shall live

There is wonder in the Word of God, But only if we heed it.


20 posted on 01/27/2013 7:48:33 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Gospel Refections

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Nehemia 8:2-4,5-6,8-10 II: 1Cor 12:12-30
Gospel
Luke 1:1-4,4:14-21

1 Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things which have been accomplished among us,
2 just as they were delivered to us by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word,
3 it seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time past, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent The-oph'ilus,
4 that you may know the truth concerning the things of which you have been informed.
4:14 And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee, and a report concerning him went out through all the surrounding country.
15 And he taught in their synagogues, being glorified by all.
16 And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up; and he went to the synagogue, as his custom was, on the sabbath day. And he stood up to read;
17 and there was given to him the book of the prophet Isaiah. He opened the book and found the place where it was written,
18 "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed,
19 to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord."
20 And he closed the book, and gave it back to the attendant, and sat down; and the eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him.
21 And he began to say to them, "Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing."


Interesting Details
  • (v.14) "in the power of the Spirit". Luke prepares his readers to appreciate that the passage from Isaiah in verse 18 applies to Jesus ("The Spirit of the Lord is upon me...").
  • (v.15) The synagogue was the real center of religious life in Israel. The law at that time was that wherever there were ten Jewish families there must be a synagogue. The synagogue service has three parts:
    a. The worship part, where a prayer is offered.
    b. The readings of the scriptures by members of the congregation. It is likely that Jesus' reading is by pre-arrangement.
    c. The teaching part, whereby a distinguished person in the congregation is invited to speak, followed by a discussion.
  • (v. 18) Jesus is the Spirit-bearer foretold in this Isaiah passage. The goal of his ministry is spelled out here. Luke arranges the verses in a pattern commonly found in ancient literature:
    a. good news to the poor
    b. release to the captives
    c. sight to the blind
    b'. freedom to the oppressed
    a'. proclaim year of the Lord's favor
    This concentric arrangement helps the reader see that lines a and a' are similar, b and b' are similar. Line c stands out as the focus of the verses.
  • (v. 19) In ancient Jewish tradition, at an interval of every fifty years, a "jubilee" year was celebrated where all debts are forgiven and slaves regain their freedom. For obvious reasons, the poor look toward this jubilee year with much hope. Jesus brings new meanings to the jubilee year: freedom from and forgiveness of sins.
  • (v. 20) Jesus sits down. This gives the readers the impression that he is finished. Actually he is about to start. The speaker usually gives his address while seated.
  • (v. 21) "Today this scripture has been fulfilled". The word "today" should not be taken to mean "at the time of Jesus". It refers to the present time of fulfillment of God's promise.

One Main Point

God is ever faithful to his people. In Jesus he fulfills his promise: to set us free, to bring awareness to our unenlightened (and thus blind) state.


Reflections
  1. What does the word "freedom" mean to me? As a Christian, how am I free or not free?
  2. I close my eyes to 'see' what blindness is like. I attempt to remember the colors around me, to remember the faces of people I know. As Jesus has restored the sight of the blind, I ask Jesus to restore the sight of my soul, to give me new understanding and awareness.

21 posted on 01/27/2013 7:50:56 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, January 27, 2013
Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Nehemiah 8:2-4, 5-6, 8-10
Psalm 19:8-10, 15
1 Corinthians 12:12-30 or 12:12-14, 27
Luke 1:1-4; 4:14-21

Since Christ Himself has said, "This is My Body" who shall dare to doubt that It is His Body?

-- St Cyril of Jerusalem


22 posted on 01/27/2013 7:53:42 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

23 posted on 01/27/2013 7:54:40 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


24 posted on 01/27/2013 7:56:24 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 1
1 FORASMUCH as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a narration of the things that have been accomplished among us; Quoniam quidem multi conati sunt ordinare narrationem, quæ in nobis completæ sunt, rerum : επειδηπερ πολλοι επεχειρησαν αναταξασθαι διηγησιν περι των πεπληροφορημενων εν ημιν πραγματων
2 According as they have delivered them unto us, who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word: sicut tradiderunt nobis, qui ab initio ipsi viderunt, et ministri fuerunt sermonis : καθως παρεδοσαν ημιν οι απ αρχης αυτοπται και υπηρεται γενομενοι του λογου
3 It seemed good to me also, having diligently attained to all things from the beginning, to write to thee in order, most excellent Theophilus, visum est et mihi, assecuto omnia a principio diligenter, ex ordine tibi scribere, optime Theophile, εδοξεν καμοι παρηκολουθηκοτι ανωθεν πασιν ακριβως καθεξης σοι γραψαι κρατιστε θεοφιλε
4 That thou mayest know the verity of those words in which thou hast been instructed. ut cognoscas eorum verborum, de quibus eruditus es, veritatem. ινα επιγνως περι ων κατηχηθης λογων την ασφαλειαν

25 posted on 01/27/2013 11:43:49 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
1. Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,
2. Even as they delivered them to us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word:
3. It seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write to you in order, most excellent Theophilus,
4. That you might know the certainty of those things, wherein you have been instructed.

EUSEBIUS; St. Luke at the commencement of his Gospel has told us the reason of his writing, which was, that many others had rashly taken upon themselves to give accounts of those things of which he had a more certain knowledge. And this is his meaning when he says, Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of things.

AMBROSE; For as many among the Jewish people prophesied by inspiration of the Spirit of God, but others were false prophets rather than prophets, so now also travel many attempted to write Gospels which the good moneychanger refuses to pass. One gospel is mentioned which the twelve Apostles are said to have written; another Basilides presumed to write; and another is said to have been by Matthias.

BEDE; The many who are mentioned, he reckons not so much by their number, as by the variety of their manifold heresies; men who were not endued with the gift of the Holy Spirit, but engaging in a vain work, have rather set forth in order a relation of events, than woven a true history

AMBROSE; Now they who have attempted to set forth these things in order have labored by themselves, and have not succeeded in what they attempted. For without the assistance of man come the gifts and the grace of God, which, when it is infused, is wont so to flow, that the genius of the writer is not exhausted, but ever abounding. He well says therefore, Of things which have been fully accomplished among us, or which abound among us. For that which abounds is lacking to none, and no one doubts about that which is fulfilled, since the accomplishment builds up our faith, and the end manifests it.

TITUS BOSTRENSIS; He says, of things, because not by shadows, as the heretics say, did Jesus accomplish His advent in the flesh, but being as He was the Truth, so in very truth He performed His work.

ORIGEN; The effect upon his own mind, St. Luke explains by the expression, of the things which have been fully accomplished among us, i.e. have had their full manifestation among us, (as the Greek word signifies, which the Latin cannot not express in one word,) for he had been convinced of them by sure faith and reason, and wavered not in any thing

CHRYS; The Evangelist was so far from being content with his single testimony, that he refers the whole to the Apostles, seeking from them a confirmation of his words; and therefore he adds, as they handed them down to us, who were themselves from the beginning eyewitnesses.

EUSEBIUS; Luke is a sure witness, because he obtained his knowledge of the truth either from St. Paul's instructions, or the instructions and traditions of the other Apostles, who were themselves eyewitnesses from the beginning.

CHRYS. He says, were eyewitnesses, because this is our chief ground for believing in a thing, that we derive it from those who were actually eyewitnesses.

ORIGEN; It is plain that of one kind of knowledge, the end is in the knowledge itself, as in geometry; but of another kind, the end is counted to be in the work, as in medicine; and so it is in the word of God, and therefore having signified the knowledge by the words were themselves eyewitnesses, he points out the work by what follows, and were ministers of the word

AMBROSE; This expression is used, not that we should suppose the ministry of the word to consist rather in seeing than hearing, but that, because by the word was meant not a word that can be spoken by the mouth, but one of real existence, we may understand that to have been not a common, but a Heavenly Word, to which the Apostles ministered.

CYRIL; In what he says of the Apostles having been eyewitnesses of the word, he agrees with John, who says, The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, and we saw His glory. For the Word by means of the flesh was made visible.

