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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 02-24-13, Second Sunday of Lent
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 02-24-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 02/23/2013 8:49:25 PM PST by Salvation

February 24, 2013

 

Second Sunday of Lent 

 

 

Reading 1 Gn 15:5-12, 17-18

The Lord God took Abram outside and said,
“Look up at the sky and count the stars, if you can.
Just so,” he added, “shall your descendants be.”
Abram put his faith in the LORD,
who credited it to him as an act of righteousness.

He then said to him,
“I am the LORD who brought you from Ur of the Chaldeans
to give you this land as a possession.”
“O Lord GOD,” he asked,
“how am I to know that I shall possess it?”
He answered him,
“Bring me a three-year-old heifer, a three-year-old she-goat,
a three-year-old ram, a turtledove, and a young pigeon.”
Abram brought him all these, split them in two,
and placed each half opposite the other;
but the birds he did not cut up.
Birds of prey swooped down on the carcasses,
but Abram stayed with them.
As the sun was about to set, a trance fell upon Abram,
and a deep, terrifying darkness enveloped him.

When the sun had set and it was dark,
there appeared a smoking fire pot and a flaming torch,
which passed between those pieces.
It was on that occasion that the LORD made a covenant with Abram,
saying: “To your descendants I give this land,
from the Wadi of Egypt to the Great River, the Euphrates.”

Responsorial Psalm Ps 27:1, 7-8, 8-9, 13-14

R. (1a) The Lord is my light and my salvation.
The LORD is my light and my salvation;
whom should I fear?
The LORD is my life’s refuge;
of whom should I be afraid?
R. The Lord is my light and my salvation.
Hear, O LORD, the sound of my call;
have pity on me, and answer me.
Of you my heart speaks; you my glance seeks.
R. The Lord is my light and my salvation.
Your presence, O LORD, I seek.
Hide not your face from me;
do not in anger repel your servant.
You are my helper: cast me not off.
R. The Lord is my light and my salvation.
I believe that I shall see the bounty of the LORD
in the land of the living.
Wait for the LORD with courage;
be stouthearted, and wait for the LORD.
R. The Lord is my light and my salvation.

Reading 2 Phil 3:17—4:1

Join with others in being imitators of me, brothers and sisters,
and observe those who thus conduct themselves
according to the model you have in us.
For many, as I have often told you
and now tell you even in tears,
conduct themselves as enemies of the cross of Christ.
Their end is destruction.
Their God is their stomach;
their glory is in their “shame.”
Their minds are occupied with earthly things.
But our citizenship is in heaven,
and from it we also await a savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.
He will change our lowly body
to conform with his glorified body
by the power that enables him also
to bring all things into subjection to himself.

Therefore, my brothers and sisters,
whom I love and long for, my joy and crown,
in this way stand firm in the Lord.

or PHIL 3:20—4:1


Brothers and sisters:
Our citizenship is in heaven,
and from it we also await a savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.
He will change our lowly body
to conform with his glorified body
by the power that enables him also
to bring all things into subjection to himself.

Therefore, my brothers and sisters,
whom I love and long for, my joy and crown,
in this way stand firm in the Lord, beloved.

Gospel Lk 9:28b-36

Jesus took Peter, John, and James
and went up the mountain to pray.
While he was praying his face changed in appearance
and his clothing became dazzling white.
And behold, two men were conversing with him, Moses and Elijah,
who appeared in glory and spoke of his exodus
that he was going to accomplish in Jerusalem.
Peter and his companions had been overcome by sleep,
but becoming fully awake,
they saw his glory and the two men standing with him.
As they were about to part from him, Peter said to Jesus,
“Master, it is good that we are here;
let us make three tents,
one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.”
But he did not know what he was saying.
While he was still speaking,
a cloud came and cast a shadow over them,
and they became frightened when they entered the cloud.
Then from the cloud came a voice that said,
“This is my chosen Son; listen to him.”
After the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone.
They fell silent and did not at that time
tell anyone what they had seen.



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; lent; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 02/23/2013 8:49:33 PM PST by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...

Praise to you, Lord, Jesus Christ, King of Endless Glory Ping!

If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be on it, please Freepmail me.



2 posted on 02/23/2013 8:52:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18

God’s Covenant with Abram


[5] And [the Lord God] brought him outside and said, “Look toward heaven, and
number the stars, if you are able to number them.” Then he said to him, “So
shall your descendants be.” [6] And he believed the Lord; and he reckoned it to
him as righteousness.

[7] And he said to him, “I am the Lord who brought you from Ur of the Chaldeans,
to give you this land to possess.” [8] But he said, “O Lord God, how am I to know
that I shall possess it?” [9] He said to him, “Bring me a heifer three years old, a
she-goat three years old, a ram three years old, a turtledove, and a young pigeon.”
[10] And he brought him all these, cut them in two, and laid each half over against
the other; but he did not cut the birds in two. [11] And when birds of prey came
down upon the carcasses, Abram drove them away.

[12] As the sun was going down, a deep sleep fell on Abram; and lo, a dread and
great darkness fell upon him.

[17] When the sun had gone down and it was dark, behold, a smoking firepot and
a flaming torch passed between these pieces. [18] On that day the Lord made a
covenant with Abram, saying, “To your descendants I give this land, from the river
of Egypt to the great river, the river Euphrates.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

15:1-21. God rewards Abraham for his generosity towards Mechizedek and for
his renouncing of the riches offered him by the king of Sodom. He appears to
him in a vision and promises his help, many descendants and the land of Canaan.
Here all that is required of Abraham is that he believe in the promise that God him-
self, through a rite of covenant, undertakes to fulfill. This passage emphasizes the
gravity of God’s promise and speaks of the faithfulness of God, who will keep his
word.

15:4-6. Once more Abraham is asked to make an act of faith in the word of God,
and he does so. This pleases God and is reckoned righteous. This makes Abra-
ham the father of all those who believe in God and his saving word.

In the light of this passage St Paul sees Abraham as the model of how a person
becomes righteous in God’s eyes—through faith in his word, the definitive word
being the announcement that God saves us through the death and resurrection
of Jesus. In this way, Abraham not only becomes the father of the Jewish people
according to the flesh, but also the father of those who without being Jews have
become members of the new people of God through faith in Jesus: “We say that
faith was reckoned to Abraham as righteousness. How then was it reckoned to
him? Was it before or after he was circumcised? It was not after, but before he
was circumcised. He received circumcision as a sign or seal of the righteousness
which he had by faith while he was still uncircumcised. The purpose was to make
him the father of all who believe without being circumcised and who thus have
righteousness reckoned to them, and likewise the father of the circumcised who
are not merely circumcised but also follow the example of the faith which our fa-
ther Abraham had before he was circumcised” (Rom 4:9-12).

Abraham’s faith revealed itself in his obedience to God when he left his homeland
(cf. 12:4), and later on when he was ready to sacrifice his son (cf 22:1-4). This is
the aspect of Abraham’s obedience which is given special emphasis in the Letter
of St James, inviting Christians to prove the genuineness of their faith with obedi-
ence to God and good works: “Was not Abraham our father justified by works,
when he offered his son Isaac upon the altar? You see that faith was active along
with his works, and faith was completed by works, and scripture was fulfilled
which says, ‘Abraham believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteous-
ness’; and he was called the friend of God” (Jas 2:21-23).

15:7-21. The strength of God’s resolve to give the land of Canaan is vividly demon-
strated by his ordaining a rite of covenant to externalize the commitment under-
taken by both parties. According to this ancient rite (cf. Jer 34:18), the action of
the two parties—”passing between” the pieces of the victims-indicated a readi-
ness to be similarly cut in pieces if one were guilty of breaking the pact. The text
makes the point that God (represented by the flaming torch: cf Ex 3:2; 13:21; 19:
18) “passes between” the bloody limbs of the victims, to ratify his promise.

This is how the book of Genesis portrays the people of Israel’s right to the land of
Canaan and explains how the land came to belong to it only in recent times, after
the Exodus. During the ceremony Abraham is given advance information about
the afflictions the people will suffer before the promise is fulfilled. An explanation
is also given as to why God will take the land away from the Canaanites (here
described as Amorites): their evil-doing will have gone too far. God emerges here
as the Lord of the earth and of nations. On the sojourn of the people of Israel in
Egypt, cf. the note on 37:2-50:25.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 02/23/2013 8:57:53 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Philippians 3:17-4:1

Citizens of Heaven


[17] Brethren, join in imitating me, and mark those who so live as you have an
example in us. [18] For many, of whom I have often told you and now tell you
even with tears, live as enemies of the cross of Christ. [19] Their end is destruc-
tion, their god is the belly, and they glory in their shame, with minds set on ear-
thly things. [20] But our commonwealth is in heaven, and from it we await a Sa-
vior, the Lord Jesus Christ, [21] who will change our lowly body to be like his
glorious body, by the power which enables him even to subject all things to him-
self.

Exhortation to Perseverance and Joy


[1] Therefore, my brethren, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand
firm thus in the Lord, my beloved.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

17. The Apostle’s teaching goes further than to list a series of truths and rules
for moral behavior: he backs this up with his own life in the service of the Gospel,
and, through it, all men; this is what makes his preaching arresting and convin-
cing.

There is no better teaching than the teacher’s own example,” St John Chrysos-
tom exclaims, commenting on this passage; “by taking this course the teacher
is sure of getting his disciple to follow him. Speak wisely, instruct as eloquently
as you can ..., but your example will make a greater impression, will be more
decisive.... When your actions are in line with your words, nobody will be able
to find fault with you” (”Hom. on Phil, ad loc.”).

This, then, is the standard Christians should aim at. It will help those they come
in contact with to learn how to be hard-working, noble, loyal and sincere people,
or at least to tend in that direction.

One can see from this verse, as from many other passages in his letters, that St
Paul refers to himself now as “me”, now as “us”. In the second case he is proba-
bly also referring to his co-workers; these they should also imitate, for like him
they are imitators of Christ (cf. 1 Cor 4:17). it is quite likely that he is thinking
particularly of Timothy, whose name he put alongside his own at the head of this
letter — and whom he praised in glorious terms in the previous chapter (cf. Phil
2:19, 22).

Imitation of the saints is a very good way to equip oneself to serve others. “Most
earnestly, then, we exhort you”, Pius XII says, “be very solicitous for the salva-
tion of those whom Providence has entrusted to your apostolic labors, maintai-
ning throughout the closest union with our divine Redeemer, by whose strength
we can do all things (cf. Phil 4:13). It is our ardent desire, beloved sons, that you
may emulate those saintly men of old who, by the immensity of their achieve-
ment, bore witness to the power of divine grace. Would that each of you could
on the evidence of the faithful attribute to himself in humble sincerity the words
of the Apostle: ‘I will most gladly spend and be spent for your souls’ (2 Cor 12:
15)” (”Menti Nostrae”, 31).

18-19. St Paul points to the bad example given by those (cf. v. 2) who, by uphol-
ding false doctrines or abusing their Christian freedom, lead a life steeped in vice;
they let themselves be controlled by their sensual appetites and they set their
hearts on things which enslave them, which should rather make them blush.
They are enemies of Christ’s cross.

“They glory in their own shame”: they take pride in behavior which is shameful.
This may also be an allusion to circumcision, for Judaizers were proud of a mark
which decency keeps covered.

20-21. “It is nature, flawed by sin, that begets all the citizens of the earthly city,
whereas it is grace alone which frees nature from sin, which begets citizens of
the heavenly city” (”De Civitate Dei”, 15, 2). Christians are “citizens of heaven”
and therefore are called to live a life that is joyful and full of hope, as befits chil-
dren of God.

The effort to live in a manner worthy of members of the commonwealth of heaven
is aided by hope in the second coming of our Lord Jesus Christ in glory. The Pa-
rousia, as well as the passion and death of Christ and his subsequent resurrec-
tion, are constant themes in the Apostle’s preaching. Reflection on these mys-
teries helps us to have hope and gives us encouragement in our everyday strug-
gle.

