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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 02-10-13, Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 02-10-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 02/09/2013 8:41:03 PM PST by Salvation

February 10, 2013

 

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Is 6:1-2a, 3-8

In the year King Uzziah died,
I saw the Lord seated on a high and lofty throne,
with the train of his garment filling the temple.
Seraphim were stationed above.

They cried one to the other,
“Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts!
All the earth is filled with his glory!”
At the sound of that cry, the frame of the door shook
and the house was filled with smoke.

Then I said, “Woe is me, I am doomed!
For I am a man of unclean lips,
living among a people of unclean lips;
yet my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts!”
Then one of the seraphim flew to me,
holding an ember that he had taken with tongs from the altar.

He touched my mouth with it, and said,
“See, now that this has touched your lips,
your wickedness is removed, your sin purged.”

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying,
“Whom shall I send? Who will go for us?”
“Here I am,” I said; “send me!”

Responsorial Psalm Ps 138:1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 7-8

R. (1c) In the sight of the angels I will sing your praises, Lord.
I will give thanks to you, O LORD, with all my heart,
for you have heard the words of my mouth;
in the presence of the angels I will sing your praise;
I will worship at your holy temple
and give thanks to your name.
R. In the sight of the angels I will sing your praises, Lord.
Because of your kindness and your truth;
for you have made great above all things
your name and your promise.
When I called, you answered me;
you built up strength within me.
R. In the sight of the angels I will sing your praises, Lord.
All the kings of the earth shall give thanks to you, O LORD,
when they hear the words of your mouth;
and they shall sing of the ways of the LORD:
“Great is the glory of the LORD.”
R. In the sight of the angels I will sing your praises, Lord.
Your right hand saves me.
The LORD will complete what he has done for me;
your kindness, O LORD, endures forever;
forsake not the work of your hands.
R. In the sight of the angels I will sing your praises, Lord.

Reading 2 1 Cor 15:1-11 or 15:3-8, 11

I am reminding you, brothers and sisters,
of the gospel I preached to you,
which you indeed received and in which you also stand.
Through it you are also being saved,
if you hold fast to the word I preached to you,
unless you believed in vain.
For I handed on to you as of first importance what I also received:
that Christ died for our sins
in accordance with the Scriptures;
that he was buried;
that he was raised on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures;
that he appeared to Cephas, then to the Twelve.
After that, Christ appeared to more
than five hundred brothers at once,
most of whom are still living,
though some have fallen asleep.
After that he appeared to James,
then to all the apostles.
Last of all, as to one born abnormally,
he appeared to me.
For I am the least of the apostles,
not fit to be called an apostle,
because I persecuted the church of God.
But by the grace of God I am what I am,
and his grace to me has not been ineffective.
Indeed, I have toiled harder than all of them;
not I, however, but the grace of God that is with me.
Therefore, whether it be I or they,
so we preach and so you believed.

or

Brothers and sisters,
I handed on to you as of first importance what I also received:
that Christ died for our sins
in accordance with the Scriptures;
that he was buried;
that he was raised on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures;
that he appeared to Cephas, then to the Twelve.
After that, he appeared to more
than five hundred brothers at once,
most of whom are still living,
though some have fallen asleep.
After that he appeared to James,
then to all the apostles.
Last of all, as to one abnormally born,
he appeared to me.
Therefore, whether it be I or they,
so we preach and so you believed.

Gospel Lk 5:1-11

While the crowd was pressing in on Jesus and listening
to the word of God,
he was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret.
He saw two boats there alongside the lake;
the fishermen had disembarked and were washing their nets.
Getting into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon,
he asked him to put out a short distance from the shore.
Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat.
After he had finished speaking, he said to Simon,
“Put out into deep water and lower your nets for a catch.”
Simon said in reply,
“Master, we have worked hard all night and have caught nothing,
but at your command I will lower the nets.”
When they had done this, they caught a great number of fish
and their nets were tearing.
They signaled to their partners in the other boat
to come to help them.
They came and filled both boats
so that the boats were in danger of sinking.
When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at the knees of Jesus and said,
“Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man.”
For astonishment at the catch of fish they had made seized him
and all those with him,
and likewise James and John, the sons of Zebedee,
who were partners of Simon.
Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid;
from now on you will be catching men.”
When they brought their boats to the shore,
they left everything and followed him.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 02/09/2013 8:41:17 PM PST by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
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please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 02/09/2013 8:45:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Isaiah 6:1-2a, 3-8

The Lord calls Isaiah


[1] In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high
and lifted up; and his train filled the temple. [2a] Above him stood the seraphim.
[3] And one called to another and said:

“Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts;
the whole earth is full of his glory.”

[4] And the foundations of the thresholds shook at the voice of him who called,
and the house was filled with smoke. [5] And I said: “Woe is me! For I am lost;
for I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean
lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!”

[6] Then flew one of the seraphim to me, having in his hand a burning coal which
he had taken with tongs from the altar. [7] And he touched my mouth, and said:
“Behold, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away, and your sin forgi-
ven.” [8] And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send, and who
will go for us?” Then I said, “Here am I! Send me.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

6:1-13. As an introduction to what is called the “Book of Immanuel” (7:1-12:6)
we get this account of how the Lord called Isaiah to be a prophet, sending him
to his people at the time of the Syrian-Ephraimite coalition to explain to them
what is going on and how they should act.

The account begins with a theophany (vv. 1-4), which is one of the key points
in this book’s message. God manifests himself seated in the manner of eastern
kings, surrounded by his angelic court (the “seraphim”), who extol the holiness
of the Lord: he clearly is Lord of all. In this vision, God is depicted as the thrice
holy (v. 3), the highest form of superlative available in Hebrew. Being holy im-
plies standing apart — standing above everything else. God stands far above all
other beings and he is their creator. In Hebrew “holy includes the idea of “sa-
cred”. It means that God has none of the limitations and imperfections that cre-
ated beings have.

The holiness and majesty of God fill Isaiah with a sense of his own uncleanness
and that of his people (v. 5). Typically, visions of God in biblical history induce
feelings of fear in the seer; we even see this in the angel’s announcement to
Mary (cf. Lk 1:30): “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favour with God.”

“Faced with God’s fascinating and mysterious presence, man discovers his own
insignificance. Before the burning bush, Moses takes off his sandals and veils
his face (cf. Ex 3:5-6) in the presence of God’s holiness. Before the glory of the
thrice-holy God, Isaiah cries out: ‘Woe is me! I am lost; for I am a man of unclean
lips’ (Is 6:5). Before the divine signs wrought by Jesus, Peter exclaims: ‘Depart
from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord’ (Lk 5:8). But because God is holy, he can
forgive the man who realizes that he is a sinner before him: ‘I will not execute my
fierce anger . . . for I am God and not man, the Holy One in your midst (Hos 11:
9)’” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 208).

Isaiah is cleansed and consoled as soon as he humbly acknowledges his un-
worthiness and insignificance before God (vv. 6-7). His instinctive sense of fear is
immediately replaced by a generous and trusting response on the prophet’s part:
he is ready to do what God wants (v. 8). “In their ‘one to one’ encounters with
God the prophets draw light and strength for their mission. Their prayer is not
flight from this unfaithful world, but rather attentiveness to the Word of God. At
times their prayer is an argument or a complaint, but it is always an intercession
that awaits and prepares for the intervention of the Saviour God, the Lord of histo-
ry (cf. Amos 7:2, 5; Is 6:5, 8, 11; Jer 1:6; 15:15-18; 20:7-18)” (Catechism of the
Catholic Church, 2584).

Finally, the Lord entrusts him with his mission. The message he is to deliver is
hard-hitting and full of paradoxes (vv. 9-10). The task given him is not, as one
might at first think, to render the people incapable of hearing and understanding
the word of God that could move their hearts. It is, rather, to tell them that if they
fail to listen to the word of God, their hearts will be blinded: they will not be able
to see things right and, because of that, the sinner will feel no need to take
stock of his position and be converted. The Synoptic Gospels interpret Jesus’
preaching as a fulfillment of what is said here in vv. 9-10 (Mt 13:13-15; Mk 4:11-
12). The Gospel of St John sees these same words as anticipating what will hap-
pen to those who reject Jesus’ message: “Therefore they could not believe. For
Isaiah again said, ‘He has blinded their eyes and hardened their heart, lest they
should see with their eyes and perceive with their heart, and turn for me to heal
them.’ Isaiah said this because he saw his glory and spoke of him” (Jn 12:27-
41). And St Paul also uses vv. 9-10 to reproach the Jews of Rome for rejecting
the Good News of salvation in Christ which he is proclaiming to them (cf. Acts
28:23-28).

The people’s hardness of heart will merit severe punishment; cities and houses
will he laid waste, but all will not be lost: a holy seed will remain and from it the
tree will grow back again (v. 11-13). These verses carry a message for people in
all ages. Isaiah approaches God in all humility, showing him every reverence,
and at the same time he puts his trust in God. For his part, the Lord cleanses
his chosen ones and sends them out to help in his work of salvation. Origen,
who commented on this passage a number of times, points out: “May burning
coals he brought from the altar of heaven to burn my lips. If the burning coals
of the Lord touch my lips, they will he purified; and when they are purified and
cleansed of all sin, […] my mouth will he opened to the Word of God and I will
not utter another impure word [...]. The seraphim who was sent to purify the pro-
phet’s lips did not purify the lips of the people […]; therefore, they continued to
live in sin, and now they deny the Lord Jesus Christ and curse him from their
unclean mouths. For my part, I pray that the seraphim will come to cleanse my
lips (Homiliae in Isaiam, 1, 4). All we need is the same humble docility that Isai-
ah had: “Having received the grace God, he did not want it to be a gift granted to
him to no avail, without being put to work in everything that needed to be done.
Seeing the seraphim and the Lord of hosts seated on high, on his throne of glory,
he said: ‘Woe me ...’. By speaking thus and making himself ‘unworthy’, he re-
ceived the help of God because He took in account his humility” (ibid., 6:2).
And St John Chrysostom, commenting on Isaiah’s response to God, says that
the prophet shows readiness to carry out his mission to the people because
“since the saints are friends of God, they, too, love all men dearly” (In Isaiam,
6, 5).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 02/09/2013 8:51:20 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

From: 1 Corinthians 15:1-11

Christ’s Resurrection and His Appearances


[1] Now I would remind you, brethren, in what terms I preached to you the gospel,
which you received, in which you stand, [2] by which you are saved, if you hold it
fast — unless you believed in vain.

[3] For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received, that Christ
died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures, [4] that he was buried, that
he was raised on the third day in accordance with the scriptures, [5] and that he
appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. [6] Then he appeared to more than five
hundred brethren at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fal-
len asleep. [7] Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles. [8] Last of
all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. [9] For I am the least of
the apostles, unfit to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of
God. [10] But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was
not in vain. On the contrary, I worked harder than any of them, though it was not
I, but the grace of God which is with me. [11] Whether then it was I or they, so
we preach and so you believed.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1-58. Some of the Corinthian Christians were objecting to the doctrine of the re-
surrection of the dead, because this was a belief with which Greeks were unfami-
liar, even those Greeks who held that the soul was immortal. Given the great im-
portance of this doctrine, St Paul replies at length, pointing first to the historical
fact of Christ’s resurrection (vv. 1-11 ) and how it necessarily connects up with
the resurrection of the dead in general (vv. 12-34). He then goes on to discuss
what form this resurrection will take (vv. 35-58). This epistle, which began with
an exposition on Jesus Christ crucified, the power and wisdom of God (cf. 1:18-
2:5), ends with a development of doctrine on the resurrection of Christ and the
consequent resurrection of the members of his mystical body.

To understand what St Paul is saying it is useful to bear in mind that here he is
referring only to the glorious resurrection of the just. Elsewhere in Sacred Scrip-
ture it is clearly stated that all men will rise from the dead (cf., e.g., Jn 5:28-29;
Acts 24:15).

1-11. The resurrection of Jesus Christ is one of the essential doctrines of the
Catholic faith, explicitly stated in the first creeds or symbols of the faith. It is in
fact the supreme argument in favor of the divinity of Jesus and his divine mission:
our Lord proclaimed it many times (cf., e.g., Mt 16:21-28; 17:22-27; 20:17-19),
and by rising from the dead he provided the sign which he had promised those
who did not believe him (cf. Mt 12:38-40).

This point is so important that the primary role of the Apostles is to bear witness
to Christ’s resurrection (cf. Acts 1:22; 2:32; 3:15; etc.); the proclamation of the
resurrection of the Lord is the very core of apostolic catechesis (cf., e.g., the dis-
courses of St Peter and St Paul reported in the Acts of the Apostles).

3-8. On the verbs “deliver” and “receive” see the note on 1 Cor 11:23-26. St Paul
reminds the Corinthians of certain basic points in his preaching — that Jesus
Christ died for our sins; “that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day
in accordance with the scriptures” (a statement which has passed directly into
the Creed) and was seen by many people.

It should be pointed out that the Greek verb translated as “appeared” refers to
being seen by the eye. This is relevant to studying the nature of the appearances
of the risen Jesus: St Paul is speaking of true, ocular, sight; there seems to be
no way this can be identified with imagination or intellectual vision.

The appearances of the risen Christ are a direct proof of the historical fact of his
resurrection. This argument gains special force when one remembers that at the
time this letter was written many people who had seen the risen Lord were still
alive (v. 6). Some of the appearances referred to by St Paul are also mentioned
in the Gospels and in Acts — that to Peter (cf. Lk 24:34), those to the Apostles
(cf., e.g., Lk 24:36-49; Jn 20:19-29), that to St Paul himself (cf. Acts 9:1-6);
others — that to James and to the five hundred brethren — are mentioned only
here.

The importance of this passage is enhanced by the fact that it is the earliest do-
cumentary record earlier than the Gospels — of our Lord’s resurrection, which had
taken place scarcely twenty years earlier.