AMBROSE; Now not only did they see the Lord in the body, but also in the Word. For they saw the Word, who with Moses and Elias saw the glory of the Word. Others did not see it, who could only see the body.

ORIGEN; It is written in Exodus, The people saw the voice of the Lord. Now a voice is rather heard than seen. But it was so written, to show us that men see the voice of the Lord with other eyes, which they only have who are worthy of them. Again in the Gospel, it is not the voice that is perceived, but the Word, which is more excellent than the voice.

THEOPHYL; By these words it is plainly implied, that Luke was not a disciple from the beginning but became one in course of time; others were disciples from the beginning, as Peter, and the sons of Zebedee.

THEOPHYL; Nevertheless both Matthew and John were obliged in many things that they wrote to consult those who had had means of knowing the infancy, childhood, and genealogy of our Lord, and of seeing the things which he did.

ORIGEN; St. Luke hereby explains to us the source of his writing; seeing that what things he wrote, he gained not from report, but had himself traced them up from the beginning. Hence it follows, It seemed good to me also, having carefully investigated every thing from the very first, to write to you in order, most excellent Theophilus.

AMBROSE; When he says, It seemed good to me, he does not deny that it seemed good to God for it is God who predisposes the wills of men. Now no one has doubted that this book of the Gospel is more full of details than the others; by these words then he claims to himself, not any thing that is false, but the truth; and therefore he says, "It seemed good to me, having investigated every thing, to write." Not to write every thing, but from a review of every thing; "for if all the things which Jesus did were written, I do not think the world itself could contain them." But purposely has Luke passed by things that were written by others, in order that each book of the Gospel might be distinguished by certain mysteries and miracles peculiar to itself.

THEOPHYL; He writes to Theophilus, a man probably of some distinction, and a governor; for the form, Most excellent, was not used except to rulers and governors. As for example, Paul says to Festus, Most excellent Festus.

THEOPHYL; Theophilus means, "loving God," or "being loved by God." Whoever then loses God, or desires to be loved by Him, let him think this Gospel to have been written to him, and preserve it as a gift presented to him, a pledge entrusted to his care. The promise was not to explain the meaning of certain new and strange things to Theophilus, but to set forth the truth of those words in which he had been instructed; as it is added, That you might know the truth of those words in which you have been instructed; that is, "that you might be able to know in what order each thing was said or done by the Lord."

CHRYS; Or it may be, "That you might feel certain and satisfied as to the truth of those things which you have heard, now that you behold the same in writing."

THEOPHYL; For frequently, when a thing is asserted by any one, and not expressed in writing, we suspect it of falsehood; but when a man has written what he asserts, we are the more inclined to believe it, as if, unless he thought it to be true, he would not commit it to writing.

GREEK EX. The whole preface of in this Evangelist contains two things; first, the condition of those who wrote Gospels before him, (Matthew and Mark for example;) secondly, the reason why he also himself proposed to write one.

Having said, "attempted," a word which may be applied both to those who presumptuously engage upon a subject, and those who reverently handle it, he determines the doubtful expression by two additions; first, by the words, Of things which have been fully accomplished among us; and secondly, As they handed them down to us, who were eyewitnesses from the beginning. The word handed down seems to show, that the eye-witnesses themselves had a commission to transmit the truth. For as they handed it down, so it became others also receiving it in due order, in their turn to publish it. But from the not depositing in writing what had been delivered, several difficulties through lapse of time sprang up. Rightly then did those who had received the tradition from the first eye-witnesses of the Word, establish it in writing for the whole world; thereby repelling falsehood, destroying forgetfulness, and making up from tradition itself a perfect whole.

Catena Aurea Luke 1
26 posted on 01/27/2013 11:44:35 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Holy Apostol Luke Writes an Icon of the Mother of God

Living Tradition School of Iconography
St. Petersburg, Russia

(*) In Russian practice, a wider circle than the initial twelve is sometimes called "apostles". The icons are said to be "written" rather than painted.

27 posted on 01/27/2013 11:46:58 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 4
14 And Jesus returned in the power of the spirit, into Galilee, and the fame of him went out through the whole country. Et regressus est Jesus in virtute Spiritus in Galilæam, et fama exiit per universam regionem de illo. και υπεστρεψεν ο ιησους εν τη δυναμει του πνευματος εις την γαλιλαιαν και φημη εξηλθεν καθ ολης της περιχωρου περι αυτου
15 And he taught in their synagogues, and was magnified by all. Et ipse docebat in synagogis eorum, et magnificabatur ab omnibus. και αυτος εδιδασκεν εν ταις συναγωγαις αυτων δοξαζομενος υπο παντων
16 And he came to Nazareth, where he was brought up: and he went into the synagogue, according to his custom, on the sabbath day; and he rose up to read. Et venit Nazareth, ubi erat nutritus, et intravit secundum consuetudinem suam die sabbati in synagogam, et surrexit legere. και ηλθεν εις την ναζαρετ ου ην τεθραμμενος και εισηλθεν κατα το ειωθος αυτω εν τη ημερα των σαββατων εις την συναγωγην και ανεστη αναγνωναι
17 And the book of Isaias the prophet was delivered unto him. And as he unfolded the book, he found the place where it was written: Et traditus est illi liber Isaiæ prophetæ. Et ut revolvit librum, invenit locum ubi scriptum erat : και επεδοθη αυτω βιβλιον ησαιου του προφητου και αναπτυξας το βιβλιον ευρεν τον τοπον ου ην γεγραμμενον
18 The Spirit of the Lord is upon me. Wherefore he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor, he hath sent me to heal the contrite of heart, Spiritus Domini super me : propter quod unxit me, evangelizare pauperibus misit me, sanare contritos corde, πνευμα κυριου επ εμε ου εινεκεν εχρισεν με ευαγγελισασθαι πτωχοις απεσταλκεν με ιασασθαι τους συντετριμμενους την καρδιαν κηρυξαι αιχμαλωτοις αφεσιν και τυφλοις αναβλεψιν αποστειλαι τεθραυσμενους εν αφεσει
19 To preach deliverance to the captives, and sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord, and the day of reward. prædicare captivis remissionem, et cæcis visum, dimittere confractos in remissionem, prædicare annum Domini acceptum et diem retributioni. κηρυξαι ενιαυτον κυριου δεκτον
20 And when he had folded the book, he restored it to the minister, and sat down. And the eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him. Et cum plicuisset librum, reddit ministro, et sedit. Et omnium in synagoga oculi erant intendentes in eum. και πτυξας το βιβλιον αποδους τω υπηρετη εκαθισεν και παντων εν τη συναγωγη οι οφθαλμοι ησαν ατενιζοντες αυτω
21 And he began to say to them: This day is fulfilled this scripture in your ears. Cœpit autem dicere ad illos : Quia hodie impleta est hæc scriptura in auribus vestris. ηρξατο δε λεγειν προς αυτους οτι σημερον πεπληρωται η γραφη αυτη εν τοις ωσιν υμων

(*) κηρυξαι αιχμαλωτοις αφεσιν και τυφλοις αναβλεψιν αποστειλαι τεθραυσμενους εν αφεσει -- belongs to verse 19 in the translations.

28 posted on 01/27/2013 11:47:58 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
14. And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee: and there went out a fame of him through all the region round about.
15. And he taught in their synagogues, being glorified of all.
16. And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read.
17. And there was delivered to him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when he had opened the book, he found the place where it was written,
18. The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to preach the Gospel to the poor: he has sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised,
19. To preach the acceptable year of the Lord.
20. And he closed the book, and he gave it again to the minister, and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on him.
21. And he began to say to them, This day is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears.

ORIGEN; The Lord having overcome the tempter, power was added to Him, i.e. as far as regards the manifestation of it. Hence it is said, And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit.

THEOPHYL; By the power of the Spirit he means showing forth of miracles.