Christ’s resurrection is the cause of our resurrection, for “Christ has been raised
from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep. For as by a man
came death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead” (1 Cor 15:
20-21). An essential prerequisite for attaining resurrection in glory is the effort to
identify with Christ, in both joy and suffering, in both life and death. “If we have
died with him, we shall also live with him; if we endure, we shall also reign with
him” (2 Tim 2:12). Christ is the Lord of all creation; his authority extends over the
entire universe (cf. Col 1:15-20). If we make the effort that fidelity requires, he will
take our body, which is weak and subject to illness, death and decay, and trans-
form it into a glorious body.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 02/23/2013 8:58:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 9:28b-36

The Transfiguration


[28b] [Jesus] took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the moun-
tain to pray. [29] And as he was praying, the appearance of his countenance was
altered, and his raiment became dazzling white. [30] And behold, two men talked
with him, Moses and Elijah, [31] who appeared in glory and spoke of his depar-
ture, which he was to accomplish at Jerusalem. [32] Now Peter and those who
were with him were heavy with sleep, and when they wakened they saw his glory
and the two men who stood with him. [33] And as the men were parting from him,
Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is well that we are here; let us make three booths,
one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah” — not knowing what he said.
[34] As he said this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were afraid
as they entered the cloud. [35] And a voice came out of the cloud, saying, “This
is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!” [36] And when the voice had spoken,
Jesus was found alone. And they kept silence and told no one in those days
anything of what they had seen.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

28-36. By His transfiguration Jesus strengthens His disciples’ faith, revealing a
trace of the glory His body will have after the Resurrection. He wants them to rea-
lize that His passion will not be the end but rather the route He will take to reach
His glorification. “For a person to go straight along the road, he must have some
knowledge of the end—just as an archer will not shoot an arrow straight unless
he first sees the target [...]. This is particularly necessary if the road is hard and
rough, the going heavy, and the end delightful” (St. Thomas Aquinas, “Summa
Theologiae”, III, q. 45, a. 1).

Through the miracle of the Transfiguration Jesus shows one of the qualities of glo-
rified bodies—brightness, “by which the bodies of the saints shall shine like the
sun, according to the words of our Lord recorded in the Gospel of St. Matthew:
‘The righteous will shine like the sun in the Kingdom of their Father’ (Matthew 13:
43). To remove the possibility of doubt on the subject, He exemplifies this in His
transfiguration. This quality the Apostle (St. Paul) sometimes calls glory, some-
times brightness: ‘He will change our lowly body to be like His glorious body’
(Philippians 3:21); and again, ‘It is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory’ (1 Corin-
thians 15:43). Of this glory the Israelites beheld some image in the desert, when
the face of Moses, after he had enjoyed the presence and conversation of God,
shone with such luster that they could not look on it (Exodus 34:29; 2 Corinthians
3:7). This brightness is a sort of radiance reflected by the body from the supreme
happiness of the soul. It is a participation in that bliss which the soul enjoys [...].
This quality is not common to all in the same degree. All the bodies of the saints
will be equally impassible; but the brightness of all will not be the same, for, ac-
cording to the Apostle, ‘There is one glory of the sun, and another of the moon,
and another glory of the stars; for star differs from star in glory. So it is with the
resurrection of the dead’ (1 Corinthians 15:4f)” (”St. Pius V Catechism”, I, 12, 13).
See also the notes on Matthew 17:1-13; 17:5; 17:10-13; and Mark 9:2-10; 9:7.

31. “And spoke of His departure”: that is, His departure from this world, in other
words, His death. It can also be understood as meaning our Lord’s Ascension.

35. “Listen to Him!”: everything God wishes to say to mankind He has said
through Christ, now that the fullness of time has come (cf. Hebrews 1:1). “There-
fore,” St. John of the Cross explains, “if any now should question God or desire
a vision or revelation, not only would he be acting foolishly but he would be com-
mitting an offense against God, by not fixing his gaze on Christ with no desire for
any new thing. For God could reply to him in this way: ‘If I have spoken all things
to you in My Word, which is My Son, and I have no greater word, what answer
can I give you now, or what can I reveal to you that is greater than this? Fix your
eyes on Him alone, for in Him I have spoken and revealed to you all things, and
in Him you will find even more than what you ask for and desire [...]. Hear Him,
for I have no more faith to reveal, nor have I any more things to declare’” (”Ascent
of Mount Carmel”, Book 2, Chapter 22, 5).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 02/23/2013 9:00:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Genesis 15:5-12,17-18 ©
Taking Abram outside, the Lord said, ‘Look up to heaven and count the stars if you can. Such will be your descendants.’ Abram put his faith in the Lord, who counted this as making him justified.
  ‘I am the Lord’ he said to him ‘who brought you out of Ur of the Chaldaeans to make you heir to this land.’ ‘My Lord,’ Abram replied ‘how am I to know that I shall inherit it?’ He said to him, ‘Get me a three-year-old heifer, a three-year-old goat, a three-year-old ram, a turtledove and a young pigeon.’ He brought him all these, cut them in half and put half on one side and half facing it on the other; but the birds he did not cut in half. Birds of prey came down on the carcases but Abram drove them off.
  When the sun had set and darkness had fallen, there appeared a smoking furnace and a firebrand that went between the halves. That day the Lord made a Covenant with Abram in these terms:
‘To your descendants I give this land,
from the wadi of Egypt to the Great River.’

Psalm Psalm 26:1,7-9,13-14 ©
The Lord is my light and my help;
  whom shall I fear?
The Lord is the stronghold of my life;
  before whom shall I shrink?
O Lord, hear my voice when I call;
  have mercy and answer.
Of you my heart has spoken:
  ‘Seek his face.’
It is your face, O Lord, that I seek;
  hide not your face.
Dismiss not your servant in anger;
  you have been my help.
I am sure I shall see the Lord’s goodness
  in the land of the living.
Hope in him, hold firm and take heart.
  Hope in the Lord!
*The Lord is my light and my help.
EITHER:
Second reading Philippians 3:17-4:1 ©
My brothers, be united in following my rule of life. Take as your models everybody who is already doing this and study them as you used to study us. I have told you often, and I repeat it today with tears, there are many who are behaving as the enemies of the cross of Christ. They are destined to be lost. They make foods into their god and they are proudest of something they ought to think shameful; the things they think important are earthly things. For us, our homeland is in heaven, and from heaven comes the saviour we are waiting for, the Lord Jesus Christ, and he will transfigure these wretched bodies of ours into copies of his glorious body. He will do that by the same power with which he can subdue the whole universe.
  So then, my brothers and dear friends, do not give way but remain faithful in the Lord. I miss you very much, dear friends; you are my joy and my crown.
OR:
Second reading Philippians 3:20-4:1 ©
For us, our homeland is in heaven, and from heaven comes the saviour we are waiting for, the Lord Jesus Christ, and he will transfigure these wretched bodies of ours into copies of his glorious body. He will do that by the same power with which he can subdue the whole universe.
  So then, my brothers and dear friends, do not give way but remain faithful in the Lord. I miss you very much, dear friends; you are my joy and my crown.

Gospel Acclamation Mt17:5
Glory and praise to you, O Christ!
From the bright cloud the Father’s voice was heard:
‘This is my Son, the Beloved. Listen to him.’
Glory and praise to you, O Christ!

Gospel Luke 9:28-36 ©
Jesus took with him Peter and John and James and went up the mountain to pray. As he prayed, the aspect of his face was changed and his clothing became brilliant as lightning. Suddenly there were two men there talking to him; they were Moses and Elijah appearing in glory, and they were speaking of his passing which he was to accomplish in Jerusalem. Peter and his companions were heavy with sleep, but they kept awake and saw his glory and the two men standing with him. As these were leaving him, Peter said to Jesus, ‘Master, it is wonderful for us to be here; so let us make three tents, one for you, one for Moses and one for Elijah.’ – He did not know what he was saying. As he spoke, a cloud came and covered them with shadow; and when they went into the cloud the disciples were afraid. And a voice came from the cloud saying, ‘This is my Son, the Chosen One. Listen to him.’ And after the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. The disciples kept silence and, at that time, told no one what they had seen.

6 posted on 02/23/2013 9:06:00 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray with Pope Benedict

On Ash Wednesday
On God As Creator of Heaven and Earth
On Abraham's Faith
On Christ As Mediator Between God and Man
On the Incarnation
On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 02/23/2013 9:09:20 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Your Guide To A Catholic Lent
Following the Truth: Lent: Becoming Uncomfortable About Being Comfortable [Catholic and Open]
Following the Truth: Spiritual Exercises – Week One [of Lent] In Review
Clerical Narcissism and Lent
Content of Pope's Lenten spiritual exercises revealed
How Lent Can Make a Difference in Your Relationship with God (Ecumenical Thread)
A Call from the FSSP French District: offer up your Lent for Catholic Unity [Catholic Caucus]
A Call from the FSSP French District: offer up your Lent for Catholic Unity [Catholic Caucus]
On the 40 Days of Lent
Christians Tailor Lent Outside Catholic Traditions
Christians Tailor Lent Outside Catholic Traditions
Lent, A Time to Shoulder Our Christian Responsibilities
Consecrate this Lent to Jesus through Mary, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity [Catholic Caucus]
Opinion: Lent for Redacted [Ekoomenikal]

Ash (or Clean) Monday - Lent Begins (for some Catholics) - February 20, 2012
[Why I Am Catholic]: Lent And Holy Week (A Primer) [Catholic Caucus]
Lent, A Time to Give from the Heart [Catholic caucus}
Learning the beatitudes during Lent -- use your Rosary to learn the Beatitutdes [Catholic Caucus]
Lenten Ember Days: March 16th, 18th, and 19th, 2011 (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
St. Vincent Ferrer - Sermon for the First Sunday of Lent [Ecumenical]
Pope describes ‘Lenten road’ that leads to renewal
St. Andrew of Crete, Great Canon of Repentance - Tuesday's portion (Orthodox/Latin Caucus)
The Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete (Monday's portion) [Orth/Cath Caucus]
Penance and Reparation: A Lenten Meditation(Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
For Lent - Top 10 Bible Verses on Penance
Cana Sunday: Entrance into Great Lent
2011 Catechetical Homily on the opening of Holy and Great Lent
8 Ways to Pray During Lent [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Baptists, Lent, and the Rummage Sale
So What Shall We Do during These Forty Days of Lent? [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Lenten Traditions (Catholic Caucus)
Are You Scrupulous? A Lenten Homily by John Cardinal O’Connor
Blow the Trumpet! Call the Assembly! The Blessings of Fasting
Lenten Challenges

Lent and the Catholic Business Professional (Interview)
Temptations Correspond to Our Vulnerabilities: Biblical Reflection for 1st Sunday of Lent
A Lenten “Weight” Loss Program
On the Lenten Season
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US seminarians begin Lenten pilgrimage to Rome's ancient churches
Conversion "is going against the current" of an "illusory way of life"[Pope Benedict XVI for Lent]
vanity] Hope you all make a good Lent [Catholic Caucus]
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On the Spiritual Advantages of Fasting [Pope Clement XIII]
Christ's temptation and ours (Reflection for the First Sunday of Lent)
Pope Benedict XVI Message for Lent 2010 (Feb 15 = Ash Monday & Feb 17 = Ash Wednesday)
Whatever happened to (Lenten) obligations? [Prayer, Fasting, Almsgiving]Archbishop John Vlazny
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Prayer, Fasting and Mercy by St. Peter Chrysologus, Early Church Father [Catholic Caucus]
History of Lent (Did the Church always have this time before Easter?)

