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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 02-03-13, Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 02-03-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 02/02/2013 9:12:23 PM PST by Salvation

February 3, 2013

Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Jer 1:4-5, 17-19

The word of the LORD came to me, saying:
Before I formed you in the womb I knew you,
before you were born I dedicated you,
a prophet to the nations I appointed you.

But do you gird your loins;
stand up and tell them
all that I command you.
Be not crushed on their account,
as though I would leave you crushed before them;
for it is I this day
who have made you a fortified city,
a pillar of iron, a wall of brass,
against the whole land:
against Judah’s kings and princes,
against its priests and people.
They will fight against you but not prevail over you,
for I am with you to deliver you, says the LORD.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 71:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 15-17

R. (cf. 15ab) I will sing of your salvation.
In you, O LORD, I take refuge;
let me never be put to shame.
In your justice rescue me, and deliver me;
incline your ear to me, and save me.
R. I will sing of your salvation.
Be my rock of refuge,
a stronghold to give me safety,
for you are my rock and my fortress.
O my God, rescue me from the hand of the wicked.
R. I will sing of your salvation.
For you are my hope, O Lord;
my trust, O God, from my youth.
On you I depend from birth;
from my mother’s womb you are my strength.
R. I will sing of your salvation.
My mouth shall declare your justice,
day by day your salvation.
O God, you have taught me from my youth,
and till the present I proclaim your wondrous deeds.
R. I will sing of your salvation.

Reading 2 1 Cor 12:31—13:13 or 13:4-13

Brothers and sisters:
Strive eagerly for the greatest spiritual gifts.
But I shall show you a still more excellent way.

If I speak in human and angelic tongues,
but do not have love,
I am a resounding gong or a clashing cymbal.
And if I have the gift of prophecy,
and comprehend all mysteries and all knowledge;
if I have all faith so as to move mountains,
but do not have love, I am nothing.
If I give away everything I own,
and if I hand my body over so that I may boast,
but do not have love, I gain nothing.

Love is patient, love is kind.
It is not jealous, it is not pompous,
It is not inflated, it is not rude,
it does not seek its own interests,
it is not quick-tempered, it does not brood over injury,
it does not rejoice over wrongdoing
but rejoices with the truth.
It bears all things, believes all things,
hopes all things, endures all things.

Love never fails.
If there are prophecies, they will be brought to nothing;
if tongues, they will cease;
if knowledge, it will be brought to nothing.
For we know partially and we prophesy partially,
but when the perfect comes, the partial will pass away.
When I was a child, I used to talk as a child,
think as a child, reason as a child;
when I became a man, I put aside childish things.
At present we see indistinctly, as in a mirror,
but then face to face.
At present I know partially;
then I shall know fully, as I am fully known.
So faith, hope, love remain, these three;
but the greatest of these is love.

or

Brothers and sisters:
Love is patient, love is kind.
It is not jealous, it is not pompous,
it is not inflated, it is not rude,
it does not seek its own interests,
it is not quick-tempered, it does not brood over injury,
it does not rejoice over wrongdoing but rejoices with the truth.
It bears all things, believes all things,
hopes all things, endures all things.

Love never fails.
If there are prophecies, they will be brought to nothing;
if tongues, they will cease;
if knowledge, it will be brought to nothing.
For we know partially and we prophesy partially,
but when the perfect comes, the partial will pass away.
When I was a child, I used to talk as a child,
think as a child, reason as a child;
when I became a man, I put aside childish things.
At present we see indistinctly, as in a mirror,
but then face to face.
At present I know partially;
then I shall know fully, as I am fully known.
So faith, hope, love remain, these three;
but the greatest of these is love.

Gospel Lk 4:21-30

Jesus began speaking in the synagogue, saying:
“Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”
And all spoke highly of him
and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his mouth.
They also asked, “Isn’t this the son of Joseph?”
He said to them, “Surely you will quote me this proverb,
‘Physician, cure yourself,’ and say,
‘Do here in your native place
the things that we heard were done in Capernaum.’”
And he said, “Amen, I say to you,
no prophet is accepted in his own native place.
Indeed, I tell you,
there were many widows in Israel in the days of Elijah
when the sky was closed for three and a half years
and a severe famine spread over the entire land.
It was to none of these that Elijah was sent,
but only to a widow in Zarephath in the land of Sidon.
Again, there were many lepers in Israel
during the time of Elisha the prophet;
yet not one of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian.”
When the people in the synagogue heard this,
they were all filled with fury.
They rose up, drove him out of the town,
and led him to the brow of the hill
on which their town had been built,
to hurl him down headlong.
But Jesus passed through the midst of them and went away.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 02/02/2013 9:12:44 PM PST by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 02/02/2013 9:16:02 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

I’m having trouble with my email so haven’t received the Navarre commentaries. But they aren’t posted on their site either.

I’ll send them out when I get them.


3 posted on 02/02/2013 9:29:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Jeremiah 1:4-5,17-19 ©
In the days of Josiah, the word of the Lord was addressed to me, saying:
‘Before I formed you in the womb I knew you;
before you came to birth I consecrated you;
I have appointed you as prophet to the nations.
‘So now brace yourself for action.
Stand up and tell them
all I command you.
Do not be dismayed at their presence,
or in their presence I will make you dismayed.
‘I, for my part, today will make you
into a fortified city,
a pillar of iron,
and a wall of bronze
to confront all this land:
the kings of Judah, its princes,
its priests and the country people.
They will fight against you
but shall not overcome you,
for I am with you to deliver you –
it is the Lord who speaks.’

Psalm Psalm 70:1-6,15,17 ©
My lips will tell of your help.
In you, O Lord, I take refuge;
  let me never be put to shame.
In your justice rescue me, free me:
  pay heed to me and save me.
My lips will tell of your help.
Be a rock where I can take refuge,
  a mighty stronghold to save me;
  for you are my rock, my stronghold.
Free me from the hand of the wicked.
My lips will tell of your help.
It is you, O Lord, who are my hope,
  my trust, O Lord, since my youth.
On you I have leaned from my birth,
  from my mother’s womb you have been my help.
My lips will tell of your help.
My lips will tell of your justice
  and day by day of your help.
O God, you have taught me from my youth
  and I proclaim your wonders still.
My lips will tell of your help.
EITHER:
Second reading 1 Corinthians 12:31-13:13 ©
Be ambitious for the higher gifts. And I am going to show you a way that is better than any of them.
  If I have all the eloquence of men or of angels, but speak without love, I am simply a gong booming or a cymbal clashing. If I have the gift of prophecy, understanding all the mysteries there are, and knowing everything, and if I have faith in all its fullness, to move mountains, but without love, then I am nothing at all. If I give away all that I possess, piece by piece, and if I even let them take my body to burn it, but am without love, it will do me no good whatever.
  Love is always patient and kind; it is never jealous; love is never boastful or conceited; it is never rude or selfish; it does not take offence, and is not resentful. Love takes no pleasure in other people’s sins but delights in the truth; it is always ready to excuse, to trust, to hope, and to endure whatever comes.
  Love does not come to an end. But if there are gifts of prophecy, the time will come when they must fail; or the gift of languages, it will not continue for ever; and knowledge – for this, too, the time will come when it must fail. For our knowledge is imperfect and our prophesying is imperfect; but once perfection comes, all imperfect things will disappear. When I was a child, I used to talk like a child, and think like a child, and argue like a child, but now I am a man, all childish ways are put behind me. Now we are seeing a dim reflection in a mirror; but then we shall be seeing face to face. The knowledge that I have now is imperfect; but then I shall know as fully as I am known.
  In short, there are three things that last: faith, hope and love; and the greatest of these is love.
OR:
Second reading 1 Corinthians 13:4-13 ©
Love is always patient and kind; it is never jealous; love is never boastful or conceited; it is never rude or selfish; it does not take offence, and is not resentful. Love takes no pleasure in other people’s sins but delights in the truth; it is always ready to excuse, to trust, to hope, and to endure whatever comes.
  Love does not come to an end. But if there are gifts of prophecy, the time will come when they must fail; or the gift of languages, it will not continue for ever; and knowledge – for this, too, the time will come when it must fail. For our knowledge is imperfect and our prophesying is imperfect; but once perfection comes, all imperfect things will disappear. When I was a child, I used to talk like a child, and think like a child, and argue like a child, but now I am a man, all childish ways are put behind me. Now we are seeing a dim reflection in a mirror; but then we shall be seeing face to face. The knowledge that I have now is imperfect; but then I shall know as fully as I am known.
  In short, there are three things that last: faith, hope and love; and the greatest of these is love.

Gospel Acclamation Jn14:6
Alleluia, alleluia!
I am the Way, the Truth and the Life, says the Lord;
No one can come to the Father except through me.
Alleluia!
Or Lk4:18
Alleluia, alleluia!
The Lord has sent me to bring the good news to the poor,
to proclaim liberty to captives.
Alleluia!

Gospel Luke 4:21-30 ©
Jesus began to speak in the synagogue: ‘This text is being fulfilled today even as you listen.’ And he won the approval of all, and they were astonished by the gracious words that came from his lips They said, ‘This is Joseph’s son, surely?’
  But he replied, ‘No doubt you will quote me the saying, “Physician, heal yourself” and tell me, “We have heard all that happened in Capernaum, do the same here in your own countryside.”’ And he went on, ‘I tell you solemnly, no prophet is ever accepted in his own country.
  ‘There were many widows in Israel, I can assure you, in Elijah’s day, when heaven remained shut for three years and six months and a great famine raged throughout the land, but Elijah was not sent to any one of these: he was sent to a widow at Zarephath, a Sidonian town. And in the prophet Elisha’s time there were many lepers in Israel, but none of these was cured, except the Syrian, Naaman.’
  When they heard this everyone in the synagogue was enraged. They sprang to their feet and hustled him out of the town; and they took him up to the brow of the hill their town was built on, intending to throw him down the cliff, but he slipped through the crowd and walked away.

4 posted on 02/02/2013 9:32:58 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray with Pope Benedict

On God the Almighty Father
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On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
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Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

5 posted on 02/02/2013 9:34:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 

  PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION

 


Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen

6 posted on 02/02/2013 9:35:31 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
7 posted on 02/02/2013 9:36:50 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
8 posted on 02/02/2013 9:37:31 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
9 posted on 02/02/2013 9:38:03 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


10 posted on 02/02/2013 9:39:02 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


11 posted on 02/02/2013 9:39:48 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

12 posted on 02/02/2013 9:40:54 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


13 posted on 02/02/2013 9:42:07 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

February Devotion: The Holy Family

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of February has been primarily asociated with the Holy Family, probably due to the feast of Our Lord's presentation at the temple, celebrated on February 2. At the very outset of Christ's work on earth, God showed the world a family in which, as Pope Leo XIII teaches, "all men might behold a perfect model of domestic life, and of all virtue and holiness." The harmony, unity, and holiness which characterized this holy Family make it the model for all Christian families.

INVOCATION
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph most kind, Bless us now and in death's agony.

FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE HOLY FAMILY
Grant unto us, Lord Jesus, ever to follow the example of Thy holy Family, that in the hour of our death Thy glorious Virgin Mother together with blessed Joseph may come to meet us and we may be worthily received by Thee into everlasting dwellings: who livest and reignest world without end. Amen.
Roman Missal

CONSECRATION TO THE HOLY FAMILY
O Jesus, our most loving Redeemer, who having come to enlighten the world with Thy teaching and example, didst will to pass the greater part of Thy life in humility and subjection to Mary and Joseph in the poor home of Nazareth, thus sanctifying the Family that was to be an example for all Christian families, graciously receive our family as it dedicates and consecrates itself to Thee this day. Do Thou defend us, guard us and establish amongst us Thy holy fear, true peace, and concord in Christian love: in order that, by conforming ourselves to the divine pattern of Thy family, we may be able, all of us without exception, to attain to eternal happiness.

Mary, dear Mother of Jesus and Mother of us, by thy kindly intercession make this our humble offering acceptable in the sight of Jesus, and obtain for us His graces and blessings.

O Saint Joseph, most holy guardian of Jesus and Mary, assist us by thy prayers in all our spiritual and temporal necessities; that so we may be enabled to praise our divine Savior Jesus, together with Mary and thee, for all eternity.

Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory be, three times.

IN HONOR OF THE HOLY FAMILY
O God, heavenly Father, it was part of Thine eternal decree that Thine only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ, the Savior of the human race, should form a holy family with Mary, His blessed mother, and His foster father, Saint Joseph. In Nazareth home life was sanctified, and a perfect example was given to every Christian family. Grant, we beseech Thee, that we may fully comprehend and faithfully imitate the virtues of the Holy Family so that we may be united with them one day in their heavenly glory. Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Holy Family Chaplet

Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, I give you my heart.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, be with me in my last hour.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, may I breathe forth my soul
in peace with you.

Blessed be Jesus Christ, true God and true man.
Blessed be the great Mother of God, Mary most holy.
Blessed be St. Joseph, her most chaste spouse. Amen.

Say 3 Our Father's, 3 Hail Mary's, and 3 Glory be's.

The Holy Family Icon by Nicholas Markell

PRAYER TO
THE HOLY FAMILY
=====================================================================================

GOD our Heavenly Father, You call all peoples to be united as one family in worshipping You as the one and true God. You willed that Your Son become man, giving Him a virgin mother and a foster father to form the Holy Family of Nazareth.

WE pray: may the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, image and model of every human family unit walk in the spirit of Nazareth and grow in the understanding of its particular mission in society and the Church. May our families be living cells of love, faithfulness and unity, thus reflecting God's covenant with humanity and Christ's redeeming love for His Church.

JESUS, Mary and Joseph protect our families from all evil; keep us, who are away from home, one in love with our dear ones.