CYRIL; Now He performed miracles not from any external power, and from having as it were the acquired grace of the Holy Spirit, as other saints, but rather as being by nature the Son of God, and partaking of all things which are the Father's, He exercises as by His own power and operation that grace which is of the Holy Spirit. But it was right that from that time He should become known, and that the mystery of His humanity should shine forth among those who were of the seed of Israel. It therefore follows, And his fame went out.

THEOPHYL; And because wisdom belongs to teaching, but power to works, both are joined here, as it follows, And he taught in the synagogue.

Synagogue, which is a Greek word, is rendered in Latin congregatio. By this name then the Jews were accustomed to call not only the gathering together of people, but also the house where they met together to hear the word of God; as we call by the name of Church, both the place and the company of the faithful. But there is this difference between the synagogue which is called congregation, and the Church which is interpreted convocation, that flocks and cattle, and any thing else can be gathered together in one, but only rational beings can be called together. Accordingly the Apostolical doctors thought right to call a people which was distinguished by the superior dignity of a new grace rather by the name of Church, than Synagogue. But rightly also was the fact of His being magnified by those present proved, by actual evidence of word and deed, as it follows, And he was magnified by all.

ORIGEN; But you must not think that they only were happy, and that you are deprived of Christ's teaching. For now also throughout the world He teaches through His instruments, and is now more glorified by all men, than at that time when those only in one province were gathered together.

CYRIL; He communicates the knowledge of Himself to those among whom He was brought up according to the flesh. As it follows, And he came to Nazareth.

THEOPHYL. That He might teach us to benefit and instruct first our brethren, then to extend our kindness to the rest of our friends.

THEOPHYL; They flocked together on the Sabbath day in the synagogues, that, resting from all worldly occupations, they might set themselves down with a quiet mind to meditate on the precepts of the Law. Hence it follows, And he entered as was his custom on the Sabbath day into the synagogue.

AMBROSE; The Lord in every thing so humbled Himself to obedience, that He did not despise even the office of a reader, as it follows, And he rose up to read, and there was delivered to him the book, &c. He received the book indeed, that He might show Himself to be the same who spoke in the Prophets, and that He might stop the blasphemies of the wicked, who say that there is one God of the Old Testament, another of the New; or who say that Christ had His beginning from a virgin. For how did He begin from a virgin, who spoke before that virgin was?

ORIGEN; He opens not the book by chance, and finds a chapter containing a prophecy of Himself, but by the providence of God. Hence it follows, And when he had opened the book, he found the place, &c.

ATHAN. He says this to explain to us the cause of the revelation made Or to the world, and of His taking upon Him the human nature. For as the Son, though He is the giver of. the Spirit, does not refuse to confess as man that by the Spirit He casts out devils, so, inasmuch as He was made man, He does not refuse to say, The Spirit of the Lord is upon me.

CYRIL; In like manner we confess Him to have been anointed, inasmuch as He took upon Him our flesh, as it follows, Because he has anointed me. For the Divine nature is not anointed, but that which is cognate to us. So also when He says that He was sent, we must suppose Him speaking of His human nature. For it follows, He has sent me to preach the gospel to the poor.

AMBROSE; You see the Trinity coeternal and perfect. The Scripture speaks of Jesus as perfect God and perfect man. It speaks of the Father, and the Holy Spirit, who was shown to be a cooperator, when in a bodily form as a dove He descended upon Christ.

ORIGEN; By the poor He means the Gentile nations, for they were poor, possessing nothing at all, having neither God, nor Law, nor Prophets, nor justice, and the other virtues.

AMBROSE; Or, He is anointed all over with spiritual oil, and heavenly virtue, that He might enrich the poverty of man's condition with the everlasting treasure of His resurrection.

THEOPHYL; He is sent also to preach the Gospel to the poor, saying, Blessed are the poor, for yours is the kingdom of heaven.

CYRIL; For perhaps to the poor in spirit He declares in these words, that among all the gifts which are obtained through Christ, upon them was bestowed a free gift. It follows, To heal the broken hearted. He calls those broken hearted, who are weak, of an infirm mind, and unable to resist the assaults of the passions, and to them He promises a healing remedy.

BASIL; Or, He came to heal the broken hearted, i.e. to afford a remedy to those that have their heart broken by Satan through sin, because beyond all other things sin lays prostrate the human hears.

THEOPHYL; Or, because it is written, A broken and a contrite heart God will not despise. He says therefore, that He is sent to heal the broken hearted, as it is written, Who heals the broken hearted.

It follows, And to preach deliverance to the captives.

CHRYS. The word captivity has many meanings. There is a good captivity, which St. Paul speaks of when he says, Bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ. There is a bad captivity also, of which it is said, Leading captive silly women laden with sins. There is a captivity present to the senses, that is by our bodily enemies. But the worst captivity is that of the mind, of which he here speaks. For sin exercises the worst of all tyrannies, commanding to do evil, and destroying them that obey it. From this prison of the soul Christ lets us free.

THEOPHYL. But these things may be understood also of the dead, who being taken captive have been loosed from the dominion of hell by the resurrection of Christ. It follows, And recovering of sight to the blind.

CYRIL; For the darkness which the Devil has spread over the human heart, Christ the Sun of Righteousness has removed making men, as the Apostle says, children not of night and darkness, but of light and the day. For they who one time wandered have discovered the path of the righteous. It follows, To set at liberty them that are bruised.

ORIGEN; For what had been so shattered and dashed about as man, who was set at liberty by Jesus and healed?

THEOPHYL; Or, to set at liberty them that are bruised; i.e. to relieve those who had been heavy laden with the intolerable burden of the Law.

ORIGEN; But all these things were mentioned first, in order that after the recovery of sight from blindness, after deliverance from captivity, after being healed of divers wounds, we might come to the acceptable year of the Lord. As it follows, To preach the acceptable year of the Lord. Some say that, according to the simple meaning of the word, the Savior preached the Gospel throughout Judea in one year, and that this is what is meant by preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. Or, the acceptable year of the Lord is the whole time of the Church, during which while present in the body, it is absent from the Lord.

THEOPHYL; For not only was that year acceptable in which our Lord preached, but that also in which the Apostle preaches, saying, Behold, now is the accepted time. After the acceptable year of the Lord, he adds, And the day of retribution; that is, the final retribution, when the Lord shall give to every one according to his work.

AMBROSE; Or, by the acceptable year of the Lord, he means this day extended through endless ages, which knows of no return to a world of labor, and grants to men everlasting reward and rest. It follows, And he closed the book, and he gave it again.

THEOPHYL; He read the book to those who were present to hear Him, but having read it, He returned it to the minister; for while He was in the world He spoke openly, teaching in the synagogues and in the temple; but about to return to heaven, He committed the office of preaching the Gospel to those who from the beginning were eye-witnesses and ministers of the word. He read standing, because while explaining those Scriptures which were written of Him, He condescended to work in the flesh; but having returned the book, He sits down, because He restored Himself to the throne of heavenly rest. For standing is the part of the workman, but sitting of one who is resting or judging. So also let the preacher of the word rise up and read and work and preach, and sit down, i.e. wait for the reward of rest. But He opens the book and reads, because sending the Spirit, He taught His Church all truth; having shut the book, He returned it to the minister, because all things were not to be said to all, but He committed the word to the teacher to be dispensed according to the capacity of the hearers. It follows, And the eyes of all in the synagogue were fastened on him.

ORIGEN; And now also if we will, our eyes can look upon the Savior. For when you direct your whole heart to wisdom, truth, and the contemplation of the only-begotten Son of God, your eyes behold Jesus.

CYRIL; But then He turned the eyes of all men upon Him, wondering how He knew the writing which He had never learnt. But since it was the custom of the Jews to say that the prophecies spoken of Christ are completed either in certain of their chiefs, i.e. their kings, or in some of their holy prophets, the Lord made this announcement; as it follows, But he began to say to them that this Scripture is fulfilled.