Beginning of Lent
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40 Ways to Improve Your Lent
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Pre-Lenten Days -- Family activities-Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras)[Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
40 Ways to Get the Most Out of Lent! [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

Lenten Fasting or Feasting? [Catholic Caucus]
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The Triduum and 40 Days
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Give it up (making a Lenten sacrifice)
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8 posted on 02/23/2013 9:10:37 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
40 Days for Life: Vision and Mission, February 13 - March 24, 2013
9 posted on 02/23/2013 9:12:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 9
28 And it came to pass about eight days after these words, that he took Peter, and James, and John, and went up into a mountain to pray. Factum est autem post hæc verba fere dies octo, et assumpsit Petrum, et Jacobum, et Joannem, et ascendit in montem ut oraret. εγενετο δε μετα τους λογους τουτους ωσει ημεραι οκτω και παραλαβων πετρον και ιωαννην και ιακωβον ανεβη εις το ορος προσευξασθαι
29 And whilst he prayed, the shape of his countenance was altered, and his raiment became white and glittering. Et facta est, dum oraret, species vultus ejus altera : et vestitus ejus albus et refulgens. και εγενετο εν τω προσευχεσθαι αυτον το ειδος του προσωπου αυτου ετερον και ο ιματισμος αυτου λευκος εξαστραπτων
30 And behold two men were talking with him. And they were Moses and Elias, Et ecce duo viri loquebantur cum illo. Erant autem Moyses et Elias, και ιδου ανδρες δυο συνελαλουν αυτω οιτινες ησαν μωσης και ηλιας
31 Appearing in majesty. And they spoke of his decease that he should accomplish in Jerusalem. visi in majestate : et dicebant excessum ejus, quem completurus erat in Jerusalem. οι οφθεντες εν δοξη ελεγον την εξοδον αυτου ην εμελλεν πληρουν εν ιερουσαλημ
32 But Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep. And waking, they saw his glory, and the two men that stood with him. Petrus vero, et qui cum illo erant, gravati erant somno. Et evigilantes viderunt majestatem ejus, et duos viros qui stabant cum illo. ο δε πετρος και οι συν αυτω ησαν βεβαρημενοι υπνω διαγρηγορησαντες δε ειδον την δοξαν αυτου και τους δυο ανδρας τους συνεστωτας αυτω
33 And it came to pass, that as they were departing from him, Peter saith to Jesus: Master, it is good for us to be here; and let us make three tabernacles, one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias; not knowing what he said. Et factum est cum discederent ab illo, ait Petrus ad Jesum : Præceptor, bonum est nos hic esse : et faciamus tria tabernacula, unum tibi, et unum Moysi, et unum Eliæ : nesciens quid diceret. και εγενετο εν τω διαχωριζεσθαι αυτους απ αυτου ειπεν πετρος προς τον ιησουν επιστατα καλον εστιν ημας ωδε ειναι και ποιησωμεν σκηνας τρεις μιαν σοι και μιαν μωσει και μιαν ηλια μη ειδως ο λεγει
34 And as he spoke these things, there came a cloud, and overshadowed them; and they were afraid, when they entered into the cloud. Hæc autem illo loquente, facta est nubes, et obumbravit eos : et timuerunt, intrantibus illis in nubem. ταυτα δε αυτου λεγοντος εγενετο νεφελη και επεσκιασεν αυτους εφοβηθησαν δε εν τω εκεινους εισελθειν εις την νεφελην
35 And a voice came out of the cloud, saying: This is my beloved Son; hear him. Et vox facta est de nube, dicens : Hic est Filius meus dilectus, ipsum audite. και φωνη εγενετο εκ της νεφελης λεγουσα ουτος εστιν ο υιος μου ο αγαπητος αυτου ακουετε
36 And whilst the voice was uttered, Jesus was found alone. And they held their peace, and told no man in those days any of these things which they had seen. Et dum fieret vox, inventus est Jesus solus. Et ipsi tacuerunt, et nemini dixerunt in illis diebus quidquam ex his quæ viderant. και εν τω γενεσθαι την φωνην ευρεθη ο ιησους μονος και αυτοι εσιγησαν και ουδενι απηγγειλαν εν εκειναις ταις ημεραις ουδεν ων εωρακασιν

10 posted on 02/24/2013 7:10:53 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
28. And it came to pass about eight days after these sayings, he took Peter and John and James, and went up into a mountain to pray.
29. And as he prayed, the fashion of his countenance was altered, and his raiment was white and glistering.
30. And, behold, there talked with him two men, which were Moses and Elias:
31. Who appeared in glory, and spoke of his decease which he should accomplish at Jerusalem.

EUSEBIUS; Our Lord, when He made known to His disciples the great mystery of His second coming, that it might not seem that they were to believe in His words only, proceeds to works, manifesting to them, through the eyes of their faith, the image of His kingdom; as it follows, And it came to pass about eight days after these sayings, he took Peter and John and James, and went up into a mountain to pray.

DAMASCENE; Matthew and Mark indeed say that the transfiguration took place on the sixth day after the promise made to the disciples, but Luke on the eighth. But there is no disagreement in these testimonies, but they who make the number six, taking off a day at each end, that is, the first and the last, the day on which He makes the promise, and that on which He fulfilled it, have reckoned only the intervening ones, but He who makes the number eight, has counted in each of the two days above mentioned. But why were not all called, but only some, to behold the sight? T here was only one indeed who was unworthy to see the divinity, namely Judas, according to the word of Isaiah, Let the wicked be taken away, that he should not behold the glory of God. If then he alone had been sent away, he might have, as it were from envy, been provoked to greater wickedness. Henceforward He takes away from the traitor every pretext for his treachery, seeing that He left below the rest of the company of the Apostles. But He took with Him three, that in the mouths of two or three witnesses every word should be established. He took Peter, indeed, because He wished to show him that the witness he had borne to Him was confirmed by the witness of the Father, and that he was as it were to preside over the whole Church. He took with Him James, who was to be the first of all the disciples to die for Christ; but He took John as the clearest singer of the sacred doctrine, that having seen the glory of the Son, which submits not to time, he might sound forth, In the beginning was the Word.

AMBROSE; Or, Peter went up, who received the keys of the kingdom of heaven, John, to whom was committed our Lord’s mother; James, who first suffered martyrdom.

THEOPHYL. Or, He takes these with Him as men who were able to conceal this thing, and reveal it to no one else. But going up into a mountain to pray, He teaches us to pray solitary, and going up, into stooping to earthly things.

DAMASCENE; Servants however pray in one way; our Lord prayed in another. For the prayer of the servant is offered up by the lifting up of the mind to God, but the holy mind of Christ, (who was hypostatically united to God,) prayed, that He might lead us by the hand to the ascent, whereby we mount up in prayer to God, and teach us that He is not opposed to God, but reverences the Father as His beginning, nay, even tempting the tyrant, who sought from Him whether He were God, (which the power of His miracles declared) He concealed as it were under the bait a hook; that he who had deceived man with the hope of divinity might fitly himself be caught with the clothing of humanity. Prayer is the revelation of Divine glory; as it follows, And as he prayed, the fashion of his countenance was altered.

CYRIL; Not as though His body changed its human form, but a certain glistening glory overspread it.

DAMASCENE; Now the devil, seeing His face shining in prayer, recollected Moses, whose face was glorified. But Moses indeed was arrayed with a glory, which came from without; our Lord, with that which proceeded from the inherent brightness of Divine glory. For since in the hypostatical union there is one and the same glory of the Word and the flesh, He is transfigured not as receiving what He was not, but manifesting to His disciples what He was. Hence, according to Matthew, it is said, that He was transfigured before them, and that His face shone as the sun; for what the sun is in things of sense, God is in spiritual things. And as the sun, which is the fountain of light, cannot be easily seen, but its light is perceived from that which reaches the earth; so the countenance of Christ shines more intensely, like the sun, but His raiment is white as snow; as it follows, And his raiment was white and glistening; that is, lighted up by its participation of the divine light. And a little afterwards, But while these things were so, that it might be shown there was but one Lord of the new and old covenant, and the mouths of heretics might be shut, and men might believe in the resurrection, and He also, who was transfigured, be believed to be the Lord of the living and the dead, Moses and Elias, as servants, stand by their Lord in His glory; hence it follows, And behold there talked with him two men. For it became men, seeing the glory and confidence of their fellow servants, to admire indeed the merciful condescension of the Lord, but to emulate those who had labored before them, and looking to the pleasantness of future blessings, to be the more strengthened for conflicts. For he who has known the reward of his labors, will the more easily endure them.

CHRYS. Or else this took place because the multitude said He was Elias or Jeremias, to show the distinction between our Lord and His servants. And to make it plain that He was not an enemy of God, and transgressor of the law, He showed these two standing by Him; (for else, Moses the lawgiver, and Elias who was zealous for the glory of God, had not stood by Him,) but also to give testimony to the virtues of the men. For each had ofttimes exposed Himself to death in keeping the divine commands. He wishes also His disciples to imitate them in the government of the people, that they might be indeed meek like Moses, and zealous like Elias. He introduces them also to set forth the glory of His cross, to console Peter and the others who feared His Passion. Hence it follows, And spoke of his decease, which he should accomplish at Jerusalem.

CYRIL; The mystery, namely, of His Incarnation, also the life-giving Passion accomplished on the sacred cross.

AMBROSE; Now in a mystical manner, after the words above said, is exhibited the transfiguration of Christ, since he who hears the words of Christ, and believes, shall see the glory of His resurrection. For, on the eighth day the resurrection took place. Hence also several Psalms are written, ‘for the eighth,’ or perhaps it was that He might make manifest what He had said, that he who for the word of God shall lose his own life, shall save it, seeing that He will make good His promises at the resurrection.

BEDE; For as He rose from the dead after the seventh day of the Sabbath, during which He lay in the tomb, we also after the six ages of this world, and the seventh of the rest of souls, which meanwhile is passed in another life, shall rise again as it were in the eighth age.

AMBROSE; But Matthew and Mark have related that He took them with Him after six days, of which we may say after 6000 years, (for a thousand years in the Lord’s sight are as one day;) but more than 6000 years are reckoned. We had rather then take the six days symbolically, that in six days the works of the world were completed, that by the time we may understand the works, by the works the world. And so the times of the world being finished, the resurrection to come is declared; or because, He who has ascended above the world, and has passed beyond the moments of this life, is waiting, seated as it were on a high place, for the everlasting fruit of the resurrection.

BEDE; Hence He ascends the mountain to pray and be transfigured, to show that those who expect the fruit of the resurrection, and desire to see the King in His glory, ought to have the dwelling place of their hearts on high, and be ever on their knees in prayer.

AMBROSE; I should think that in the three who are taken up into the mountain, was contained in a mystery the human race, because from the three sons of Noah sprung the whole race of man; I did not perceive that they were chosen out. Three then are chosen to ascend the mountain, because none can see the glory of the resurrection, but they who have preserved the mystery of the Trinity with inviolable purity of faith.

BEDE; Now the transfigured Savior shows the glory of His own coming, or our resurrection; who as He then appeared to His Apostles shall in like manner appear to all the elect. But the raiment of the Lord is taken for the band of His Saints, which in truth when our Lord was upon earth seemed to be despised, but when He sought the mount, shines with a new whiteness; for now are we the sons of God; and it does not yet appear what we shall be. But we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him.

AMBROSE; Or else, according to your capacity is the word either lessened or increased to you, and unless you ascend the summit of a higher wisdom, you behold not what glory there is in the word of God. Now the garments of the Word, are the discourses of the Scriptures, and certain clothings of the Divine mind; and as His raiment shone white, so in the eyes of your understanding, the sense of the divine words becomes clear. Hence after Moses, Elias; that is, the Law and the Prophets in the Word. For neither can the Law exist without the Word, nor the Prophet, unless he prophesied of the Son of God.

32. But Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep: and when they were awake, they saw his glory, and the two men that stood with him.
33. And it came to pass, as they departed from him, Peter said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for you, and one for Moses, and one for Elias: not knowing what he said.
34. While he thus spoke, there came a cloud, and overshadowed them: and they feared as they entered into the cloud.
35. And there came a voice out of the cloud, saying This is my beloved Son: hear him.
36. And when the voice was past, Jesus was found alone. And they kept it close, and told no man in those days any of those things which they had seen.

THEOPHYL. While Christ is engaged in prayer, Peter is heavy with sleep, for he was weak, and did what was natural to man; as it is said, But Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep. But when they awake, they behold His glory, and the two men with Him; as it follows, And when they were awake, they saw his glory, and the two men that stood with him.

CHRYS. Or, by the word sleep, he means that strange maze that fell upon them by reason of the vision. For it was not night time, but the exceeding brightness of the light weighed down their weak eyes.

AMBROSE; For the incomprehensible brightness of the Divine nature oppresses our bodily senses. For if the sight of the body is unable to contain the sun's ray when opposite to the eyes which behold it, how can the corruption of our fleshly members endure the glory of God? And perhaps they were oppressed with sleep, that after their rest they might behold the sight of the resurrection. Therefore when they were awake they saw His glory. For no one, except he is watching, sees the glory of Christ. Peter was delighted, and as the allurements of this world enticed him not, was carried away by the glory of the resurrection. Hence it follows, And it came to pass as they departed, &c.

CYRIL; For perhaps holy Peter imagined that the kingdom of heaven was at hand, and therefore it seemed good to him to abide on the mount.

DAMAS. It were not good for you, Peter, that Christ should abide there, for if He had remained, the promise made to you would never receive its accomplishment. For neither would you have obtained the keys of the kingdom, nor the tyranny of death been abolished. Seek not bliss before its time, as Adam did to be made a God. The time shall come when you shall enjoy the sight without ceasing, and dwell together with Him who is light and life.

AMBROSE; But Peter distinguished not only by earnest feeling, but also by devout deeds, wishing like a zealous workman to build three tabernacles, offers the service of their united labor; for it follows, let us make three tabernacles, one for you, &c.

DAMAS. But the Lord ordained you not the builder of tabernacles, but of the universal Church. Your words have been brought to pass by your disciples, by your sheep, in building a tabernacle, not only for Christ, but also for His servants. But Peter said not this deliberately, but through the inspiration of the Spirit revealing things to come, as it follows, not knowing what he said.

CYRIL; He knew not what he said, for neither was the time come for the end of the world, or for the Saints' enjoyment of their promised hope. And when the dispensation was now commencing, how was it fitting that Christ should abandon His love of the world, Who was willing to suffer for it?

DAMAS. It behoved Him also not to confine the fruit of His incarnation to the service of those only who were on the mount, but to extend it to all believers, which was to be accomplished by His cross and passion.