The Holy Family


 
"The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist ( the Doni tondo )" by Michelangelo c.1506, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
Parent's Prayer

Jesus, Son of God, Son of Man, and Son of Mary, I thank you for the gift of life you have entrusted to my care. Help me be a parent both tender and wise, both loving and forgiving.

Mary, Holy Mother of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and our Motherly Queen of Heaven, nourish our family with your heavenly grace. Help us to remain faithful to The Most Holy Trinity, in all our sorrows and joys.

Joseph, Earthly father to our Lord God, guardian and spouse of Mary, keep our family safe from harm. Help us in all times of discouragement or anxiety.

Holy Family of Nazareth, help our family to walk in your footsteps. May we be peace-loving and peace-giving.
Amen.
 

Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph
Recovering God’s Plan for Marriage and Family: A Sermon on the Feast of the Holy Family

“Why were you looking for me?" (On the Feast of The Holy Family)
U.S. Postal Service Issues Holy Family Forever Stamp
On Prayer in the Life of the Holy Family
The Holy Family - held together by Love through all their problems [Ecumenical]
Feast of the Holy Family: The Christian Family is a Domestic Church
Chesterton on "The Human Family and the Holy Family"
Joseph, Mary and Jesus: A Model Family
ADVICE TO PARENTS by Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787)
The Holy Family
St. Joseph as Head of the Holy Family (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

Feast of the Holy Family
Feast of the Holy Family (Dom Guéranger OSB)
The Feast of the Holy Family
The Holy Family vs. The Holy Innocents: A Christmas season reflection [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican creche to place Holy Family in Joseph's carpentry workshop
The Redemption and Protection of the Family [Feast of the Holy Family]
Study Backs Tradition of Loreto House - Stones in Altar Match Those in Nazareth, It Says
Unraveling Jesus' mystery years in Egypt
Gaudi’s Church of the Holy Family to be ready for worship in 2008
Imitating the Holy Family; Four Traits that Make It Possible
Lots of Graphics: Post your favorite image of the St. Mary and Child, the Holy Family...


14 posted on 02/02/2013 9:42:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
February 2013
Pope's Intentions
 
Migrant Families: That migrant families, especially the mothers, may be supported and accompanied in their difficulties.
 
Peace: That the peoples at war and in conflict may lead the way in building a peaceful future.

15 posted on 02/02/2013 9:43:53 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

Change we can believe in
Fr. Jerry J. Pokorsky

Change is usually disruptive. Habits make life easier because, by definition, habits are designed to reduce the effort of our tasks. But when habits are challenged with changes, uncertainties are introduced that make demands on our patterns of thinking and behaving. The breaking of everyday routines can be annoying at the very least. Yet change is often desirable or even necessary: a change of scenery; changes to get out of “ruts” of behavior (such as watching too much television or a fixation with iPhones); above all, changes to renounce sinful behavior.

As usual it is helpful to look at the Gospel to examine the way God changes the world. We will find that the Gospel pattern is gradual and nonviolent, following the pattern of fulfillment before the changes of replacement.

This Sunday’s Gospel completes the Gospel passage of the preceding Sunday. In His hometown synagogue, Jesus reveals that He is the fulfillment of the prophecy of Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.” For those with the eyes to see and the ears to hear, especially in connection with His reputed mighty deeds in Capernaum, Jesus is revealing that He is the Christ. Jesus is reaching deep into the history of Israel to make His case in a thoughtful, even gradual manner. Contrary to the opinions of many theologians of our time, Jesus was not a “revolutionary.”

Initially the neighbors of Jesus spoke highly of Him. St. Luke reveals all “were amazed at the gracious words that came from his mouth.” But their familiarity with Him and the habits of their relationship with Him would not change. “They also asked, ‘Isn’t this the son of Joseph?’” And soon they were “all filled with fury” and “rose up, drove him out of the town and led him to the brow of the hill” to “hurl him down headlong.” He was not provoked by the rejection. He simply “passed through the midst of them and went away.” Such is the patience of Christ, patience demonstrated throughout the Gospels in the face of His enemies up to His self-surrender on the cross.

In the divine economy the second person of the Trinity enters into the world and fulfills the revelations of the Old Testament prophets before He replaces the old wine skins with the new (cf. Mk 2:22). Hence the liturgy of the synagogue is fulfilled and replaced by the Liturgy of the Word at Mass. The sacrifice of the temple is fulfilled and replaced by the one sacrifice of Christ. And the one sacrifice of Christ is represented in the Liturgy of the Eucharist and the worship of the triune God. The change that Christ effects is preceded by fulfillment. For Christ insists, “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them” (Mt 5:17). For Christians, change is linked to fulfillment and enlightenment. Grace, as the theologians say, builds on nature.

In contrast the game plan of the evil one is, as usual, a half-truth. The radical demand for replacement (“change”) is not preceded by patience; it can only be preceded by the violence of destruction. In our day, evidence of the diabolical plan for change is clear. The Ten Commandments need to be destroyed and replaced. The Sixth and Ninth Commandments protecting marriage must be destroyed and redefined to promote contraception and the “gay” agenda. The Fifth Commandment also needs to be redefined to mandate subsidized abortion on demand and euthanasia for those outside the womb deemed to be a drag on the economy. The Seventh Commandment protecting private property (always, of course, in the service of the common good) also needs to be redefined to insist upon the centralization of economic and social power in the hands of a few, including theft from children not yet born. The first three commandments, our duties to God, must be replaced by our duties to the state, perverting the notion of “social justice.” The Fourth Commandment teaching filial respect and obedience (including respect and obedience to the teachings of church and recognition of the Holy Father’s teaching infallibility in matters of faith and morals) must be replaced by the infallible teaching authority of the state and its spokesman.

Underpinning the whole diabolical plan is the undermining and replacement of the Eighth Commandment. For revolutionaries, truth can no longer be objective. Lies are enunciated with great certainty and never retracted. The most arrogant and often the most successful of politicians follow this path with great worldly success. But Christians are not “of the world” as they remain in the world. As the prophet Isaiah reveals, “My thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord” (Is 55:8).

Following the Lord requires of each of us a profound conversion, a change in our way of thinking and living; and it requires us to open our hearts to be enlightened and to be inwardly transformed. In other words, the Lord invites us to a lifetime of change. He does us no violence. We are, after all, His handiwork. The Lord does not destroy or even modify our nature. With His grace He purifies it, in a real sense fulfills it in His love. This is the only change we ought to believe in.

Fr. Pokorsky is pastor of St. Michael Parish in Annandale.


16 posted on 02/02/2013 10:08:59 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

No prophet is accepted in his own country Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year C

 -  4th Sunday in ordinary time

No prophet is accepted in his own country

No prophet is accepted in his own country Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Luke 4:21-30

21 Then he began to say to them, "Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing."
22 All spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his mouth. They said, "Is not this Joseph's son?"
23 He said to them, "Doubtless you will quote to me this proverb, 'Doctor, cure yourself!' And you will say, 'Do here also in your hometown the things that we have heard you did at Capernaum.' "
24 And he said, "Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet's hometown.
25 But the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the land;
26 yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon.
27 There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian."
28 When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with rage.
29 They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off the cliff.
30 But he passed through the midst of them and went on his way. (NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

4th Sunday in ordinary time - No prophet is accepted in his own country When the people of Nazareth heard me speak at the Synagogue, they were amazed. At first they approved my wisdom, but then they started asking questions about me.

Surely this is just the son of a carpenter, how can he speak with such wisdom, how can he be the man who has performed miracles if he is just an ordinary person from this town? How can he claim that he has the Spirit of God upon Him and that He can give sight to the blind, heal the sick, free those possessed by evil spirits and bring forth the Grace of God upon us?

I replied to them that no man is a prophet in his own land; that God preferred to bring healing to the pagans in the past instead of granting his favor to his chosen people. The reason is that they took the Kingdom of Heaven for granted and neglected the commandments of God.

After that, they decided to get rid of me, although I knew their plans and escaped from the menacing crowd.

In baptism, you are anointed with the Spirit of God and you become sons and daughters of the Most High. How come you don’t enjoy the privileges and gifts of the rightful inheritance that is yours? The reason is your lack of faith.

Ah, if you only gave credit to God, if you acknowledged with the appropriate reverence the gift that God has given you. You are temples of the Holy Spirit, God is with you, the Lord is One with you, His Spirit moves you to come to him and to know him, love him and serve him, to become One with him.

Stop underestimating yourselves, stop denying the power of the Spirit of God within you, stop alienating yourselves from God through sinfulness and lack of faith. Come closer, enter the temple of the Presence of God within you, accept that God has come to save you, that his flesh and blood is a part of you now and that you belong to Him.

I am calling everyone to accept my Holy Spirit as the power that will act in you, think in you and will in you. Surrender your lives to the action of God who wants to make you saints. Repent of your sins and forget who you are now, accept what I can make of you through my mercy, and you will be transformed. I accept you as you are; I desire your sanctification in the power of my burning Love.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


17 posted on 02/02/2013 10:16:08 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Archdiocese of Washington

A “Rule of Life” for Prophets: A Homily for the 4th Sunday of the Year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

Prophets are those who speak for God. They Love God, and they love his people, and speak the very true (and often painful) truth of God to his people. They do so not to win an argument, but because of their love and conviction that only the undiluted truth of God can save us in the end.

People-pleasing and other forms of human respect cannot supplant the reverence for God and His truth. Thus Prophets are willing to endure pain and suffering to proclaim God’s truth to an often unappreciative segment of God’s people. But out of love for God and his people, they press on to proclaim his truth, and they do so willingly, knowing that even death awaits their personal, persistent and prophetic proclamation.

Today’s readings set for us a kind of “rule for life for prophets.” And we, who are baptized into the order of prophet, do well to hear the teachings of these readings, Let us examine them in three stages.

I. The Call that is Declared – The text says: In the first reading God says to Jeremiah (and to us): The word of the LORD came to me, saying: Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I dedicated you, a prophet to the nations I appointed you. But do you gird your loins; stand up and tell them all that I command you.

We ought to note four things about our call as prophets.

1. The Prevenient nature of our Call- The word “prevenient” refers to something which comes before; which precedes, something that is expectant or anticipatory. And thus God has not chosen us in a whimsical way, as if to say, “you’ll do.” He has considered our call before He made us and equipped, empowered and enabled us for our work.

God tells Jeremiah and us, that he has known, loved and cherished us long before He ever made us. And thus he made us in a way that prepared and equipped us of the very work of being a prophet.

How? you say. That is as variable as the person you are. There is no one who can proclaim God or announce the kingdom like you can. Perhaps too he has especially equipped you to evangelize certain individuals no one else can reach. Just know this, God has thought a long time about you and prepared for you in very specific and thoughtful ways. What ever you have needed has “come before” is “prevenient.”

2. The Purview of our Call -The text tells Jeremiah (and us) that we are appointed unto the nations. Now, Jeremiah did not himself, in his own life, journey beyond Israel. But since his life, the Word of the Lord uttered through him, has reached every nation.

Never doubt the influence you can exert by the grace of God. Even in and through reaching one person you can change the destiny of many. Stay in your lane and do your work, but remember God can accomplish through you more than you ask or imagine. Your influence by his grace can reach the nations.

3. The Preparation of our Call -The Lord tells Jeremiah (and us) to “gird our loins.” This is an ancient way of saying “roll up your sleeves.” In other words, prepare to work by assembling what you need and being ready to exert effort.

Surely for us this means daily prayer, weekly Eucharist and frequent confession. It means prayerfully reading God’s reading and the teaching of the Church and it means keeping fellowship with the Church, and with fellow believers. All of this equips, empowers and enables us for the work of being a prophet which God has called us to do.

Beyond this there may be other specific gifts God calls us to develop, be it music, learning a second language, growing in the gift of healing, preaching, or administration. What it may be, God will show you and help you to grow the gifts and talents you have received.

In all this you “roll up your sleeves” for the work God has given and is preparing you for so that you will be an evermore effective prophet.

4. The Prescription of our Call -The text says, “tell them all that I command you.” In other words, leave nothing out, proclaim the whole counsel of God. Don’t just proclaim what appeals to you or jives with you politics and worldview, don’t just say what is popular or in sync with currently worldly thinking. Tell them the whole message, in season or out of season.

II. The Courage that is demanded – The text says Be not crushed on their account, as though I would leave you crushed before them; for it is I this day who have made you a fortified city, a pillar of iron, a wall of brass, against the whole land: against Judah’s kings and princes, against its priests and people.

And here note three qualities of a prophet:

Strength - A prophet needs to be strong, for people are stubborn and unwilling to easily change. Indeed, we are collectively a stiff-necked people, we have a neck of iron and forehead of brass. We are thick-headed, willful and obdurate. A prophet has to be willing to endure a lot to move the ball even a few inches. If you don’t think we’re a hard case, look at the cross and see what it took to save us (you). Prophets need strength and persistence.

Support- The prophet (Jeremiah and us) is called “a pillar of iron.”  That is, we are to lend support to a crumbling nation and culture. Whether our culture likes to admit it or not, it is crumbling and collapsing, If it stands any chance at all, it is only that we are willing to be a pillar of iron calling this culture back to modesty, decency, chastity, self control, maturity, obedience to God and generosity to the poor. Otherwise, everything is destined for ruin.

Sadly the Church has often had to pick up the shattered pieces of fallen cultures, nations and eras that refused to repent. But this is what prophets must do, they must be pillars of iron when cultures go weak and soft, or crumble under the weight of pride, sin and un-repentance.

And failing that,  we must become, by God’s grace the new foundation and pillar of what rises from the ashes. All of this takes great courage.

Sanctifier - Jeremiah is told that the priests, kings and princes have all been co-opted, and corrupted, and he must speak the truth to them all and summon them to repentance.

Here is the hardest work of the prophet, to call those who most benefit from the status quo, to change and repentance. This is not only hard because they are “on top” of the current system, but it is also hard because to one degree or another, they are owed respect and obedience as lawful superiors.