THEOPHYL; Because, in fact, as that Scripture had foretold, the Lord was both doing great things, and preaching greater.



Catena Aurea Luke 4
29 posted on 01/27/2013 11:48:41 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Christ in Glory among Angels

Manfredino da Pistoia

1280s
Fresco
San Bartolomeo in Pantano, Pistoia

30 posted on 01/27/2013 11:49:12 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


The Harrowing of Hell

c. 1460
Oak with polychrome decoration, height 98 cm (case)
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

31 posted on 01/27/2013 11:49:36 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Resurrection of Christ
(Descent to Hades)

The last two images show Christ liberating Adam and Eve, captive in the abode of the dead, and in their persons liberating us all.

32 posted on 01/27/2013 11:50:18 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
Saint Angela Merici, Virgin

Saint Angela Merici, Virgin
Optional Memorial
January 27th


traditional holy card

 

St. Angela (1470-1540) was born in northern Italy. In 1535, she founded the Order of Ursulines, the first women's teaching order approved by the Church. Italy then was rife with violence and immorality. St. Angela believed that the formation of Christian women in society's greatest need.

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003

 

Collect:
May the Virgin Saint Angela never fail to commend us
to your compassion, O Lord, we pray,
that, following the lessons of her charity and prudence,
we may hold fast to your teaching
and express it in what we do.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: 1 Peter 4:7b-11
Keep sane and sober for your prayers. Above all hold unfailing your love for one another, since love covers a multitude of sins. Practice hospitality ungrudgingly to one another. As each has received a gift, employ it for one another, as good stewards of God's varied grace: whoever speaks, as one who utters oracles of God; whoever renders service, as one who renders it by the strength which God supplies; in order that in everything God may be glorified through Jesus Christ. To him belong glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

Gospel Reading: Mark 9:34b-37
On the way [to Capernaum] they [the disciples] had discussed with one another who was the greatest. And He [Jesus] sat down and called the twelve; and He said to them, "If any one would be first, he must be last of all and servant of all." And He took a child, and put him in the midst of them; and taking him in His arms, He said to them, "Whoever receives one such child in My name receives Me; and whoever receives Me, receives not Me but Him who sent Me."


33 posted on 01/27/2013 3:17:46 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
A Saint's Day is superseded by the Sunday Liturgy.

Jan 27 - St. Angela Merici 1470-1540, (Founder-Ursuline Order) [Catholic Caucus]
[St.] Angela Merici: A Great Saint And A Great Citizen Of Desenzano

34 posted on 01/27/2013 3:20:06 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
St. Angela Merici

Feast Day: January 27
Born:

21 March 1474, Desenzano del Garda, Province of Brescia, Lombardy, Italy

Died: 27 January 1540, Brescia, Lombardy, Italy
Canonized: May 24, 1807, Rome by Pope Pius VII
Major Shrine: The Merician Centre (including the now subterranean Church of St Afra, Brescia, Lombardy, Italy)
Patron of: sickness, handicapped people, loss of parents



35 posted on 01/27/2013 3:34:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Kids and Saints

SAINT ANGELA MERICI

January 27                                                                                   
Patron of :                                                                                                           Disabled people

Angela was born in Italy in the year 1470. At fifteen years of age she became a tertiary of St. Francis. A tertiary means 3rd order. In a vision, God revealed to her that she would inspire a group of devout women to give themselves to the service of God.

In Crete, during a pilgrimage to Holy Land, she became blind. Her friends wanted to return home, but she insisted on going on, visiting the shrines with as much devotion and enthusiasm as if she had her sight. On the way home, while praying before a crucifix, her sight was restored at the same place where it had been lost.

When she was about twenty-two, Angela returned to her home town to find that parents were not teaching their children the simplest truths of religion. She talked the matter over with her friends. They gathered together the little girls of the neighborhood to whom they gave regular instruction. Angela began with twelve girls at Brescia and this was the beginning of the Ursuline Order - the first teaching Order of women to be founded in the Church. As a patron, Angela chose St. Ursula.
In 1535, twenty-eight young women consecrated themselves with her to the service of God. These women lived a holy life. They met for classes and spiritual exercises, and carried out the duties given to them. Angela was chosen as their superior.


36 posted on 01/27/2013 3:40:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Kids and Saints

SAINT ANGELA MERICI

January 27                                                                                   
Patron of :                                                                                                           Disabled people

Angela was born in Italy in the year 1470. At fifteen years of age she became a tertiary of St. Francis. A tertiary means 3rd order. In a vision, God revealed to her that she would inspire a group of devout women to give themselves to the service of God.

In Crete, during a pilgrimage to Holy Land, she became blind. Her friends wanted to return home, but she insisted on going on, visiting the shrines with as much devotion and enthusiasm as if she had her sight. On the way home, while praying before a crucifix, her sight was restored at the same place where it had been lost.

When she was about twenty-two, Angela returned to her home town to find that parents were not teaching their children the simplest truths of religion. She talked the matter over with her friends. They gathered together the little girls of the neighborhood to whom they gave regular instruction. Angela began with twelve girls at Brescia and this was the beginning of the Ursuline Order - the first teaching Order of women to be founded in the Church. As a patron, Angela chose St. Ursula.
In 1535, twenty-eight young women consecrated themselves with her to the service of God. These women lived a holy life. They met for classes and spiritual exercises, and carried out the duties given to them. Angela was chosen as their superior.


37 posted on 01/27/2013 3:41:38 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, January 27

Liturgical Color: Green


Today is the optional memorial of St. Angela Merici, founder of the Ursuline Sisters. In 1524, she was struck blind while preparing for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. She went anyway and her sight was miraculously restored upon her return.


38 posted on 01/27/2013 4:40:47 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: January 27, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Almighty ever-living God, direct our actions according to your good pleasure, that in the name of your beloved Son we may abound in good works. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: January 27th

Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Septuagesima Sunday

"Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news of him spread throughout the whole region. He taught in their synagogues and was praised by all (Luke 4:14-15)."

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Book of Nehemiah, 8:2-4a, 5-6, 8-10. Nehemiah and Ezra lived in the time when the people of Israel had been returned to their land after the years of the Babylonian Captivity and it was a time of rebuilding. The people had lost their connections to their faith.

The second reading is from the first Letter of St. Paul to the Corinthians, 12:12-30 and refers to the Mystical Body of Christ. St. Paul concludes his description of the different parts of the body by applying it to the Church, where variety of functions does not detract from unity.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 1:1-4; 4:14-21. In the first four verses of St. Luke's Gospel which have been read to you today, you will find reason to be grateful to him. He went to a lot of trouble in order to put in a permanent form, in a written record, the essential facts concerning Christ, his words and his works, so that we "would understand (like Theophilus) the certainty of the faith in which we have been instructed."

But while we must be grateful to St. Luke, we owe a bigger debt of gratitude still to the all-good, all-wise God who moved Luke and the other Evangelists to preserve for us in writing the essential truths of the Christian faith that has been handed down to us. The Apostles were companions of Christ. They witnessed his works and his words; they remembered most of his doings and his sayings, and what they might have forgotten the Holy Spirit recalled to their memory on that first Pentecost day in Jerusalem. The first two generations of Christians received the facts of the faith from these eye-witnesses and the miracles so frequent in the infant Church were confirmation of the truth of their teaching.

But God in his wisdom provided for the many generations to come who would not have this evident confirmation of their faith. He established a teaching body in his Church which would safeguard the purity of the Christian truths, for "he himself would be with it all days," and he gave us a written record of the facts of the faith in the Gospels and the ether writings of the New Testament.

How can we ever thank God sufficiently for his thoughtfulness in our regard? We Christians of today can be as certain, as assured, of the truth of the faith that we are trying to practice as was St. Luke who was converted by St. Paul. We have a living, teaching Magisterium in the Church, which authentically preserves and interprets for us the true facts of Christ's teaching and works as written down for us by a first-generation Christian under the impulse and guidance of God's Holy Spirit. If we needed further proof of the priceless value of our New Testament Books, the virulent attacks on their authenticity, on their objectivity, and on their veracity, by enemies of the faith down to and including our own day, should be sufficient.