TIT. BOST. Peter also was ignorant what he said, seeing that it was not proper to make three tabernacles for the three. For the servants are not received with their Lord, the creature is not placed beside the Creator.

AMBROSE; Nor does the condition of man in this corruptible body allow of making a tabernacle to God, whether in the soul or in the body, or in any other place; and although he knew not what he said, yet a service was offered which not by any deliberate forwardness, but its premature devotion, receives in abundance the fruits of piety. For his ignorance was part of his condition, his offer of devotion.

CHRYS. Or else Peter heard that it was necessary Christ must die, and on the third day rise again, but he saw around him a very remote and solitary place; he supposed therefore that the place had some great protection. For this reason he said, It is good for us to be here. Moses a too was present, who entered into the cloud. Elias, who on the mount brought down fire from heaven. The Evangelist then, to indicate the confusion of mind in which he utters this, added, Not knowing what he said.

AUG. Now in what Luke here says of Moses and Elias, And it came to pass as they departed from him, Peter said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here, he must not be thought contrary to Matthew and Mark, who have so connected Peter's suggestion of this, as if Moses and Elias were still speaking with our Lord. For they did not expressly state that Peter said it then, but rather were silent about what Luke added, that as they departed, Peter suggested this to our Lord.

THEOPHYL. But while Peter spoke, our Lord builds a tabernacle not made with hands, and enters into it with the Prophets. Hence it is added, While he thus spoke there came a cloud and overshadowed them, to show that He was not inferior to the Father. For as in the Old Testament it was said, the Lord dwelt in the cloud, so now also a cloud received our Lord, not a dark cloud, but bright and shining.

BASIL; For the obscurity of the Law had passed away; for as smoke is caused by the fire, so the cloud by light; but because a cloud is the sign of calmness, the rest of the future state is signified by the covering of a cloud.

AMBROSE; For it is the overshadowing of the divine Spirit which does not darken, but reveals secret things to the hearts of men.

ORIGEN; Now His disciples being unable to bear this, fell down, humbled under the mighty hand of God, greatly tom afraid since they knew what was said to Moses, No man shall see my face, and live. Hence it follows, And they feared as they entered into the cloud.

AMBROSE; Now observe, that the cloud was not black from the darkness of condensed air, and such as to overcast the sky with a horrible gloom, but a shining cloud, from which we were not moistened with rain, but as the voice of Almighty God came forth the dew of faith was shed upon the hearts of men. For it follows, And there came a voice out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear you him. Elias was not His Son. Moses was not. But this is the Son whom you see alone.

CYRIL; How then should men suppose Him who is really the Son to be made or created, when God the Father thundered c. from above, This is my beloved Son! as if He said, Not one of My sons, but He who is truly and by nature My Son, according to whose example the others are adopted. He ordered them then to obey Him, when He added, Hear you him. And to obey Him more than Moses and Elias, for Christ is the end of the Law and the Prophets. Hence the Evangelist adds significantly, And when the voice was past, Jesus was found alone.

THEOPHYL. Lest in truth any one should suppose that these words, This is my beloved Son, were uttered about Moses or Elias.

AMBROSE; They then departed, when our Lord's manifestation had begun. There are three seen at the beginning, one at the end; for faith being made perfect, they are one. Therefore are they also received into the body of Christ, because we also shall be one in Christ Jesus; or perhaps, because the Law and the Prophets came out from the Word.

THEOPHYL. Now those things which began from the Word, end in the Word. For by this he implies that up to a certain time the Law and the Prophets appear, as here Moses and Elias; but afterwards, at their departure, Jesus is alone. For now abides the Gospel, legal things having passed away.

THEOPHYL; And mark, that as when our Lord was baptized in Jordan, so also when He was glorified on the Mount, the mystery of the whole Trinity is declared, for His glory which we confess at baptism, we shall see at the resurrection. Nor in vain does the Holy Spirit appear here in the cloud, there in the form of a dove, seeing that he who now preserves with a simple heart the faith which he receives, shall then in the light of open vision look upon those things which he believed.

ORIGEN; Now Jesus wishes not those things which relate to His glory to be spoken of before His passion. Hence it follows, And they kept it close. For men would have been offended, especially the multitude, if they saw Him crucified Who had been so glorified.

DAMAS. This also our Lord commands, since He knew His disciples to be imperfect, seeing that they had not yet received the full measure of the Spirit, lest the hearts of others who had not seen should be prostrated by sorrow, and lest the traitor should be stirred up to a frantic hatred.

Catena Aurea Luke 9
vv. 28-31
11 posted on 02/24/2013 7:12:09 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Transfiguration

Duccio di Buoninsegna

1308-11
Tempera on wood, 48 x 50,5 cm
National Gallery, London

12 posted on 02/24/2013 7:12:44 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Transfiguration

Fra Angelico

1440-42
Fresco, 181 x 152 cm
Convento di San Marco, Florence

13 posted on 02/24/2013 7:13:35 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Transfiguration

Lorenzo Lotto

c. 1511
Oil on wood, 300 x 203 cm
Pinacoteca Civica, Recanati

14 posted on 02/24/2013 7:14:18 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
15 posted on 02/24/2013 8:43:27 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
16 posted on 02/24/2013 8:44:43 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

***

Prayers for Our Holy Father Benedict XVI and the Papal Conclave

Prayers for Pope Benedict XVI

Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]

Prayer Thread - Prayer for the Conclave

17 posted on 02/24/2013 8:46:24 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


18 posted on 02/24/2013 8:47:36 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sundays are not part of the 40 Days of Lent, sothe Glorious Mysteries may be said.

Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


19 posted on 02/24/2013 8:49:36 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

20 posted on 02/24/2013 8:51:28 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


21 posted on 02/24/2013 8:52:53 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

February Devotion: The Holy Family

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of February has been primarily asociated with the Holy Family, probably due to the feast of Our Lord's presentation at the temple, celebrated on February 2. At the very outset of Christ's work on earth, God showed the world a family in which, as Pope Leo XIII teaches, "all men might behold a perfect model of domestic life, and of all virtue and holiness." The harmony, unity, and holiness which characterized this holy Family make it the model for all Christian families.

INVOCATION
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph most kind, Bless us now and in death's agony.

FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE HOLY FAMILY
Grant unto us, Lord Jesus, ever to follow the example of Thy holy Family, that in the hour of our death Thy glorious Virgin Mother together with blessed Joseph may come to meet us and we may be worthily received by Thee into everlasting dwellings: who livest and reignest world without end. Amen.
Roman Missal

CONSECRATION TO THE HOLY FAMILY
O Jesus, our most loving Redeemer, who having come to enlighten the world with Thy teaching and example, didst will to pass the greater part of Thy life in humility and subjection to Mary and Joseph in the poor home of Nazareth, thus sanctifying the Family that was to be an example for all Christian families, graciously receive our family as it dedicates and consecrates itself to Thee this day. Do Thou defend us, guard us and establish amongst us Thy holy fear, true peace, and concord in Christian love: in order that, by conforming ourselves to the divine pattern of Thy family, we may be able, all of us without exception, to attain to eternal happiness.

Mary, dear Mother of Jesus and Mother of us, by thy kindly intercession make this our humble offering acceptable in the sight of Jesus, and obtain for us His graces and blessings.

O Saint Joseph, most holy guardian of Jesus and Mary, assist us by thy prayers in all our spiritual and temporal necessities; that so we may be enabled to praise our divine Savior Jesus, together with Mary and thee, for all eternity.

Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory be, three times.

IN HONOR OF THE HOLY FAMILY
O God, heavenly Father, it was part of Thine eternal decree that Thine only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ, the Savior of the human race, should form a holy family with Mary, His blessed mother, and His foster father, Saint Joseph. In Nazareth home life was sanctified, and a perfect example was given to every Christian family. Grant, we beseech Thee, that we may fully comprehend and faithfully imitate the virtues of the Holy Family so that we may be united with them one day in their heavenly glory. Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Holy Family Chaplet

Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, I give you my heart.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, be with me in my last hour.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, may I breathe forth my soul
in peace with you.

Blessed be Jesus Christ, true God and true man.
Blessed be the great Mother of God, Mary most holy.
Blessed be St. Joseph, her most chaste spouse. Amen.

Say 3 Our Father's, 3 Hail Mary's, and 3 Glory be's.

The Holy Family Icon by Nicholas Markell

PRAYER TO
THE HOLY FAMILY
=====================================================================================

GOD our Heavenly Father, You call all peoples to be united as one family in worshipping You as the one and true God. You willed that Your Son become man, giving Him a virgin mother and a foster father to form the Holy Family of Nazareth.

WE pray: may the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, image and model of every human family unit walk in the spirit of Nazareth and grow in the understanding of its particular mission in society and the Church. May our families be living cells of love, faithfulness and unity, thus reflecting God's covenant with humanity and Christ's redeeming love for His Church.

JESUS, Mary and Joseph protect our families from all evil; keep us, who are away from home, one in love with our dear ones.

The Holy Family


 
"The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist ( the Doni tondo )" by Michelangelo c.1506, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
Parent's Prayer

Jesus, Son of God, Son of Man, and Son of Mary, I thank you for the gift of life you have entrusted to my care. Help me be a parent both tender and wise, both loving and forgiving.

Mary, Holy Mother of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and our Motherly Queen of Heaven, nourish our family with your heavenly grace. Help us to remain faithful to The Most Holy Trinity, in all our sorrows and joys.

Joseph, Earthly father to our Lord God, guardian and spouse of Mary, keep our family safe from harm. Help us in all times of discouragement or anxiety.

Holy Family of Nazareth, help our family to walk in your footsteps. May we be peace-loving and peace-giving.
Amen.
 

Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph
Recovering God’s Plan for Marriage and Family: A Sermon on the Feast of the Holy Family

“Why were you looking for me?" (On the Feast of The Holy Family)
U.S. Postal Service Issues Holy Family Forever Stamp
On Prayer in the Life of the Holy Family
The Holy Family - held together by Love through all their problems [Ecumenical]
Feast of the Holy Family: The Christian Family is a Domestic Church
Chesterton on "The Human Family and the Holy Family"
Joseph, Mary and Jesus: A Model Family
ADVICE TO PARENTS by Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787)
The Holy Family
St. Joseph as Head of the Holy Family (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

Feast of the Holy Family
Feast of the Holy Family (Dom Guéranger OSB)
The Feast of the Holy Family
The Holy Family vs. The Holy Innocents: A Christmas season reflection [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican creche to place Holy Family in Joseph's carpentry workshop
The Redemption and Protection of the Family [Feast of the Holy Family]
Study Backs Tradition of Loreto House - Stones in Altar Match Those in Nazareth, It Says
Unraveling Jesus' mystery years in Egypt
Gaudi’s Church of the Holy Family to be ready for worship in 2008
Imitating the Holy Family; Four Traits that Make It Possible
Lots of Graphics: Post your favorite image of the St. Mary and Child, the Holy Family...


22 posted on 02/24/2013 8:54:44 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
February 2013
Pope's Intentions
 
Migrant Families: That migrant families, especially the mothers, may be supported and accompanied in their difficulties.
 
Peace: That the peoples at war and in conflict may lead the way in building a peaceful future.

23 posted on 02/24/2013 8:55:44 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Daily Gospel Commentary

Second Sunday of Lent - Year C
Commentary of the day
Saint Leo the Great (?-c.461), Pope and Doctor of the Church
Sermon 51, 2-3, 7-8 ; PL 54, 310-313, SC 74 bis (Nicene and post-Nicene Fathers rev.)

The glory of the Cross

The Lord displays his glory before chosen witnesses and invests that bodily shape which he shared with others with such splendor rthat his face was like the sun's in brightness and his garments white as snow. And in this Transfiguration the foremost object was to remove the offense of the cross from his disciples' hearts and to prevent their faith being disturbed by the humiliation of his voluntary Passion by revealing to them the excellence of his hidden dignity.

But with no less foresight, the foundation was laid of holy Church's hope that the whole body of Christ might realize the character of the change which it would have to receive, since each member is called to share one day in the glory seen shining beforehand in its head...

“This is my beloved Son...; listen to him... Listen to him who opens the way to heaven, and by the punishment of the cross prepares for you the steps of ascent to the Kingdom. Why tremble to be redeemed? Why fear to be healed of your wounds, you who were wounded? Let that happen that Christ wills and I will. Cast away all fleshly fear and arm yourselves with the constancy that inspires faith. For it is unworthy for you to fear in the Savior's Passion what, by his good gift, you will not have to fear in your own death...”

In these three apostles the whole Church has learned everything that their eyes saw and their ears heard (cf. 1Jn 1,1). Let the faith of all, then, be established according to the preaching of the holy Gospel, and let no one be ashamed of Christ's cross, through which the world has been redeemed.