Navigating the balance between respect for authority and the summons of them to repentance is not easy and only God can really pull it off. Nevertheless speaking the truth to power is the unenviable lot of the prophet.

Well, fellow prophets this means you and me. I would only urge prayer here. Bishop-bashing and the usual fare of ridiculing political leaders is not the solution. Neither is quiet acquiescence when we are clear that those in authority need to hear a call from the Lord. Lots of prayer and a general tone of respect will surely lead the way. Clarity with charity, and light with love.

III. Conclusion - The text says,  They will fight against you but not prevail over you, for I am with you to deliver you, says the LORD.

In the end, the truth will out. The Light wins, He always wins. Every night gives way to day and the light scatters darkness. Darkness has its hour but truth has eternity. Good Friday only points to Easter Sunday, and death is cast off like a garment. In the end, every true prophet is on the winning team. While he may endure jail, laughter, ridicule. persecution, setbacks and trials, what every true prophet announces will come to pass. History bears this out and it will be definitively manifest at the Last Day. The darkness cannot prevail, it always gives place to the light.

The Conclusion for the prophet, for the Church, for the Gospel, for the Lord is total victory. It cannot be any other way, God has spoken it and He will do it.

Even if in a small way the Lord Jesus shows this in today’s Gospel. The text says,

They rose up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town had been built, to hurl him down headlong. But Jesus passed through the midst of them and went away.

Here is a preview of Easter, just when Satan is running his victory lap, the Lord casts off death and stands as light in the shadow of the Cross. Satan loses, Jesus wins. That is the conclusion.

So get on the winning team. Pay little heed to the current struggle, it cannot last or win. Jesus has already won.


18 posted on 02/02/2013 10:20:08 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

4th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Jer 1:4-5,17-19 II: 1Cor 12:31-13:13
Gospel
Luke 4:21-30

21 And he began to say to them, "Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing."
22 And all spoke well of him, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth; and they said, "Is not this Joseph's son?"
23 And he said to them, "Doubtless you will quote to me this proverb, 'Physician, heal yourself; what we have heard you did at Caper'na-um, do here also in your own country.'"
24 And he said, "Truly, I say to you, no prophet is acceptable in his own country.
25 But in truth, I tell you, there were many widows in Israel in the days of Eli'jah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, when there came a great famine over all the land;
26 and Eli'jah was sent to none of them but only to Zar'ephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who was a widow.
27 And there were many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Eli'sha; and none of them was cleansed, but only Na'aman the Syrian."
28 When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with wrath.
29 And they rose up and put him out of the city, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their city was built, that they might throw him down headlong.
30 But passing through the midst of them he went away.


Interesting Details
  • It was customary in Jewish society for a son to carry on his father's trade and his grandfather's name. No one was ever expected to become something better than or to improve on the lot of the parents. This fact is the basic foundation of honor. Thus for Jesus to step shamefully beyond His family boundaries would be quite a scandal.
  • (v.22) "Isn't he Joseph's son?" Luke quoted the popular opinion and confirmed that Jesus did not follow Joseph's trade thus breaching His family honor.
  • In the Mediterranean world, the basic rule is also "look after your family first". Again, Jesus broke the rule. He healed the sick outside of His home town.
  • The examples of Elijah and Elisha working miracles for the Gentiles simply emphasize the point that God's salvation is not limited to the Jews.
  • The crowd's reaction foreshadows Jesus' passion and death, as His escape to continue His journey points ahead to Easter victory and the continuing spread of God's word.
  • The passage announces the theme of prophetic rejection that had been predicted by the prophecy of Simeon (2:34). Jesus is rejected by His own and accepted by foreigners. The comparison's equations are simple:
    Jesus = a prophet
    Nazareth = Israel
    Capernaum = the Gentiles

One Main Point

Jesus confirmed that He is the Messiah.


Reflections
  1. Jesus always shows His love through action. How do I show His love to my brothers and sisters?
  2. How well do I listen or react to the people that I dislike even though their intentions are good?
  3. It is difficult for us today to appreciate what Jesus suffered to show His love. Meditate on how great His love is for us.

19 posted on 02/02/2013 10:24:29 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, February 03, 2013
Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Jeremiah 1:4-5, 17-19
Psalm 71:1-6, 15-17
1 Corinthians 12:31 -- 13:13 or 13:4-13
Luke 4:21-30

Fidélium ánimae per misericordiam Dei requiéscant in pace. Amen May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen.

-- Fidélium ánimae


20 posted on 02/02/2013 10:28:15 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

21 posted on 02/02/2013 10:33:26 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


22 posted on 02/02/2013 10:35:08 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Saint Blaise, Bishop & Martyr

Saint Blaise, Bishop & Martyr
Optional Memorial
February 3rd

Traditional Prayer card

History:
St. Blaise has been extremely popular for centuries in both the Eastern and Western Churches. He was a physician and the Bishop of Sebaste, Armenia. He once saved a child who was choking on a fish bone, which led to the blessing of throats on St. Blaise's feast day. He was beheaded in 316.

Collect:
Hear, O Lord, the supplications your people make
under the patronage of the Martyrs Saint Blaise,
and grant that they may rejoice in peace in this present life,
and find help for life eternal.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: Romans 5:1-5
Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Through Him we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God. More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God's love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit which has been given to us.

Gospel Reading: Mark 16:15-20
And He[Jesus] said to them, "Go into all the world and preach the gospel to the whole creation. He who believes and is baptized will be saved; but he who does not believe will be condemned. And these signs will accompany those who believe: in My name they will cast out demons; they will speak in new tongues; they will pick up serpents, and if they drink any deadly thing, it will not hurt them; they will lay their hands on the sick, and they will recover."

So then the Lord Jesus, after He had spoken to them, was taken up into heaven, and sat down at the right hand of God. And they went forth and preached everywhere, while the Lord worked with them and confirmed the message by the signs that attended it. Amen.



Blessing of Throats:

Excerpt from Ceremonies of the Liturgical Year by Monsignor Peter Elliott (Ignatius Press 2002)

85. On the day after the Presentation of Our Lord, the memorial of Saint Blase, it is customary in many places to bless the throats of the faithful with two candles tied together with a red ribbon to form a cross. The candles are privately blessed with the paryer provided in the Book of Blessings or the preconciliar Roman Ritual, title IX, chapter III. The rite of blessing of throats may take place before or after Mass.

86. The priest or deacon places the candles around the throat of whoevers seeks the blessing, using the formula: "Through the intercession of Saint Blaise, bishop and martyr, may God deliver you free from every disease of the throat, and from every other disease. In the name of the Father and of the Son, + and of the Holy Spirit. R. Amen."

Because the celebrant makes the sign of the cross with his right hand, it is best to apply the candles with both hands. Then the celebrant withdraws his right hand to make the sign of the cross, while continuing to hold the condles in place with his left hand. For the convenience of the celebrant the formula should be printed on a small card, attached to the candles.


23 posted on 02/03/2013 7:11:02 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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St. Blaise and the Blessing of Throats [Catholic Caucus]
On Blaise and Throat Blessings [Ecumenical]
Catholic Caucus] Feast of St. Blaise
Blessing Throats on the Feast of St. Blaise
St Blase, Bishop And Martyr
24 posted on 02/03/2013 7:12:01 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Saint Ansgar, Bishop

Saint Ansgar, Bishop
Optional Memorial
February 3rd

History:
Saint Ansgar was born in France, become known as the "Apostle of the North" for his great evangelical work in Denmark and Sweden. He was the first Archbishop of Hamburg and then of Bremen. Pope Gregory IV appointed him as his delegate to Denmark and Sweden. In reply to those who questioned some miracles attributed to him, he said, "Were God to choose me to do such things, I would ask Him for one miracle only: that by His power He would make me a good man."

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003

 

Collect:
O God, who willed to send the Bishop Saint Ansgar
to enlighted many peoples,
grant us, through his intercession,
that we may always walk in the light of your truth.
through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: Isaiah 52:7-10
How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him who brings good tidings, who publishes peace, who brings good tidings of good, who publishes salvation, who says to Zion, "Your God reigns." Hark, your watchmen lift up their voice, together they sing for joy; for eye to eye they see the return of the Lord to Zion. Break forth together into singing, you waste places of Jerusalem; for the Lord has comforted his people, he has redeemed Jerusalem. The Lord has bared his holy arm before the eyes of all the nations; and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God.

Gospel Reading: Mark 1:14-20
Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of God, and saying, "The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent, and believe in the gospel."

And passing along by the Sea of Galilee, He saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net in the sea; for they were fishermen. And Jesus said to them, "Follow me and I will make you become fishers of men." And immediately they left their nets and followed Him. And going on a little farther, He saw James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were in their boat mending the nets. And immediately He called them; and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired servants, and followed Him.


25 posted on 02/03/2013 7:14:43 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Saints' days are superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

St. Ansgar, [Anskar] "Apostle of the North" (Scandinavia)

26 posted on 02/03/2013 7:16:21 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information:
St. Blaise
Feast Day: January 24
Born:

Armenia

Patron of: Animals, builders, choking, veterinarians, throats, infants, stonecutters, carvers, wool workers



27 posted on 02/03/2013 7:17:42 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Blasé

 
Feast Day: February 03
Died:316

St. Blase was an Armenian who came from a rich family and was given a Christian education. As a young man, Blase thought about all the sufferings and troubles in the world. He found that only spiritual joys can make a person really happy.

He became a priest and then bishop of Sebaste in Armenia which is now modern Turkey. Blase worked wholeheartedly to make his people holy and happy. He prayed and preached; he tried to help everyone.

Later he lived in a cave on Mount Argeus. He had the gift of healing and both men and animals were brought to him to be healed. According to legend, sick animals would come to him on their own for help, but would never disturb him at prayer.

When the governor, Licinius, began to harass the Christians, St. Blase was captured. He was sent to prison to be beheaded. On the way, people crowded the road to see their beloved bishop for the last time. He blessed them all, even the pagans.

A poor mother rushed up to him. She begged him to save her child who was choking to death from a fishbone. The saint whispered a prayer and blessed the child. He worked a miracle that saved the child's life. That is why St. Blase is called upon by all who have throat diseases. On his feast day, we have our throats blessed. We ask him to protect us from all sicknesses of the throat.

In prison, the saintly bishop converted many non-believers. No torture could make Blaise give up his faith in Jesus. Thrown into a lake to drown, Blaise stood on the surface and invited his persecutors to walk out and prove the power of their gods; they drowned. When he returned to land, he was beheaded. Now St. Blase is with Jesus forever.

Reflection: Each of us experiences a need of healing in some area of our lives. Today, invite God to come into these places with the comfort of his presence.

28 posted on 02/03/2013 7:21:14 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
In Mark's Gospel (6.3) Joseph is not mentioned but Jesus himself is referred to as a carpenter (tekton--the Greek word can also apply to someone who works in stone or metal as well as in wood).

The translation they were using today had St. Paul say "so that I may boast" in I Cor. 133 instead of the more familiar "to be burned." The Vulgate has ita ut ardeam. (Latin ardere, ardeo, arsi, arsus: to burn)

The Greek manuscripts are divided. There is just a one-letter differnce in the Greek...if the reading with a theta is accepted, it means "burn," if the reading with the chi is accepted, it means "boast."

29 posted on 02/03/2013 12:44:03 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus

I left out a period. “I Cor. 133” should read “I Cor. 13.3”


30 posted on 02/03/2013 12:45:50 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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From: Jeremiah 1:4-5, 17-19

The Lord calls Jeremiah


[4] Now the word of the Lord came to me saying,
[5] “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you,
and before you were born I consecrated you;
I appointed you a prophet to the nations.”

Vision of the boiling pot


[17] But you, gird up your loins; arise, and say to them everything that I com-
mand you. Do not be dismayed by them, lest I dismay you before them. [18]
And I, behold, I make you this day a fortified city, an iron pillar, and bronze walls,
against the whole land, against the kings of Judah, its princes, its priests, and
the people of the land.[19] They will fight against you; but they shall not prevail
against you, for I am with you, says the Lord, to deliver you.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1:1-19. The book of Jeremiah is a collection of the prophet’s oracles arranged
more by subject than in chronological order and interspersed with stories about
his life. The heading (vv. 1-3), as in most of the prophetical books, introduces the
prophet and tells when he lived. Then, as an introduction to the book, comes an
account of the call of Jeremiah (vv. 4-10) along with two visions that give a good
description of the man (vv. 11-12 and 13-19).

1:4-10. This account of the call of Jeremiah gives a very good idea of the myste-
rious nature of every divine call — a call from all eternity and involving no merit on
the part of the person called, in which God makes known to a soul the why and
wherefore of his or her life. No one comes into being by accident, for everything
that happens is part of God’s providence (v. 5).God’s action in creating a person
is described graphically — “formed” you in the womb — a word used to describe
what a potter does when he models something in clay. The Lord “knew” Jere-
miah — a reference to his choosing him for a specific mission (cf. Amos 3:2;
Rom 8:29); God has a plan for each person, and he endows each with talents
that equip him or her to put that plan into effect. The passage also talks of a
“consecration”, that is, the earmarking of a person or thing for the service of
God. God’s plan for someone, made before the person is born, emerges in due
course, when he or she is old enough to take on the assignments that God has
been preparing him for. Glossing this passage, St John Chrysostom, has God
say this: “I am the one who knit you together in your mother’s womb. Your life
is not a work of nature, nor the fruit of suffering. I am the origin and cause of all
things: you should obey and offer yourself to me,” and he adds: “It does not
begin with I consecrated you: first, I knew you; then I consecrated you. Thus
is the original choice shown, and after the original choice, the particular calling”
(Fragmenta in Ieremiam, 1).