4. “Was buried”: in recounting the death of Christ, all four evangelists expressly
mention that his body was buried (cf. Mt 27:57-61 and par.). St Paul also con-
firms the fact in this letter, written very soon after the time, thereby confirming
a tradition which had come down from the beginning (v. 3). The fact that Christ’s
body was buried eliminates any doubt about his death, and underlines the mira-
cle of the Resurrection: Jesus Christ rose by his own power, rejoining his soul
with his body, and leaving the tomb with the same human body (not merely the
appearance of a body) as died and was buried, although now that body was glori-
fied and had certain special properties (cf. note on 15:42-44). The Resurrection,
therefore, is an objective, physical event, witnessed to by the empty tomb (cf.
Mt 28:1ff and par) and by Christ’s appearances.

“He was raised on the third day”: Jesus died and was buried on the evening of
Good Friday; his body lay in the tomb the entire sabbath, and rose on the Sun-
day. It is correct to say that he rose on the third day after his death, even though
it was not a full seventy-two hours later.

“According to the scriptures”: St Paul may be referring to certain passages of the
Old Testament which — “after” the event — were seen to foreshadow the Resurrec-
tion — for example, the episode of Jonah (chaps. 1-2), which Jesus in fact applied
to himself (cf. Mt 12:39-40; cf. also Hos 6:1-2 and Ps 16:9-10).

9-10. St Paul’s humility, which leads him to think that his past faults render him
unworthy of the grace of the apostolate, is precisely what gives God’s grace scope
to work in him. “Admit outright that you are a servant whose duty it is to perform
very many services. Do not pride yourself on being called a son of God: let us re-
cognize grace, yet be mindful of our nature; do not be proud of having rendered
good service, of having done what you were supposed to do. The sun fulfills its
function; the moon obeys, the angels carry out their charge. The Lord’s chosen in-
strument for the Gentiles says, ‘I am unfit to be called an apostle, because I per-
secuted the church of God’ (1 Cor 15:9) [...]. Neither should we seek to be praised
on our own account” (St Ambrose, “Expositio Evangelii sec. Lucam”, VIII, 32).

However, the grace of God is not enough on its own. As in St Paul’s case, man’s
cooperation is needed, because God has chosen to rely on our free response to
grace: “God, who created you without you, will not save you without you” (St Au-
gustine, “Sermon” 169, 13). And, commenting on St Paul’s words — “Not I, but the
grace of God which is with me” — Augustine points out, “that is, not just me, but
God with me; and therefore not the grace of God alone, nor myself alone, but the
grace of God and myself” (”De Gratia Et Libero Arbitrio”, V, l2).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 02/09/2013 8:53:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 5:1-11

The Miraculous Catch of Fish and the Calling of the First Disciples


[1] While the people pressed upon Him (Jesus) to hear the word of God, He was
standing by the Lake of Gennesaret. [2] And He saw two boats by the lake, but
the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. [3] Getting into
one of the boats, which was Simon’s, He asked him to put out a little from the
land. And He sat down and taught the people from the boat. [4] And when He
had ceased speaking, He said to Simon, “Put out into the deep and let down
your nets for a catch.” [5] And Simon answered, “Master, we toiled all night and
took nothing! But at your word I will let down the nets.” [6] And when they had
done this, they enclosed a great shoal of fish; and as their nets were breaking,
[7] they beckoned to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And
they came and filled both the boats, so that they began to sink. [8] But when Si-
mon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Depart from me, for I am
a sinful man, O Lord.” [9] For he was astonished, and all that were with Him, at
the catch of fish which they had taken; [10] And so also were James and John,
sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, “Do
not be afraid; henceforth you will be catching men.” [11] And when they had
brought their boats to land, they left everything and followed Him.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1. “Just as they do today! Can’t you see? They want to hear God’s message,
even though outwardly they may not show it. Some perhaps have forgotten
Christ’s teachings. Others, through no fault of their own, have never known them
and they think that religion is something odd. But of this we can be sure, that in
every man’s life there comes a time sooner or later when his soul draws the line.
He has had enough of the usual explanations. The lies of the false prophets no
longer satisfy. Even though they may not admit it at the time, such people are
longing to quench their thirst with the teachings of our Lord” (St. J. Escriva,
“Friends of God”, 260).

3. The Fathers saw in Simon’s boat a symbol of the pilgrim Church on earth.
“This is the boat which according to St. Matthew was in danger of sinking and
according to St. Luke was filled with fish. Here we can see the difficult begin-
nings of the Church and its later fruitfulness” (St. Ambrose, “Expositio Evangelii
sec. Lucam in loc.”). Christ gets into the boat in order to teach the crowds —
and from the barque of Peter, the Church, He continues to teach the whole world.

Each of us can also see himself as this boat Christ uses for preaching. External-
ly no change is evident: “What has changed? There is a change inside our soul,
now that Christ has come aboard, as He went aboard Peter’s boat. Its horizon
has been expanded. It feels a greater ambition to serve and an irrepressible de-
sire to tell all creation about the “magnalia Dei” (Acts 2:11), the marvellous do-
ings of our Lord, if only we let Him work” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of God”, 265).

4. “When He had finished His catechizing, He told Simon: ‘Put out into the deep,
and lower your nets for a catch.’ Christ is the master of this boat. He it is who
prepares the fishing. It is for this that He has come into the world, to do all He
can so that His brothers may find the way to glory and to the love of the Father”
(”Friends of God”, 260). To carry this task out, our Lord charges all of them to
cast their nets, but it is only Peter He tells to put out into the deep.

This whole passage refers in some way to the life of the Church. In the Church
the bishop of Rome, Peter’s successor, “is the vicar of Jesus Christ because he
represents Him on earth and acts for Him in the government of the Church” (”St.
Pius X Catechism”, 195). Christ is also addressing each one of us, urging us to
be daring in apostolate: ‘”Duc in altum. Put out into deep water!’ Throw aside the
pessimism that makes a coward of you. ‘Et laxate retia vestra in capturam. And
pay out your nets for a catch.’ Don’t you see that you, like Peter, can say: ‘In no-
mine tuo, laxabo rete’: Jesus, if You say so, I will search for souls?” (St. J. Es-
criva, “The Way”, 792).

“If you were to fall into the temptation of wondering, ‘Who’s telling me to embark
on this?’, we would have reply, ‘Christ Himself is telling you, is begging you.’ ‘The
harvest is plentiful enough, but the laborers are few. You must ask the Lord to
whom the harvest belongs to send laborers out for the harvesting’ (Matthew 9:37-
38). Don’t take the easy way out. Don’t say, ‘I’m no good at this sort of thing;
there are others who can do it; it isn’t my line.’ No, for this sort of thing, there is
no one else: if you could get away with that argument, so could everyone else.
Christ’s plea is addressed to each and every Christian. No one can consider him-
self exempt, for whatever reason—age, health or occupation. There are no excu-
ses whatsoever. Either we carry out a fruitful apostolate, or our faith will prove
barren” (”Friends of God”, 272).

5. When Christ gives him these instructions, Peter states the difficulties involved.
“A reasonable enough reply. The night hours were the normal time for fishing, and
this time the catch had yielded nothing. What was the point of fishing by day?
But Peter has faith: ‘But at Your word I will let down the nets.’ He decides to act
on Christ’s suggestion. He undertakes the work relying entirely on the word of
our Lord” (”Friends of God”, 261).

8. Peter does not want Christ to leave him; aware of his sins, he declares his un-
worthiness to be near Christ. This reminds us of the attitude of the centurion who
confesses his unworthiness to receive Jesus into his house (Matthew 8:8). The
Church requires her children to repeat these exact words of the centurion before
receiving the Blessed Eucharist. She also teaches us to show due external reve-
rence to the Blessed Sacrament when going to Communion: by falling down on
his knees Peter also shows that internal adoration of God should be also be ex-
pressed externally.

11. Perfection is not simply a matter of leaving all things but of doing so in order
to follow Christ—which is what the Apostles did: they gave up everything in order
to be available to do what God’s calling involved.

We should develop this attitude of availability, for “Jesus isn’t satisfied ‘going
halves’: He wants the lot” (St. J. Escriva, “The Way”, 155).

If we don’t give ourselves generously we will find it very difficult to follow Jesus:
“Detach yourself from people and things until you are stripped of them. For, says
Pope St. Gregory, the devil has nothing of his own in this world, and naked he
comes to battle. If you go clothed to fight him, you will soon be pulled to the
ground: for he will have something to catch you by” (”The Way”, 149).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 02/09/2013 8:54:59 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Isaiah 6:1-2,3-8 ©
In the year of King Uzziah’s death I saw the Lord of Hosts seated on a high throne; his train filled the sanctuary; above him stood seraphs, each one with six wings.
  And they cried out to one another in this way,
‘Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of Hosts.
His glory fills the whole earth.’
The foundations of the threshold shook with the voice of the one who cried out, and the Temple was filled with smoke. I said:
‘What a wretched state I am in! I am lost,
for I am a man of unclean lips
and I live among a people of unclean lips,
and my eyes have looked at the King, the Lord of Hosts.’
Then one of the seraphs flew to me, holding in his hand a live coal which he had taken from the altar with a pair of tongs. With this he touched my mouth and said:
‘See now, this has touched your lips,
your sin is taken away,
your iniquity is purged.’
Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying:
‘Whom shall I send? Who will be our messenger?’
I answered, ‘Here I am, send me.’

Psalm Psalm 137:1-5,7-8 ©
Before the angels I will bless you, O Lord.
I thank you, Lord, with all my heart:
  you have heard the words of my mouth.
In the presence of the angels I will bless you.
  I will adore before your holy temple.
Before the angels I will bless you, O Lord.
I thank you for your faithfulness and love,
  which excel all we ever knew of you.
On the day I called, you answered;
  you increased the strength of my soul.
Before the angels I will bless you, O Lord.
All earth’s kings shall thank you
  when they hear the words of your mouth.
They shall sing of the Lord’s ways:
  ‘How great is the glory of the Lord!’
Before the angels I will bless you, O Lord.
You stretch out your hand and save me,
  your hand will do all things for me.
Your love, O Lord, is eternal,
  discard not the work of your hands.
Before the angels I will bless you, O Lord.
EITHER:
Second reading 1 Corinthians 15:1-11 ©
Brothers, I want to remind you of the gospel I preached to you, the gospel that you received and in which you are firmly established; because the gospel will save you only if you keep believing exactly what I preached to you – believing anything else will not lead to anything.
  Well then, in the first place, I taught you what I had been taught myself, namely that Christ died for our sins, in accordance with the scriptures; that he was buried; and that he was raised to life on the third day, in accordance with the scriptures; that he appeared first to Cephas and secondly to the Twelve. Next he appeared to more than five hundred of the brothers at the same time, most of whom are still alive, though some have died; then he appeared to James, and then to all the apostles; and last of all he appeared to me too; it was as though I was born when no one expected it.
  I am the least of the apostles; in fact, since I persecuted the Church of God, I hardly deserve the name apostle; but by God’s grace that is what I am, and the grace that he gave me has not been fruitless. On the contrary, I, or rather the grace of God that is with me, have worked harder than any of the others; but what matters is that I preach what they preach, and this is what you all believed.
OR:
Second reading 1 Corinthians 15:3-8,11 ©
Brothers, in the first place I taught you what I had been taught myself, namely that Christ died for our sins, in accordance with the scriptures; that he was buried; and that he was raised to life on the third day, in accordance with the scriptures; that he appeared first to Cephas and secondly to the Twelve. Next he appeared to more than five hundred of the brothers at the same time, most of whom are still alive, though some have died; then he appeared to James, and then to all the apostles; and last of all he appeared to me too; it was as though I was born when no one expected it. But what matters is that I preach what they preach, and this is what you all believed.

Gospel Acclamation Jn15:15
Alleluia, alleluia!
I call you friends, says the Lord,
because I have made known to you
everything I have learnt from my Father.
Alleluia!
Or Mt4:19
Alleluia, alleluia!
Follow me, says the Lord,
and I will make you into fishers of men.
Alleluia!

Gospel Luke 5:1-11 ©
Jesus was standing one day by the Lake of Gennesaret, with the crowd pressing round him listening to the word of God, when he caught sight of two boats close to the bank. The fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. He got into one of the boats – it was Simon’s – and asked him to put out a little from the shore. Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat.
  When he had finished speaking he said to Simon, ‘Put out into deep water and pay out your nets for a catch.’ ‘Master,’ Simon replied, ‘we worked hard all night long and caught nothing, but if you say so, I will pay out the nets.’ And when they had done this they netted such a huge number of fish that their nets began to tear, so they signalled to their companions in the other boat to come and help them; when these came, they filled the two boats to sinking point.
  When Simon Peter saw this he fell at the knees of Jesus saying, ‘Leave me, Lord; I am a sinful man.’ For he and all his companions were completely overcome by the catch they had made; so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were Simon’s partners. But Jesus said to Simon, ‘Do not be afraid; from now on it is men you will catch.’ Then, bringing their boats back to land, they left everything and followed him.

6 posted on 02/09/2013 9:09:22 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Pray with Pope Benedict

7 posted on 02/09/2013 9:11:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

8 posted on 02/09/2013 9:12:24 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 02/09/2013 9:14:36 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
10 posted on 02/09/2013 9:16:21 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
11 posted on 02/09/2013 9:16:57 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


12 posted on 02/09/2013 9:18:26 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


13 posted on 02/09/2013 9:19:21 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

14 posted on 02/09/2013 9:21:06 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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February Devotion: The Holy Family

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of February has been primarily asociated with the Holy Family, probably due to the feast of Our Lord's presentation at the temple, celebrated on February 2. At the very outset of Christ's work on earth, God showed the world a family in which, as Pope Leo XIII teaches, "all men might behold a perfect model of domestic life, and of all virtue and holiness." The harmony, unity, and holiness which characterized this holy Family make it the model for all Christian families.

INVOCATION
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph most kind, Bless us now and in death's agony.

FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE HOLY FAMILY
Grant unto us, Lord Jesus, ever to follow the example of Thy holy Family, that in the hour of our death Thy glorious Virgin Mother together with blessed Joseph may come to meet us and we may be worthily received by Thee into everlasting dwellings: who livest and reignest world without end. Amen.
Roman Missal

CONSECRATION TO THE HOLY FAMILY
O Jesus, our most loving Redeemer, who having come to enlighten the world with Thy teaching and example, didst will to pass the greater part of Thy life in humility and subjection to Mary and Joseph in the poor home of Nazareth, thus sanctifying the Family that was to be an example for all Christian families, graciously receive our family as it dedicates and consecrates itself to Thee this day. Do Thou defend us, guard us and establish amongst us Thy holy fear, true peace, and concord in Christian love: in order that, by conforming ourselves to the divine pattern of Thy family, we may be able, all of us without exception, to attain to eternal happiness.

Mary, dear Mother of Jesus and Mother of us, by thy kindly intercession make this our humble offering acceptable in the sight of Jesus, and obtain for us His graces and blessings.

O Saint Joseph, most holy guardian of Jesus and Mary, assist us by thy prayers in all our spiritual and temporal necessities; that so we may be enabled to praise our divine Savior Jesus, together with Mary and thee, for all eternity.

Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory be, three times.

IN HONOR OF THE HOLY FAMILY
O God, heavenly Father, it was part of Thine eternal decree that Thine only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ, the Savior of the human race, should form a holy family with Mary, His blessed mother, and His foster father, Saint Joseph. In Nazareth home life was sanctified, and a perfect example was given to every Christian family. Grant, we beseech Thee, that we may fully comprehend and faithfully imitate the virtues of the Holy Family so that we may be united with them one day in their heavenly glory. Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Holy Family Chaplet

Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, I give you my heart.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, be with me in my last hour.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, may I breathe forth my soul
in peace with you.

Blessed be Jesus Christ, true God and true man.
Blessed be the great Mother of God, Mary most holy.
Blessed be St. Joseph, her most chaste spouse. Amen.

Say 3 Our Father's, 3 Hail Mary's, and 3 Glory be's.

The Holy Family Icon by Nicholas Markell

PRAYER TO
THE HOLY FAMILY
=====================================================================================

GOD our Heavenly Father, You call all peoples to be united as one family in worshipping You as the one and true God. You willed that Your Son become man, giving Him a virgin mother and a foster father to form the Holy Family of Nazareth.

WE pray: may the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, image and model of every human family unit walk in the spirit of Nazareth and grow in the understanding of its particular mission in society and the Church. May our families be living cells of love, faithfulness and unity, thus reflecting God's covenant with humanity and Christ's redeeming love for His Church.

JESUS, Mary and Joseph protect our families from all evil; keep us, who are away from home, one in love with our dear ones.

The Holy Family


 
"The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist ( the Doni tondo )" by Michelangelo c.1506, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
Parent's Prayer

Jesus, Son of God, Son of Man, and Son of Mary, I thank you for the gift of life you have entrusted to my care. Help me be a parent both tender and wise, both loving and forgiving.

Mary, Holy Mother of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and our Motherly Queen of Heaven, nourish our family with your heavenly grace. Help us to remain faithful to The Most Holy Trinity, in all our sorrows and joys.

Joseph, Earthly father to our Lord God, guardian and spouse of Mary, keep our family safe from harm. Help us in all times of discouragement or anxiety.

Holy Family of Nazareth, help our family to walk in your footsteps. May we be peace-loving and peace-giving.
Amen.
 

Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph
Recovering God’s Plan for Marriage and Family: A Sermon on the Feast of the Holy Family

“Why were you looking for me?" (On the Feast of The Holy Family)
U.S. Postal Service Issues Holy Family Forever Stamp
On Prayer in the Life of the Holy Family
The Holy Family - held together by Love through all their problems [Ecumenical]
Feast of the Holy Family: The Christian Family is a Domestic Church
Chesterton on "The Human Family and the Holy Family"
Joseph, Mary and Jesus: A Model Family
ADVICE TO PARENTS by Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787)
The Holy Family
St. Joseph as Head of the Holy Family (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

Feast of the Holy Family
Feast of the Holy Family (Dom Guéranger OSB)
The Feast of the Holy Family
The Holy Family vs. The Holy Innocents: A Christmas season reflection [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican creche to place Holy Family in Joseph's carpentry workshop
The Redemption and Protection of the Family [Feast of the Holy Family]
Study Backs Tradition of Loreto House - Stones in Altar Match Those in Nazareth, It Says
Unraveling Jesus' mystery years in Egypt
Gaudi’s Church of the Holy Family to be ready for worship in 2008
Imitating the Holy Family; Four Traits that Make It Possible
Lots of Graphics: Post your favorite image of the St. Mary and Child, the Holy Family...


15 posted on 02/09/2013 9:22:48 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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February 2013
Pope's Intentions
 
Migrant Families: That migrant families, especially the mothers, may be supported and accompanied in their difficulties.
 
Peace: That the peoples at war and in conflict may lead the way in building a peaceful future.

16 posted on 02/09/2013 9:24:03 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Zenit.org

Vocation Comes From an Encounter

Lectio Divina: V Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C

     For these holy people the day of their encounter with God was not an ordinary day. To them that day was not like anything else, it was the event that changed their lives and brought them to put themselves at the service of God.

     It is important to notice that in all these three cases, vocation was for a mission of salvation and that for God the sins and the fragility of the three called had not been an obstacle to His call. He forgave them, purified them, and gave them the strength for the task.

     All of them received the peace of forgiveness and became missionaries among men. They became spokespersons of God and of His Kingdom, that is a kingdom of freedom, justice, truth, peace and above all of love.

     For Isaiah who welcomed the divine cry "Whom shall I send? Who will go for us?" God changed the heart so that he could answer "Here I am, send me!" The great prophet could answer in this way because the Seraphim had purified his lips with burning coal. This angelic deed is the consequence of the fact that Isaiah had encountered God and had recognized his condition as a sinner.

      Christ gave to Paul His grace and told him "I have appeared to you for this purpose, to appoint you as a servant and a witness of what you have seen [of me] and what you will be shown." (Acts, 26 16b) For the Apostle of the Gentiles the encounter with the Lord was the condition to change the meaning of his life and to live it as a mission. From rabid persecutor Paul became tireless announcer of Christ.

       To Peter, Jesus gave strength strong as a stone so that the first among the apostles could follow Him without giving in. As a co-star of the miraculous catch of fish, Peter had said to Jesus "Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man. I'm not worthy to have a Saint in my boat" ( Lk 5,8). The Redeemer answered "Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men."(Lk 5:10) That humble fisherman of Galilee became the one who fished men, lifting them from the water poisoned by sin and plunging them in the water purified by God's love.

Life as a vocation

     The astonishment of the miracle, the words and above all the encounter with Christ invaded not only Peter, but also all the ones who were with him fishing and in particular his brother Andrew and his partners James and John.

     Jesus wasn't alone any more. Four men, two pairs of brothers who became even more brothers because of the common faith, abandoned everything, their job and their families to become companions of Christ. Four humble fishermen, four workmen who, if not illiterate, definitely were not doctors, had been called by Jesus to share His mission as the savior of the human family.

     Why did these fishermen leave everything to follow this Man who was promising neither money nor glory and was speaking "only" about love, perfection, poverty and joy ("Blessed be the poor because they will be the Kingdom of Heaven")?

    They left everything because God had become the affective center of their life and only He had words of eternal life. He is the Life of life. The encounter with Christ impacted their insignificance. The discovery of Christ as the center of everything erased every fear. They proved to them that the one who follows Christ doesn't walk in darkness and they put themselves at the service of the Kingdom of God. They followed Christ and lived in community with Him, who in a parable described himself as the Good Shepherd. In this parable charity manifests itself in all its full capacity of initiative, creativity, and strength. ( LK 15:4-6)

    The Apostles accepted life as a vocation and Christ's mission became their vocation.

Zacchaeus' vocation

      The profound availability to put their life at the service of Christ's love was essential to understand their personal vocation. That is not the case of Zacchaeus. (Today's gospel in the Ambrosian Rite) ( Lk 19:1-10)

      Zacchaeus was only curious to see Him, and didn't have any intention whatsoever to be close to Christ because, being a publican, he was considered a sinner. He didn't know that Christ had come to call the sinners, to give them a vocation that is the proposal to be with him and share his life and his mission. In the day when Christ was going by Jericho, this man, very attached to money, had climbed a tree to see the Messiah.

For him that day was not an ordinary day. It was the day of the encounter between him and Christ who, looking at him with love (Christ loves the sinners. He has come for them and for us) said to him "Today I must stay at your house". Perhaps Christ had thought of him when He told the parable of the Pharisee and the Publican who didn't dare to lift his eyes, was ashamed to be in front of the Lord, to be seen, was beating his chest and was able only to say "God, have pity on me because I'm a sinner".

      Perhaps in Zacchaeus the question of forgiveness was implicit in the request to see Jesus. The rest was done by God whose look saves. Christ's look goes beyond appearances and sees the heart that hopes for the resurrection. He doesn't ask to Zacchaeus "What did you do?" He doesn't reproach his sins. He calls him to be his guest. Zacchaeus understands that it is a call to be in communion with Christ.

     It is natural that this man put himself at the disposal of the Man God and of His messianic mission. This publican "welcomes Jesus with joy" because Christ's invitation had given new and true meaning to his life. His neighbor was not any more someone to take advance of, but someone with whom to have a relationship of justice, forgiveness and true fraternity.

Vocation to love in virginity.

    This native and fundamental vocation to love typical of any man and of any woman can be fully realized in matrimony and in virginity. These are "two ways to express and to live the unique mystery of the covenant between God and his people" (Familiaris Consortio, # 11)

     Matrimony and virginity are not in contrast. They are two different and complementary gifts that converge manifesting the same spousal mystery of the fecund and salvific union between Christ and the Church.

     However it is important to remember that in the Church Virginity is the highest vocation. It is the acme of love, the full answer to Christ's predilection, within which one can look at people in the same way Christ looked. Of this love of predilection the Virgins are called to be martyrs (a Greek word that means witnesses), spouses and mothers in spirit, able to give their life with passion so that Christ can be known and the encounter with Him may change one's life.

      The Bishop during the Rite of the Consecration of the Virgins urges "Your motherhood will be a motherhood of the spirit, as you do the will of your Father and work with others in a spirit of charity, so that a great family of children may be born, or reborn, to the life of grace" (CV 29). "Our Lord Jesus Christ (….) may by the strength of his word make your life fecund)" (CV 56). "The Holy Church considers you an elected part of Christ's flock: in you his supernatural fecundity blooms and gives fruit" (CV 29). In this way the consecrated Virgins collaborate in the divine fishing, generating and recuperating many children to the life of grace and love given by Christ.

---

Roman Rite

Is 6:1-2,3-8; Ps 137; 1Cor 15.1-11; Lk 5:1-11


17 posted on 02/09/2013 9:52:06 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY LK 5:1-11
Fear turns into love
Fr. Jerome Magat

“Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man.” St. Peter’s reaction to the miraculous draught of fish represents one of the most intense reactions to the person of Jesus Christ. Why did Peter react in such an intense way? After all, it was not the first miracle that he had witnessed. Recall that in the previous chapter of St. Luke’s Gospel, Peter had already witnessed the miraculous cure of his mother-in-law in Capernaum. He had seen Jesus cure the physically infirm and perform exorcisms. So, Peter had already witnessed Jesus’ power.

So, what made this miracle so different and so much more powerful in its impression on Peter? Scholars and commentators suggest that this miracle was more compelling to Peter because Peter was an expert in fishing. He knew that Jesus was not knowledgeable about fishing — Jesus was a carpenter. By virtue of this miracle, Jesus had broken into Peter’s world in a most dramatic way. Jesus was demonstrating that he had power over that which Peter considered himself an expert and professional. Jesus had disrupted Peter’s sense of self precisely in the place that Peter conducted his business and felt in control of his life.

Thus, Peter had come face to face with the reality that Jesus was no ordinary man — He could only be God. In humility, Peter declared himself unworthy to be in the presence of divinity. The holiness and perfection of Christ unsettled Peter, who was now totally aware of his own frailties and sins. This reaction was not without precedent. The Old Testament contains stories about Moses, Job and Isaiah all reacting to an awareness of God’s presence with fear and trembling and awe. Peter was overwhelmed at what he had just witnessed at Jesus’ command, much like the aforementioned biblical heroes.

Moreover, Peter had encountered Our Lord in such a way that his faith and obedience to Jesus’ command to put out into the deep was matched with Our Lord’s superabundant generosity, represented in the miraculous catch of fish. It demonstrated that God is never outdone in generosity with those who obey his commands. He will always give more than is rendered by a believer in return for faithful discipleship.

On a deeper level, what is more astonishing than Peter’s reaction of fear and humility in the presence of Jesus is Jesus’ response to Peter’s sense of unworthiness. Our Lord exhorted Peter to put aside his fear and prepare for his ultimate life’s work — to save souls and lead the church. In other words, Jesus revealed to Peter that while the miraculous catch of fish may have overwhelmed him in the present moment, Peter needed to assume a larger life role as the future pope.

And so, when Peter reached shore with James and John, he and they abandoned their prior lives and followed Jesus immediately and unreservedly in love. Perhaps with this in mind, John would later write that, “perfect love casts out fear (1 Jn. 4:18).” Some 30 years later, as Peter hung crucified upside down on the Vatican Hill in Rome, this dramatic scene depicted in this Sunday’s Gospel reading must have come to mind. Peter’s encounter with the Son of God forever altered the trajectory of his life. In this moment of martyrdom, Peter was longer overwhelmed by fear. Rather, he was overcome with love for the One for whom he was dying.

Fr. Magat is parochial vicar of St. William of York Parish in Stafford.