24 posted on 02/24/2013 4:20:50 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, February 24, 2013
Second Sunday of Lent
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18
Psalm 27:1, 7-9, 13-14
Philippians 3:17 -- 4:1 or 3:20 -- 4:1
Luke 9:28-36

You recall that one and the same Word of God extends throughout Scripture, that it is one and the same Utterance that resounds in the mouths of all the sacred writers, since He who was in the beginning God with God has no need of separate syllables; for He is not subject to time.

-- St. Augustine, Enarrationes in Psalmos


25 posted on 02/24/2013 4:46:07 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY LK 9:28B-36
Better than tents
Fr. Paul Scalia

Sacred Scripture begins with God giving man a dwelling place in paradise (cf. Gen 2:8). It ends with God making His dwelling place among men (cf. Rev 21:3). And at every point in between we find expressions of both God’s desire and man’s to dwell with one another. We can see salvation history as the story of God fashioning a dwelling place for Himself with us, and for us with Him. Ultimately, He accomplishes this in a manner beyond our expectations: By grace He dwells in us and we in Him.

This helps shed light on St. Peter’s reaction to Our Lord’s transfiguration: “Master, it is good that we are here; let us make three tents, one for you, one for Moses and one for Elijah” (Lk 9:33). Although we can quibble with his timing, we cannot find fault with Peter’s desire. It is simply that of the human heart — and of God’s: to dwell with one another. Peter wants the moment of glory to last; he wants dwellings built.

What Peter desired inordinately at the Transfiguration we have received abundantly by grace. Almighty God has made for us more than mere tents. At baptism He made us His dwelling place and caused us to dwell within Him. The entire Christian life is a growth in appreciation of this. Thinking again of Peter’s reaction, therefore, let us learn from the events on Mount Thabor how to deepen this dwelling one with the other.

First, Our Lord takes Peter, John and James “up the mountain” (Lk 9:28) — “apart by themselves,” St. Mark adds (Mk 9:2). To dwell with God we must first leave the false dwellings of the fallen world. The prince of this world is always enticing us to set down roots. And sin is when we settle for a lesser dwelling than God intends for us. But “here we have no lasting city” (Heb 13:14). So the psalmist exclaims, “Better the threshold of the house of my God than a home in the tents of the wicked” (Ps 84:10). To find eternal dwellings we must ascend with Christ, apart by ourselves, away from the allure of the world. This is one of the purposes of Lent: to detach ourselves from the things of this world — from false dwellings — so that we can better dwell with and within God.

Second, they ascended Mount Thabor “to pray” (cf. Lk 9:28). So also the mutual indwelling between God and us is deepened by interior prayer. Not mere recitation of prayers but intimate conversation with the One who is within. The intimacy of this prayer is indicated by the entrance of the apostles into the cloud: they were consumed by the presence of God (cf. Lk 9:34). If we do not give time to interior prayer, then we do not really abide in Him and He will not long abide in us (cf. Jn 15:4). The life of grace within us will atrophy and die.

Third, this dwelling with God comes from an appreciation of His word. “Listen to Him,” the Father’s voice sounds from the cloud (Lk 9:35). He desires to dwell with us by way of His word — both in the sense of Scripture and in the broader sense of His teachings. St. Paul exhorts the Colossians not merely to know the word of Christ but to let it “dwell in you richly” (Col 3:16). As always, Mary serves as the greatest example. Just as she first listened and received the word of the Archangel Gabriel, and then conceived the Word within her — so also by receiving the word of God in faith we too become a dwelling place for Him.

St. Peter thought it a wonderful idea to have three tents built. Our Lord has seen fit to do something greater: to fashion each of us into His dwelling place and bring us to dwell with Him. May we, who enjoy the grace that Peter lacked at the Transfiguration, learn from his faith to treasure our dwelling with God.

Fr. Scalia is pastor of St. John the Beloved Parish in McLean.


26 posted on 02/24/2013 4:53:46 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

 This is my beloved Son; hear him. Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year C

 -  2nd Sunday of Lent

This is my beloved Son; hear him.

This is my beloved Son; hear him. Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Luke 9:28-36

28 Now about eight days after these sayings Jesus took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray.
29 And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white.
30 Suddenly they saw two men, Moses and Elijah, talking to him.
31 They appeared in glory and were speaking of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem.
32 Now Peter and his companions were weighed down with sleep; but since they had stayed awake, they saw his glory and the two men who stood with him.
33 Just as they were leaving him, Peter said to Jesus, "Master, it is good for us to be here; let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah" -- not knowing what he said.
34 While he was saying this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were terrified as they entered the cloud.
35 Then from the cloud came a voice that said, "This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!"
36 When the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. And they kept silent and in those days told no one any of the things they had seen. (NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

2nd Sunday of Lent - This is my beloved Son; hear him. When the time came, I revealed the plan of the Father to my apostles, which included all my sufferings and my death in Calvary for the redemption of men. It was very difficult for them to accept that they would soon be left without their master.

I invited my three closest apostles to come with me to pray, however they were tired and sleepy, so they missed out on my prayers.

There was a moment when my humanity was overwhelmed by my divinity, so Moses and Elijah came to see me and to talk with me. In the middle of this consolation my apostles woke up to see me transfigured in the light of my divinity, then they saw my heavenly visitors and at that moment they heard the voice of my Father saying “This is my beloved, listen to him”. The participation in these divine moments caused them great amazement. For a start they had a glance at my divinity, something that would strengthen their faith for the future sufferings they had to endure. They were very fortunate to also hear the voice of my Father who confirms my mission as his Word, who urges men to take advantage of the heavenly gift that has been sent from heaven, the Son of God.

My transfiguration is also the great hope of man. When you come face to face with me after the resurrection, this is what you will become like, Sons and Daughters of God, whose humanity will be divinized by the grace of my Salvation.

But my work is already in you because you have heard my words and have taken them into your heart.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


27 posted on 02/24/2013 5:02:48 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

Every Round Goes, Higher, Higher. A Meditation on the Gospel for the Second Sunday of Lent

By:

The second Sunday of Lent always features the transfiguration. This is done in the first place because we are following the Lord on his final journey to Jerusalem and this journey up Mt Tabor was one of the stops Jesus himself made with Peter, James and John. It is commonly held that Jesus did this to prepare his apostles for the difficult days ahead. There’s a line from an old spiritual which says, Sometimes I up, sometimes I’m down, sometimes I’m almost on the ground…..but see what the end shall be. And this is what the Lord is doing here: he is showing us what the end shall be. There is a cross to get through, but there is glory on the other side.

There also seems a purpose in placing this account here in that it helps describe the pattern of the Christian life which is the paschal mystery. For we are always dying and rising with Christ in repeated cycles as we journey to an eternal Easter (cf 2 Cor4:10). This Gospel shows forth the pattern of the cross, in the climb, and rising, in the glory of the mountaintop. Then it is back down the mountain again, only to climb another mountain, (Golgotha) and through it find another glory (Easter Sunday). Here is the pattern of the Christian life: the paschal mystery. Let’s look a little closer at the Gospel in three stages.

I. The Purpose of Trials. The text says – Jesus took Peter, John, and James and went up the mountain to pray.. Now we often pass over this fact, that they had to climb that mountain. And the climb was no easy task. Any one who has been to the sight of Tabor knows what high mountain it is. The climb was almost 2000 feet, high and steep. It may have taken the better part of a day and probably had its dangers. Once at the top it is like looking from an airplane window out on the Jezreel Valley (a.k.a. Megiddo or Armageddon).

So here is a symbol of the cross and of struggle. A climb was up the rough side of the mountain: exhausting, difficult, testing their strength.

I have it on the best of authority that as they climbed they were singing gospel songs: I’m comin’ up on the rough side of the mountain, and I’m doin’ my best to carry on! Another songs says, My soul looks back and wonders how I got over! Yet another says, We are climbing Jacob’s ladder, every round goes higher, higher.

Now, this climb reminds us of our life. For often we have had to climb, to endure and have our strength tested. Perhaps it was the climb of getting a college degree. Perhaps it was the climb of raising children, or building a career. What do you have that you really value that did not come at the price of a climb….of effort and struggle?

And most of us know that, though the climb is difficult, there is glory at the top is we but endure and push through. Life’s difficulties are often the prelude to success and greater strength.

Though we might wish that life had no struggles, it would seem that the Lord intends the climb for us. For, the cross alone leads to true glory. Where would we be without some of the crosses in our life? Let’s ponder some of the Purposes of problems:

  1. God uses problems to DIRECT us. Sometimes God must light a fire under you to get you moving. Problems often point us in a new directions and motivate us to change. Is God trying to get your attention? “Sometimes it takes a painful situation to make us change our ways,” Proverbs 20:30 says: Blows and wounds cleanse away evil, and beatings purge the inner most being. Another old gospel song speaks of the need of suffering to keep us focused on God: Now the way may not be too easy. But you never said it would be. Cause when our way gets a little too easy, you know we tend to stray from thee. Sad but true, God sometimes needs to use problems to direct our steps to him.
  2. God uses problems to INSPECT us. People are like tea bags.. if you want to know what’s inside them, just drop them into hot water! Has God ever tested your faith with a
    problem? What do problems reveal about you? Our problems have a way of helping to see what we’re really made of. I have discovered many strengths I never knew I had through trials and testings. There is a test in every testimony and trials have a way of purifying and strengthening our faith as well as inspecting our faith to see whether it is really genuine. 1 Peter 1:6 says, In this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials. These trials are only to test your faith, to see whether or not it is strong and pure.
  3. God uses problems to CORRECT us. Some lessons we learn only through pain and failure. It’s likely that as a child your parents told you not to touch a hot stove. But you probably learned by being burned. Sometimes we only learn the value of something health, money, a relationship by losing it. Scripture says in Psalm 119:71-72 It was good for me to be afflicted so that I might learn your decrees and also in Psalm 119:67 it says Before I was afflicted, I strayed. But now I keep you word.
  4. God uses problems to PROTECT us. A problem can be a blessing in disguise if it prevents you from being harmed by something more serious. A man was fired for refusing to do something unethical that his boss had asked him to do. His unemployment was a problem-but it saved him from being convicted and sent to prison a year later when management’s actions were eventually discovered. Scripture says in Genesis 50:20 as Joseph speaks to his brothers You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives.”
  5. God uses problems to PERFECT us. Problems, when responded to correctly, are character builders. God is far more interested in your character than your comfort. Romans 5:3 says We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they are good for us they help us learn to be patient. And patience develops strength of character in us and helps us trust God more each time we use it until finally our hope and faith are strong and steady. And 1 Peter 1:7 says You are being tested as fire tests gold and purifies it and your faith is far more precious to God than mere gold; so if your faith remains strong after being tried in the fiery trials, it will bring you much praise and glory and honor on the day of his return.

So here it is, the cross symbolized by the climb. But after the cross comes the glory. Let’s look at stage two:

II. The Productiveness of Trials. The text says, While he was praying his face changed in appearance  and his clothing became dazzling white. And behold, two men were conversing with him, Moses and Elijah,  who appeared in glory and spoke of his exodus  that he was going to accomplish in Jerusalem. Peter and his companions had been overcome by sleep,  but becoming fully awake,  they saw his glory and the two men standing with him. As they were about to part from him, Peter said to Jesus,  “Master, it is good that we are here; let us make three tents, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.” But he did not know what he was saying. While he was still speaking,  a cloud came and cast a shadow over them,  and they became frightened when they entered the cloud. Then from the cloud came a voice that said,  “This is my chosen Son; listen to him.”

All the climbing has paid off. Now comes the fruit of all that hard work! The Lord gives them a glimpse of glory! They get to see the glory that Jesus has always had with the Father. He is dazzlingly bright. A similar vision from the book of revelation gives us more detail:

I turned around to see the voice that was speaking to me. And when I turned I saw seven golden lampstands, and among the lampstands was someone like a son of man, dressed in a robe reaching down to his feet and with a golden sash around his chest. The hair on his head was white like wool, as white as snow, and his eyes were like blazing fire. His feet were like bronze glowing in a furnace, and his voice was like the sound of rushing waters. In his right hand he held seven stars, ….. His face was like the sun shining in all its brilliance. When I saw him, I fell at his feet as though dead. Then he placed his right hand on me and said: “Do not be afraid. I am the First and the Last. I am the Living One; I was dead, and now look, I am alive for ever and ever! And I hold the keys of death and Hades. (Rev 1:12-17)

Yes, all the climbing has paid off. Now comes the glory, the life, the reward or endurance and struggle. Are you enjoying any the fruits of your crosses now? If we think about it, our crosses, if they were carried in faith have made us more confident, stronger. Some of us have discovered gifts, abilities and endurance we never knew we had. Our crosses have brought us life!