When the mystery of a person’s calling begins to be revealed, their initial reac-
tion can be one of fear, because they are very conscious of their limitations and
feel that they are not up to the tasks that the Lord entrusts them with. Jeremiah,
for example, argues that he is too young (v. 6).We do not know how old he was
at the time, for the word he uses to describe his age (na’ar) is imprecise. He was
probably only an adolescent (cf. Gen 37:2; 1 Sam 2:18; 3:1-21). In responding
to a vocation, one needs to listen, above all, to God who calls, who never leaves
his chosen ones on their own, and who always gives them the wherewithal to
carry out the mission he is charging them with (vv. 7-8).

The Lord’s symbolic gesture of putting out his hand to touch Jeremiah’s mouth,
as if to fill it with divine words, is similar to other gestures found in accounts of
the calling of prophets (cf. Is 6:7; Ezek 2:8-3:3; Dan 10:16). It is to tell the man
not to be concerned: he can rest assured that God will give him the right words
to express himself. It is a promise similar to that made by Jesus to his disciples:
he assured them of the Holy Spirit’s help when the time came for them to bear
witness to him (cf. Mt 10:19-20).

The assignment given to Jeremiah implies a heavy responsibility; he will need
fortitude if he is to carry it out (v. 10). It involves in the first place doing destruc-
tive things (plucking up, breaking down, destroying and overthrowing) and only
then come constructive roles (building and planning). St Gregory the Great will
apply the same idea to the attention that is called for in the pastoral care of the
faithful: “One cannot build up if what disturbs the foundation has not been des-
troyed. In other words, the sweet words of good preaching are sown in vain if
the thorns of self-love have not first been plucked from the hearts of listeners”
(Regular pastoralis, 3, 34).

13-19. Jeremiah is shown a pot that is beginning to boil over (v. 13). He is given
to understand the meaning of the disquieting news that is reaching Jerusalem —
rumours of advances by foreign armies that threaten the holy city from the north
(vv. 14-15). These reports are a warning that God sends his people to encourage
them to admit their unfaithfulness (v. 16). In this way the Lord is beginning to an-
nounce a future punishment, which we shall hear much more about as the book
develops — a chastisement to be inflicted on the people of Judah and Jerusalem
for failing to keep the Covenant.

It will be up to Jeremiah to speak to them, reproaching them for their sins and
explaining the reasons for events (vv. 17-18) — not an easy task, but God will
give him the strength to perform it (v. 19).

This passage outlines the framework, the setting, of the oracles and narratives
contained in the book. God never forgets his people and, in a time of crisis, when
the kingdom of Judah is about to collapse, he chooses Jeremiah and sends him
out on his mission. God means him to show the people the real reasons for all
the distress they will meet and, once all the various disasters have come to pass,
he intends Jeremiah to console them and assure them that God never abandons
them.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


31 posted on 02/03/2013 2:04:13 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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From: 1 Corinthians 12:31-13:13

[31] But earnestly desire the higher gifts. And I will show you still a more excel-
lent way.

Hymn to Charity


[1] If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy
gong or a clanging cymbal. [2] And if I have prophetic powers, and understand
all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains,
but have not love, I am nothing. [3] If I give away all I have, and if I deliver my bo-
dy to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing. [4] Love is patient and kind;
love is not jealous or boastful; [5] it is not arrogant or rude. Love does not insist
on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; [6] it does not rejoice at wrong, but
rejoices in the right. [7] Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things,
endures all things.

[8] Love never ends; as for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they
will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away. [9] For our knowledge is imper-
fect and our prophecy is imperfect; but when the perfect comes, the imperfect
will pass away. [11] When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child,
I reasoned like a child; when I became a man, I gave up childish ways. [12] For
now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I
shall understand fully, even as I have been fully understood. [13] So faith, hope,
love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

31. “Earnestly desire the higher gifts”: according to some Greek manuscripts
this can be translated “earnestly seek the greater gifts.” St Paul is encouraging
his Christians to put greater value on those gifts of the Holy Spirit which contri-
bute most to the goal of the Church than on those which are spectacular. He pro-
bably has in mind the teaching he will develop (chap. 14) about the superiority of
graces and charisms to do with teaching and catechesis.

“A still more excellent way”: this undoubtedly refers to charity, which he goes on
to describe and praise (chap. 13). Therefore, what is called his “hymn to charity”
is not a digression, much less a later addition, but an outpouring of the Apostle’s
soul, which perfectly explains why charity is the greatest of all gifts, a sure route
to holiness and salvation, and the identifying mark of the Christian: “the first and
most necessary gift is charity, by which we love God above all things and our
neighbor because of him. [...] This is because love, as the bond of perfection and
fullness of the law (cf. Col 3:14, Rom. 13:10), governs, gives meaning to, and per-
fects all the means of sanctification. Hence the true disciple of Christ is marked
by love both of God and of his neighbor” (Vatican II, “Lumen Gentium”, 42).

1-13. This wonderful hymn to charity is one of the most beautiful pages in Pau-
line writing. The literary style of the chapter is designed to present charity in all
its splendor. St Paul sings the praises of love as seen from three points of view
— the superiority and absolute need of this gift (vv. 1-3); its features and practical
expression (vv. 4-7); and the fact it endures for ever (vv. 8-13).

Love, the charity of which St Paul is speaking, has nothing to do with selfish de-
sire for physical passionate possession; nor is it restricted to mere philanthropy,
whose motivation is purely humanitarian: charity is a love which is to be found in
the new order of things established by Christ; its origin, context and purpose are
radically new; it is born of the love of God for men, a love so intense that he sacri-
ficed his only-begotten Son (In 3:16). The Christian is enabled to respond to this
love of God by this gift of the Holy Spirit, charity (cf. Gal 5:22; Rom 15:30), and
by virtue of this divine love he discovers God in his neighbor: he recognizes that
all are children of the one Father and brothers and sisters of Jesus Christ: “Our
love is not to be confused with sentimentality or mere good fellowship, nor with
that somewhat questionable zeal to help others in order to convince ourselves of
our superiority. Rather, it means living in peace with our neighbor, venerating the
image of God that is found in each and every person and doing all we can to get
them in their turn to contemplate that image and learn to turn to Christ” (St. J.
Escriva, “Friends of God”, 230).

To make this clear St Paul mentions those gifts which appear to be most excep-
tional — the gift of tongues; knowledge; and heroic actions.

Firstly, the gift of tongues. St Thomas Aquinas comments that the Apostle “right-
ly compares words lacking in charity to the sound of lifeless instruments, to the
sound of a bell or cymbals, whose sound though clear is a dead sound. The
same occurs in the speech of someone who has no charity; no matter how bril-
liant it be, it comes across as something dead, because it is of no help as far as
meriting eternal life is concerned” (”Commentary on 1 Cor, ad loc.”). By way of
emphasis St Paul speaks of the tongues of angels as the highest degree of the
gift of tongues.

“I am nothing”: this conclusion could not be more emphatic. A little further on (1
Cor 15:10), St Paul will himself say that “by the grace of God I am what I am”, to
make us see that from God’s love for man (grace) derives man’s love for God and
for his neighbor for God’s sake (charity).

Knowledge and faith, which need not ever be separated, also acquire their full
meaning in the Christian who lives by love: “Each one according to his own gifts
and duties must steadfastly advance along the way of a living faith, which arou-
ses hope and works through love” (Vatican II, “Lumen Gentium”, 41).

Strictly speaking, martyrdom is the supreme act of love. St Paul is referring here
as in the previous points to hypothetical cases or merely external gestures,
which seem to be token detachment and generosity, but are in fact mere appea-
rances: “If someone does not have charity”, St Augustine says, “even though he
may have these gifts at the moment, they will be taken away from him. What he
has will be taken away because he is missing the main thing, that whereby he
will have everything and which will keep him safe [...]. He has the power to pos-
sess, but he has no charity in what he does; and because he lacks charity, what
he has in his possession will be taken from him” (”Enarrationes in Psalmos”,
146, 10).

4-7. In his listing of the qualities of charity, St Paul, under the inspiration of the
Holy Spirit, begins with two general features — patience and kindness — which
the Bible attributes to God. Both of these lead on to thirteen particular ways in
which love expresses itself.

Patience is a quality often praised in the Bible: in the Psalms God is said to be
slow to anger (Ps 145:8); patience means great serenity in the face of injury;
kindness has to do with being inclined to do good to others. St Thomas Aquinas
explains this by starting with the etymology of the word: “Kindness [”benignitas”,
benignity] is like good fuel [”bona igneitas”]: just as fire causes solid substances
to become liquid and start to melt, charity sees to it that a person does not keep
his things for himself but distributes them to others” (”Commentary on 1 Cor, ad
loc.”). Since to charity are attributed qualities which in the first instance apply to
God, we can see the excellence of this virtue: “Charity towards our neighbor is
an expression of our love of God. Accordingly, when we strive to grow in this vir-
tue, we cannot fix any limits to our growth. The only possible measure for the
love of God is to love without measure: on the one hand, because we will never
be able to thank him enough for what he has done for us; and on the other, be-
cause this is exactly what God’s own love for us, his creatures, is like: it over-
flows without calculation or limit” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of God”, 232).

“Love is patient”, St Gregory the Great comments, “because it bears serenely
the injury it suffers. It is kind, because it repays evil with good. It is not jealous,
because it covets nothing in this world: it does not know what it is to envy world-
ly prosperity. It is not boastful, because it yearns only for spiritual reward and it
is not carried away by external things. It is not arrogant, because it thrives only
on the love of God and neighbor and avoids whatever would take it from the path
of righteousness. It is not covetous, because although it ardently pursues its
own spiritual goals, it does not desire the goods of others. It does not insist on
its own way, because it scorns as alien those things it temporarily possesses
here below: it seeks to hold on only to what is enduring. It is not irritable, and
even though injuries seek to provoke it, it does not let itself have any desire for
vengeance, for no matter how difficult a time it may have in this life, it hopes for
greater rewards in the next. It is not resentful, because it has invested its thought
in the love of purity, and having rooted out all hatred it is incapable of harboring in
its heart any type of aversion. It does not rejoice at wrong, because it feels affec-
tion for others and does not rejoice at seeing the ruin of its enemies. It rejoices
in the right, because by loving others as it loves itself, it is as pleased to see
goodness in them as if it were indeed something to its own personal advantage”
(”Moralia”, X, 7-8, 10).

7. The repetition of the word “all” reinforces the absolute, essential, value of cha-
rity. This is not hyperbole, much less a depiction of utopia: it is recognition of the
fact, as the Word of God confirms, that love lies at the very source of all Christian
virtue. “Since we are all children of God,” the founder of Opus Dei reminds us,
“our fraternity is not a cliché or an empty dream; it beckons as a goal which,
though difficult, is really ours to achieve.

“As Christians we must show that affection of this kind is in fact possible, what-
ever cynics, skeptics, those disappointed in love or those with a cowardly out-
look on life might say. It may be quite difficult to be truly affectionate, for man
was created free and he can rebel against God in a useless and bitter way. But
it is possible and people can attain it, because it flows as a necessary conse-
quence of God’s love for us and our love for God. If you and I want it, Jesus also
wants it. Then we will obtain a full and fruitful understanding of the meaning of
suffering, sacrifice and unselfish dedication in ordinary life” (”Friends of God”,
233).

8-13. Love is enduring; it will never disappear. In this sense it is greater than all
God’s other gifts to man; each of those gifts is designed to help man reach per-
ection and eternal beatitude; charity, on the other hand, is beatitude, blessed-
ness, itself. A thing is imperfect, St Thomas comments, for one of two reasons
— either because it contains certain defects, or because it will later be superse-
ded. In this second sense knowledge of God and prophecy are overtaken by see-
ing God face to face. “Charity, on the other hand, which is love of God, does not
disappear but, rather, increases; the more perfect one’s knowledge of God, the
more perfectly does one love him” (St Thomas Aquinas, “Commentary on 1 Cor,
ad loc.”).

St Paul is constantly reminding us to pursue the goal of charity, the bond of per-
fection (cf. Col. 3:14). Following his example the saints teach the same mes-
sage; St Teresa of Avila puts it in this way: “I only want you to be warned that, if
you would progress a long way on this road and ascend to the mansions that we
desire, it is not a matter of thinking much, but of loving much; do, then, whatever
most arouses you to love. Perhaps we do not know what it is to love; that would
not greatly surprise me; for love consists, not in what most pleases us, but in the
strength of our determination to desire to please God in everything and to endea-
vor to do everything we can not to offend him, and to pray him ever to advance
the honor and glory of his Son and the growth of the catholic Church” (”Interior
Castle”, IV, 1, 7).

11-12. “Then I shall understand fully, even as I have been fully understood”: the
Old Testament usually avoids mentioning God by name; these words in effect
mean “Then I will know God as he knows me.” The knowledge which God has of
men is not merely speculative: it involves an intimate, personal union which em-
braces a person’s mind and will and all his or her noble aspirations. Thus in Sa-
cred Scripture God is said to know someone when he shows a preferential love
for him (1 Cor 8:3), particularly when he chooses him out to be a Christian (Gal
4:8).

Happiness in heaven consists in this direct knowledge of God. To explain this
better St Paul uses the simile of the mirror: in those times mirrors were made of
metal and produced a reflection which was blurred and dark; but it is still easy
for us to understand what St Paul means; as St Thomas explains, in heaven “we
shall see God face to face, because we shall see him directly, just as we see a
man face to face. And by seeing in this way we become very like God, becoming
sharers in his beatitude: for God has knowledge of his own substance in its very
essence and therein his happiness lies. Therefore does St John (1 Jn 3:2) write:
‘When he appears we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is”’ (”Summa
Contra Gentiles”, III, 51).