But they have stood the test of time and the onslaughts of biased, prejudiced criticism, for they are the word of truth, which is eternal, and comes from God.

We have a priceless gift of God in the inspired Books of the Bible. Let us show true appreciation for that gift by using it to build up a better knowledge of the Christian faith which it teaches us. There should be a Bible, or at least the New Testament, in every Christian home. It should not be an ornament on a shelf, but a fountain and source from which we can draw strength and refreshment in the daily practice of our Christian faith. Almost two thousand years ago, God's infinite goodness provided this source of strength, the "fountain of living water," for us Christians of this century. Are we grateful for his thoughtfulness? Are we nourishing our faith at this blessed fountain of his infinite wisdom and love?

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


39 posted on 01/27/2013 5:15:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Luke 1:1-4; 4:14-21

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing. (Luke 4:21)

Returning to his hometown of Nazareth, Jesus was invited to speak in the synagogue. His reputation as a wonder worker and powerful preacher had preceded him, and the people hung on his every word. This was not the first time that they had heard this passage—it was part of their regular cycle of Scripture readings. But this time it was different. Jesus spoke with unmistakable authority, and their hearts were stirred.

What made the difference? The Spirit of anointing rested on Jesus just as he had filled the prophet who first spoke these words. The words came alive as Jesus declared, “He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives.” You can just imagine some of the people seeing themselves in those words for the first time—and sensing that their own deliverance was at hand!

How can we have this same experience? What will make the Scriptures leap off the page for us? The Spirit of anointing! When you read the Bible, invite the Holy Spirit to help you. Ask him to open your eyes to his truths in a deeper, more personal way. Read the passage carefully, and make sure you understand what it is saying. Use a commentary or a good study Bible, but don’t stop there. Prayerfully ponder what you have read. Let the words echo in your mind and heart. If a particular verse or even a word strikes you, stay with it and see what happens. Give it time, and don’t worry about the rest of the passage. Maybe the Lord wants to say something to you personally right then and there.

Finally, make sure you write down whatever sense you receive as you ponder the word of God. Keep a prayer journal so that you can review it every now and then to see how much the Lord is doing in your life. He wants to talk with you! He wants you to learn how to hear his voice!

“Lord, open my eyes to your wonders in the Scriptures.”

Nehemiah 8:2-6, 8-10; Psalm 19:8-10, 15; 1 Corinthians 12:12-30

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the first reading, we hear how the word of God so touched the hearts and moved those who “listened attentively.” What is the attitude of your heart when you read Scriptures? What is the attitude of your heart when the word of God is read at Mass? What steps can you take to hear God speaking to you more clearly through the Scriptures and be moved by them?

2. The responsorial psalm also speaks of the effect the word of God has on those who “listen”: i.e., life, refreshment, wisdom, joy, enlightenment, etc. How often during the week do you turn to the Scriptures for your strength? What are some ways God has touched you through your commitment to regularly reading his word? If you don’t already do it, are you willing to commit to a daily time of Scripture reading? If not, why not? It could be something as simple as reading and meditating on the daily Mass readings.

3. In the second reading, St. Paul continues the theme he began in last Sunday’s reading: we are all members of one body, and each of us has an important part to play in building the Church. He tells us that there should be no division in the body. What steps can you take to heal any divisions that may exist in your family or your parish? What steps can you take to bring more unity to your family or parish?

4. St. Paul also says that we must be concerned for one another….that when one of us suffers, all of us suffer. What are the opportunities in your parish or community that you can respond to in order to reach out to those who are suffering or have great needs?

5. In the Gospel, Christ tells us that he brings us “glad tidings”, “liberty”, “recovery of sight”, and freedom. Pope John Paul II said, “Sometimes even Catholics have lost or never had a chance to experience Christ personally”. What specifically can you do this week to get to know Christ better, not “as a mere paradigm or value” (John Paul II), but as your living Lord, as your way, your truth, your life? Also, take some time to pray and consecrate your life and the members of your family to Jesus Christ, asking that each would “experience Christ personally.”

6. In the meditation ends, we hear these words, “What will make the Scriptures leap off the page for us? The Spirit of anointing! When you read the Bible, invite the Holy Spirit to help you. Ask him to open your eyes to his truths in a deeper, more personal way.” Are you willing to experiment with these suggestions whenever you read the Scriptures? What do you think will happen as you do it?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord for a fresh anointing of his Spirit so that reading the Scriptures will have a greater impact on your life and will deepen your faith and trust in the Lord. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.

 


40 posted on 01/27/2013 5:34:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

TODAY THIS SCRIPTURE HAS BEEN FULFILLED IN YOUR HEARING

(A biblical refection on the 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C, 27 January 2013)

Gospel Reading: Luke 1:1-4; 4:14-21 

First Reading: Neh 8:2-6,8-10; Psalms: Ps 19:8-10,15; Second Reading: 1Cor 12:12-30 

YESUS MENGAJAR - DALAM SINAGOGA DI NAZARET

The Scripture Text

Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things which have been accomplished among us, just as they were delivered to us by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word, it seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time past, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theopilus, that you may know the truth concerning the things of which you have been informed. 

And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee, and a report concerning Him went out through all the surrounding country. And He taught in their synagoues, being glorified by all. 

And He came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up; and He went to the synagogue, as His custom was, on the sabbath day. And He stood up to read; and there was given to Him the book of the prophet Isaiah. He opened the book and found the place where it was written, “The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me, because He has anointed Me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent Me to proclaim release to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed, to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord.” And He closed the book, and gave it back to the attendant, and sat down; and the eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on Him. And He began to say to them, “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.” (Lk 1:1-4; 4:14-21 RSV) 

Coming to Nazareth, Jesus went to the synagogue on the sabbath. He stood up to read and was given the book of Isaiah. He chose a familiar passage, one that the people probably could have recited by heart, for it echoed their longing for the Messiah to come and set them free. Little did they know that the one they longed for was standing right in front of them!

Jesus identified Himself as the Messiah, the one who was anointed by the Holy Spirit to set God’s people free from sin. He stood in their midst as the Good News Himself, come to the “poor” who are all in need of salvation. He brought healing through His words and His touch, and the Father’s blessing rained down on all who accepted Him.

Just as Jesus stood before His townsfolk in the synagogue that day, so He stands before each of us and says, “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing” (Lk 4:21). Do we recognize Him? Can we take our eyes off ourselves and look to Jesus, our hope? Each day, He offers us the same work of the Holy Spirit that He offered to the greatest of saints in our heritage.

Because of Jesus’ death and resurrection, the Holy Spirit has come to dwell in us to bring us freedom from sin and intimacy with God our Father. He has come to heal our hearts and our bodies. He has come to reveal to us the love of the Father. He has come to fill us with joy in the midst of trials. He offers us all His wisdom and His strength as we seek to please the Lord. As the Holy Spirit fills us more and more, He can flow through us out to the world around us, giving us authority over sin and evil not only in us but around us.

Short Prayer: Holy Spirit, God, we are amazed that You would come to live inside of us! We open our hearts to You and ask You to work in us and through us. Thank You for Your love, Your healing, and Your power. Amen


41 posted on 01/27/2013 5:41:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

GOD-NEWS FOR THE POOR

(A biblical refection on the 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C, 27 January 2013)

First Reading: Neh 8:2-6,8-10; Psalms: Ps 19:8-10,15; Second Reading: 1Cor 12:12-30; Gospel Reading: Lk 1:1-4; 4:14-21  

YESUS DI SINAGOGA DI NAZARET - 4

Behind every movement is an inspiring vision (even if it is not always articulated), from which it draws its day-to-day energy. Jesus proclaimed His ministry as the Lord’s year of favor. Shortly before that He had Himself been confirmed in the Father’s favor, called “My beloved Son.” Now, out of that vision and in the power of the Holy Spirit, He had news of God, that is God-news, for the poor. And we are all of us poor and captive in some way. His mission was to be a time of proclaiming God’s love: a time to show the smile of God’s favor towards people. This God-news is that God is on our side and totally prejudiced in our favor, liberating people from all sorts of captivity and unseeing.