  1. The other night I went over to the Church and played the pipe organ. It was most enjoyable and the fruit of years of hard work.
  2. And not only have my own crosses brought me life, but the crosses of others have also blessed me and brought me life. I live and work in buildings that others saved and scrimped and labored to build. I have a faith that martyrs died to hand on to me, that missionaries journeyed long distances to proclaim. See the trials do produce. Enjoy it!
  3. St. Paul says, that this momentary affliction is producing for us a weight of glory beyond all compare (2 Cor 4:14). He also says For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us. (Rom 8:18).
  4. An old gospel song says, By and by, when the morning comes, and all the saints of God are gathered home, we’ll tell the story, of how we’ve overcome. And we’ll understand it better, by and by.

So then, here is the glory that comes after the climb. Here is the life that comes from the cross. Here is the paschal mystery: Always carrying about in our selves the dying of Christ so also that the life of Christ may be manifest in us (2 Cor 4:10).

III. The Pattern of Trials – The text says, After the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. They fell silent and did not at that time tell anyone what they had seen..

Notice that, although Peter wanted to stay, Jesus makes it clear that they must go down the mountain for now and walk a very dark valley, to another hill, Golgotha. For now, the pattern must repeat. The cross has led to glory, but more crosses are needed before final glory. An old spiritual says, We are climbing Jacob’s ladder….every round goes higher, higher, soldiers of the cross!

This is our life. Always carrying within our self the dying of Christ so also that [the rising of Christ], the life of Christ may be manifest in us (cf 2 Cor 4:10).

There are difficult days ahead for Jesus and the apostles. But the crosses lead to a final and lasting glory. This is our life too. The paschal mystery, the pattern and rhythm of our life.

This Homily was recorded and is available in mp3 here: http://frpope.com/audio/2%20Lent%20A%202011.mp3

Here is an excerpt from the Song We are Climbing Jacob’s Ladder. The Text says that every round goes higher, higher! Almost as if imagining a spiral staircase even as the rounds get pitched higher musically. For this is the pattern of our life that we die with Christ so as to live with him. And each time we come back around to the cross, or back around to glory, we are one round higher and one level closer to final glory.


28 posted on 02/24/2013 5:14:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Gospel Reflections

2nd Sunday of Lent
Reading I:
Genesis 15:5-12,17-18 II: Philippians 3:17-4:1
Gospel
Luke 9:28-36

28 Now about eight days after these sayings he took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray.
29 And as he was praying, the appearance of his countenance was altered, and his raiment became dazzling white.
30 And behold, two men talked with him, Moses and Eli'jah,
31 who appeared in glory and spoke of his departure, which he was to accomplish at Jerusalem.
32 Now Peter and those who were with him were heavy with sleep, and when they wakened they saw his glory and the two men who stood with him.
33 And as the men were parting from him, Peter said to Jesus, "Master, it is well that we are here; let us make three booths, one for you and one for Moses and one for Eli'jah" --not knowing what he said.
34 As he said this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were afraid as they entered the cloud.
35 And a voice came out of the cloud, saying, "This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!"
36 And when the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. And they kept silence and told no one in those days anything of what they had seen.


Interesting Details
  • (v.28) Luke tightly connects the transfiguration to Jesus' teaching in the previous verses 23-27. The event occurs several days after Jesus "said these words:" "If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me ... For whoever would save his life will lose it."
  • (v.28) Jesus begins His ministry with a prayer and ends his ministry with a prayer. Jesus prays while performing miracles. He teaches his disciples to pray. The transfiguration occurs as a prayer experience. As Jesus teaches in 11:13, the Holy Spirit is given in response to prayer.
  • (v.29) White garments are symbols of joy and celebration. The angels who appear at the resurrection (and later in the ascension) wear dazzling, white clothes.
  • (v.30) Moses and Elijah are 2 figures from the Old Testament. Moses was the giver of God's Law, and Elijah was the great prophet through whom God spoke to his people. Their appearance is a sign that the road which Jesus is taking is a fulfillment of the law and the prophets, i.e., a fulfillment of God's will.
  • (v.31) Moses and Elijah talk to Jesus about his "departure," or death in Jerusalem. In the middle of this vision of glory is an image of suffering.
  • (v.33) Peter wants to make a tent for Jesus. Peter indeed does not know what he is saying, for "the Most High does not dwell in houses made by hands" (Acts 7:48).
  • (v.34) Cloud is a symbol of God's presence.
  • (v.35) "This is my Son, my Chosen one, listen to him." God reveals who the Son is: the one who returns to God via the cross.

One Main Point

Listen to Jesus, and follow him. The road to everlasting life must pass through suffering.


Reflections
  1. "Listen to him." In what way am I listening to Jesus? What do I hear? How do I know it's Jesus' voice? What will help me more easily to recognize his voice?
  2. When I do not do my will (what I like, what I want), I suffer. Recall the instances that led me to bad consequences because I follow my will (my impulses, job choices, relationship choices, decisions about money, etc.) instead of listening to a wiser person.

29 posted on 02/24/2013 5:20:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

30 posted on 02/24/2013 5:21:50 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


31 posted on 02/24/2013 5:23:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information:
St. Ethelbert

Feast Day: February 24
Born:

552

Died: 24 February 616



32 posted on 02/24/2013 5:28:17 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Montanus, St. Lucius and Companions

Feast Day: February 24
Born/Died: in the third century


Emperor Valerian tortured and punished the Christians during the days of the early Church. He had allowed a Roman officer to put St. Cyprian to death in September 258.

The Roman officer himself died soon after and the new official, Solon, was nearly killed by some rebels. He suspected that they tried to kill him in revenge for the death of St. Cyprian and arrested eight innocent people.

They were all Christians; mostly deacons, priests and bishops. Each of them had been a devoted follower of St. Cyprian. These Christians were taken down into dark dungeons where they found others whom they knew.

These deep dungeons were dirty and damp and the high walls surrounded the group. They realized that they would soon be put to death. The Christians were kept many months in the prison.

They were made to work during the day and were often kept without food and water for no reason. The cruel treatment, made these Christians grow close together and they helped one another bear their sufferings. The ordinary people protected the bishops, priests and deacons at whom the emperor's cruelty was specially aimed at.

When the Christians were finally called to the place of execution, each was allowed to speak. Montanus, who was tall and strong, spoke bravely to the entire Christian crowd. He told them to be true to Jesus and to die rather than give up the faith.

Lucius, who was small and in poor health, walked quietly to the place where he was to die. He was weak from the hard months in prison. In fact, he had to lean on two friends who helped him to the place where the executioner waited. The people who watched asked him to remember them when he went to heaven.

As each of the Christians were beheaded one after another, the Christians who watched became braver and stronger. They wept for those who suffered such injustice. But they were also filled with joy when they realized that these martyrs would bless them from heaven.

Montanus, Lucius and their companions willingly died for their faith in Jesus in 259

33 posted on 02/24/2013 5:32:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, February 24

Liturgical Color: Violet


Pope John XXIII approved the Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ on this day in 1960. St. Gaspar Bufalo began devotion to Jesus in His Most Precious Blood in 1808, when he co-founded the Confraternity of the Precious Blood.


34 posted on 02/24/2013 6:04:07 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: February 24, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: O God, who have commanded us to listen to your beloved Son, be pleased, we pray, to nourish us inwardly by your word, that, with spiritual sight made pure, we may rejoice to behold your glory. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Lent: February 24th

Second Sunday of Lent

Old Calendar: Second Sunday of Lent

Between Moses and Elias Jesus shows forth His divine glory, thus foreshadowing His resurrection. He is the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end of all things. Today's Mass places before us the transfigured Lord and the model toward Whom we must tend, and our own transfiguration as the goal we must attain. We attain this goal by a profound realization of our sinfulness and need of a Redeemer; by preserving purity of body and soul; by combatting our passions and carnal instincts and observing the commandments and most importantly by participating in the Mass. — Excerpted from Cathedral Daily Missal

Stational Church


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the book of Genesis 15:5-12; 17-18. God made a Covenant or pact with Abram in which he promised to make Abram the father of a great race to which he would give the land of Canaan as their territory. The faith of Abram is praised because he believed God's promise, I.e. that he would have descendants even though his wife Sarah was barren.

The second reading is from the letter of St. Paul to the Philippians 3:17; 4:1. In the preceding verses St. Paul has been telling his converts that he has given up all earthly things for the sake of the Christian faith and promise. He admits he is far from perfect but he continues to press forward on the road to heaven.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 9:28-36. It was out of the abundance of his divine love that God gave a glimpse of the future glory of Christ in his risen humanity to the three disciples on that memorable occasion. And with Christ he showed two others of his faithful servants also in glory. He understood the human weakness of the disciples, and foresaw the shock to their faith which the sad scenes of the passion and crucifixion of their beloved Master would be some weeks later. So, to strengthen and forearm them for that sad trial, he gave them a glimpse of the future glory which was to be theirs, too. if they persevered.

It is for this same reason that this all-important event in the life of Christ and of his Apostles has been preserved for us in the Gospels and is put before us today.

Like the Apostles, we. too, believe firmly in God. We. too, are convinced that Christ was sent by God to bring us to heaven. We now have much more convincing proof that Christ was not only the Messiah, an envoy of God, but the very Son of God—something the Apostles did not then understand. But we are still very like them in our human weakness, and in our half-hearted acceptance of God's purpose for and promises to us.

The Apostles had to face the awful test to their faith and trust in God, which the passion and crucifixion of Christ was for them. We now accept with gratitude and realize that Christ "had to suffer and thus enter into his glory." We even understand that the very purpose of Christ's passion was that, in spite of our mortality and weakness, we also might enter into eternal glory through his suffering, on condition that we remain true to our faith.

In our moments of cool, calm reasoning we can see clearly how good God has been to us, how wonderful his love which has arranged for us an eternity of happiness, the perfect fulfillment of every rational human desire. We can also see how little God asks of us during our few short years here, in return for the everlasting happy home he has prepared for us.

But unfortunately we have many moments in life in which cool, calm reasoning does not prevail. We have moments when our vices and not our virtues take charge, moments when we are prepared to sell our eternal heritage in exchange for a mess of earthly pottage. Some of us may already have bartered our heavenly home for some temporal gain or pleasure—but while there is life there is hope. We can still put things right with God.

"Lord, it is good for us to be here"; it is wonderful to be adopted sons of God on the road back to our Father. It is wonderful to be assured that in death this body of ours with its pains and aches, its attraction to earthly things and worse still its propensity to sin, will give place to a glorified body. This glorified body will be free from all pain and corruption and will possess all the human spiritual gifts of intelligence and will to so much greater a degree as will enable us to appreciate and enjoy the eternal happiness in store for us.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


The Station at Rome is in the church of St. Mary in Dominica, on Monte Celio. Tradition tells us that in this basilica was the diaconicum of which St. Lawrence had charge, and from which he distributed to the poor the alms of the Church.


35 posted on 02/24/2013 6:10:04 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Philippians 3:17–4:1

2nd Sunday of Lent

My joy and crown … stand firm in the Lord. (Philippians 4:1)

Not only was St. Paul passionate about his faith, he was also highly educated. He was well versed in the Hebrew Scriptures as well as in Jewish and Roman law. He was fluent in multiple languages and was an accomplished debater as well. But in spite of all these achievements, Paul considered the people he served to be his true “crown.” Every person, whether educated or uneducated, rich or poor, Jew or Greek, held a special place in his heart. In today’s second reading, as he encourages his friends in Philippi to stand firm, Paul can’t help but tell them how deeply he treasures them.

If these people were jewels in Paul’s crown, how much more are we all jewels in Jesus’ crown! Each one of us, regardless of our achievements, skills, history, or social status, is a precious treasure to the Lord. He considers each of us—yes, even you—worth his time and his energy. You are so valuable to him, in fact, that he became a man and willingly shed his own blood in order to win you back to his Father.

The thought that we are so valuable to Jesus can help us to stand firm—just as the Philippians stood firm. Knowing that the Lord of all creation considers us so important can strengthen us in the battle against temptation. It can reveal to us the great dignity that we have in Christ. It can convince us that we don’t have to settle for a lesser experience of God’s love and grace. If Jesus considers each of us worth dying for, surely we can consider him worth living for!

At Mass today, we will hear the story of Jesus’ transfiguration. As you do, picture yourself on that mountain with Jesus. Tell yourself that he went through the cross so that you could be transfigured with him in heaven. You are of infinite value to the Lord. You certainly can stand firm because of his love for you!

“Lord Jesus, show me how precious I am to you.”

Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18

Philippians 3:17–4:1
 
Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. Lent is not an isolated personal affair. As we begin this Second Sunday in Lent, we are reminded in the first reading that beginning with Abraham we belong to a great people to whom God has given a promise and a covenant. Your family and your parish are part of the people of God. What steps are you taking this Lent to help your family and your parish prepare for the Easter celebration?

2. The Responsorial Psalm is a prayer in which the Psalmist asks God not to hide his face from him—so that he may seek his presence. What does the Psalmist say is the benefit of such seeking? What practical steps can you take this Lent to spend more time seeking God’s presence in prayer?

3. In the second reading, St. Paul, who so loved the Christian community that he called it his “joy and crown,” reminds us that our true “citizenship is in heaven.” What do you think St. Paul meant by this statement? What approach can you take this Lent (e.g., almsgiving and fasting) that will provide evidence of where your true citizenship resides?

4. In the Gospel, both the law and the prophets (Moses and Elijah), as well as the very voice of the Father himself, bear witness to Jesus. The Holy Father, in his teachings and his writings, repeatedly asks us to be a witness to others for Jesus. What are some obstacles in your life in bearing witness to Jesus? What are some ways you can overcome them?

5. In the meditation, we are reminded that Jesus “went through the cross so that we could be transfigured with him in heaven.” Do you consider this future reality as you read the story of Jesus’ Transfiguration? Does your experience at Mass, in prayer, or while reading Scripture, reflect the promise that you can hear from heaven and be transformed by what you hear and experience? How can you strengthen this reality in your life?

6. Has there ever been a time when you believe you heard God “speak” to you. What was the impact on your life?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask for the grace to more deeply understand and experience the truth of who you are in Christ. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.


36 posted on 02/24/2013 6:14:21 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

GOD WILL REVEAL HIMSELF TO US

(A biblical reflection on the 2nd Sunday of Lent, Year C – 24 February 2013)

Gospel Reading: Luke 9:28-36 

First Reading: Gen 15:5-121,17-18; Psalms: Ps 27:1,7-9,13-14; Second Reading: Phil 3:17-4:1 (Phil 3:20-4:1)

The Scripture Text

TRANSFIGURASI - 12

Now about eight days after these saying He took with Him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray. And as He as praying, the appearance of His countenance was altered, and His raiment became dazzling white. And behold, two men talked with Him, Moses and Elijah, who appeared in glory and spoke of His departure, which He was to accomplish at Jerusalem. Now Peter and those who were with Him were heavy with sleep but kept awake, and they saw His glory and the two men who stood with Him. And as the  men were parting from Him, Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is well that we are here; let us make three booths, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah – not knowing what he said. As he said this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were afraid as they entered the cloud. And a voice came out of the cloud, saying, “This is My Son, My Chosen; listen to Him!” And when the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. And they kept silence and told no one in those days anything of what they had seen. (Lk 9:28-36 RSV) 

The revelation of Jesus that the three disciples experienced at the transfiguration can give us a glimpse of what can ultimately happen in our own prayer lives. God wants to reveal His glory and His love to us as well. Many of us might wonder how we could have such an experience with God. We may or may not see grand visions of heaven, but we can be sure that as we pray and ponder His word, God will reveal Himself.

Prayer need not be a complicated activity, filled with the right words and feelings. God just wants us to speak to Him from our hearts and listen for His reply. It is important that our prayer be consistent. A good way to ensure this is to set aside some time – ten or fifteen minutes every day – to meet the Lord. It is also very helpful to choose a place free from distractions and a time when we are alert and sensitive to God’s voice.

Begin by inviting the Holy Spirit to come and help you pray. Recall and proclaim in faith the truth that God loves you and that He wants to speak to you. Ask the Holy Spirit to help you repent of any sin that might be hindering your relationship with Him. Then, with your conscience freed up by the mercy of God, praise the Lord and thank Him for His mercy, forgiveness, and abundant blessings.

The disciples had been following Jesus for quite a while before the transfiguration. Similarly, we must remember that a deep and meaningful prayer life may not happen overnight. If we begin with small steps, we will see our lives change as God reveals Himself to us more and more. May we all come to experience the glory of Jesus as fully as Peter and the others did! Nothing can compare to such a revelation.

Short Prayer: Holy Spirit, apart from You we cannot do anything. We ask You to teach us to pray. Show us Jesus in all His glory so that our hearts would burn with love for Him. Amen.


37 posted on 02/24/2013 7:08:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

LENT IS OUR TRANSFIGURATION TIME

 (A biblical reflection on the 2nd Sunday of Lent, Year C – 24 February 2013)

First Reading: Gen 15:5-121,17-18; Psalms: Ps 27:1,7-9,13-14; Second Reading: Phil 3:17-4:1 (Phil 3:20-4:1); Gospel Reading: Lk 9:28-36 

TRANSFIGURASI - 7

Rising abruptly from the cultivated plains of northern Israel is the famed Mount Tabor – Galilee’s most picturesque mountain. This majestic, tree-covered elevation is six miles east of Nazareth. Honored in Jewish history as the site of a decisive victory over the Canaanites, it is hallowed by Christians as the sacred scene of the transfiguration of Jesus.

Atop this 1600 foot mountain, tradition says the three privileged apostles witnessed an astonishing change in the appearance of their Master. Bathed in glorious light, Jesus accepted approval from the Father as His “Beloved Son.” He also received support from two of the most outstanding names in Hebrew history – Moses and Elijah. The Lord’s radiant splendor, previously disguised, here stood revealed.

It was a sneak preview of the Resurrection and was the closest glimpse of heaven that Peter, James and John had ever seen. Mesmerized by all of this, Peter expressed a strong desire to remain. Speaking in behalf of the other two apostles, he offered to pitch tents for Jesus, Moses and Elijah. He, James and John would be content to sleep in the open, if only they could stay.

Gradually the two Old Testament celebrities faded into the thin mountain air, as did the emphatic request of Peter. Sufficient would be the memory, since it was not God’s plan for the Redeemer and His apostles to settle on the mountain, basking in carefree glory.

“This is My beloved Son,” had been proclaimed at Jesus’ baptism, and now again these words were repeated with the Father’s additional advice, “hear Him.” This even moved Jesus to begin speaking openly of His coming death and Resurrection. He said, “Tell the vision to no one until the Son of Man has risen from the dead.”

There’s goodness and glory in all of us – often unseen and unappreciated by others and even by ourselves. God sees more than meets the human eye and it’s His grace that makes us truly beautiful. It’s good to remember that, especially in hard times. Jesus must have recalled Mount Tabor when He climbed His next mount – Calvary. The memory helped Him to know that the Father had not forsaken Him.

Lent is our transfiguration time, to be achieved through reconciliation, the Eucharist, good works and prayers. During this season of reform, we are encouraged to deepen our internal attractiveness. There’s hidden beauty in all, but especially in those souls approved by God. They are gradually being transfigured into everlasting glory.

Note: Taken from Fr. James McKarns, GO TELL EVERYONE, Makati, Philippines: ST. PAUL PUBLICATIONS, 1985, pages 206-207.


38 posted on 02/24/2013 7:10:58 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for February 24, 2013:

Today’s Gospel is the account of the Transfiguration. Just as Jesus’s body was “glorified,” marriage can be an experience of miraculous ecstasy – not all the time, but at special moments. It is a grace that carries us through the mundane times. Share a time of ecstasy.


39 posted on 02/24/2013 7:26:54 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Scripture Study

Second Sunday of Lent – Cycle C

Opening prayer

Genesis 15:5-12,17-18 (Ps 27:1,7-9,13-14) Philippians 3:20—4:1 Luke 9:28b-36

Overview of the Gospel:

In this Sunday’s Gospel Jesus, having just made his first prediction of his Passion (Luke 9:22),

takes three of his Apostles (Peter, John, and James) up to Mt. Tabor to pray. Jesus often

prays at momentous times in his life (see Luke 6:12; 9:18; 11:1; 22:41; 23:46), and these

same three Apostles are often present at crucial times (see Luke 5:37; 14:33).

During Jesus’ prayer, he is transfigured so that his divine glory (usually veiled by his human

flesh) is revealed, in a limited way, to these three Apostles. Their experience recalls the

experience of Israel at another mountain (Sinai) where in a similar way God’s glory was seen

and his voice heard (see Exodus 20:18-21 and Deuteronomy 5:24).

The presence of Moses and Elijah represent, respectively, the Jewish Law and Prophets

whose voices Israel had always been urged to heed. Jesus, who is the fulfillment of the Law

and the Prophets, is God’s chosen Son; God’s voice tells us to “listen to him” (verses 35-36).

Questions:

In the First Reading, why was Abram (later renamed Abraham by God) doubtful of God’s

promises? Ultimately, upon what did Abram place his trust that God would fulfill the promises

that he had made to make of Abram a great nation with innumerable descendents?

Why would Jesus take these three disciples to witness this event? How is this related to: (a)

Peter’s confession (verses 18-20)? (b) Jesus’ prophecy (verse 22)? (c) The preceding saying

(verse 27)? (d) The radiant face of Moses (Exodus 34:29-30)?

Why is this event misunderstood by Peter (verse 33)? Underscored by God (verses 34-35)?

When have you experienced God in an unusual manner? What happened?

When it comes to listening to Jesus, how hard of hearing are you?

What do you do to obey the command of the Father to obey his Son?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 554-56, 697, 2600

Closing prayer

The saints are like the stars. In his providence Christ conceals them in a hidden place that they may

not shine before others when they might wish to do so. Yet they are always ready to exchange the

quiet of contemplation for the works of mercy as soon as they perceive in their heart the invitation of

Christ. -St. Anthony of Padua

Remember to read and meditate on the daily Mass readings!

Sunday Scripture Study for Catholics

www.sundayscripturestudy.com

 


40 posted on 02/24/2013 7:36:27 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Transfiguration and Suffering
Pastor’s Column
2nd Sunday of Lent
February 24, 2013
 
“Peter said to Jesus, ‘Master, it is good that we are here.
Let us build three tents: one for you; one for Moses; one for Elijah.”
                                                                                      (from Luke 9:28-36)
 
          No pilgrimage to the Holy Land is complete without a visit to Mount Tabor, only about 6 miles from Nazareth in Galilee. The mountain rises about 2000 feet above the plain, with a commanding view. We pilgrims had the choice of walking up (like the disciples and Jesus did) or taking the easy way out and using the tour bus (an option Jesus didn’t have!). I decided to take the bus to have more time to explore the church on top. Those walking up, however, got more than they bargained for: a sudden, unseasonable torrential downpour left them absolutely soaked when they arrived on top! Though we who took the bus missed the “suffering” of walking to the top, the others had a more memorable experience.
 
          When Peter, James and John were at Mt. Tabor 2000 years ago, they encountered a vision of heaven on earth and, naturally, they did not want to leave (who would?). Peter wanted to set up tents for everyone and move in permanently! But Jesus had led the disciples to this mountaintop experience for a reason. He wanted them to see the future, to see the goal, to see Christ in glory, because what was coming was incredible suffering, so much so that all of them would be tempted to lose faith in Christ entirely.
 
          Glory and triumph come after suffering. More specifically, any disciple of Christ’s will be asked to carry his or her share of the cross before being given their own personal transfiguration. The two go together in the gospel like bread and butter. Of course, most of us are looking for a shortcut to this process! Our time on earth, like Christ’s is not a pleasure cruise (occasionally these don’t turn out too well either), but a time of journey, battle, suffering, growth, sacrifice for others and, ultimately, transfiguration.
 
          I am reminded of a saying that has proven useful on many occasions: love is what you have been through with someone. What kind of friend, spouse, relative or follower of Christ would we be if we were only willing to share glory, happiness, and a care-free existence with the other person? Instead, we prove our love as servants of God, as Saint Paul says in his 2nd letter to the Corinthians “by great fortitude in times of suffering: in times of hardship and distress.” (2 Cor. 6:4-5). To have suffered with someone we love or for someone we love (and this is always for Christ), is to have shared something with them that will last forever. This is what Christ is offering us.
                                                                            
                                                                                      Father Gary

41 posted on 02/24/2013 7:45:10 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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St. Paul Center Blog

The Glory in Sight: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 2nd Sunday of Lent

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 02.22.13 |


Transfiguration 3

Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18
Psalm 27:1,7-9, 13-14
Philippians 3:17-4:1
Luke 9:28-36

In today’s Gospel, we go up to the mountain with Peter, John and James. There we see Jesus “transfigured,” speaking with Moses and Elijah about His “exodus.”

The Greek word “exodus” means “departure.” But the word is chosen deliberately here to stir our remembrance of the Israelites’ flight from Egypt.