In this connection the Church’s Magisterium teaches that “in the usual provi-
dence of God, the souls of all the saints who departed this world [...] see the di-
vine essence with an intuitive and even face-to-face vision, without the interposi-
tion of any creature in the function of object seen; rather, the divine essence im-
mediately manifests itself to them plainly, clearly, openly [...]. We also define
that those who see the divine essence in this way take great joy from it, and that
because of this vision and enjoyment the souls of those who have already died
are truly blessed and possess life and eternal rest” (Benedict XII, “Benedictus
Deus, Dz-Sch”, 1000f).

13. Faith, hope and charity are the most important virtues in the Christian life.
They are called “theological” virtues, “because they have God as their direct and
principal object” (”St Pius X Catechism”, 859), and it is he himself who infuses
them into the soul together with sanctifying grace (cf. ibid., 861).

When discussing the superiority of charity over faith and hope, St Thomas Aqui-
nas says that the greatest of these virtues is that which most directly unites one
to good: “Faith and hope attain God in so far as we derive from him the know-
ledge of truth or the acquisition of good; whereas charity attains God himself that
it may rest in him, not that something else should come to us from him” (”Sum-
ma Theologiae”, II-II, q. 23, a.6).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


32 posted on 02/03/2013 2:09:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 4:21-30

Jesus Preaches in Nazareth


[21] And He began to say to them, “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in
your hearing. [22] And all spoke well of Him, and wondered at the gracious
words which proceeded out of His mouth; and they said, “Is not this Joseph’s
son?” [23] And He said to them, “Doubtless you will quote to Me this proverb,
‘Physician, heal yourself; what we have heard you did at Capernaum, do here al-
so in your own country.’” [24] And He said, “Truly, I say to you, no prophet is ac-
ceptable in his own country. [25] But in truth, I tell you, there were many widows
in Israel in the days of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six
months, when there came a great famine over all the land; [26] and Elijah was
sent to none of them but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who
was a widow. [27] And there were many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet
Elisha; and none of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian.” [28]
When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with wrath. [29] And they
rose up and put Him out of the city, and led Him to the brow on the hill on which
their city was built, that they might throw Him down headlong. [30] But passing
through the midst of them He went away.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

21. Christ’s words in verse 21 show us the authenticity with which He preached
and explained the Scriptures: “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hea-
ring.” Jesus teaches that this prophecy, like the other main prophecies in the Old
Testament, refers to Him and finds its fulfillment in Him (cf. Luke 24:44ff). Thus,
the Old Testament can be rightly understood only in the light of the New—as the
risen Christ showed the Apostles when He opened their minds to understand the
Scriptures (cf. Luke 24:45), an understanding which the Holy Spirit perfected on
the day of Pentecost (cf. Acts 2:4).

22-29. At first the people of Nazareth listened readily to the wisdom of Jesus’s
words. But they were very superficial; in their narrow-minded pride they felt hurt
that Jesus, their fellow-townsman, had not worked in Nazareth the wonders He
had worked elsewhere. They presume they have a special entitlement and they
insolently demand that He perform miracles to satisfy their vanity, not to change
their hearts. In view of their attitude, Jesus performs no miracle (His normal res-
ponse to lack of faith: cf., for example, His meeting with Herod in Luke 23:7-11);
He actually reproaches them, using two examples taken from the Old Testament
(cf. 1 Kings 17:9 and 2 Kings 5:14), which show that one needs to be well-dis-
posed if miracles are to lead to faith. His attitude so wounds their pride that they
are ready to kill Him. This whole episode is a good lesson about understanding
Jesus. We can understand Him only if we are humble and are genuinely resolved
to make ourselves available to Him.

30. Jesus does not take flight but withdraws majestically, leaving the crowd para-
lyzed. As on other occasions men do Him no harm; it was by God’s decree that
He died on a cross (cf. John 18:32) when His hour had come.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


33 posted on 02/03/2013 2:11:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, February 3

Liturgical Color: Green


Today is the optional memorial of St. Blaisé, bishop and martyr. St. Blaisé saved a child from choking. In commemoration, we have our throats blessed asking God's protection against choking and other problems and diseases of the throat.


34 posted on 02/03/2013 2:31:23 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: February 03, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Grant us, Lord our God, that we may honor you with all our mind, and love everyone in truth of heart. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: February 3rd

Fourth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Sexagesima Sunday

There is a shocking turnaround in today's Gospel. The people with whom Jesus grew up were assembled in the Nazareth synagogue. After they heard him read Sacred Scripture and give a one sentence homily "Today this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing" St. Luke tells us that "all spoke well of him and were AMAZED at the gracious words that came from his mouth." But that amazement soon turned into doubt and then into fury. — Fr. Roger J. Landry

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the book of Jeremiah (Jer 1:4-5, 17-19). Jeremiah is the second of the four great prophets of Israel; a contemporary of Zephaniah, Nahum, and Habakkuk. He was born in the last part of the reign of Manasseh, about 645 years before the birth of Jesus and almost a century after Isaiah. Today's reading comes from the prologue which gives an account of Jeremiah's calling. It is a dialog between Yahweh and Jeremiah.

The second reading, taken from the first letter of Paul to the Corinthians (1 Cor 12:31-13:13), continues last week's comparison of the Church to the human body. Each part of the body is no greater than any other part; rather, all work together to serve the common good. The second reading also discusses the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The Gospel reading is taken from St. Luke (Lk 4:21-30). This rejection of Jesus by his own townfolk must have sincerely grieved him. But it was only the beginning of similar rejections. Their attempt to murder him was an indication of what was yet to come. "To his own he came but his own did not accept him" as St. John says (1:11). The reason was that the Messiah they were looking for was a political leader who would make Israel a political power not only among the nations but over the other nations. Nearly all the messianic prophecies had references to the universality of the messianic kingdom–this universality they interpreted in a political, worldly sense. Their interest in things spiritual was then at a very low ebb and therefore the message of Christ had little interest for them. They did not want a spiritual kingdom.

For seventeen centuries they had been God's Chosen People, and they were proud of their superiority over the sinful Gentiles who did not know the true God. That very pride of theirs was their undoing. The Gentiles were God's children too, and they also were to share in the new kingdom which the Messiah would establish, but the very thought of this was abhorrent to the vast majority of the Jews.

In spite of all their opposition, however, Jesus spent his public life amongst them. He gave them the first offer of entering the new kingdom. They could still continue to be God's Chosen People together with, and alongside, the other nations of the earth. They refused. And their refusal went so far as to call in the aid of the hated Gentiles to crucify the One—their own fellow Jew—who had come to bring them the message of the true kingdom and the offer of being its first citizens.

There were exceptions, of course, and honorable exceptions at that. Christ founded his Church, the new kingdom of God on the Apostles, who were Jews, and through their noble sacrifices and efforts, the kingdom spread to all the Gentile nations of the earth. Because of their sacrifices, we are Christians, members of Christ's kingdom on earth and heirs to his eternal kingdom in heaven. Through our Christian teaching we have learned that our life on this earth is but a period of preparation, a period during which we can earn the true life as citizens of his eternal kingdom. How often do we, like the Jews of Christ's day, forget this and bend all our efforts to building for ourselves a kingdom of power or wealth in this world, a kingdom which we will have to leave so soon?

We would not, of course, openly deny Christ, much less try, like his neighbors in Nazareth, to throw him to his death over a cliff: but how often in our private actions, and in our dealings with our neighbors, do we push him and his doctrine quietly aside and act as if we knew him not. In this we are no better than Christ's neighbors of Nazareth and we grieve his loving heart as much as they did on that sad day. Am I one of those (each one of us can ask himself)? Do I really love Christ or, to put it in a more personal way, do I really love myself ? If I do, I will not risk losing my place in the eternal kingdom for the sake of some paltry pleasure or gain in this present life which will end for me so very soon.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.

Things to Do:

  • Read or reread Pope John Paul II's Apostolic Letter, Dies Domini on Keeping the Lord's Day Holy

35 posted on 02/03/2013 2:39:09 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: 1 Corinthians 12:31–13:13

4th Sunday in Ordinary Time

“Love never fails.” (1 Corinthians 13:8)

Addressing the fractious Corinthian church, Paul urged the believers to “strive eagerly for the greatest spiritual gifts” (1 Corinthians 12:31). He even told them how to get there: by practicing love. Not the overly romantic love that musicians sing about but divine love—the love Jesus poured out when he died on the cross. Paul wants us to learn how to operate out of God’s infinite love, not just our own limited version of it.

The sad truth, however, is that we are all fallible. We all fail to meet the standard of love presented in this reading. So how can we love in the way God is asking us to? By receiving it as a gift. Prophecy, tongues, miracles—all these spectacular gifts of the Spirit will fade. But not love. It is limitless. It never fails.

Just as Jesus taught his apostles the way of love, he wants to teach us as well. But we have to come to him if we want to be taught. As we take up a life of prayer, Scripture, and the sacraments, something happens. Often enough, it is a gradual process, and we may not even notice what is happening. But something prompts us to look back over our lives, and we begin to see the ways that God’s grace has made us more kind and generous. We can see how he has made us more alert to other people’s situations and needs.

All this happens because we are becoming like Jesus. We are receiving him in the Eucharist and soaking up his wisdom in the Scriptures. And the Holy Spirit is responding by shaping our hearts and minds according to Jesus’ own image and likeness.

So let God fill you with his perfect love at Mass today. There will be plenty of time for action in the week to come. For now, just sit still and receive. This, after all, is the greatest of all the gifts!

“Lord, I surrender my relation-ships to you. Come and fill me to overflowing so that your love can flow from me to everyone in my life.”

Jeremiah 1:4-5,17-19; Psalm 71:1-6, 15-17; Luke 4:21-30

1 Corinthians 12:31–13:13
 

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the first reading, the Lord tells Jeremiah that even before he was born, he was known by God and had been called by God to serve him. God has also called each one of us to his service as well. He has also given us the spiritual gifts we need to serve him and build his Church. In exercising these gifts (the first reading uses prophecy as an example), God promises his strength and protection. He promises to be with all of us who respond to his call. What are the gifts you believe God has given you? How have you used them to serve him and others,? What steps can you take to use them even more in the future?

2. In the responsorial psalm, we state that our hope, trust, and dependence are in God who is our strength. Can you share an example of how God gave you the opportunity and strength to share your gifts with someone?

3. In the second reading, St. Paul reminds us to “strive eagerly” for spiritual gifts, but that no matter how important the individual gifts each of us has, unless we exercise love in their use we “are” and “gain” nothing. How open are you to “strive eagerly” for spiritual gifts? If you are not, why not?

4. The well know definition of love in 1 Corinthians 13 contains a list of elements that should resonate with each of us and cut to the heart of our weaknesses, whether we are quick-tempered, keep score of injuries received, etc. Take a close look at this list. How can you use it to pray for the grace to change in certain areas, and learn what St. Paul calls the “more excellent way” of love?

5. In the Gospel, we see the reaction of people to hearing the word of God from someone close to them. The initial reaction to his “gracious words” was positive. When he went on to challenge them, the people reacted angrily to Jesus’ words? What is your response when someone close to you challenges your preconceptions either of yourself or of God? Is there room for improvement? In what way?

6. In the meditation, we hear these words: “Just as Jesus taught his apostles the way of love, he wants to teach us as well. But we have to come to him if we want to be taught.” Why do you think our ability to love others in the same way the Lord has loved us is so tied to the depth of our own personal experience of his love? What steps can you take to open yourself more to the love of Christ and the “way of love”?

7. Take some time now to pray for one another to know and experience Jesus’ love more deeply, so that you can give it to others. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.

 


36 posted on 02/03/2013 2:52:40 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

LET HIS LOVE MELT OUR HEARTS

(A biblical refection on the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C, 3 February 2013)

Gospel Reading: Luke 4:21-30 

First Reading: Jer 1:4-5,17-19; Psalms: Ps 71:1-6,15-17; Second Reading: 1Cor 12:31-13:13 

YESUS DI SINAGOGA DI NAZARET - 4

The Scripture Text

And He began to say to them, “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.” And all spoke well of Him, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of His mouth; and they said, “Is not this Joseph’s son?” And He said to them, “Doubtless you will quote to Me this proverb, ‘Physician, heal yourself; what we have heard you did at Capernaum, do here also in you own country.’” And He said, “Truly, I say to you, no prophet is acceptable in his own country. But in truth, I tell you, there were many widows in Israel in the days of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, when there came a great famine over all the land; and Elijah was sent to none of them but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who was a widow. And there were many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha; and none of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian. When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with wrath. And they rose up and put Him out of the city, and led Him to the brow of the hill on which their city was built, that they might throw Him down headlong. But passing through the midst of them He went away. (Lk 4:21-30 RSV) 

When you think of a biblical prophet, do you imagine a rather thin, ascetic-looking man who speaks angrily against the sins and evils of his day? In fact, three of the prophets mentioned in today’s readings – Jeremiah, Elijah, and Elisha – might well have fit that description. But what about Jesus?

In this today’s Gospel, Jesus identified himself as a prophet. However, the image that Jesus gave throughout His ministry would probably be better summed up by today’s second reading, which is all about Christian love. In all His words to the people of Israel, Jesus consistently spoke with the kind of love Paul described in this passage: a love that is patient, kind, and selfless. So even when He chastised His fellow Nazarenes for not accepting Him, He did it out of a loving concern and even anguish over their hardness of heart.

Think of how Jesus could have responded to His townsfolk’s hostility. He could have lashed out in anger. He could have denounced them as hypocrites. He even could have singled out one or two people He knew well and exposed all their faults and sins just to silence them. But He did not. Instead, He simply walked away and continued His preaching, hoping that some of them might finally accept Him.

Jesus wants to teach us how to become prophets after His example. He wants to show us how to deal with people in the compassion and humility of godly love. It is one thing to learn how to be bold – and Jesus certainly was that. But it is another thing to be able to join that boldness with both shrewdness and gentleness. And the only way that can happen is if we spend time with Jesus. In prayer, let His love melt your heart, even as His words prick your conscience. As you do, you will find yourself becoming just as prophetic as He was.