18 posted on 02/09/2013 9:57:47 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

Jesus is a Rock and I’m Ready to Roll: A Meditation on the Gospel for the 5th Sunday of the Year

 

In today’s Gospel, we see the Call of Simon Peter. It is a call that takes place in several stages. And while it is presented in a compact time frame for Simon, for most of us it takes place over a longer period and the Lord works to deepen our faith and heighten our call. The upshot of today’s Gospel is that Peter is strengthened and led to say, Jesus is my rock, and I’m Ready to Roll.

Lets see how the Lord gets him there.

I. The Help that isn’t Hard - The text says, While the crowd was pressing in on Jesus and listening to the word of God, he was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret. He saw two boats there alongside the lake; the fishermen had disembarked and were washing their nets. Getting into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, he asked him to put out a short distance from the shore. Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat.

It may astonish us, but God seeks our help. What did Peter have? He had a boat at the ready and, as we shall see, a tender heart. What do you have? That will vary. But all of us have talents, gifts, access, availability, special aspects to our personality and so forth that God can use and wants to use. And the way the Lord has set things up, he “needs” our help. God who made us without our help, will not save us without our help. Call, this what you will, cooperative grace, collaborative grace, or my personal favorite, responsible grace, but God seeks to engage us in our own salvation and the salvation of others. God wants our help.

But the main point herein terms of Peter’s progression in the faith is that this initial request of Peter is just a small thing. It hardly impacts Peter to supply the boat and he gets a good sermon too. So it is a help that isn’t hard, just a small thing. And here is where the Lord begins.

But soon enough as we shall see the Lord with deepen Peter’s faith and heighten his call.

II. The Hesitation that must be Healed – The text says,  After he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into deep water and lower your nets for a catch.” Simon said in reply, “Master, we have worked hard all night and have caught nothing, but at your command I will lower the nets.

Peter is willing to do something routine for the Lord. After all, what does it take to let the Lord use your boat for a little while? But now the Lord invites Peter to go a little deeper, to “put out into deep water.” And for a moment Peter hesitates. He is tired and, frankly, discouraged. So much work, and so little to show for it.  There was probably a hint of sarcasm in his voice too, and doubt in his heart, since he later repents and calls himself a sinful man. Yes, here is a hesitation that must be healed if Peter is ever to see his blessings, and reach his destiny.

And so too for some of us. Perhaps we heard  the Lord call us to some task and we hesitated because we were tired or discouraged. Its one thing to come to Church a say a few prayers. But please Lord nothing more.

Perhaps we were fearful. Deep waters bring greater threats. The water gets deeper and the stakes get higher. And somehow we just have to step out in faith, get out of our comfort zone, and head for deeper waters. Yes, we, like Peter can hesitate and think of all sorts of reasons why what the Lord asks is not a good a idea.

How is the hesitation healed for Peter? In a very interesting and counter-cultural way. Peter’s healing is caught up in his acknowledgement that the Lord commands it. He says, But, at your command I will lower the nets. It is an intriguing fact that Peter finds strength and consolation in the Lord’s command. And yet there can be something paradoxically freeing about being under authority. We live in a culture that tends to regard authority merely with cynicism and even rewards some degree of rebellion. Further our flesh tends to bristle at being under authority. Yet, again it should be stated that there is something paradoxically freeing about being under authority.

As a Christian I want to say that I derive a lot of serenity and courage when it is clear to me that the Lord commands something of me. While the world may balk and the demands of the moral life and find much of it too difficult or demanding, I find it is often enough for me to know that the Lord both teaches and commands it. This gives both serenity and confidence. Even if some aspect of my flesh may hesitate, know that my Lord and lawful and his lawful representatives, my Bishop and the Magisterium, command something, frees me and gives me the courage to know that I am doing God’s will. Whatever natural hesitancy I might encounter is often quickly dispatched by being commanded by the Lord.

Thus a person on a given Sunday morning may hesitate to go to Mass, preferring to sleep in or finding the matter somehow difficult. And yet knowing it is commanded in the Third Commandment helps his to dismiss his hesitancy. And the same is true for the rest of the moral Law and also certain vocational matters and actions required of the Christian not under a general Command but under a specific call that is experienced from the Lord.

And in this way of obedience the Lord draws Peter to deeper waters, and so too us if we let him. The hesitation that Peter had, must be healed if he is to see his faith deepen and his call heighten.

III. The Harvest that is Hauled - The text says,  When they had done this, they caught a great number of fish and their nets were tearing. They signaled to their partners in the other boat to come to help them. They came and filled both boats so that the boats were in danger of sinking.

In this matter the Lord grants Peter a great grace to enjoy the fruits of obedience in a very immediate way. In other cases the harvest is immediate but this much is always true: it is promised, it will come, whether today of years from now, but it will come!

The Lord says elsewhere, using a more landed image, The harvest is plentiful… (Mat 9:37). And what the Lord is doing here is given Peter (and us) and audio visual aid. For obviously the harvest which the Lord heralded was not about fish, it is about Human beings. Indeed the harvest is plentiful! Consider all the people the Lord has touched after these humble beginnings in a backwater of Israel. Not only are there the 1.2 Billion Catholics on the planet today, there are countless numbers who have lived before and a number, know only to God of those who will come after us. Yes, a bountiful harvest.

It is true, some days and times are better for fishing or harvesting than others, as Peter knows, and we do too. St. Paul speaks of the Gospel as being “in season and out of season” (2 Tim 4:2). But even in those times that the Lord designates for pruning, or for the field to lie fallow for a time, He is only preparing for future growth. For he says, “the harvest in plenty” and his Word prevails.

Hence, even if now in the West the seasons have turned against us, we must remember that even in winter the farmer must stay busy preparing the soil, removing the rocks, laying fertilizers and so forth.

Yes, the Lord is heralding a harvest and we must work, no matter the season. And even if we do not seek the full harvest, the Lord does as do others. For Jesus says elsewhere: Thus the saying ‘One sows and another reaps’ is true. I sent you to reap what you have not worked for. Others have done the hard work, and you have reaped the benefits of their labor.” (John 4:37)

Bottom line, just do your work, obey what the Lord commands and know that a harvest is heralded and it will be hauled in, in nets that are strained and boats that are heavily weighted. The harvest will come and it will come with abundance. Just keep working and obeying what he commands.

IV. The Humility that Heightens. The text says,  When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at the knees of Jesus and said, “Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man.” For astonishment at the catch of fish they had made seized him and all those with him, and likewise James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were partners of Simon. Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men.” When they brought their boats to the shore, they left everything and followed him.

In falling to his knees, Peter is about to raised higher by the Lord. Peter realizes that his hesitation and doubt had been sinful, and that, had he persisted in it, he would have blocked his blessings.

Notice too, what is described here of Peter is not a cringing and devastated humility, but rather, a healthy humility.

Healthy humility raises us, it does not cast us down. Bowing in healthy humility heightens our status, it does not crush us. And thus the Lord says to Peter, in effect, “Come up higher,” your concern now will not be over fish but rather the care of human souls who are precious to me. You will be my co-worker in a far more important enterprise. Yes, healthy humility raises us.

And thus Peter’s humility is a productive one. It is the “Godly sorrow” of Which St. Paul writes:

Even if I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it. Though I did regret it—I see that my letter hurt you, but only for a little while— yet now I am happy, not because you were made sorry, but because your sorrow led you to repentance. For you became sorrowful as God intended and so were not harmed in any way by us. Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death. See what this godly sorrow has produced in you: what earnestness, what eagerness to clear yourselves, what indignation, what alarm, what longing, what concern, what readiness to see justice done. (2 Cor 7:8-11)

Peter’s humility is a productive one because it is godly. It is a humility and sorrow that equips him for greater duties no longer related fish, but now human souls. How different this is from mere shame (which Paul calls worldly sorrow). For shame usually locks us into an unhealthy self-loathing that is paralyzing. But Godly sorrow increases our zeal to do God’s will and thereby equips, empowers and enables Peter and us when God shall call.

And the Lord does call, and Peter is ready to leave everything and follow Jesus. And the Lord has led him here in stages.  It began with a request for help that wasn’t hard. But then the called him deeper and Peter needed to have his hesitation healed. Experiencing this healing he hauled in a harvest that illustrated his lack of faith. And that lack of faith humbled him, but also heightened him. Having his faith deepened in Jesus he is now ready to follow the Lord.It is always better to walk in humility rather than pride!

And thus, having been led here in stages,  Peter can say, Jesus is the Rock and I’m ready to roll!

St. Peter is still a rookie, but his first season holds great promise. We will see that he will not go without his injuries, but in the end he too will be the rock (in Christ) who is ready to roll.


19 posted on 02/09/2013 10:06:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday Gospel Reflections

5th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Is 6:1-8 II: 1Cor 15:1-11
Gospel
Luke 5:1-11

1 While the people pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he was standing by the lake of Gennes'aret.
2 And he saw two boats by the lake; but the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets.
3 Getting into one of the boats, which was Simon's, he asked him to put out a little from the land. And he sat down and taught the people from the boat.
4 And when he had ceased speaking, he said to Simon, "Put out into the deep and let down your nets for a catch."
5 And Simon answered, "Master, we toiled all night and took nothing! But at your word I will let down the nets."
6 And when they had done this, they enclosed a great shoal of fish; and as their nets were breaking,
7 they beckoned to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both the boats, so that they began to sink.
8 But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, "Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord."
9 For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the catch of fish which they had taken;
10 and so also were James and John, sons of Zeb'edee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, "Do not be afraid; henceforth you will be catching men."
11 And when they had brought their boats to land, they left everything and followed him.


Interesting Details
  • The "word of God", the introduction of this term at the beginning of the episode signals that the calling of the fishermen and their response is an occasion of the effective proclamation of the Good News.
  • Of the two boats, Jesus selected Simon's, here the spotlight is on Simon Peter who would later lead the early Church, but his companions are always in the shadows, ready to help.
  • Simon's boat is seen as a symbol of the pilgrim Church on earth. Jesus gets into the boat in order to teach the crowds and from the bark of Peter, the Church, He continues to teach the whole world.
  • Simon's reply to Jesus, stating the difficulties of not catching anything, is a reasonable enough answer. For fishing was best at night, and if nothing had been caught by then, daytime fishing was useless.
  • The vastness of the catch is a symbol of the nations to whom the gospel will be preached.
  • Shifting from "Master" to "Lord", Peter realized that Jesus is more than a rabbi.
  • "Henceforth" or "from now on" is a Lucan phrase denoting the beginning of a new period of salvation.

One Main Point

God's invitation to each of us to participate with him in bringing his message of salvation to all mankind. The only baggage needed in following his calling is to put our trust in him.


Reflections
  1. How would we respond when Jesus chose to come on board our boat and instructed us to cast out our nets for a catch?
  2. Would we be ready to give up everything like Peter, James and John to do what God's calling involved?
  3. What did Jesus perceive when he said to Simon "do not be afraid," why did he say that? What could we be afraid of?

20 posted on 02/10/2013 6:45:43 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, February 10, 2013
Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Isaiah 6:1-2, 3-8
Psalm 138:1-5, 7-8
1 Corinthians 15:1-11 or 15:3-8, 11
Luke 5:1-11

Consequently, methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things of faith derive from the same God. The humble and persevering investigator of the secrets of nature is being led, as it were, by the hand of God in spite of himself, for it is God, the conserver of all things, who made them what they are.

-- Gaudium et Spes


21 posted on 02/10/2013 6:50:04 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

22 posted on 02/10/2013 6:51:12 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


23 posted on 02/10/2013 6:52:06 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Saint Scholastica, Virgin

Saint Scholastica, Virgin
Memorial
February 10th


from Altarpiece (central section)
1493-94
Wood
Benedictine Abbey Church, Blaubeuren

Saint Scholastica was the twin sister of St. Benedict. Following the rule of her brother, she founded the Order of Benedictine nuns.

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003

 

Collect:
As we celebrate anew the Memorial of the Virgin Saint Scholastica,
we pray, O Lord,
that, following her example,
we may serve you with pure love
and happily receive what comes from loving you.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: Song of Solomon 8:6-7
Set me as a seal upon Your heart, as a seal upon Your arm; for love is strong as death, jealousy is cruel as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a most vehement flame. Many waters cannot quench love, neither can floods drown it. If a man offered for love all the wealth of his house, it would be utterly scorned.

Gospel Reading: Luke 10:38-42
Now as they went on their way, Jesus entered a village; and a woman named Martha received Him into her house. And she had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord's feet and listened to His teaching. But Martha was distracted with much serving; and she went to Him and said, "Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her then to help me." But the Lord answered her, "Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things; one thing is needful. Mary has chosen the good portion, which shall not be taken away from her."


24 posted on 02/10/2013 6:54:11 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Saint's Day is superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

OF A MIRACLE WROUGHT BY HIS SISTER SCHOLASTICA
St. Benedict and St. Scholastica (Twins)
A Patron Saint for Nuns [St. Scholastica]
St. Scholastica, Virgin and Religious Founder

25 posted on 02/10/2013 6:56:02 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
St. Scholastica
Feast Day: February 10
Born:

480, Nursia, Italy

Died: 543
Patron of: convulsive children; nuns; invoked against storms and rain



26 posted on 02/10/2013 7:02:33 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Scholastica

Feast Day: February 10
Born:480 :: Died:547

February 10: St. Scholastica
Scholastica and St. Benedict were twins born in central Italy in 480. It is said that for many years, their parents had begged God to send them children. When at last Benedict and Scholastica were born, their parents cherished them. The couple tried to raise them well.

Scholastica was a friendly, intelligent girl. She promised herself to Jesus when she was still very young. After her parents died, she went to visit her brother who had already left home. He had built a big monastery and was the leader of many good monks. Benedict had become the founder of the Benedictine order.

St. Benedict was very good to his sister. When he realized that she and other young women wanted to become nuns, he helped them start a monastery for women. While Benedict was at Subiaco, Scholastica was at a nearby monastery. When her twin brother moved to Monte Cassino, she entered a woman’s monastery near there.