Jesus liberated people from the grip of illness and handicap. Many restrictions of bodily health and fitness are rooted in illness of the spirit. The inner world has to be healed before the outer complaint will go. The compassion of God that came through Jesus enabled many to let go in the utter confidence that they found in Him. He drew faith out of them and often told them that their faith had been their saving.

Nothing will paralyze religious growth as much as a guilt complex. Luke particularly highlights the vision of the mercy of God that Jesus portrayed. The desire of Jesus to be close to sinners shattered many religious preconceptions. And stories that He told were a powerful invitation to step out of the paralysis of guilt towards a God who wanted to offer welcome and forgiveness.

Another source of captivity is anxiety. It has tentacles that strangle you any time you want to get up and move. Jesus spoke of God as a Father whose care could be relied on. His vision released people from that anxiety which makes thought of the future a constant source of terror.

Then there are those who are suffocated by the imperfection of their own efforts. To them Jesus spoke about the patience of God who understands the mix of weeds and wheat, who enjoys the oddities in the fishing net. He invited the perfectionists of life to step out from their antiseptic homes where everything has to be perfect, into the fresh air of nature, where nothing is perfect but there is beauty in the oddness of things and in the crazy balance of nature.

Jesus proclaimed a Kingdom where God is the Father of all and there must be no enemies for all are brothers and sisters. He called on all who were prisoners of anger, aggressiveness and vengeance to let go of the need to feel superior to others. Letting go is like learning to cycle or to swim. As long as the body is tensed up and rigid it won’t happen. One has to learn to relax to the balance in movement of the bike, or begin to experience the sea as a supporting millieu, before it can be enjoyed.

Jesus taught people to relax in the smile of God’s favor …… and they found that they could let go of their chains. What a day of liberation it is when you discover that the chains around you really have no lock on them except the rigidity of your own grip! Once you le go …… they fall off.

Jesus brought God-news to the poor, the news that God is loving, caring, compassionate and forgiving, because He favors us. If I am privileged to savor this God-news, then the challenge arises: to what extent do I pass on this portrait of God’s favor to others?

Not so much by words, which may be pious but hollow, as by what I am. A question to live with – what is the God-news proclaimed by my life to others today?

Note: Taken from Silvester O’Flynn OFMCap., THE GOOD NEWS OF LUKE’S YEAR, Dublin, Ireland: CATHEDRAL BOOKS, 1994, pages 123-124.


42 posted on 01/27/2013 5:43:53 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for January 27, 2013:

“If one part [of the body] is honored, all the parts share its joy.” (1 Corinthians 12:26) Bodies are complicated and we humans can be embarrassed by some parts and proud of others. What about your beloved’s physical appearance do you find especially attractive?


43 posted on 01/27/2013 5:47:53 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Scripture Study

Third Sunday in Ordinary Time—Cycle C

Opening prayer

Nehemiah 8:2-4a, 5-6, 8-10 (Psalm 19:8-10, 15) 1 Corinthians 12:12-30 Luke 1:1-4, 4:14-21

Overview of the Gospel:

This Sunday’s reading starts at the beginning of Luke’s Gospel (Chapter 1) and concludes in Chapter 4,

skipping over the Infancy Narratives and Jesus’ baptism (which we looked at during Advent) and his temptation in the wilderness (which we will be looking at during Lent).

Luke emphasizes in the prologue to his Gospel (verses 1-4) the reasons he wrote, and the care with which he compiled the information, and the reliability of his sources.

After he has preached and performed miracles in other parts of Judea, Jesus returns to his hometown of Nazareth. No doubt his reputation as a preacher and miracle worker preceded him and his fellow townsfolk were curious to see what sort of things he would say and do.

Called upon to read the Scripture and make commentary in the local synagogue on the Sabbath, Jesus applies the messianic announcement of the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 61:1-2) to himself. Rather than seeing the miracles they had heard of him performing elsewhere, he announces to them the Kingdom of God. Next week, we will see their surprising reaction to that announcement.

Questions:

What do you learn from verses 1-4 about Luke? About the reason he wrote his Gospel? About his sources? Who might these sources have been? Why is it important to seek out reliable and authoritative sources for learning our about our Faith?

Compare verses 14 and 18 with Luke 3:21 and Luke 4:1. What is the common element in each of these verses? What does it tell you about the source of Jesus’ power?

What is significant about the time, the place, and the posture taken by Jesus in this story (verses 16 and 21-22) for his reading from the prophet Isaiah?

What is Jesus’ five-fold mission (verses 18-19)? How did Jesus fulfill it then? How is he fulfilling it now?  How do we take part in Jesus’ mission (see Second Reading)?

In the First Reading, what were some of the reactions of the people has they heard the Law read and explained to them? What is our reaction to hearing God’s Word proclaimed?

What expectations stirred in the people as a result of Jesus’ claim (verses 21-22)? Based on this reading, what expectations about Jesus fill your heart?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 436, 695, 713-14, 1286, 2443

Closing prayer

Those who are led by the Holy Spirit have true ideas; that is why so many ignorant people are wiser than the learned. The Holy Spirit is light and strength. -St. John Vianney


44 posted on 01/27/2013 5:55:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Jesus is Misjudged
Pastor’s Column
3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time
January 27, 2013
 
“He came to Nazareth, where he had grown up,
and went according to his custom into the synagogue on the Sabbath day. 
                                                          (from Luke 1:1-21)
 
          When I was young, I had a friend who invited me to his Bar Mitzvah at his local synagogue, a Jewish coming-of-age ritual that occurs around age 13. I was amazed to find that my friend was invited to the front of the large room, where he read from a Torah scroll and then gave a teaching in front of the whole congregation! My friend later went on to become a Rabbi in Israel.   I am so grateful to him for opening my eyes to the riches of Judaism!
 
          Jesus went through just such a ritual in his own time, and this entitled him to address the congregation. Jesus went to the local synagogue, as was his custom. One can imagine Jesus and his parents, faithfully attending synagogue every Sabbath. As he grew older, Jesus exercised the trade he learned from St Joseph, carpentry. More specifically, he would have been not just a worker in wood, but more accurately, a construction worker, what we would call a blue-collar job. Jesus must have been seen often doing construction jobs for his neighbors over the years, without ever giving them a hint as to his powers of speaking!
 
          In our gospel this Sunday and the one that follows it, the congregation is deeply impressed by Jesus’ words. They also are offended by him! They think they know Jesus because he grew up there. They thought: How can this construction worker be acting like the messiah? He’s great at fixing my roof, but he doesn’t have anything to teach me about God. Not only does the town end up rejecting Jesus, but they lead him to a hill to toss him off!
 
          Here we see one of God’s normative patterns in our lives: Jesus often comes to us in surprising ways, often through people or circumstances we may have pre-judged negatively. Of course, if Jesus’ neighbors hadn’t put him in a box they might have been more open to his message.   This is precisely the test that we often face: how did I treat the people around me today, each of whom represents Christ in some way? Did I hear the Holy Spirit speaking through persons or situations that I may have mis-judged or are not open to hearing? This is often precisely how God works, so that we might grow in openness to the Spirit.
 
          God is waiting to speak to us through the inconvenient or someone we may be prejudiced against, a relative we have dismissed because of some disagreement, a stranger we encounter, a crisis we cannot avoid, a person who is of a different faith or political party. If we are a conservative Catholic, he may speak through a liberal; if we are liberal, he may speak through a conservative! It is much too easy to put people in little boxes and dismiss them, but then we often miss God’s greatest gifts to us: Jesus in disguise, who loves challenging us.
                                                                                                          Father Gary

45 posted on 01/27/2013 6:22:11 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center Blog

New Day Dawns: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Times

Posted by Nate Roberts on 01.25.13 |

 
 
Sunrise

Nehemiah 8:2-6,10
Psalms 19:8-10,15
1 Corinthians 12:12-30
Luke 1:1-4, 4:14-21

The meaning of today’s Liturgy is subtle and many-layered.