Short Prayer: Lord Jesus, I am awed at the depth of Your love, especially when I look at the shallowness of My love. Fill me, Lord Jesus, and teach me to bring Your word to everyone I meet. Amen.


37 posted on 02/03/2013 4:23:24 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

GENUINE PROPHETS WILL LEAD YOU TO GOD

 (A biblical refection on the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C, 3 February 2013)

First Reading: Jer 1:4-5,17-19; Psalms: Ps 71:1-6,15-17; Second Reading: 1Cor 12:31-13:13; Gospel Reading: Lk 4:21-30  

JEREMIAH - 002

Tell people they’re attractive, intelligent and suave, they’ll sing your praises and call you the greatest. Admonish them for imprudence or sinfulness; they’ll lose composure and you’ll lose their friendship. Most of us do not accept correction gracefully and usually tell our monitors to mind their own business. 

It was, however, the sacred business of the biblical prophets to solicit reforms from society with avenging messages from God. Faithfulness to the demands of their office normally left them with few friends. 

In the first reading today, we meet the outstanding prophet of the Old Testament – Jeremiah. For forty arduous years he exposed the national guilt of Judah and wrote the longest book of the entire Bible. He endured violent abuse from discontented people he tried to reform. Although God promised him personal protection like that bestowed on “a fortified city,” he found his work perilous, displeasing and often revolting. Candidly he confessed his continual struggle between public commitment and personal doubt. So what motivated him to continue? It was the profound conviction that his prophetic vocation was genuine, conferred by God. Although tempted many times, he would not abandon it, lest he offend his beloved Yahweh. 

Jeremiah’s articulate words and unchanging pleas present a stimulating challenge for today’s society which so easily “does its own thing,” ignores the commandments and glibly terminates binding promises. Religious vocations, business commitments, marriage vows and personal obligations are daily forsaken in the face of whimsical conflicts. Even though his vocation was thrust upon him without choice, since he was appointed before birth as “a prophet to the nations,” Jeremiah lived and died his calling. He would no doubt call our “burn-outs” “cop-outs” and term us a lax generation. Of course that would disturb us, but that was his profession. 

YESUS MENGAJAR - DALAM SINAGOGA DI NAZARET

Six hundred years later, the greatest prophet of all times faced similar problems, as noted in today’s Gospel. A mutinous and selfish crowd escorted Jesus from His hometown, intending to hurl Him over a cliff. He had dared to preach religious and social improvement to a very unreform-minded people. 

The prophets continue to speak to us today, not only in scripture but in the souls and voices of those who promote the timeless values of love and honesty. Genuine prophets preach not their own words but God’s, and they will suffer and even die for the message. If you can find a true prophet, you’ve found a real friend. He or she will lead you to God. 

Note: Taken from Fr. James McKarns, GO TELL EVERYONE, Makati, Philippines: St. Paul Publications, 1985, pages 236-237.


38 posted on 02/03/2013 4:30:11 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for February 3, 2013:

1 Cor 13:4-8 is a scripture often used at weddings. Which element of love is most challenging for you: Patience? Kindness? Goodwill? Humility? Self-Sacrifice? Tolerance? Long Suffering? Optimism? Hopefulness? Faith?


39 posted on 02/03/2013 4:59:39 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle C

February 3, 2013

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Jeremiah 1:4-5, 17-19

Psalm: 71:1-6, 15-17

Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 12:31 - 13:13 or 13:4-13

Gospel Reading: Luke 4:21-30

  • This Sunday’s Gospel is a continuation from last Sunday’s (Luke 4:14-21). Jesus, speaking in the synagogue in Nazareth, has announced that the Old Testament prophecies have been fulfilled in him; that the long awaited Messiah is here (see last week’s study).
  • The people are at first filled with excitement at his words. Their amazement turns to skepticism, however, as they recall that they have known Jesus and his family his whole life and he has never seemed exceptional or performed miracles for his own townsfolk, many of whom were relatives (see Mark 6:1-6a).
  • They are further incensed when Jesus, pointing out their lack of faith, compares them to the faithless people of Israel in the time of the prophets. These saw no miracles by the prophets, except for the despised Gentiles, or non-Jews (1 Kings 17:1-16 and 2 Kings 5:1-14).
  • In a foreshadowing of what will later happen to many of his followers (Acts 7:58, 13:50), the crowd attempts to avoid hearing Jesus’ message by getting rid of him—permanently. Jesus, however, is always the master of his own destiny.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • What is Jesus saying through the proverb (verse 23)? Through the Elijah and Elisha stories? How does this relate to the prophetic statements in Luke 2:14, 2:32, and 3:6? In what way do these words of Jesus to the villagers in Nazareth strike a chord in your own heart? 

  • Why do Jesus’ words to them turn the people’s amazement (verse 22) into anger (verses 28-29)? What might your reaction be to his words if they were directed toward you?

  • Elijah (1 Kings 17:1-16) and Elisha (2 Kings 5:1-14) performed miracles for Gentiles at a time and in a culture where it was frowned upon. Who are the “Gentiles” God desires you to care for? How might you do it?
  • Jesus was set aside from all time (see the First Reading) to be the Messiah, the anointed One of God (see verse 4:18; the word Messiah means “the anointed one,” as does the Greek word “Christ”). How are we also set apart by God from all time and for what purpose are we set apart?
  • Jesus’ neighbors reject him because he grew up among them (verses 22-24). How have you fared with evangelizing your relatives (or being evangelized by them)? How do you deal with the reactions?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 547—549

 

It is human to err; it is devilish to remain willfully in error. -St. Augustine


40 posted on 02/03/2013 5:08:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Thank you for this contribution, as always.

Although I promised another FReeper I would be taking our older two girls to Latin Mass this afternoon, due to difficulties, we did not make it.

One of the things we will be doing as penance and catechism is reading that LONG version of St. Michaels’s Prayer, this evening.


41 posted on 02/03/2013 5:14:31 PM PST by steve86 (Acerbic by Nature, not NurtureĀ™)
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To: All
What Love Is, and Isn’t
Pastor’s Column
4th Sunday in Ordinary Time
February 3, 2013
 
        Many years ago, I was assisting a young couple prepare for marriage. Normally a parish requires a number of classes to help the couple through the inevitable rough spots in the years to come and hopefully form a life-long marriage bond. One of them insisted that they had no need of these classes, that they were a “waste of time” for them. I asked them why they didn’t want to invest this time to help make their future marriage better? “What, for instance,” I asked them, “will you do when you fight?” “Oh father,” she said in reply as she batted her eyes, “We’ll never fight. We’re in loooooove.” This struck me as being just a bit naïve!
         
     Christian love is not based on feelings, but actions. Any loving relationship, whether marriage, friend, family or with God that is based primarily on how I feel about the person is going to have a rough time when these feelings depart, as they inevitably do. When a person is in love with someone, or is beginning their walk of faith in Christ, we may recognize that there will be issues; but, being filled with feelings of love, our feelings are like the tide that rolls in and covers all the rocks on the beach! And when the tide (of good feelings) goes out in our relationship, if we have not built a more substantial foundation, we may wonder how to deal with all the rocks that have suddenly appeared on the beach. Of course, they were there all the time, but our feelings covered them. Mature love is based on what I do, not necessarily on how I feel.   Here are Saint Paul’s words to the Corinthians, explaining what real love is: notice all the ways we can practice our love every day, no matter how we feel!
                                                                Father Gary
 
Love is patient
Love is kind
Love is not jealous
Love is not inflated
Love is not rude
Love does not seek its own interests
Love is not quick tempered
Love does not brood over injuries
Love does not rejoice in the wrongs of others, but the truth
Love bears all things
Believes all things
Hopes all things
Endures all things….
There are in the end three things that last:
Faith, hope and love;
And the greatest of these is love.
                                    1 Corinthians 13
 


42 posted on 02/03/2013 5:14:49 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center Blog

Prophet to the Nations: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 02.01.13 |


Jeremiah

Jeremiah 1:4-5,17-19
Psalm 71: 1-6,15-17
1 Corinthians 12:31-13:13
Luke 4:21-30

God’s words in today’s First Reading point us beyond Jeremiah to Jesus. Like Jeremiah, Jesus was consecrated in the womb and sent as a “prophet to the nations” (see Luke 1:31-33).

Like the prophets before Him, Jesus too faces hostility. In today’s Gospel, the crowd in His hometown synagogue quickly turns on Him, apparently demanding a sign, some proof of divine origins - that He’s more than just “the son of Joseph.”

The sign He gives them is that of the prophets Elijah and Elisha. From their colorful careers Jesus draws two stories. In each, the prophets bypass “many…in Israel” to bestow God’s blessings on non-Israelites who had faith that the prophets were men of God (see 1 Kings 17:1-16; 2 Kings 5:1-14). “None…not one” in Israel was found deserving, Jesus emphasizes.

His point isn’t lost on His audience. They know He’s likening them to the “many…in Israel” in the days of the prophets. That’s why they try to shove Him off the cliff. As He promised to protect Jeremiah, the Lord delivers Jesus from those who would crush Him.

And as were Elijah and Elisha, Jesus is sent to proclaim God’s gift of salvation - not exclusively to one nation or people, but to all who realize in faith that from the womb God alone is their hope, their rescuer, their “rock of refuge,” as we sing in today’s Psalm.

Prophecies, Paul tells us in today’s Epistle, are partial and pass away “when the perfect comes.” In Jesus, the word of the prophets has been brought to perfection, fulfilled in those who have ears to hear, as He declares in today’s Gospel.

Greater than the gifts of faith and hope, Jesus shows us how to love as He loved, to love God as our Father, as One Who formed us in the womb and destined us to hear His saving Word.

This is the salvation, the “mighty works of the Lord,” that we, as the Psalmist, are thankful to proclaim daily in the Eucharist.


43 posted on 02/03/2013 5:27:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Next Sunday Readings:
"This Scripture passage is fulfilled . . ."
4th Sunfay: Comfort the afflicted/afflict the comfortable
 Grant us, Lord our God,
that we may honor you with all our mind,
and love everyone in truth of heart.
Through our Lord, Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God for ever and ever.

(Collect, 4th Sunday)

 
The late comedian Rodney Dangerfield had a familiar line: “I get no respect!”  He would, in often racy terms, decry how he was misunderstood, rejected, and judged.  His claim of “no respect” was a humorous way of dealing with rejection. This Sunday we hear of rejection but not exactly in an amusing way.  
The strange reaction of the enraged crowd towards Jesus in the Nazareth synagogue this Sunday seems somewhat odd to us. “All spoke highly of him . . .” as we hear begins today. That being expressed we might assume that Jesus would bring in endless converts to his way. Now a the sudden turn of opinion on Jesus is shocking. In the line of the prophets Jesus experiences similar treatment. He got no respect.
In our first reading from Jeremiah we hear: “. . . for I am with you to deliver you says the Lord.” (Jer 1: 19). This promise by God to Jeremiah uncovers the real experience of rejection that often was the lot of those called by God to carry a message of truth and love to an often times hostile world.  Yes, the chosen people had strayed away from their initial covenant with God but God desired to call them back.  They must repent and reconfigure their lives in keeping with the sacred law of God, and then he will forgive. That’s good news.  
But Jeremiah, the other prophets of the Old Testament and certainly Jesus himself found disrespect, rejection and hostility as a frequent reaction from some. So too today from his own kinsfolk in Nazareth it was a veritable lynch mob that, “. . . led him to the brow of the hill on which the town had been built, to hurl him down headlong . . .” (Lk 4: 29-30). What’s that about?
It was not the good works, the reported miracles of Jesus in Galilee that the people of Nazareth had heard of and wanted him to offer in their own town but rather the claim that Jesus was making in the scripture passage he had just read: “Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing . . .” (Lk 4: 21) that caused their hyper irritation. One would think that the crowd would rejoice on hearing this good news.  Finally, the Messiah is among us and we can have hope that the poor will hear “glad tidings,” the captive will hear of their “liberty,” the blind will see, and a “year acceptable to the Lord” would take place. 
While the assembly in the synagogue were familiar with this and other sacred passages, their rabbis, of which Jesus now claimed this position, would read of a future time.  They would claim someone else will come. 
Now Jesus takes this same passage and stakes his claim that he is the fulfillment of this scriptural promise of the Messiah.  He claims that in him the age of salvation has begun.  But, he’s only “the son of Joseph.” If the crowd was right in their sudden accusation then we can understand how dangerous Jesus would be to the culture and status quo of his time – and beyond.
In our present day values of independence and self-initiation any child who tries to achieve more than their parents did, or especially their own father, would be lauded. Not so in the time of Jesus.  No one was ever expected to achieve more or to improve on the born fate of their parents.  Each child would inherit the lot they were born into.  In carrying on the same profession of their father, sons would be praised for protecting the family honor.  Any son who would “think outside the box” or turn to another way of life would be criticized in a breach of family honor. Your father is a carpenter and so you will be the same.  At the very least Jesus does not seem to be carrying on his “father’s” profession of carpentry and stone masonry. How dare he discredit his own father and family!
Yet it was his claim to be the one for who they were waiting, the one who would carry on the sign of salvation spoken of in Isaiah that riled the crowd enough to consider his death.  
So the controversial mission of Jesus begins.  St. Luke may want us to see in this passage not only how the mission of Christ begins but also how it will end and maybe how it has always annoyed the status quo over the millennia of Christian history. While it was clear that Jesus’ mission would go far beyond his own tiny village of Nazareth the mission of the Church which he entrusted to the ages must do the same; we must push beyond the borders. Today we hear more of the evangelizing mission of the Church for good reasons.  
As the Apostles set out beyond the small region of ancient Palestine to the wider ancient world, they too found themselves not only with great conversions but also in the face of hostile pagan rulers.  All of the Apostles were martyred except for St. John as tradition tells us.  We know well the experience of the great missionary to the Gentiles, St. Paul.
In the 12th – 16th centuries of Christian history we see a decided blending of both politics and religion.  We find the Church weighed down by the burden of the earthly kingdom and the spiritual.  Popes and Bishops were powerful rulers of territories whose own personal fortunes and the oft corruption that goes with it was rampant.  The Renaissance Popes of the Italian Borgia family were notorious for their scandalous personal immorality yet at the same time supported great artists, sculptors, architects that have given us grand temples to God such as St. Peter Basilica in Rome and one of a kind, irreplaceable works of art such as the Sistine Chapel ceiling.  
But in today’s day we find ourselves confronted with tense social issues and the call for the Church to reform itself and to be more accommodating to the prevailing issues of today. Whether it is about human life, marriage, or the right of the Church to speak out in the market place of the public square, the Pope is no longer an earthly ruler in the sense of a King, Emperor or President but a voice for a spiritual and moral force.  So too the voice of the Church takes on the call for spiritual and moral reform and so will be, like Jesus himself, a sign of contradiction at times.  Pushing against the grain, in the opposite direction of what is acceptable and popular, is somewhat of a personality characteristic of the Church’s mission.  Yet, it is all good news.
It may pose the question, “What is the purpose of the Church?” To just annoy everyone?  To be purposely in opposition and spoil the party? Maybe we all have an opinion as to what the Church should be and should be doing. 
In the end, the ultimate purpose of the Church is to be what Jesus himself is: a road to salvation.  What Christ enntrusted to his Church, in spite of the sin we often see in each other, is the way to reach heaven.  It demands our faith and trust in the person of Christ and to embrace humbly what the Church offers in the continuation of Jesus’ presence in his sacraments and his sacred word. As the Holy Spirit works in and through the sacramental life of the Church we find the spiritual tools which bring us salvation.
As we look to this Sunday, very close to the beginning of Lent, we may not have a particular gripe with Jesus but many certainly do have a position on the Church and its teaching.  Do we want to “hurl over the brow of the hill” some position or teaching?  What should I accept with humility and faith? Someone once said, “Jesus came to comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable.” Now, there’s some food for thought.  
St. Paul in the second reading speaks in the all familiar spiritual poem of love from 1 Corinthians 12: 31-13:13.  Isn’t the Church calling all of us to be “patient, kind, not jealous . . .” and to carry on our mission with charity as baptized in Christ Jesus?
Fr. Tim