Once a year Benedict visited his sister and spent the day with her. On one of his visits, when he rose to leave, Scholastica begged him to stay longer. Benedict said he could not. His sister quietly bowed her head and begged the Lord to prolong her brother’s visit. Suddenly, a storm arose and Benedict was unable to leave. He stayed and they talked all through the night. They spoke of the goodness of God and the happiness of the saints in heaven. Not long after, Scholastica passed away. She died in 547.

Reflection: How can I learn to value the goodness of others who share their gifts with me?


27 posted on 02/10/2013 7:13:14 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 5
1 AND it came to pass, that when the multitudes pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he stood by the lake of Genesareth, Factum est autem, cum turbæ irruerunt in eum ut audirent verbum Dei, et ipse stabat secus stagnum Genesareth. εγενετο δε εν τω τον οχλον επικεισθαι αυτω του ακουειν τον λογον του θεου και αυτος ην εστως παρα την λιμνην γεννησαρετ
2 And saw two ships standing by the lake: but the fishermen were gone out of them, and were washing their nets. Et vidit duas naves stantes secus stagnum : piscatores autem descenderant, et lavabant retia. και ειδεν δυο πλοια εστωτα παρα την λιμνην οι δε αλιεις αποβαντες απ αυτων απεπλυναν τα δικτυα
3 And going into one of the ships that was Simon's, he desired him to draw back a little from the land. And sitting he taught the multitudes out of the ship. Ascendens autem in unam navim, quæ erat Simonis, rogavit eum a terra reducere pusillum. Et sedens docebat de navicula turbas. εμβας δε εις εν των πλοιων ο ην του σιμωνος ηρωτησεν αυτον απο της γης επαναγαγειν ολιγον και καθισας εδιδασκεν εκ του πλοιου τους οχλους
4 Now when he had ceased to speak, he said to Simon: Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught. Ut cessavit autem loqui, dixit ad Simonem : Duc in altum, et laxate retia vestra in capturam. ως δε επαυσατο λαλων ειπεν προς τον σιμωνα επαναγαγε εις το βαθος και χαλασατε τα δικτυα υμων εις αγραν
5 And Simon answering said to him: Master, we have labored all the night, and have taken nothing: but at thy word I will let down the net. Et respondens Simon, dixit illi : Præceptor, per totam noctem laborantes nihil cepimus : in verbo autem tuo laxabo rete. και αποκριθεις ο σιμων ειπεν αυτω επιστατα δι ολης της νυκτος κοπιασαντες ουδεν ελαβομεν επι δε τω ρηματι σου χαλασω το δικτυον
6 And when they had done this, they enclosed a very great multitude of fishes, and their net broke. Et cum hoc fecissent, concluserunt piscium multitudinem copiosam : rumpebatur autem rete eorum. και τουτο ποιησαντες συνεκλεισαν πληθος ιχθυων πολυ διερρηγνυτο δε το δικτυον αυτων
7 And they beckoned to their partners that were in the other ship, that they should come and help them. And they came, and filled both the ships, so that they were almost sinking. Et annuerunt sociis, qui erant in alia navi, ut venirent, et adjuvarent eos. Et venerunt, et impleverunt ambas naviculas, ita ut pene mergerentur. και κατενευσαν τοις μετοχοις τοις εν τω ετερω πλοιω του ελθοντας συλλαβεσθαι αυτοις και ηλθον και επλησαν αμφοτερα τα πλοια ωστε βυθιζεσθαι αυτα
8 Which when Simon Peter saw, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying: Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord. Quod cum vidisset Simon Petrus, procidit ad genua Jesu, dicens : Exi a me, quia homo peccator sum, Domine. ιδων δε σιμων πετρος προσεπεσεν τοις γονασιν ιησου λεγων εξελθε απ εμου οτι ανηρ αμαρτωλος ειμι κυριε
9 For he was wholly astonished, and all that were with him, at the draught of the fishes which they had taken. Stupor enim circumdederat eum, et omnes qui cum illo erant, in captura piscium, quam ceperant : θαμβος γαρ περιεσχεν αυτον και παντας τους συν αυτω επι τη αγρα των ιχθυων η συνελαβον
10 And so were also James and John the sons of Zebedee, who were Simon's partners. And Jesus saith to Simon: Fear not: from henceforth thou shalt catch men. similiter autem Jacobum et Joannem, filios Zebedæi, qui erunt socii Simonis. Et ait ad Simonem Jesus : Noli timere : ex hoc jam homines eris capiens. ομοιως δε και ιακωβον και ιωαννην υιους ζεβεδαιου οι ησαν κοινωνοι τω σιμωνι και ειπεν προς τον σιμωνα ο ιησους μη φοβου απο του νυν ανθρωπους εση ζωγρων
11 And having brought their ships to land, leaving all things, they followed him. Et subductis ad terram navibus, relictis omnibus, secuti sunt eum. και καταγαγοντες τα πλοια επι την γην αφεντες απαντα ηκολουθησαν αυτω

28 posted on 02/10/2013 7:16:20 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
1. And it came to pass, that, as the people pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he stood by the lake of Gennesaret,
2. And saw two ships standing by the lake: but the fishermen were gone out of them, and were washing their nets.
3. And he entered into one of the ships, which was Simon's, and prayed him that he would thrust out a little from the land. And he sat down, and taught the people out of the ship.

AMBROSE; When the Lord had performed many and various kinds of cures, the multitude began to heed neither time nor place in their desire to be healed. The evening came, they followed; a lake is before them, they still press on; as it is said, And it came to pass, as the people pressed upon him.

CHRYS. For they clung to Him with love and admiration, and longed to keep Him with them. For who would depart while He performed such miracles? who would not be content to see only His face, and the mouth that uttered such things? Nor as performing miracles only was He an object of admiration, but His whole appearance was overflowing with grace. Therefore when He speaks, they listen to Him in silence, interrupting not the chain of His discourse; for it is said, that they might hear the word of God, &c. It follows, And he stood near the lake of Gennesaret.

THEOPHYL; The lake of Gennesaret is said to be the same as the sea of Galilee or the sea of Tiberias; but it is called the sea of Galilee from the adjacent province, the sea of Tiberias from a neighboring city. Gennesaret, however, is the name given it from the nature of the lake itself, (which is thought from its crossing waves to raise a breeze upon itself,) being the Greek expression for "making a breeze to itself." For the water is not steady like that of a lake, but constantly agitated by the breezes blowing over it. It is sweet to the taste, and wholesome to drink. In the Hebrew tongue, any extent of water, whether it be sweet or salt, is called a sea.

THEOPHYL. But the Lord seeks to avoid glory the more it followed Him, and therefore separating Himself from the multitude, He entered into a ship, as it is said, And he saw two ships standing near the lake: but the Fishermen were gone out of them, and were washing their nets.

CHRYS. This was a sign of leisure, but according to Matthew He finds them mending their nets. For so great was their poverty, that they patched up their old nets, not being able to buy new ones. But our Lord was very desirous to collect the multitudes, that none might remain behind, but they might all behold Him face to face; He therefore enters into a ship, as it is said, And he entered into a ship, which was Simon's, and prayed him.

THEOPHYL. Behold the gentleness of Christ; He asks Peter; and the willingness of Peter, who was obedient in all things.

CHRYS. After having performed many miracles, He again commences His teaching, and being on the sea, He fishes for those who were on the shore. Hence it follows, And he sat down and taught the people out of the ship.

GREG. NAZ. Condescending to all, in order that He might draw forth a fish from the deep, i.e. man swimming in Or the ever changing scenes and bitter storms of this life.

THEOPHYL; Now mystically, the two ships represent circumcision and uncircumcision. The Lord sees these, because in each people He knows who are His, and by seeing, i.e. by a merciful visitation, He brings them nearer the tranquillity of the life to come. The fishermen are the doctors of the Church, because by the net of faith they catch us, and bring us as it were ashore to the land of the living. But these nets are at one time spread out for catching fish, at another washed and folded up. For every time is not fitted for teaching, but at one time the teacher must speak with the tongue, and at another time we must discipline ourselves. The ship of Simon is the primitive Church, of which St. Paul says, He that wrought effectually in Peter to the Apostleship of circumcision. The ship is well called one, for in the multitude of believers there was one heart and one soul.

AUG. From which ship He taught the multitude, for by the authority of the Church He teaches the Gentiles. But the Lord entering the ship, and asking Peter to put off a little from the land, signifies that we must be moderate in our words to the multitude, that they may be neither taught earthly things, nor from earthly things rush into the depths of the sacraments. Or, the Gospel must first be preached to the neighboring countries of the Gentiles, that (as He afterwards says, Launch out into the deep) He might command it to be preached afterwards to the more distant nations.

4. Now when he had left speaking, he said to Simon, Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught.
5. And Simon answering said to him, Master, we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at your word I will let down the net.
6. And when they had this done, they enclosed a great multitude of fishes: and their net broke.
7. And they beckoned to their partners, which were in the other ship, that they should come and help them. And they came, and filled both the ships, so that they began to sink.

CYRIL; Having sufficiently taught the people, He returns again to His mighty works, and by the employment of fishing fishes for His disciples. Hence it follows, When he had left off speaking, he said to Simon, Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught.

CHRYS. For in His condescension to men, He called the wise men by a star, the fishermen by their art of fishing.

THEOPHYL. Peter did not refuse to comply, as it follows, And Simon answering said to him, Master, we have toiled all night and have taken nothing. He did not go on to say, "I will not hearken to you, nor expose myself to additional labor," but rather adds, Nevertheless, at your word I will let down the net. But our Lord, since he had taught the people out of the ship, left not the master of the ship without reward, but conferred on him a double kindness, giving him first a multitude of fishes, and next making him His disciple:

as it follows, And when they had done this, they enclosed a great multitude of fishes. They took so many fishes that they could not pull them out, but sought the assistance of their companions;

as it follows, But their net broke, and they beckoned to their partners who were in the other ship to come, &c. Peter summons them by a sign, being unable to speak from astonishment at the draught of fishes. We next hear of their assistance, And they came and filled both the ships.

AUG. John seems indeed to speak of a similar miracle, but this is very different from the one he mentions. That took place after our Lord's resurrection at the lake of Tiberias, and not only the time, but the miracle itself is very different. For in the latter the nets being let down on the right side took one hundred and fifty-three fishes, and these of large size, which it was necessary for the Evangelist to mention, because though so large the nets were not broken, and this would seem to have reference to the event which Luke relates, when from the multitude of the fishes the nets were broken.

AMBROSE; Now in a mystery, the ship of Peter, according to Matthew, is beaten about by the waves, according to Luke, is filled with fishes, in order that you might understand the Church at first wavering, at last abounding. The ship is not shaken which holds Peter; that is which holds Judas. In each was Peter; but he who trusts in his own merits is disquieted by another's. Let us beware then of a traitor, lest through one we should many of us be tossed about. Trouble is found there where faith is weak, safety here where love is perfect. Lastly, though to others it is commanded, Let down your nets, to Peter alone it is said, Launch out into the deep, i.e. into deep researches. What is so deep, as the knowledge of the Son of God! But what are the nets of the Apostles which are ordered to be let down, but the interweaving of words and certain folds, as it were, of speech, and intricacies of argument, which never let those escape whom they have once caught. And rightly are nets the Apostolical instruments for fishing, which kill not the fish that are caught, but keep them safe, and bring up those that are tossing about in the waves from the depths below to the regions above. But he says, Master, we have toiled the whole night and have caught nothing; for this is not the work of human eloquence but the gift of divine calling. But they who had before caught nothing, at the word of the Lord enclosed a great multitude of fishes.

CYRIL; Now this was a figure of the future. For they will not labor in vain who let down the net of evangelical doctrine, but will gather together the shoals of the Gentiles.

AUG. Now the circumstance of the nets breaking, and the ships being filled with the multitude of fishes that they began to sink, signifies that there will be in the Church so great a multitude of carnal men, that unity will be broken up, and it will be split into heresies and schisms.

THEOPHYL; The net is broken, but the fish escape not, for the Lord preserves His own amid the violence of persecutors.

AMBROSE; But the other ship is Judea, out of which James and John are chosen. These then came from the synagogue to the ship of Peter in the Church, that they might fill both ships. For at the name of Jesus every knee shall bow, whether Jew or Greek.

THEOPHYL; Or the other ship is the Church of the Gentiles, which itself also (one ship being not sufficient) is filled with chosen fishes. For the Lord knows who are His, and with Him the number of His elect is sure. And when He finds not in Judea so many believers as He knows are destined to eternal life, He seeks as it were another ship to receive His fishes, and fills the hearts of the Gentiles also with the grace of faith. And well when the net brake did they call to their assistance the ship of their companions, since the traitor Judas, Simon Magus, Ananias and Sapphira, and many of the disciples, went back. And then Barnabas and Paul were separated for the Apostleship of the Gentiles.

AMBROSE; We may understand also by the other ship another Church, since from one Church several are derived.

CYRIL; But Peter beckons to his companions to help them. For many follow the labors of the Apostles, and first those who brought out the writings of the Gospels, next to whom are the other heads and shepherds of the Gospel, and those skilled in the teaching of the truth.

THEOPHYL; But the filling of these ships goes on until the end of the world. But the fact that the ships, when filled, begin to sink, i.e. become weighed low down in the water; (for they are not sunk, but are in great danger,) the Apostle explains when he says, In the last days perilous times shall come; men shall be lovers of their own selves, &c. For the sinking of the ships is when men, by vicious habits, fall back into that world from which they have been elected by faith.

8. When Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord.
9. For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the draught of the fishes which they had taken:
10. And so was also James, and John, the sons of Zebedee, which were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, Fear not; from henceforth you shall catch men.
11. And when they had brought their ships to land, they forsook all, and followed him.

THEOPHYL; Peter was astonished at the divine gift, and the more he feared, the less did he now presume; as it is said, When Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord.