We need background to understand what’s happening in today’s First Reading.

Babylon having been defeated, King Cyrus of Persia decreed that the exiled Jews could return home to Jerusalem. They rebuilt their ruined temple (see Ezra 6:15-17) and under Nehemiah finished rebuilding the city walls (see Nehemiah 6:15).

The stage was set for the renewal of the covenant and the re-establishment of the Law of Moses as the people’s rule of life. That’s what’s going on in today’s First Reading, as Ezra reads and interprets (see Nehemiah 8:8) the Law and the people respond with a great “Amen!”

Israel, as we sing in today’s Psalm, is rededicating itself to God and His Law. The scene seems like the Isaiah prophecy that Jesus reads from in today’s Gospel.

Read all of Isaiah 61. The “glad tidings” Isaiah brings include these promises: the liberation of prisoners (61:1); the rebuilding of Jerusalem, or Zion (61:3-4; see also Isaiah 60:10); the restoration of Israel as a kingdom of priests (61:6; Exodus 19:6) and the forging of an everlasting covenant (61:8; Isaiah 55:3). It sounds a lot like the First Reading.

Jesus, in turn, declares that Isaiah’s prophecy is fulfilled in Him. The Gospel scene, too, recalls the First Reading. Like Ezra, Jesus stands before the people, is handed a scroll, unrolls it, then reads and interprets it (compare Luke 4:16-17,21 and Nehemiah 8:2-6,8-10).

We witness in today’s Liturgy the creation of a new people of God. Ezra started reading at dawn of the first day of the Jewish new year (see Leviticus 23:24). Jesus too proclaims a “sabbath,” a great year of Jubilee, a deliverance from slavery to sin, a release from the debts we owe to God (see Leviticus 25:10).

The people greeted Ezra “as one man.” And, as today’s Epistle teaches, in the Spirit the new people of God - the Church - is made “one body” with Him.


46 posted on 01/27/2013 6:33:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Next Sunday Readings:
Greg Olson: Jesus in the Nazareth Synagogue

3rd Sunday: A Mission Impossible?

 
 

Nh 8: 2-4a, 5-6, 9-10
1 Cor 12: 12-30
Lk 1: 1-4; 4: 14-21

Many of us may remember the 1960’s television thriller called “Mission Impossible.” Certainly we all know of the most recent Hollywood take offs on this same show – aka Tom Cruise who starred in the recent movie versions by the same name.

The main premise began with a secret government agent (Mr. Phelps) and a tape recorder which would explain the mission he was to accept. It would imply danger and covert activity to find and eliminate the bad guys which always led to the use of technological wonders in his mission.  The agent was reminded: “Your mission, should you decide to accept it . . . “then would go on to describe that secret mission. At the end of the description, the tape destroyed itself in a matter of seconds with a puff of smoke in order to eliminate any evidence this agent was offered.   

The first point of the spy thriller was that an agent was chosen, made an offer and the mission itself would prove to be both dangerous and exciting. In the end what seemed impossible considering the odds would eventually prove once again that good guys win! I don’t recall hearing if the agent ever rejected the mission he was offered.

This Sunday we hear of another potential mission impossible.  Jesus appears at the beginning of his ministry after a period of travel around Galilee and, as was his custom, he enters the synagogue of Nazareth his home town one Saturday, the Sabbath. There he stands up to read, is handed a tape recorder (no a scroll of the prophet Isaiah actually) and reads of his mission:

The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor . . . to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord . . .” (Lk 4: 18-19). Will he accept this mission from God?

Jesus well knew by this time that he was called and sent, assigned as it were, to fulfill a mission greater than any other ever given.  Our first reading from the book of Nehemiah speaks of a scene where the prophet Ezra reads the word of God to the people who reacted by weeping for they may have recognized in the sacred law their own unfaithfulness.  So too did the crowds in the synagogue react impressively to Jesus’ own word.  Unlike the people who heard the prophet Ezra read to them of a law separate from himself, however, Jesus’ reading of the prophet Isaiah became his own fulfillment.

He had been baptized in the Jordan; the Spirit appeared and compels him to go, as Luke makes the point in his Gospel today. In this reading of the prophet Isaiah, he proclaims to the assembled community, many who knew him as a former resident of Nazareth. Many knew his mother Mary and presumed father, Joseph: “Today, the Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” (Lk 4: 21).

For the early Christians of St. Luke’s time, as he writes at the beginning of his Gospel today, he wants to assure his hearers to, “. . . have certainty of the teachings you have received . . .” (Lk 1: 1). It is nearly fifty years since Jesus appeared by now, many of the eye witnesses of Jesus have died, and it is essential as the Christian body grows that they have a record of who Jesus is and the mission he was to accomplish. How they as believers can be “certain” that their faith is based in the Apostles teaching which is founded upon Christ Jesus and his mission – impossible though it may have seemed at times.

What was it about Jesus tone of voice, posture, gestures, or his facial expression that so impressed his crowd?  I have always wondered and have come to believe there is no doubt Jesus’ presence was indeed charismatic.  Not in the way we speak of sports heroes, Presidents or Movie stars being “charismatic” but about him must have been a spiritual presence which convinced the crowds he was either all he claimed to be or he was mad and delusional. Both opinions circulated about him which made his mission at times seem controversial if not nearly up against impossible odds.

In this Gospel today, which comes shortly after Jesus’ baptism by John, Jesus in a sense gives it all he’s got.  In essence he says, “This is who I am; this is my mission,” and we can embrace his good news or reject it.

Jesus preaches not in a fashioned hell fire and brimstone manner but in a way that promises good news – the Gospel.  He speaks being sent by the Spirit as the anointed one (Messianic imagery) to bring good news, to proclaim liberty, recovery of sight, and freedom for the oppressed, and to proclaim a year of favor.  This is good news!

In our own call to mission we carry on this same good news.  More and more today the message of the Church is pushed aside – why? Does it make many uncomfortable?  It is too challenging?  Out of touch? Too unrealistic and old fashioned?  Yet the Church is about good news. 

Our teachings on the dignity of the human person, on respect for freedom of religious expression, on the sanctity of marriage between a man and woman and the fundamental balance in family life, about the option for the poor and marginalized, and the defense of the vulnerable and the defenseless is good news. 

Yes, we have been labeled as bigoted, narrow minded, authoritarian, and absolutist.  But the position of the Church is to guard what has been revealed to us as absolute truth.  To “stand in the synagogue” as it were and proclaim what God has revealed to humanity.  In the midst of today’s culture, as Jesus did, we don’t pound people senseless with the message or use threatening tactics and lay upon the faithful unreasonable laws and regulations.  In the end the good news is announced and all are invited to embrace what is proposed. 

Our celebration of the Eucharist calls us to unity as the Body of Christ we hear in the second reading.  In the gathering each Sunday we see visible what God has done and how we are all called to live lives of holiness and proclaim that the same Spirit which compelled Jesus to carry out his mission, also carries out that same mission of Christ in and through us.

This Sunday we may want to ask ourselves what about the mission of Jesus seemed impossible at times.  What about my mission as a Catholic Christian feels impossible?  What sort of odds am I up against?

This past week we marked the terrible decision of the Supreme Court from 1973 which made the evil of abortion rampant across this County.  To date nearly 55 million unborn children have been eliminated.  That is almost the total population of New York and California combined!

How am I fulfilling the mission of the Church, which is the mission of Jesus himself? In the end we believe that with God nothing is impossible.