44 posted on 02/03/2013 5:46:49 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

The motive and mission of the true prophet

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, February 3, 2013 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Jer 1:4-5, 17-19
• Ps 71:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 15-17
• 1 Cor 12:31—13:13 or 13:4-13
• Lk 4:21-30

The nineteenth-century poet Thomas Moore once observed: “The prophet ill sustains his holy call/Who finds not heav’n to suit the tastes of all.” There have long been false prophets who have sought to tickle the ears of the people in order to acquire money, power, and fame. In our day and culture, we can easily point to televangelists as heirs to false prophets, but such sophists and con men come in many forms. The words of the Apostle John are as true today as they were in the first century: “[M]any false prophets have gone out into the world” (1 Jn 4:1).

But what is a prophet? What does a true prophet do? Yes, often says things about the future; the Old Testament prophets frequently spoke about future events. But most prophecy had as much to do with the moral choices of ordinary people as it did with earth-shaking events. Prophetic utterances were often exhortations to holiness, to authentic worship, and to zealous love for God and neighbor. Prophets such as Jeremiah and Elijah (both part of today’s readings) were called to tell the truth about God and to proclaim God’s Word to the people. Thus, the false prophet lies about God and leads people away Him.

Young Jeremiah, not even thirty years old, began to prophecy during a time of extreme political turmoil and overt apostasy. The people of Judah had turned away from the worship of Yahweh and were worshipping Baal. Jeremiah was told three things: he was chosen before birth by God to be a prophet, he would suffer persecution for his witness, and he would be sustained by the Lord. In a similar vein, the responsorial Psalm praises God for His sustaining salvation: “On you I depend from birth; from my mother’s womb you are my strength.” The mission of the prophet is summed up well in the refrain: “I will sing of your salvation.”

The reading from Paul’s first letter to the church at Corinth provides a perfect theological bridge to the event described in today’s Gospel. 1 Corinthians 13 is a well-known passage, nearly poetic in nature, about the theological virtue of love. The relationship between prophecy and love is not commonly remarked upon, but Paul, himself an apostle and prophet, states, “And if I have the gift of prophecy, and comprehend all mysteries and all knowledge; if I have all faith so as to move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing.”

Love first; all else follows. Why? First, because God is Love, the perfect and eternal communion of three Persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (cf. I Jn 1:5; 4:8; CCC 214, 218-221). Secondly, because the greatest commandment is to “love the Lord, your God, with all of your heart, with all of your soul, and with all of your mind” (Matt 22:34-40; CCC 2055). Third, because the true prophet is a child of God who loves God and others and who speaks the truth about God. Love, Paul wrote, does not seek its own interests, “but rejoices with the truth.”

The reading from Luke’s Gospel demonstrates that those who seek their own interests and do not love the truth will despise the true prophet. At first the people were taken with Jesus and His message. But when Jesus made it clear—by comparing His mission to that of Elijah—that He came to reach the Gentiles as well as the Jews, matters turned ugly. Jesus was no longer accepted in His own country because He made it clear that His work of salvation is meant for all men, even those beyond His country. 

By virtue of being baptized into Christ, all Christians, including the laity, are called to participate in the prophetic work of their Savior (CCC 904-905). “By virtue of their prophetic mission,” states the Catechism “lay people ‘are called . . . to be witnesses to Christ in all circumstances and at the very heart of the community of mankind’” (CCC 942; cf CCC 871). Like Jeremiah, every child of God is known by his heavenly Father before he is born. Being a prophet means evangelizing however we can, by both word and deed, proclaiming the truth about God no matter the tastes of the listeners.

 (This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the January 28, 2007, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


45 posted on 02/03/2013 6:40:54 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

From the Epistle of Sexagesima Sunday

 on February 3, 2013 7:03 AM |
 
37ecstas.jpg

Nicolas Poussin, The Ecstasy of Saint Paul, 1649-50

This glorious entanglement of arms and legs, both mortal and angelic represents Saint Paul's rapture up to the third heaven. The lower angel on the right is supporting the Apostle under the knee, while the lower angel on right, whose face is shadowed, lifts him just above the ankle. The chief angel, situated above Saint Paul, is pointing upward as if to say, "Let us go up thither." On the slab of stone at the bottom of the painting we see the bound book of Saint Paul's Epistles and a sword. The sword represents the Word of God preached by the Apostle; it also prefigures his martyrdom.

And I know such a man
(whether in the body, or out of the body, I know not: God knoweth):
that he was caught up into paradise,
and heard secret words,
which it is not granted to man to utter.
For such an one I will glory,
but for myself I will glory in nothing,
but in my infirmities. . . .

I have no mind that anybody should think of me
except as he seeth me,
as he heareth me talking to him.
And indeed,
for fear that these surpassing revelations
should make me proud,
I was given a sting to distress my outward nature,
an angel of Satan sent to rebuff me.
Three times it made me entreat the Lord to rid me of it;
but He told me, My grace is enough for thee;
my strength finds its full scope in thy weakness.

More than ever, then,
I delight to boast of the weaknesses that humiliate me,
so that the strength of Christ may enshrine itself in me.
I am well content with these humiliations of mine,
with the insults, the hardships,
the persecutions, the times of difficulty I undergo for Christ;
when I am weakest, then I am strongest of all.
(2 Corinthians 12:3-10)


46 posted on 02/03/2013 6:51:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Vultus Christi

Mother Yvonne-Aimée de Jésus

 on February 3, 2013 7:46 PM |
 
MYV copy.jpg

Dear readers, On this anniversary of the death of Mother Yvonne-Aimée de Jésus, you will want to learn about the Confraternity of Jesus, King of Love by reading the entry that Dom Benedict posted on our monastery website here.

The Anniversary of a Heavenly Friend

Yes, today is the 62nd anniversary of the death of one of my dearest heavenly friends: Mother Yvonne-Aimée de Jésus (Yvonne Beauvais), Augustinian Canoness, Hospitaller of the Mercy of Jesus, of the Monastery of Malestroit in Brittany, France. Born in 1901, Mother Yvonne-Aimée died at 49 years of age on 3 February 1951. On the very day of her death she was preparing to undertake a visitation of the monasteries of her Order in South Africa.

Beloved of Jesus

Mother Yvonne-Aimée's life was indescribably rich . . . in the most bitter sufferings and in the most astonishing charisms. From the time of her girlhood she knew of Our Lord's tender love for her. She believed in it. She trusted it, and she staked her life upon it. She was, in the truest sense of her name in religion, the Beloved of Jesus.

An Intercessor

Mother Yvonne-Aimée's intercession is powerful. From her place in heaven she is attentive to all the prayers addressed to her. She responds graciously, willingly, generously, and promptly to those who ask her for help. In a word, she is in heaven as she was on earth: a dispenser of tenderness, mercy, healing, and joy.

Sortais-Gabriel-1.JPG

Her Care for Priests

During her life, Mother Yvonne-Aimée had a particular mission to priests. She was sensitive to priests in moral distress and in temptation. She readily took on the sufferings of priests. She calmed many a troubled conscience, dispensed wise motherly advice, and communicated joy and hope to priests haunted by depression and tempted to despair.

The Impressions of Two Great Abbots

According to Mother Yvonne-Aimée's spiritual son, Father Paul Labutte, Dom Marie-Gabriel Sortais (1902-1963), Abbot General of the Trappist Order (O.C.S.O.) -- see his photo to the left -- considered her a great Superior who built all her work on the rock of faith. Dom Sortais remarked Mother Yvonne-Aimée's gift for pacifying and opening up souls; he kept her photo on his desk. The Abbot of Solesmes, Dom Germain Cozien (1921-1959), observed that Mother Yvonne-Aimée was marked by "the sense of prayer, of liturgical beauty, of praising God, in the school of the Church." And he added: "All the life of Mother Yvonne-Aimée was under the influence of God."

My Own Experience

Over twenty-five years ago, after having tried for a very long time, as most monks do, to practice the ceaseless prayer of the heart, providentially I came upon a biography of Mother Yvonne-Aimée, and learned of her Little Invocation, "O Jesus, King of Love, I put my trust in thy merciful goodness." One day, kneeling before the Blessed Sacrament without trying to think of anything in particular, I realized, to my surprise, that the prayer was repeating itself ceaselessly and effortlessly in my heart. I found myself praying the Little Invocation at every waking moment and even during the night, in a way similar to the practice of the "Jesus Prayer" by monks of the Eastern Church. Over the years, the grace of ceaseless prayer by means of the Little Invocation has not abated. It is always there: a gentle murmur of confidence bubbling up deep inside.

As a newly-ordained priest, I often gave the Little Invocation as penance to those who came to me for Confession. Individuals from all walks of life began attesting to the graces received: graces of inner healing, of victory over persistent and deeply rooted habits of sin, of trust in the mercy of Christ, and of a ceaseless prayer of the heart.

Malestroit_1.jpg

The Little Invocation

O Jésus, Roi d'Amour,
j'ai confiance en ta miséricordieuse bonté.

O Jesus, King of Love,
I put my trust in thy loving mercy.

Mother Yvonne-Aimée received the inspiration of the Little Invocation in 1922. Immediately the invocation began to spread, first in certain communities of her own Order and among their hospital patients, and then on a wider scale. Before long, persons praying the Little Invocation began witnessing to the graces and favours they received. In 1932 the Bishop of Vannes, France, approved the prayer for his diocese. The following year, Pope Pius XI indulgenced it for the Augustinian Canonesses of the Mercy of Jesus, for their sick and for all those hospitalized in their health care facilities. Pope Pius XII renewed the favour, and on December 6, 1958, Pope John XXIII extended it to the universal Church.

Mother Yvonne-Aimée cherished the Little Invocation to Jesus, King of Love; she wanted to make it known and see it spread because such was Our Lord's own desire. In a letter requesting that Pope Pius XI indulgence the prayer, she wrote:

It is so sweet, so strong, so rich, this little invocation . . . This invocation is appreciated by the sick; it consoles them. They love this prayer because it appeals to the Kingship of Christ Jesus, to His Love, His Mercy, His Goodness; in some way, it compels us to trust. It condenses our familiar invocations to the Sacred Heart and sums them.

In 1927, Mother Yvonne-Aimée had little cards printed in order to spread the prayer. In 1940, during World War II, in order to make the prayer even better known and loved, she had a medal struck. She drew an image of the Child Jesus, King of Love, which has since been distributed around the globe. Her drawing is naive and sweet; let the art critics say what they will, it appeals to the little and the poor, to the weak and the fearful, and has a way of touching their hearts. Mother Yvonne-Aimée had but one aim: to draw souls to trust in the Heart of the Child King, to hope in His merciful goodness, and to abandon to Him all their worries, their fears, their cares, and even their sins.