CYRIL; For calling back to his consciousness the crimes he had committed, he is alarmed and trembles, and as being unclean, he believes it impossible he can receive Him who is clean, for he had learnt from the law to distinguish between what is defiled and holy.

GREG. NYSS. When Christ commanded to let down the nets, the multitude of the fishes taken was just as great as the Lord of the sea and land willed. For the voice of the Word is the voice of power, at whose bidding at the beginning of the world light and the other creatures came forth. At these things Peter wonders, for he was astonished, and all that were with him, &c.

AUG. He does not mention Andrew by name, who however is thought to have been in that ship, according to the accounts of Matthew and Mark. It follows, And Jesus said to Simon, Fear not.

AMBROSE; Say you also, Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord, that God may answer, Fear not. Confess your sin, and the Lord will pardon you. See how good the Lord is, who gives so much to men, that they have the power of making alive. As it follows, From henceforth you shall catch men.

THEOPHYL; This especially belongs to Peter himself, for the Lord explains to him what this taking of fish means; that in fact as now he takes fishes by the net, so hereafter he will catch men by words. And the whole order of this event shows what is daily going on in the Church, of which Peter is the type.

CHRYS. But mark their faith and obedience. For though they were eagerly engaged in the employment of fishing, yet when they heard the command of Jesus, they delayed not, but forsook all and followed Him. Such is the obedience which Christ demands of us; we must not forego it, even though some great necessity urges us. Hence it follows, And having brought their ships to land.

AUG. Matthew and Mark here briefly state the matter, and how it was done. Luke explains it more at large. There seems however to be this difference, that he makes our Lord to have said to Peter only, From henceforth you shall catch men, whereas they related it as having been spoken to both the others. But surely it might have been said at first to Peter, when he marveled at the immense draught of fishes, as Luke suggests, and afterwards to both, as the other two have related it. Or we must understand the event to have taken place as Luke relates, and that the others were not then called by the Lord, but only it was foretold to Peter that he should catch men, not that he should no more be employed in fishing; and hence there is room for supposing that they returned to their fishing, so that afterwards that might happen which Matthew and Mark speak of. For then the ships were not brought to land, as if with the intention of returning, but they followed Him as calling or commanding them to come. But if according to John, Peter and Andrew followed Him close by Jordan, how do the other Evangelists say that He found them fishing in Galilee, and called them to the discipleship? Except we understand that they did not see the Lord near Jordan so as to join Him inseparably, but knew only who He was, and marveling at Him returned to their own.

AMBROSE; But mystically, those whom Peter takes by his word, he claims not as his own booty or his own gift. Depart, he says, from me, O Lord. Fear not then also to ascribe what is your own to the Lord, for what was His He has given to us.

AUG. Or, Peter speaks in the character of A the Church full of carnal men, Depart from me, for I am a sinful man. As if the Church, crowded with carnal men, and almost sunk by their vices, throws off from it, as it were, the rule in spiritual things, wherein the character of Christ chiefly shines forth. For not with the tongue do men tell the good servants of God that they should depart from them, but with the utterance of their deeds and actions they persuade them to go away, that they may not be governed by the good. And yet all the more anxiously do they hasten to pay honors to them, just as Peter testified his respect by falling at the feet of our Lord, but his conduct in saying, Depart from me.

THEOPHYL; But the Lord allays the fears of carnal men, that no one trembling at the consciousness of his guilt, or astonished at the innocence of others, might be afraid to undertake the journey of holiness.

AUG. But the Lord did not depart from them, showing thereby that good and spiritual men, when they ere troubled by the wickedness of the many, ought not to wish to abandon their ecclesiastical duties, that they might live as it were a more secure and tranquil life. But the bringing their ships to land, and forsaking all to follow Jesus, may represent the end of time, when those who have clung to Christ shall altogether depart from the storms of this world.

Catena Aurea Luke 5
29 posted on 02/10/2013 7:16:54 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Calling of Peter and Andrew

Duccio di Buoninsegna

1308-11
Tempera on wood, 43,5 x 46 cm
National Gallery of Art, Washington

30 posted on 02/10/2013 7:17:42 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:
Sunday, February 10
Liturgical Color: White

Today is the Memorial of St. Scholastica, virgin. She was the twin sister of St. Benedict and both dedicated their lives to God. At her death in 543 A.D., Benedict had a vision of her soul in the form of a dove leaving her body and entering heaven.

31 posted on 02/10/2013 2:40:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: February 10, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Keep your family safe, O Lord, with unfailing care, that, relying solely on the hope of heavenly grace, they may be defended always by your protection. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: February 10th

Fifth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Quinquagesima Sunday

After Jesus had finished speaking, he said to Simon Peter, "Put out into the deep water and lower your nets for a catch!" The Holy Father proposed Jesus' imperative "Put out into the deep water" as the motto of the Church. He did this because so often we in the Church today can feel that we're in Peter's shoes. In many areas of life, but particularly in our discipleship, we can work so hard and seem to have so little to show for it. We're called, like Peter, Andrew, James and John to leave behind whatever might keep us from the Lord and follow him, being sent out into the deep water of the world to fish for souls. We're called, like St. Paul, to "work harder than any" of the rest, because of the Lord's great mercy, love and trust in calling us and sending us. — Fr. Roger Landry

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the book of Isaiah (Is 6:1-2a, 3-8). This reading describes Isaiah's call to prophetic office. According to Jewish tradition, Isaiah was of royal stock. It is certain that he belongs to the tribe of Judah and that his home was in Jerusalem. From the time of his calling, Isaiah's whole life was devoted to the "Lord Yahweh". The Lord had called him and henceforth Isaiah was His servant. Jeremiah's call to office was in the form of a dialog between Yahweh and Jeremiah; Isaiah's is a majestic vision. Isaiah is eager to serve God, "Here I am," I said, "send me!"

The second reading is taken from the first letter of Paul to the Corinthians (1 Cor 15:1-11). St. Paul treats the subject of the resurrection of the body. A characteristic Greek and Platonic concept was that the body was a hindrance to the soul's activity. St. Paul answers this question by declaring that the bodily resurrection of Christ is a fact duly attested to by chosen witnesses.

The Gospel is a reading from St. Luke (Lk 5:1-11). How the wisdom of God differs from the wisdom of men! If a businessman of today (or even of the year 28 A.D.) were choosing a chairman and assistants for the world-wide enterprise he was about to set up, is it likely that he would choose them from among the unknown, unlettered fishermen of Galilee? Yet Christ, who was about to set up not only a world-wide institute but an everlasting one, chose these simple fishermen and made them his assistants and his successors in the work that he had taken in hand.

And it wasn't that he was restricted in his choice. There were many highly educated priests and scribes in Jerusalem whom he could have won over, men who could preach and instruct so much more eloquently than Peter or Andrew. There were Roman officers in Palestine who were highly educated, and who would be much more eagerly listened to in the Gentile world. There were Greek philosophers whose very name would add prestige to the Gospel message had they been Apostles. Yet it was to none of these that Christ entrusted the arduous task of spreading the good news of the Gospel, it was to none of these that he gave the keys of his kingdom.

Christ was not influenced in his judgement by external, accidental qualifications. He judged the heart and the will. He knew the true worth of men. Furthermore, the society that he was about to set up was not a worldly business concern but a free transport system to heaven. The truths he was committing to its keeping were not based on earthly wisdom which would require eloquence and prestige to bolster them up. They were the eternal, divine truths which needed no human propaganda, no help from mere men.

Thus, in the selection of his Apostles, Christ has given us an extra proof, if one were needed, of his own divine wisdom and of the divine origin of the Christian religion which we profess. Our religion is not man-made, God is its author.

While thanking God today for our Christian religion, with its clearly-drawn map of salvation, let us show our appreciation by doing our own little part, as humble apostles, weak but willing helpers of Christ. This we can do without eloquence, or personal prestige. We do so by living as true Christians in our homes, in our places of work, and in our recreations, by carrying our cross daily and patiently, ever ready to give a hand when the neighbor's cross seems too heavy for him. This will be Christian eloquence, this will be a true apostleship of Christ, because actions speak louder than words.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.

Things to Do:

  • Prepare a fish dinner and discuss what it means to be "Fishers of Men". Ask your children if this just applies to priests or if they can also "fish" for men.

  • Say a prayer for the Holy Father.

32 posted on 02/10/2013 2:51:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Luke 5:1-11

 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

“Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men.” (Luke 5:10)

Think about what would have been left out of this story if Jesus had never said this to Peter. It still would have been an amazing miracle and one of the best “fish stories” of all time. A fisherman at the peak of his profession can’t catch any fish. A virtual stranger tells him to try again, and he catches more than his nets can hold! That alone showed Peter that he was standing before someone with a special relationship with God—an important lesson indeed. But there’s more at stake than fish here.

When Jesus tells Peter that he will be catching people, he is telling him about his mission. Peter now has a new calling. He is to bring souls into the kingdom of God. Jesus proves that he will provide for all of Peter’s material needs—fishing is no problem for him! It’s people that he values most of all. So he entrusts Peter with bringing them into his Church. And in saying “Do no be afraid,” he’s assuring Peter that he’ll give him the same success in his new endeavor as he gave him with catching fish.

Do you have a plan for how you are going to share the gospel? Do you have some idea of the people you are going to share it with? Try this approach. Choose five people, and pray for them every day. Ask the Lord to open their hearts and to give you opportunities to share your faith with them.

Ask him, also, to lead you in what to say. You may end up telling one person how you met the Lord. You may invite another to Mass or adoration. Or you may ask another why he or she doesn’t believe, and just plant a seed. Don’t worry about the outcome. Just trust that the Lord will lead the right people to whatever “net” you are casting.

“Lord, give me the desire to lead people to you. Help me to see their needs, to meet them where they are, and to be willing to tell them of your salvation.”

Isaiah 6:1-8; Psalm 138:1-8; 1 Corinthians 15:1-11

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the first reading, God asks, “Whom shall I send?” Isaiah responded, “Here I am, send me!” St. Teresa of Avila once said, “Yours are the eyes through which the compassion of Christ must look out on the world.” What are some areas of service to the Lord in your life? In what w ay may God be asking you to be of even greater service to him in today’s world?

2. The responsorial psalm speaks of giving praise, thanks, and worship to the Lord for all he has done. How would you describe what the Lord has done for you?

3. The responsorial psalm also asserts that “When I called you, you answered me; you built up strength within me.” Can you share an example of how God has answered you and strengthened you when facing difficulties?

4. In the second reading, St. Paul refers to his own conversion and how God’s grace “has not been ineffective” in him. While maybe not as dramatic as St. Paul’s, can you share an example of a time when Christ touched and turned your heart toward him?

5. In the Gospel, we hear Jesus say to Simon Peter, “Put out into deep water and lower your nets for a catch.” After a fruitful catch of fish, Jesus tells Peter, James, and John that they will now “be catching men” (be fishers of men). This story also reminds us of how “fruitful” we will be if we only seize the moment and heed Christ’s promptings, especially in sharing our faith with others. Were there some times during the past week (or month) when you were attentive to the promptings of the Spirit and “seized the moment” to share your faith? Were there some times when you may have missed some opportunities to do so. What did you learn from these opportunities?

6. In the Gospel, Simon Peter was so astounded by Christ’s actions that his first thought was of his own unworthiness. What is your reaction when you see Christ’s love touching lives through your words and actions? Does it humble you or are you filled with pride? In what ways?

7. The meditation lays out a possible approach and plan for sharing your faith with others: “Choose five people, and pray for them every day. Ask the Lord to open their hearts and to give you opportunities to share your faith with them. Ask him, also, to lead you in what to say.” Are you willing to experiment with this approach and see how the Lord will use you? If not, why not? Are their other steps you can take to reach out to others with the Good News of Jesus Christ?

8. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord for a new openness to him -- and courage, boldness, and wisdom in sharing your faith with others. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.

 


33 posted on 02/10/2013 3:06:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

LET DOWN YOUR NETS

(A biblical refection on the 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C, 10 February 2013)

Gospel Reading: Luke 5:1-11 

First Reading: Is 6:1-2a,3-8; Psalms: Ps 138:1-5,7-8; Second Reading: 1Cor 15:1-11 (or 1Cor 15:3-8,11) 

SIMON PETRUS SANG NELAYAN

The Scripture Text

While the people pressed upon Him to hear the word of God, He was standing by the lake of Gennesaret. And He saw two boats by the lake; but the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. Getting into one of the boats, which was Simon’s, He asked him to put out a little from the land. And He sat down and taught the people from the boat. And when He had ceased speaking, He said to Simon, “Put out into the deep and let down your nets for a catch.” And Simon answered, “Master, we toiled all night and took nothing! But at Your worth I will let down the nets.” And when they had done this, they enclosed a great shoal of fish; and as their nets were breaking, they beckoned to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both the boats, so that they began to sink. But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord.” For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the catch of fish which they had taken; and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; henceforth you will be catching men.” And when they had brought their boats to land, they left everthing and followed Him. (Lk 5:1-11 RSV) 

“Holy, holy, holy ……” is spoken to God and “let down your nets,” is spoken by God. These two brief proclamations merit bold print in today’s liturgy. The author of the first reading, Isaiah, is recording a transitory vision he experienced while at prayer in the Temple. The angels huddled around the throne of the Almighty, and chanted in Hebrew the triple holy: “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts; the whole earth is full of His glory” (Is 6:3). This was the only way the language could express the superlative form of the adjective – by repairing the positive three times. We recognize this sublime prayer as the introduction to the canon of the Mass, still retained in the original Hebrew form.

In comparison to the vision, Isaiah saw himself as very unholy. Isaiah said; “Woe is me! For I am lost; for I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts!” (Is 6:5). Then, Isaiah welcomed a lip-cleansing ceremony by the application of a burning coal (Is 6:6-7). Following his searing purification, he could boldly proclaim readiness to serve God – “Here am I! Send me” (Is 6:8). Isaiah is both attracted to God’s adorable holiness and overjoyed that he can share in it. The Church helps us appreciate the sacred nature of God through word and sacrament, encouraging us (like Isaiah) to imitation.