47 posted on 01/27/2013 7:22:40 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Insight Scoop

“Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, January 27, 2013 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
Neh 8:2-4a, 5-6, 8-10
Ps 19:8, 9, 10, 15
1 Cor 12:12-30 or 12:12-14, 27
Lk 1:1-4; 4:14-21

The books of Ezra and Nehemiah tell the story of the restoration of the Jews to the promised land following the Babylonian exile (c. 587-538 B.C.). The many years spent by the dislocated people of God in Babylon had a profound effect on the attitude and identity of the Jewish people. It is estimated that of the two to three million Jews given permission to return home, less than 50,000 took up the offer. 

As Peter Kreeft notes in his book, You Can Understand the Bible, “We usually prefer comfort to freedom. Life in Babylon had been comparatively easy, but the trek to Jerusalem was 900 miles long … Not only that, but once they arrived, they faced a ruined land, city, and temple, along with the formidable task of rebuilding” (Ignatius Press, 2005; p. 68). 

As today’s reading from Nehemiah describes, it was not just a physical rebuilding; in fact, the heart of the restoration was spiritual, religious, and liturgical. The people had to hear anew the book of the law and relearn the meaning and purpose of the law. The law shaped and defined the Jewish people, for it oriented them toward God and showed who they were in relation to him. Hearing the words read by the prophet Ezra, the people gave their assent and praise: “‘Amen, amen!’ Then they bowed down and prostrated themselves before the LORD.”

Fast forward a few hundred years to a small synagogue in Nazareth. The setting was significant The exact origin of the synagogue (meaning “house of assembly”) as a regular place of Jewish gathering is unknown, but some scholars believe it can be located in the Babylonian exile, when synagogues were needed as places of worship for Jews so far removed from the Jerusalem temple. During the time of Christ, the synagogue was an established place for reading and teaching the law and the prophets. 

St. Luke describes, in today’s Gospel, how Jesus “went according to his custom into the synagogue on the sabbath day.” The young man appeared to be just one of many ordinary, devout Jews. To those who heard Jesus read from the prophet Isaiah, he was simply the son of a carpenter (Lk. 4: 22). But he was not long removed from being baptized in the Jordan and being tested in the desert; he was ready to embark upon his public ministry. And that ministry began and was marked throughout by the proclamation of God’s word—after all, every utterance of Jesus was a proclamation of that word by the Word, the Incarnate logos. 

Like Ezra, he was a priest and he spoke as a prophet. Like Ezra, he unrolled the scroll and he read from the law and the prophets. Yet, whatever the similarities, the essential differences are summed up in his concluding words: “Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” Ezra, Isaiah, and all of the other prophets told the people to worship, love, and obey God; Jesus said the same, but also made it known that he was God (cf. Jn. 8:54-59). His priesthood was singular; his words were uniquely authoritative. The passage from Isaiah was fulfilled because the word of God had gone forth—not merely from the mouth of a human prophet, but into the world as the word who had assumed human nature: “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth…” (Jn 1:14). 

The ministry of Christ—the anointed one—was to proclaim glad tidings to the poor, grant liberty to captives, give sight to the blind, and free the oppressed. This is true restoration from the ancient exile of both Jews and Gentiles in the land of sin and darkness. Every man is invited by the Messiah to leave the land of sin and enter the promised rest. “He set the captives free,” wrote Cyril of Jerusalem, “having overthrown the tyrant Satan, he shed the divine and spiritual light on those whose heart was darkened.”

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the January 24, 20120, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.) 


48 posted on 01/27/2013 7:32:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

Bringing Good News
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Luke 1:1-4, 4:14-21

Since many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the events that have been fulfilled among us, just as those who were eyewitnesses from the beginning and ministers of the word have handed them down to us, I too have decided, after investigating everything accurately anew, to write it down in an orderly sequence for you, most excellent Theophilus, so that you may realize the certainty of the teachings you have received. Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news of him spread throughout the whole region. He taught in their synagogues and was praised by all. He came to Nazareth, where he had grown up, and went according to his custom into the synagogue on the sabbath day. He stood up to read and was handed a scroll of the prophet Isaiah. He unrolled the scroll and found the passage where it was written: "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord." Rolling up the scroll, he handed it back to the attendant and sat down, and the eyes of all in the synagogue looked intently at him. He said to them, "Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing."

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I come to discover you more deeply today. I believe that you are really present in your word. I trust that you guide my life. I love you for taking the initiative to look for me by your Incarnation.

Petition: Lord, fill me with the joy of your presence.

1. Telling the Story: The Gospels tell us the truth about Jesus Christ: his life, teachings, death and resurrection. In Jesus Christ, God has personally become involved in human history. He has come to make a path to eternal union with the Father. We can thank Our Lord for becoming man and strengthening the relationship between God and man. We should read the Gospels with reverence and take seriously Christ’s invitation to become his followers.

2. Glad Tidings to the Poor: All of us are poor in God’s eyes. We all need his grace, friendship and mercy. Our spiritual neediness is a source of blessings. Christ has come to enrich each of us with the presence of his love, the love of the Father for his children. When we are in need, we can turn with confidence to Christ. We can learn from him how to make our life fruitful. Do I turn to him in confidence in my needs? Do I allow the greatness of his presence in my heart to fill me with joy?

3. A Year Acceptable to the Lord: For three short years Jesus walked among the people of Palestine. How many people really discovered him for who he was? We, too, have only a short time to come to know the Lord. Our human existence is short. Jesus gives us many ways to come into contact with him: his word in Scripture, the sacraments, the good example of other Christians, the providential circumstances of our life, etc. Christ is present for the asking. Do I attempt to discover him more deeply each day?

Conversation with Christ: Lord, thank you for singling me out. I know that you give me many ways to discover you. Help me to look for you more this day through the eyes of faith. I want to commit to following you.

Resolution: Today I will review my New Year’s resolutions and work on abiding by one in a particular way.


49 posted on 01/27/2013 7:52:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, January 27, 2013 >> 3rd Sunday Ordinary Time
 
Nehemiah 8:2-6, 8-10
1 Corinthians 12:12-30

View Readings
Psalm 19:8-10, 15
Luke 1:1-4; 4:14-21

 

GUESS WHAT HAPPENED AT CHURCH TODAY?

 
"...entering the synagogue on the sabbath as He was in the habit of doing..." —Luke 4:16
 

For nearly thirty years, Jesus had habitually entered the synagogue on the Sabbath to worship God (Lk 4:16). Then, on one special Sabbath day, the time "of favor" came (Lk 4:19). On that day, the Holy Spirit anointed and sent Jesus out, Scriptures were fulfilled, Jesus prophesied in power, and was nearly killed (Lk 4:23ff).

Since Jesus is the same today as He was then (Heb 13:8), He is working in power today, His day, the Lord's Day. Therefore, we should never be comfortable and complacent walking into Church; rather, we should approach "the liturgy of the Lord" (Acts 13:2) with trembling, anticipation, reverence, and awe. At any moment, in any Mass, the Spirit may explode and an international, earthshaking ministry could be born (see Lk 4:18; Acts 13:2). Great healings (Acts 20:7-12) or life-changing revelations (Lk 24:30-32) might occur. Miracles will occur, as bread and wine are being transformed into the body and blood of Jesus, Who is God. The proclaimed Scriptures will be fulfilled in the lives of many today as Jesus comes alive in their hearts and sets them free (Lk 4:18).

Today is the Lord's Day, "the first of all days" (Catechism, 2174). "Today is holy to the Lord" (Neh 8:9). Today the Holy Spirit anoints you (Lk 4:18). Expect today's Mass to be charged with power as Jesus makes all things new (Rv 21:5) — today.

 
Prayer: Jesus, may I never be so "familiar" with You that I become like the people of Nazareth and fail to see You as God.
Promise: "You, then, are the body of Christ. Every one of you is a member of it." —1 Cor 12:27
Praise: Praise You, risen Jesus, "the Resurrection and the Life" (Jn 11:25). All life, all holiness comes from You. Alleluia!

50 posted on 01/27/2013 8:06:31 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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