47 posted on 02/03/2013 6:53:23 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 4
21 And he began to say to them: This day is fulfilled this scripture in your ears. Cœpit autem dicere ad illos : Quia hodie impleta est hæc scriptura in auribus vestris. ηρξατο δε λεγειν προς αυτους οτι σημερον πεπληρωται η γραφη αυτη εν τοις ωσιν υμων
22 And all gave testimony to him: and they wondered at the words of grace that proceeded from his mouth, and they said: Is not this the son of Joseph? Et omnes testimonium illi dabant : et mirabantur in verbis gratiæ, quæ procedebant de ore ipsius, et dicebant : Nonne hic est filius Joseph ? Et omnes testimonium illi dabant : et mirabantur in verbis gratiæ, quæ procedebant de ore ipsius, et dicebant : Nonne hic est filius Joseph ?
23 And he said to them: Doubtless you will say to me this similitude: Physician, heal thyself: as great things as we have heard done in Capharnaum, do also here in thy own country. Et ait illis : Utique dicetis mihi hanc similitudinem : Medice cura teipsum : quanta audivimus facta in Capharnaum, fac et hic in patria tua. Et ait illis : Utique dicetis mihi hanc similitudinem : Medice cura teipsum : quanta audivimus facta in Capharnaum, fac et hic in patria tua.
24 And he said: Amen I say to you, that no prophet is accepted in his own country. Ait autem : Amen dico vobis, quia nemo propheta acceptus est in patria sua. ειπεν δε αμην λεγω υμιν οτι ουδεις προφητης δεκτος εστιν εν τη πατριδι αυτου
25 In truth I say to you, there were many widows in the days of Elias in Israel, when heaven was shut up three years and six months, when there was a great famine throughout all the earth. In veritate dico vobis, multæ viduæ erant in diebus Eliæ in Israël, quando clausum est cælum annis tribus et mensibus sex, cum facta esset fames magna in omni terra : επ αληθειας δε λεγω υμιν πολλαι χηραι ησαν εν ταις ημεραις ηλιου εν τω ισραηλ οτε εκλεισθη ο ουρανος επι ετη τρια και μηνας εξ ως εγενετο λιμος μεγας επι πασαν την γην
26 And to none of them was Elias sent, but to Sarepta of Sidon, to a widow woman. et ad nullam illarum missus est Elias, nisi in Sarepta Sidoniæ, ad mulierem viduam. και προς ουδεμιαν αυτων επεμφθη ηλιας ει μη εις σαρεπτα της σιδωνος προς γυναικα χηραν
27 And there were many lepers in Israel in the time of Eliseus the prophet: and none of them was cleansed but Naaman the Syrian. Et multi leprosi erant in Israël sub Elisæo propheta : et nemo eorum mundatus est nisi Naaman Syrus. και πολλοι λεπροι ησαν επι ελισσαιου του προφητου εν τω ισραηλ και ουδεις αυτων εκαθαρισθη ει μη νεεμαν ο συρος
28 And all they in the synagogue, hearing these things, were filled with anger. Et repleti sunt omnes in synagoga ira, hæc audientes. και επλησθησαν παντες θυμου εν τη συναγωγη ακουοντες ταυτα
29 And they rose up and thrust him out of the city; and they brought him to the brow of the hill, whereon their city was built, that they might cast him down headlong. Et surrexerunt, et ejecerunt illum extra civitatem : et duxerunt illum usque ad supercilium montis, super quem civitas illorum erat ædificata, ut præcipitarent eum. και ανασταντες εξεβαλον αυτον εξω της πολεως και ηγαγον αυτον εως οφρυος του ορους εφ ου η πολις αυτων ωκοδομητο εις το κατακρημνισαι αυτον
30 But he passing through the midst of them, went his way. Ipse autem transiens per medium illorum, ibat. αυτος δε διελθων δια μεσου αυτων επορευετο

48 posted on 02/03/2013 6:59:12 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
21. And he began to say to them, This day is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears.

CYRIL; But then He turned the eyes of all men upon Him, wondering how He knew the writing which He had never learnt. But since it was the custom of the Jews to say that the prophecies spoken of Christ are completed either in certain of their chiefs, i.e. their kings, or in some of their holy prophets, the Lord made this announcement; as it follows, But he began to say to them that this Scripture is fulfilled.

THEOPHYL; Because, in fact, as that Scripture had foretold, the Lord was both doing great things, and preaching greater.

22. And all bare him witness, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth. And they said, Is not this Joseph's son?
23. And he said to them, You will surely say to me this proverb, Physician, heal yourself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in your country.

CHRYS. When our Lord came to Nazareth, He refrains from miracles, lest He should provoke the people to greater malice. But He sets before them His teaching no less wonderful than His miracles. For there was a certain ineffable grace in our Savior's words which softened the hearts of the hearers. Hence it is said, And they all bare him witness.

THEOPHYL; They bare Him witness that it was truly He, as He had said, of whom the prophet had spoken.

CHRYS. But foolish men though wondering at the power of His words little esteemed Him because of His reputed father. Hence it follows, And they said, Is not this the son of Joseph?

CYRIL; But what prevents Him from filling men with awe, though He were the Son as was supposed of Joseph? Do you not see the divine miracles, Satan already prostrate, men released from their sickness?

CHRYS. For though after a long time and when He had begun to show forth His miracles, He came to them; they did not receive Him, but again were inflamed with envy. Hence it follows, And he said to them, You will surely say to me this proverb, Physician, heal yourself.

CYRIL; It was a common proverb among the Hebrews, invented as a reproach, for men used to cry out against infirm physicians, Physician, heal yourself.

GLOSS. It was as, if they said, We have heard that you performed many cures in Capernaum; cure also thyself, i.e. Do likewise in your own city, where you were nourished and brought up.

AUG. But since St. Luke mentions that great things had been already done by Him, which he knows he had not yet related, what is more evident than that he knowingly anticipated the relation of them. For he had not proceeded so far beyond our Lord's baptism as that he should be supposed to have forgotten that he had not y et related any of those things v, which were done in Capernaum.

24. And he said, Verily I say to you, No prophet is accepted in his own country.
25. But I tell you of a truth, many widows were in Israel in the days of Elias, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, when great famine was throughout all the land;
26. But to none of them was Elias sent, save to Sarepta, a city of Sidon, to a woman that was a widow.
27. And many lepers were in Israel in the time of Eliseus the prophet; and none of them was cleansed, saving Naaman the Syrian.

AMBROSE; But the Savior purposely excuses Himself for not working miracles in His own country, that no one might suppose that love of country is a thing to be lightly esteemed by us. For it follows, But he says, Verily I say to you, that no prophet is accepted in his own country.

CYRIL; As if He says, You wish me to work many miracles among you, in whose country I have been brought up, but I am aware of a very common failing in the minds of many. To a certain extent it always happens, that even the very best things are despised when they fall to a man's lot, not scantily, but ever at his will. So it happens also with respect to men. For a friend who is ever at hand, does not meet with the respect due to him.

THEOPHYL; Now that Christ is called a Prophet in the Scriptures, Moses bears witness, saying, God shall raise up a Prophet to you from among your brethren.

AMBROSE; But this is given for an example, that in vain can you expect the aid of Divine mercy, if you grudge to others the fruits of their virtue. The Lord despises the envious, and withdraws the miracles of His power from them that are jealous of His divine blessings in others. For our Lord's Incarnation is an evidence of His divinity, and His invisible things are proved to us by those which are visible. See then what evils envy produces. For envy a country is deemed unworthy of the works of its citizen, which was worthy of the conception of the Son of God.

ORIGEN; As far as Luke's narrative is concerned, our Lord is not yet said to have worked any miracle in Capernaum. For before He came to Capernaum, He is said to have lived at Nazareth. I cannot but think therefore that in these words, "whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum," there lies a mystery concealed, and that Nazareth is a type of the Jews, Capernaum of the Gentiles. For the time will come when the people of Israel shall say, "The things which you have shown to the whole world, show also to us." Preach your word to the people of Israel, that then at least, when the fullness of the Gentiles has entered, all Israel may be saved. Our Savior seems to me to have well answered, No prophet is accepted in his own country, but rather according to the type than the letter; though neither was Jeremiah accepted in Anathoth his country, nor the rest of the Prophets. But it seems rather to be meant that we should say, that the people of the circumcision were the countrymen of all the Prophets. And the Gentiles indeed accepted the prophecy of Jesus Christ, esteeming Moses and the Prophets who preached of Christ, far higher than they who would not from these receive Jesus.

AMBROSE; By a very apt comparison the arrogance of envious citizens is put to shame, and our Lord's conduct shown to agree with the ancient Scriptures. For it follows, But I tell you of a truth, many widows were in Israel in the days of Elias: not that the days were his, but that he performed his works in them.

CHRYS. He himself, an earthly angel, a heavenly man, who had neither house, nor food, nor clothing like others, carries the keys of the heavens on his tongue. And this is what follows, When the heaven was shut. But as soon as he had closed the heavens and made the earth barren, hunger reigned and bodies wasted away, as it follows, when there was as famine through the land.

BASIL; For when he beheld the great disgrace that arose from universal plenty, he brought a famine that the people might fast, by which he checked their sin which was exceeding great. But crows were made the ministers of food to the righteous, which are wont to steal the food of others.

CHRYS. But when the stream was dried up by which the cup of the righteous man was filled, God said, Go to Sarepta, a city of Sidon; there I will command a widow woman to feed you. As it follows, But to none of them was Elias sent, save to Sarepta, a city of Sidon, to a woman that was a widow. And this was brought to pass by a particular appointment of God. For God made him go a long journey, as far as Sidon, in order that having seen the famine of the country he should ask for rain from the Lord. But there were many rich men at that time, but none of them did any thing like the widow. For in the respect shown by the woman toward the prophet, consisted her riches not of lands, but of good will.

AMBROSE; But he says in a mystery, "In the days of Elias," because Elias brought the day to them who saw in his works the light of spiritual grace, and so the heaven was opened to them that beheld the divine mystery, but was shut when there was famine, because there was no fruitfulness in acknowledging God. But in that widow to whom Elias was sent was prefigured a type of the Church.

ORIGEN; For when a famine came upon the people of Israel, i.e. of hearing the word of God, a prophet came to a widow, of whom it is said, For the I desolate has many more children than she which has an husband; and when he had come, he multiplies her bread and her nourishment.

THEOPHYL; Sidonia signifies a vain pursuit, Sarepta fire, or scarcity of bread. By all which things the Gentiles are signified, who, given up to vain pursuits, (following gain and worldly business,) were suffering from the flames of fleshly lusts, and the want of spiritual bread, until Elias, (i.e. the word of prophecy,) now that the interpretation of the Scriptures had ceased because of the faithlessness of the Jews, came to the Church, that being received into the hearts of believers he might feed and refresh them.

BASIL; Every widowed soul, bereft of virtue and divine knowledge, as soon as she receives the divine word, knowing her own failings, learns to nourish it with the bread of virtue, and to water the teaching of virtue from the fountain of life.

ORIGEN; He cites also another similar example, adding, And there were many lepers in Israel at the time of Eliseus the Prophet, and none of them were cleansed but Naaman the Syrian, who indeed was not of Israel.

AMBROSE; Now in a mystery the people pollute the Church, that another people might succeed, gathered together from foreigners, leprous indeed at first before it is baptized in the mystical stream, but which after the sacrament of baptism, washed from the stains of body and soul, begins to be a virgin without spot or wrinkle.

THEOPHYL; For Naaman, which means beautiful, represents the Gentile people, who is ordered to be washed seven times, because that baptism saves which the seven-fold Spirit renews. His flesh after washing began to appear as a child's, because grace like a mother begets all to one childhood, or because he is conformed to Christ, of whom it is said, to us a Child is born.

28. And all they in the synagogue, when they heard these things, were filled with wrath,
29. And rose up, and thrust him out of the city, and led him to the brow of the hill whereon their city was built, that they might cast him down headlong.
30. But he passing through the midst of them went his way.

CYRIL; He convicted them of their evil intentions, and therefore they are enraged, and hence what follows, And all they in the synagogue when they heard these things were filled with wrath. Because He had said, This day is this prophecy fulfilled, they thought that He compared Himself to the prophets, and are therefore enraged, and expel Him out of their city, as it follows, And they rose up, and cast him out.

AMBROSE; It can not be wondered at that they lost their salvation who cast the Savior out of their city. But the Lord who taught His Apostles by the example of Himself to be all things to all men, neither repels the willing, nor chooses the unwilling; neither struggles against those who cast Him out, nor refuses to hear those who supplicate Him. But that conduct was the result of no slight enmity, which, forgetful of the feelings of fellow citizens, converts the causes of love into the bitterest hatred. For when the Lord Himself was extending His blessings among the people, they began to inflict injuries upon Him, as it follows, And they led him to the brow of the hill, that they might cast him down.

THEOPHYL; Worse are the Jewish disciples than their master the Devil. For he says, Cast yourself down; they actually attempt to cast Him down. But Jesus having suddenly changed His mind, or seized with astonishment, went away, since He still reserves for them a place of repentance. Hence it follows, He passing through the midst of them went his way.

CHRYS. Herein He shows both His human nature and His divine. To stand in the midst of those who were plotting against Him, and not be seized, betokened the loftiness of His divinity; but His departure declared the mystery of the dispensation, i.e. His incarnation.

AMBROSE; At the same time we must understand that this bodily endurance was not necessary, but voluntary. When He wills, He is taken, when He wills, He escapes. For how could He be held by a few who was not held by a whole people? But He would have the impiety to be the deed of the many, in order that by a few indeed He might be afflicted, but might die for the whole world. Moreover, He had still rather heal the Jews than destroy them, that by the fruitless issue of their rage they might be dissuaded from wishing what they could not accomplish.

THEOPHYL; The hour of His Passion had not yet come, which was to be on the preparation of the Passover, nor had He yet come to the place of His Passion, which not at Nazareth, but at Jerusalem, was prefigured by the blood of the victims; nor had He chosen this kind of death, of whom it was prophesied that He should be crucified by the world.

Catena Aurea Luke 4
49 posted on 02/03/2013 7:00:12 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Christ in Glory among Angels

Manfredino da Pistoia

1280s
Fresco
San Bartolomeo in Pantano, Pistoia

50 posted on 02/03/2013 7:00:46 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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