TANGKAP IKAN BANYAK - LUK 5

The second statement is found in the Gospel as a command of Jesus to Peter. The chief apostle was hesitant to comply, for the best time for fishing had passed with the cool hours before dawn. Being a “professional” fisherman, he protested what seemed bad advice. Like a seasonal fisherman Himself, Jesus patiently waited for Peter to lower the nets after he had exhausted all the reasons why he should not. Amazed at the abundant catch of fish, Peter “the expert in fishery” learned a lasting lesson about trusting the sacred word of the Lord.

Indeed, it’s difficult for us to follow faith’s advice in daily life, especially when we feel competent and well informed. Whatever the case may be, we must humbly learn with Saint Peter that our knowledge of catching fish is nothing when compared to His, Who made the fish.

These two statements originated centuries apart. Fortunately for us they are now united in the same liturgy, since they complement each other. This is the connection: if we can truly proclaim the holiness of God, believe in His profound love for us and appreciate His smiling wisdom, then with full confidence we can lower the nets at any time or to any depth He requests.

The events of life will continue to puzzle us, with accidents and diseases sidelining some, while others are blessed with good fortune. God’s ways are not our ways, but His ways are best. We’re on the road to holiness when at His gentle invitation we can lower the nets willingly and say to the Master, “have it Your way” 

Short Prayer: Lord Jesus, teach me to let go of my own plants for my life and the lives of others. I want to believe that You have a better plan for all of the things I do. Whenever I am disturbed and upset, because things are not going the way I want them to, let me back off, let go, and remember that You alone are in charge of my life. I have determined to entrust everything to You. I trust You, because of the fact that You have loved me. Amen.


34 posted on 02/10/2013 3:13:22 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

HAM, EGGS, COMMITMENT

 (A biblical refection on the 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C, 10 February 2013)

First Reading: Is 6:1-2a,3-8; Psalms: Ps 138:1-5,7-8; Second Reading: 1Cor 15:1-11 (or 1Cor 15:3-8,11); Gospel Reading: Lk 5:1-11  

KEMURIDAN - PENJALAN IKAN MENJADI PENJALA MANUSIA

REMEMBER the story about the hen who was bragging to the pig about her commitment and contribution to humanity? She says, “I supply thousands of eggs for the market.” Unimpressed, the pig countered, “And who lays down his life so people can have ham, bacon and sausages? Mine is total commitment.” 

The Gospel message talks about call and commitment. The Lord approached a band of simple, rugged fishermen and, after a strange miraculous catch of fish, bade them to follow Him. Our Lord must have a deep impression that “they left everything” – their work, their boats, their families – and followed Him (Lk 5:11). It was a total commitment. This band of fishermen formed the core group on which Christ founded His Church. 

Unfortunately many have the idea that the call of Christ is addressed only to the apostles and their successors; bishops, priests and religious. That’s not true. Every Christian is commissioned to a ministry of love and justice by virtue of his or her baptism. 

The Decree on the Laity [Apostolicam Actuositatem] of Vatican II states: “Incorporated into Christ’s Mystical Body through baptism and strengthened by the power of the Holy Spirit through confirmation, the laity are assigned to the apostolate by the Lord Himself” (AA, 3). So whether you are an accountant, a lawyer, clerk, doctor, musician, an executive, a teacher, or whatever, you share in the apostolate of preaching, teaching, healing and witnessing to Christ’s teachings. 

I used to work in a parish in Cubao, Quezon City and vividly remember a parishioner, a high-raking government official who worked with NACIDA. What impressed me very much was the fact that after office hours he would regularly drop at the parish office and work in the Legion of Mary. He did this faithfully as if he took a religious vow. Aside from the regular meetings and prayers, he and the members would visit the sick in the parish, reach out to depressed areas or a nearby jail, and sought to rekindle the faith of inactive parishioners. They were a small, low-profile band of lay workers but very dedicated and effective. They were serious and sincere in taking their Christian apostolic involvement. 

Today we know more and more numerous lay Catholics who sacrifice time, money and effort for the Church. Think of the eucharistic lay leaders, lectors, collectors, choir members and yes, the sacristans, and many others who render their services “gratis et amore.” Consider, too, the many lay Catholic involved in various renewal movements such as the charismatic organization, neo-catechumenate, Marriage Encounter, Couples for Christ, Christian Family Movement, and yes the thriving El Shaddai Catholic renewal community of Bro. Mike Velarde. Never before has there been such a renaissance of vibrant spiritual awakening. 

The most effective form of communicating the Good News is, of course, the testimony of Christian living. If people who rub shoulders with us begin to recognize a special “something” that we have, they might eventually ask about it and be attracted to our way of life. 

In communicating Christian values what should be avoided is being preachy or pushy. Not a few of us like to be preached at. We don’t like to be pushed into doing anything that makes us feel uncomfortable. We should share our belief humbly and simply, avoiding condescending insinuations that we are right and others are wrong. We should never assume that our faith in Christ guarantee us infallible wisdom. Sharing with others our own approaches and experiences in working through life’s problems is another way of making the good news receivable. 

People are far more interested in applied philosophy than in theoretical conjecturing. Telling someone how we pray, for example, is usually more interesting to them that a discourse why everyone should pray or what prayer is, and so on. If we can talk about our personal experiences in living spiritual life, other people will be more inclined to listen to us. 

But after all is said about preaching the Good News, we must reflect the Good News to others. If our life in Christ does not produce peace, joy, kindness in our character, then why should an already-miserable humanity be interested in us?

Therefore before we attempt to evangelize or be “fishers of men,” we must, first of all, be Good News to people. 

Note: Taken from Fr. Bel San Luis SVD, WORD ALIVE, Manila, Philippines: LOGOS Publications, Inc., 1994, pages 24-26.


35 posted on 02/10/2013 3:18:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for February 10, 2013:

(World Marriage Day)  We are reminded that marriage is not just a private affair, but a time for your love to impact the world. Just as Jesus told Simon to “Put out into deep water…for a catch.” (Lk 5:4) find a way to multiply your love through serving or feeding others today.


36 posted on 02/10/2013 3:23:17 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle C

February 10, 2013

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Isaiah 6:1-8

Psalm: 138:1-5, 7-8

Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 15:1-11

Gospel Reading: Luke 5:1-11

  • Between last Sunday’s Gospel (Luke 4:21-30)—when Jesus caused an uproar in the synagogue at Nazareth—and this Sunday’s reading, Jesus has been throughout Galilee and Judea (respectively, northern and southern Israel) teaching, casting out evil spirits, and healing the sick, including the mother-in-law of Simon (who would be called Peter).
  • This Sunday’s Gospel finds Jesus teaching on the shore of the Lake of Gennesaret, sometimes called the Sea of Galilee (Matthew 4:18) and the Sea of Tiberias (John 6:1). To accommodate the large crowds coming to hear him, he gets into a fishing boat (the one belonging to Peter) and teaches from there. This action was seen by the early Church Fathers as a symbol of how Christ teaches through the Church, which is often called the “Barque (or boat) of St. Peter.”
  • After finishing his teaching, Jesus directs Peter to lower his nets for a catch. Peter, an experienced fisherman, knows very well that it was not the time of day to catch fish. Out of obedience to Jesus, however he complies—with miraculous results.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • How did this miracle affect Peter? Why does it seem to have a more profound effect on him than the healing of his mother-in-law (Luke 4:38-39)? What is he beginning to grasp about Jesus? About sin? About belief in himself?

  • What do you think Simon Peter was thinking and feeling in verse 5? 7? 8? When was the first time, if ever, that you responded to Jesus like Peter did in verse 8?

  • Compare and contrast the scene from the Gospel reading with that found in the First Reading (Isaiah 6:1-8). How are the scenes similar? Different?
  • Peter asks Jesus to depart from him, “For I am a sinful man.” In reply, Jesus tells him not to be afraid. How often to feelings of unworthiness make you afraid to approach God? What do you do with that fear?
  • In your “fishing business,” how do you see Jesus: (a) Interesting, but a slightly irrelevant teacher? (b) Potentially a great business partner—if you could hire him to work for you? (c) The one who calls all the shots?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 208, 552, 765, 787, 849-852

 

“Put out into deep water!” Throw aside the pessimism that makes a coward of you. “And let down your nets for a catch.” Don’t you see that you, like Peter, can say: “Jesus, if you say so, I will search for souls”?     -St. Josemaria Escriva


37 posted on 02/10/2013 3:27:06 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Making the Most Out of Lent
Pastor’s Column
5th Sunday in Ordinary Time
February 10, 2013
 
          Perhaps some of us are just a bit dismayed that Lent has arrived so early this year (I am)! Yet there is no other six week period in the spiritual year when the majority of us together are working on something with the Lord. We don’t want to miss the opportunity of Lent and the great gift it represents in our walk with Christ. Every year I ask the Lord the same question: What is that special project that you and I are going to work on together this Lent, Lord?
 
          The real question in the spiritual life is always how well we really know ourselves. Only the Holy Spirit can guide us into that which needs renewal this year and can give us fruitfulness in dealing with it. So at the beginning of Lent, it is imperative that we pray for an enlightenment from the Spirit to see ourselves as we really are, both our virtues and what is impeding our relationship with God, because a Lenten sacrifice has so much power before God. What is out of balance in my life?
 
          Spiritual Nourishment: What is nourishing my soul, or impoverishing it? Is the media in my life out of balance, to the detriment of prayer? Do I visit websites or see movies that do violence to my walk with Christ? Lent is a time to balance this out with Lighthouse CDS (we sell them in the vestibule), good Christian media, books, and a greater emphasis on the family. We all recognize that we will become ill if we eat poorly, but many do not recognize spiritual poverty.
 
          Prayer: How do I pray? Mass will be fruitful to the extent that I have an outside relationship with God through prayer. By attending or at least reading the daily mass scriptures each day we will become ever closer to the thoughts of Christ. A good way to receive the daily Mass readings is by using this website: www.dailygospel.org. In addition, Jesus is always waiting for us in the Blessed Sacrament. In our parish, we have the great gift of having a chapel always open for you. Lent is an opportunity to try a new form of prayer: the Rosary, Lectio Divina, centering prayer, meditation, the possibilities are endless.
 
          Almsgiving: Reviewing tithing of time and talent is always appropriate for Lent. Is there a particular area of my life where God wishes me to be more generous? In what way am I being called to live the gospel in concrete external ways? All of us, one way or another have a mission in life for others: family, friends, strangers, co-workers, schoolmates, enemies. Tithing is one way to fulfill this mission, and there are many others.
         
          Fasting: The best fast is to fast from some sin that has become habitual! Is there an area of food or drink that has become unbalanced or addictive? Is God calling on me to take steps to break this habit once and for all? Perhaps the whole future depends on it!  Fasting makes room for God. Voluntary fasting helps us when life deals us with fasts that we don’t choose.
                                                                                      Father Gary 

38 posted on 02/10/2013 3:42:48 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center Blog

Into the Deep: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 5th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 02.08.13 |


Peter Fishing

Isaiah 6:1-8
Psalm 138:1-5, 7-8
1 Corinthians 15:1-11
Luke 5:1-11

Simon Peter, the fisherman, is the first to be called personally by Jesus in Luke’s Gospel.

His calling resembles Isaiah’s commissioning in the First Reading: Confronted with the holiness of the Lord, both Peter and Isaiah are overwhelmed by a sense of their sinfulness and inadequacy. Yet each experiences the Lord’s forgiveness and is sent to preach the good news of His mercy to the world.

No one is “fit to be called an apostle,” Paul recognizes in today’s Epistle. But by “the grace of God,” even a persecutor of the Church—as Paul once was—can be lifted up for the Lord’s service.

In the Old Testament, humanity was unfit for the divine—no man could stand in God’s presence and live (see Exodus 33:20). But in Jesus, we’re made able to speak with Him face-to-face, taste His Word on our tongue.
Today’s scene from Isaiah is recalled in every Mass. Before reading the Gospel, the priest silently asks God to cleanse his lips that he might worthily proclaim His Word.

God’s Word comes to us as it came to Peter, Paul, Isaiah, and today’s Psalmist— as a personal call to leave everything and follow Him, to surrender our weaknesses in order to be filled with His strength.

Simon put out into deep waters even though, as a professional fisherman, he knew it would be foolhardy to expect to catch anything. In humbling himself before the Lord’s command, he was exalted—his nets filled to overflowing; later, as Paul tells us, he will become the first to see the risen Lord.

Jesus has made us worthy to receive Him in the company of angels in God’s holy Temple. On our knees like Peter, with the humility of David in today’s Psalm, we thank Him with all our hearts and join in the unending hymn that Isaiah heard around God’s altar: “Holy, holy, holy….” (see also Revelation 4:8).


39 posted on 02/10/2013 3:57:19 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Daily Gospel Commentary

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Year C
Blessed John Henry Newman (1801-1890), priest, founder of a religious community, theologian
Sermon « A Particular Providence as Revealed in the Gospel » PPS vol.3, no.9

He calls you by name

God beholds thee individually, whoever thou art. He "calls thee by thy name." He sees thee, and understands thee, as He made thee. He knows what is in thee, all thy own peculiar feelings and thoughts, thy dispositions and likings, thy strength and thy weakness. He views thee in thy day of rejoicing, and thy day of sorrow. He sympathizes in thy hopes and thy temptations. He interests Himself in all thy anxieties and remembrances, all the risings and fallings of thy spirit. He has numbered the very hairs of thy head... He compasses thee round and bears thee in his arms; He takes thee up and sets thee down. He notes thy very countenance, whether smiling or in tears, whether healthful or sickly. He looks tenderly upon thy hands and thy feet; He hears thy voice, the beating of thy heart, and thy very breathing...

Thou art man redeemed and sanctified, His adopted son, favored with a portion of that glory and blessedness which flows from Him everlastingly unto the Only-begotten. Thou art chosen to be His... What is man, what are we, what am I, that the Son of God should be so mindful of me? What am I, that He should have raised me... to the nature of an Angel? that He should have changed my soul's original constitution, new-made me, who from my youth up have been a transgressor, and should Himself dwell personally in this very heart of mine, making me His temple?

(Biblical references : Jn 10,3; Mt 10,30; Ps 8,5; cf Gn 8,21, Ps 51[50],7; 1Co 3,16)


40 posted on 02/10/2013 4:14:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
To Sunday: God of the Call
Tintoretto
 
"Put out into deep water . . ."
 
Steer the ship of my life, good Lord, to your quiet harbour, where I can be safe from the storms of sin and conflict.  Show me the course I should take. Renew in me the gift of discernment, so that I can always see the right direction in which I should go. And give me the strength and the courage to choose the right course, even when the sea is rough and the waves are high, knowing that through enduring hardship and danger we shall find comfort and peace.

St. Basil of Caesarea

Is 6: 1-2a, 3-8
1 Cor 15: 1-11
Lk 5: 1-11
Fishing was a popular vacation pass time I remember well from growing up in the Midwest.  We took many family vacations to northern Wisconsin and settled in a resort cabins along one of the many inland lakes found nestled in the wooded low rolling hills of the central states.  Between boating, water skiing, and fishing the summer vacation days were filled.

The fish were plentiful and delicious.  Everything from bluegill, sunfish, northern pike, largemouth bass and walleye, these fresh water fish are common in those lakes. However, the fishing method was vastly different than the fishermen we hear of in the Gospel this Sunday (Lk 5: 1-11).  We used rod and reel with lures or live bait.  They used nets;  large, roped nets that would be thrown out over the water with the hope that when hauled in, many fish would be caught. But something was about to change in their routine lives.

“Put out into deep water and lower your nets for a catch.” (Lk 5: 4) said Jesus to Simon as he sat in his boat and taught the crowds on the shore of Lake Galilee. It was not a particularly profound statement for many along that shore may have said the same as good fishing advice.  Maybe they knew of a place where the fish were more likely to be found.

But from Jesus it had a deeper meaning; almost an invitation.  And so Simon had two choices – to do what Jesus had requested or to dismiss his advice as coming from a naïve preacher who knew little about the finer points of the fishing trade.

One could hear a certain respect in the voice of Simon as he answered Jesus: “Master, we have worked hard all night and have caught nothing, but at your command I will lower the nets . . .” (Lk 5: 5).  Command?  Was it the tone of Jesus’ voice or a deeper awareness in Simon that heard in Jesus’ advice a word to obey? 

Despite his own experience of failed fishing all night long, Simon does what Jesus suggests and orders the nets to be thrown over the water along the boat and to sink into the dark waves. “I’ll show him he’s wrong just to prove my point.  What does this preacher know about fishing anyway?” Simon may have thought. But then a new life began for Simon and his fishing buddies.

So many fish were caught in the nets where Jesus had ordered that the boats were near sinking.  The reaction of Simon? “. . . he fell at the knees of Jesus and said, “‘Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man.’” (Lk 5: 8). Simon recognizes in Jesus that he wasn’t dealing with just any preacher, however well meaning. This was someone whose command brought results and Simon recognized his own unworthiness in the presence of such greatness. This act of faith would serve Simon well despite his occasional failings.  Jesus would not forget Simon’s (Peter) insight from the beginning as to who he was. This preacher would be the God without limits who gives in abundance if we only follow his call.

As we approach this Sunday, so close to our holy season of Lent, where may our Lord be inviting us to “put out into deep water” and you find yourself resisting the suggestion – or command?

Fishing is slow going.  One never knows whether a catch will be found or we might be “hard at it all night” with nothing to show.  Is that time to give up? We turn to prayer but do we truly believe that nothing is impossible with God or do we bargain over or limit the possibilities? “Master, we’ve been hard at it all night long . . .”

In the first reading from Isaiah 6 the prophet is eager to answer the invitation of the Lord: “Here I am, send me!” No hesitation in throwing out his net. No bargain or limit to what Isaiah responds.  He’s ready to go.   

Whenever we hear the invitation of the Spirit, the great saints tell us to stop what we are doing and put out into deep water.  Have you ever had the urge to pray and just said, “I’m too busy right now.”  Has someone invited you to read a particular spiritual book or look up a certain scripture passage to pray over and you never did so? Has the call to service to assist at a food bank, or help to tutor children in school, or to make amends with someone who has hurt you found an eager response on your part?

It is a God without limits who calls us to trust but waits patiently for our response. Why do we wait?

More to come . . .

Fr. Tim

41 posted on 02/11/2013 3:27:18 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Insight Scoop

God initiates. Man responds. Jesus calls. Man answers.

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, February 10, 2013 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:

Is 6:1-2a, 3-8
Ps 138:1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 7-8
1 Cor 15:1-11 or 15:3-8
Lk 5:1-11

God initiates. Man responds. Jesus calls. Man answers.

Such is the dynamic relationship at the heart of salvation history and at the center of human existence. “Through an utterly free decision,” the Catechism explains, “God has revealed himself and given himself to man. This he does by revealing the mystery, his plan of loving goodness, formed from all eternity in Christ, for the benefit of all men.” Today’s readings offer a challenging view of God’s revelation of Himself, His call to specific men, and His desire for all Christians to be “fishers of men.” 

Let’s take a brief look at three men caught up in the divine drama: the prophet Isaiah, the apostle Paul, and Peter, the head of the Apostles and the first Pope. In many respects they were quite different from one another. Isaiah was likely from an upper-class family, was apparently well educated, and was married to a prophetess (Isa 8:3). Paul was also highly educated, the prize student of the great rabbi Gamaliel (Acts 22:3), and, prior to his conversion on the Damascus Road, a fervent enemy of the budding Church. Peter was certainly fervent as well, but was a fisherman and a blue-collar businessman. Yet, however different they were from one another, each man was called, in dramatic and personal fashion, to proclaim the Word of God in difficult, harrowing circumstances. 

Some seven centuries prior to Jesus and the apostles, the prophet Isaiah had a dazzling vision of the throne room of the Lord of hosts. Yahweh, the Holy One of Israel, initiated contact with the prophet and called him to the task of proclaiming the glory of God and exhorting Israel and Judah to repent of their sins. Isaiah recognized and confessed his own sinful state: “Woe is me, I am doomed! For I am a man of unclean lips, living among a people of unclean lips…”

As the Catechism says so well, “Faced with God’s fascinating and mysterious presence, man discovers his own insignificance” (CCC 208). When man sees himself in the light of God’s holiness and recognizes his desperate plight, he can then admit his sinful state and be given the grace needed for the work of God. “See,” Isaiah was told by the seraphim, “now that this has touched your lips, your wickedness is removed, your sin purged.”

Paul was also transformed and purified by a heavenly vision. Having held the cloaks of those who stoned Stephen, the first martyr, the young Saul was intent on persecuting the Church in Jerusalem and the surrounding areas (Acts 7:58; 8:1-3). Then, while traveling to Damascus in search of more Christians to arrest, “a light from the sky suddenly flashed around him” (Acts 9:3). As he wrote to the church in Corinth, in today’s Epistle, “Last of all, as to one born abnormally, he appeared to me. For I am the least of the apostles, not fit to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God.” Whereas Isaiah’s sinful lips were purified by fire, Paul’s blinded eyes were healed by the prayer and hands of Ananias, a disciple of Jesus Christ.  

Paul eventually spent time with Peter (cf. Gal 1:18), whose life contained more than a few instances of dramatic response to God’s call. Luke’s account of the miraculous catch of fish sets the stage for one such moment; it begins with the note that the crowds following Jesus were eagerly “listening to the word of God.” Some of the early Church Fathers, such as Ambrose and Augustine, saw this event as both historical and metaphorical: the boat of Peter represents the Church in history, going forth to catch men through the guidance of Christ, the head of the Church. Peter, who would eventually be the Vicar of Christ (Matt 16:16-18), accepted by faith the command of Jesus. Upon witnessing the miracle he responded with the same humility as Isaiah and Paul: “Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man.” Yet Jesus does not ask only Peter and the apostles to be fishers of men; He asks it of every son and daughter of God. 

God is calling. How will we answer? Jesus tells us to cast our nets. Will we?

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the February 4, 2007, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


42 posted on 02/11/2013 4:01:33 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

Teaching the Thickheaded
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Luke 5:1-11

While the crowd was pressing in on Jesus and listening to the word of God, he was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret. He saw two boats there alongside the lake; the fishermen had disembarked and were washing their nets. Getting into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, he asked him to put out a short distance from the shore. Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat. After he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, "Put out into deep water and lower your nets for a catch." Simon said in reply, "Master, we have worked hard all night and have caught nothing, but at your command I will lower the nets." When they had done this, they caught a great number of fish and their nets were tearing. They signaled to their partners in the other boat to come to help them. They came and filled both boats so that they were in danger of sinking. When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at the knees of Jesus and said, "Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man." For astonishment at the catch of fish they had made seized him and all those with him, and likewise James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were partners of Simon. Jesus said to Simon, "Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men." When they brought their boats to the shore, they left everything and followed him.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, thank you for revealing your tender, merciful, Sacred Heart to us. Your Heart gives me the confidence to turn back to you as many times as I fall. I know that I hurt you the most when I neglect to trust in your infinite love for me. And so now in this meditation, good and kind Jesus, I intend to rest in your love.

Petition: Lord, give me faith so I can be a docile instrument in your great work of saving souls.

1. Jesus Sees Our Hearts: In today’s Gospel we see Our Lord presented as a wonderful teacher of souls. First, Christ is a teacher to the multitude whose hearts were opened to his teaching by his marvelous miracles. He is also more subtly presented as a teacher to Saint Peter, whom he would later choose to lead his Church. His first lesson to Peter, besides the one Peter hears Jesus preach from his boat, is the very personal message of his worth in Christ’s eyes. Jesus provides a miracle just for Peter—not to heal him of some infirmity, but to demonstrate Christ’s overflowing love for him. He speaks loudly through his action of the miraculous catch. Whether through want or abundance, health or infirmity, am I able to discern Our Lord’s lessons for me in my life? Am I open to his lessons of love?

2. From the Depths of Our Faith: Our Lord implemented a deeper lesson plan with Peter in order to prepare him for his great mission of being the first pope. Peter would need to move to a more supernatural level if Christ were to entrust him with the keys of the Kingdom of heaven. Testing his generosity, Christ commandeered Peter’s boat in order to teach the crowds gathered at the shore. Then Jesus led Peter to make an act of faith: he asked him to set out into the deep and drop his nets at a time when it didn’t appear opportune to fish. If Peter were to answer the supernatural call to be a fisher of men, he would have to depend on Our Lord’s working of miracles. Only by the grace of Christ is God able to redeem what humanly seems unsalvageable.

3. A Lesson of Mercy: Mercy is God’s divine method of teaching: by showing mercy to sinners, Christ teaches us important lessons. Peter’s intentions are discovered and revealed in his confession at the shore. Peter confesses his lack of faith despite his “obedience” to Our Lord’s command to cast out into the deep. Our Lord taught Peter a great lesson when he blessed Peter’s feeble and meager faith with a contrastingly abundant catch of fish. Does my faith in God show in my actions? Am I willing to respond generously in the work of the New Evangelization?

Conversation with Christ: Lord, help me with the grace of your mercy to accept  what seems unfeasible in human terms. Help me to accept your call for me to work in establishing a civilization of love in today’s world. Help me Lord, to be always faithful to your friendship, sincere in my faith, and diligent in service to you and my neighbors in need.

Resolution: Today I will pray and make a sacrifice to Our Lord so that he sends generous and holy vocations to the Church, especially where she needs them the most.


43 posted on 02/11/2013 9:03:13 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, February 10, 2013 >> Fifth Sunday Ordinary Time
 
Isaiah 6:1-2, 3-8
1 Corinthians 15:1-11

View Readings
Psalm 138:1-5, 7-8
Luke 5:1-11

 

HE TOUCHED ME

 
"Now that this has touched your lips, your wickedness is removed, your sin purged." —Isaiah 6:7
 

We properly recognize our sinfulness not by comparing ourselves to others, but by truthfully realizing Who God is, how holy and majestic He is, and especially by comparing ourselves to His holiness.

Each of today's readings all have in common a man who recognized his sinfulness and unworthiness before God. They also have in common a man who additionally recognized that God was calling him to His service. Isaiah, Paul, and Peter all encountered the Lord personally with a profound experience of the awesome power of God (Is 6:1ff; Acts 9:3ff; Lk 5:5ff). Each man allowed God to cleanse him and make him worthy to serve Him. They responded with a deep commitment to the Lord and with steadfast perseverance for the rest of their lives.

God knows we are sinful. That is why He sent us a Savior, Jesus, to save us from our sins. He knows we are sinful and unworthy, but in His wisdom, He has called us anyway. Jesus takes away our sin. He touches our lips, most particularly in the Eucharist, and cleanses us. He commands us: "Do not be afraid. From now on you will be catching men" (Lk 5:10). Even though we are unworthy, His grace in us will not be ineffective (2 Cor 12:10).

God doesn't want us to languish in our feelings of unworthiness. Rather, He wants us to jump into the deep ocean of His grace (Lk 5:4), abandoning ourselves into His mercy and His service. Surrender your life to Jesus. Give Him your sins and your life.

 
Prayer: Father, I will go wherever You send me.
Promise: "Do not be afraid. From now on you will be catching men." —Lk 5:10
Praise: Praise the risen Jesus, Who bears the marks of His death as a sign of His great love for us.

44 posted on 02/11/2013 9:15:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Pray for an end to the Culture of Death in America!

45 posted on 02/11/2013 9:17:18 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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