By His death and resurrection, Jesus will lead a new Exodus - liberating not only Israel but every race and people; not from bondage to Pharaoh, but from slavery to sin and death. He will lead all mankind, not to the territory promised to Abraham in today’s First Reading, but to the heavenly commonwealth that Paul describes in today’s Epistle.

Moses, the giver of God’s law, and the great prophet Elijah, were the only Old Testament figures to hear the voice and see the glory of God atop a mountain (see Exodus 24:15-18; 1 Kings 19:8-18).

Today’s scene closely resembles God’s revelation to Moses, who also brought along three companions and whose face also shone brilliantly (see Exodus 24:1; 34:29). But when the divine cloud departs in today’s Gospel, Moses and Elijah are gone. Only Jesus remains. He has revealed the glory of the Trinity - the voice of the Father, the glorified Son, and the Spirit in the shining cloud.

Jesus fulfills all that Moses and the prophets had come to teach and show us about God (see Luke 24:27). He is the “chosen One” promised by Isaiah (see Isaiah 42:1; Luke 23:35), the “prophet like me” that Moses had promised (see Deuteronomy 18:15; Acts 3:22-23; 7:37). Far and above that, He is the Son of God (see Psalm 2:7; Luke 3:21-23).

“Listen to Him,“the Voice tells us from the cloud. If, like Abraham, we put our faith in His words, one day we too will be delivered into “the land of the living” that we sing of in today’s Psalm. We will share in His resurrection, as Paul promises, our lowly bodies glorified like His.


42 posted on 02/24/2013 7:56:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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2nd Sunday of Lent: "Listen to Him"

 

(Carl Bloch)
 
This is my chosen Son; listen to him. (Lk 9: 35)


Sunday Scriptures:  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/022413.cfm
 
Gen 15: 5-12,17-18
Ph 3: 17-4:1
Lk 9: 28b – 36

Sometime, our daily prayer can seem rather tedious, routine, repetitive, or done by habit.  How long, for example, does it take you to pray the Rosary or to recite the Our Father or grace before meals? It sounds like a race for the finish rather than a call to meditate on the mysteries of our Lord or pray in a meaningful way.  Some Catholics are notorious time keepers during the Mass - ready, set, go, goodbye - all before the closing prayer, announcements, final blessing and song.  That's our "eat and run" crowd.  (Sorry to be sarcastic but allow me to reveal a little pastor frustration).
However, now and then many can admit that while reading a scripture passage, receiving Our Lord in the Eucharist at Mass, during a slow meditative recitation of the Rosary, or a thought that inspires us and seems to come from outside ourselves, we see the mysterious grace of God at work.  Such moments confirm our faith and keep us going in the more mundane times when God invites us to simply sit with him.
Some have had more mysterious encounters: a claim to have seen an angel or sensed an inner voice or may have woken from a dream in the middle of the night that seemed to be a spiritual message. Yet, many of us may keep these things to ourselves thinking that, “If I tell someone they will think I’m crazy or just have a wild imagination.” 
In the end, we may also wonder if such things were just our imagination or God speaking to us in some way.  Such spiritual encounters must be tested, of course, to be verified but these experiences are certainly not beyond the power of God.  Quite frankly, I think many folks have such divine meetings more often than we realize. 
This Sunday’s Gospel passage from Luke 9: 28 -36 may have been such an experience for the three chosen disciples of Jesus: Peter, John and James.  As they traversed down the mountain with Jesus they may have wondered if they indeed saw what they saw and heard who they heard.  “Was it just a dream?”  After all Luke tells us that, “Peter and his companions had been overcome by sleep, but becoming fully awake . . .”
The transfiguration of Jesus with his appearance of the long dead prophet Elijah and the great leader of the Hebrews, Moses, may have caused them to wonder. In addition, they had never seen Jesus so dazzling with light. Yet, Luke makes the point of saying that they had, “become fully awake.”  Nonetheless, such an incredible vision may have ranked in the, “Did that really happen?” category. If so, what does it mean?
Such human questions may have crossed their minds but it is clear this moment was transforming. Yet, they likely did not realize the full implications of what they saw.  It would take the dark days of Jesus’ passion and death to be followed by the glorious resurrection to put all things in perspective. 
In a sense we may see this revelation of Jesus in glory as a kind of Kodak moment.  Hold on to this.  Keep it before you for the future will be trying.  The cross may shake your faith but this experience will be your hope. There is something more beyond the cross yet to be revealed. As we look in a month’s time to Holy Week it makes sense for us to hold on to this vision as well. Here the Father’s voice was heard: “Listen to him.” For the three disciples and for us to listen to the Lord must be the focus of our life. The Father’s voice also spoke long before the coming of Jesus.
Our first reading from Genesis relates the profound promise that God made to Abram – our father in faith: “Look up at the sky and count the stars, if you can. Just so shall your descendants be . . .” (Gen 15: 5 ff). Such a cosmic vision of future family connections may have been more than Abram could comprehend at the moment but indeed it has been played out over the centuries since.  Many before, many today and many in the future will come to know the one true God and his Son, Jesus Christ.  God binds us together with him in a covenant of love.  Though it is a bond of unequal partnership (we are not God) his overwhelming promise has been fulfilled in the incarnation and the work of the Holy Spirit since.   
So on the mountaintop, Peter, James and John, envisioned the fulfillment of that promise.  The law given through Moses and the Prophets who foretold of the future coming of a savior is now fulfilled in Jesus.  On a merely human level, such a profound truth, accompanied with this extraordinary mystical vision before them, was good enough reason to see the reaction of the disciples: “They fell silent and did not at that time tell anyone what they had seen.” (Lk 9: 36).  The future will explain everything.
When is the last time you felt struck with awe to the point of silence?  Were you ever confronted with something so puzzling that you simply had nothing to say at the moment? Truth be told, every time we attend the celebration of holy Mass, we see a miracle before our eyes.  It is not for no reason that the Church refers to the Eucharist as the “source and summit of our Christian life.” (Catholic Catechism 1324).
Every sacrament is an encounter with the risen Christ.  Hidden behind bread, wine, water, oil, fire, hands of the priest imposed, and ritual is the action of divine grace washing sin away, anointing us with the Holy Spirit, and feeding our souls with the bread of angels who is Christ himself.  Such theology, like Abram and the disciples on the mountaintop may elude us in its fullness but invites us to explore its meaning more deeply.  
These remaining weeks of Lent can be just a perfect time to do so. The beauty of ritual is that it can connect us to the divine but the downside is that it can become routine. While every Mass is not the same (prayers, theme, colors, readings, music all change), for example, we need to remind ourselves that in its familiar structure great mystery resides. Christ is always present in word and sacrament.  How I receive him, am open to that presence and seek to be changed by it is up to me.  As the saying goes, “I pray not to change God but to be changed by him.”
I think it good that we all take some time this Lent to ponder the meaning of our faith.  In this Year of Faith we already have a reason to do so.  Maybe even be bold enough to ask the Lord to reveal himself more deeply to you.  You never know when that mountaintop experience may come but we must all remember that it is in the valley below where our mission is carried out in Jesus name.
Let us open our eyes to the light that comes from God,
and our ears to the voice from heaven that everyday calls out this charge:
If you hear his voice today, do not harden your hearts. (Ps 95: 8)

The Rule of Benedict
Fr. Tim

43 posted on 02/24/2013 8:04:40 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Insight Scoop

From Temptation to Transfiguration

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, February 24, 2013, the Second Sunday of Lent | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Gn 15:5-12, 17-18
• Ps 27:1, 7-8, 8-9, 13-14
• Phil 3:17—4:1
• Lk 9:28b-36

What a difference a week makes! From temptation in the desert to Transfiguration on the mount; from supernatural battle with Satan to supernatural glory before the disciples. It is a striking contrast between the respective Gospel readings for last Sunday and today. But while the temptation in the desert is obviously Lenten—in fact, it is the inspiration and foundation of this season—why is the Transfiguration a part of the Sunday readings during Lent?

Of course, the actual time between the temptation in the desert, which preceded Jesus’ public ministry, and the stunning event on the mountain was about two years or so. But just a week prior to the Transfiguration, Jesus had asked the disciples, “Who do the multitudes say I am?” (Lk. 9:18). After Peter, the head apostle, made his famous declaration, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matt. 16:16; Lk. 9:20), Jesus began to tell them that he would soon suffer many things, be rejected by the rulers, killed, and then “raised up on the third day” (Lk. 9:22). In Matthew’s account, the intrepid Peter, stunned by this revelation, rebuked Jesus, only to be rebuked, in turn, in no uncertain terms: “Get behind me, Satan!” (Matt. 16:23).

In sum, in the days leading up the Transfiguration, Jesus had directly confronted and demolished any false notions the disciples might have had about the nature of his mission. He strongly expressed the unwavering commitment he had to offering himself as a sacrifice for the world. His kingdom was not of this world, and he was not a political leader or a military warrior; he was not promising comfort and wealth. On the contrary, Jesus was promising a cross: “If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me” (Lk. 9:23). 

We can only try to imagine how disorienting and confusing this had to be for the disciples. Suffering, rejection, and rapidly approaching death were not parts of their plan! In the midst of this confusion and anxiety, Jesus took Peter, John, and James, the inner circle of the disciples, up to the mountain to pray, ascending, as it were, toward the heavenly places. There, above the tumult of the world and an ominous future, Jesus revealed his glory and gave them a dazzling glimpse of their eternal calling.

But the glory witnessed by the three apostles was not just about the future. “The Transfiguration,” notes Erasmo Leiva-Merikakis in Fire of Mercy, Heart of the World (Ignatius Press, 2003), “is the experience of the fullness of divine Presence, action, communication, and glory now, in our very midst, in this world of passingness and disappointment.” It is about the fullness of life now—not ordinary, natural life, but extraordinary, supernatural life. The Transfiguration is about the gift of divine sonship, which comes from the Father, who says of Jesus, “This is my chosen Son; listen to him.”

St. Thomas Aquinas, in considering whether it was fitting that Jesus should be transfigured, observed that since Jesus exhorted his disciples to follow the path of His sufferings, it was right for them to see his glory, to taste for a moment such eternal splendor so they might persevere. He wrote, in the third part of the Summa, “The adoption of the sons of God is through a certain conformity of image to the natural Son of God. Now this takes place in two ways: first, by the grace of the wayfarer, which is imperfect conformity; secondly, by glory, which is perfect conformity…”

Peter and the disciples had to learn that Jesus’ death was necessary so his life could be fully revealed and given to the world. “On Tabor, light pours forth from him,” writes Leiva-Merikakis, “on Calvary it will be blood.” A week ago we entered into the desert of Lent; today we get a glimpse of the glory given to every son and daughter of God—glory conforming us to the Son.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the February 28, 2010, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


44 posted on 02/24/2013 8:15:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
"The Transfiguration: Gospel to the Dead" by Frank Sheed
The Image of Man Has Been Raised Up: On the Feast of the Ascension of the Lord
The Feast of the Transfiguration (and the 34th anniversary of Paul VI's death)

45 posted on 02/24/2013 8:16:10 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Vultus Christi

Dominus Illuminatio Mea

 on February 24, 2013 8:09 AM |
 
faceglory.jpg

A Mass of the Transfiguration

It is a curious fact of liturgical history that originally this Second Sunday of Lent had no Mass of its own. The Roman clergy and people were tired from the long night vigil that began on the evening of Ember Saturday and ended at dawn with the Holy Sacrifice. Only when the solemn night vigil was pushed back to Saturday morning did it become necessary to put together a separate Mass for Sunday morning. But what a Mass it is! From beginning to end today’s Mass bathes in the radiant light of the transfigured Christ.

Introit

The Introit is, in many places, the same one sung on August 6th, the summer festival of the Transfiguration: “Of you my heart has spoken: 'Seek His Face.’ It is your Face, O Lord, that I seek; hide not your Face from me” (Ps 26:8-9). The Church sings of what she holds deep in her heart: the desire to gaze upon the Face of Christ. The melody itself rises and lingers over the words vultum tuum, your Face. The Introit ends in a plea, at once humble and confident: “Turn not away your Face from me” (Ps 26:9).

The Way

The Church, in every age and in all her children, is called to fulfill the command addressed to Abram: “Go forth out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and out of thy father’s house, and come into the land which I shall shew thee” (Gen 12:1). The Church knows that so long as the Face of her Lord shines before her she can follow Him even along the way of the cross. He who says, “I am the way” (Jn 14:6), was lifted up on the cross, becoming the signpost pointing to “what no eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor the heart of man conceived, what God has prepared for those who love Him” (1 Cor 2:9). Relentlessly God calls us out of what is familiar, out of our routines (even our pious ones) into the uncharted vastness of faith, “into the land that He will show us” (Gen 12:1).

Seeing Only Jesus

In the Church’s choice of today’s Introit there is a very practical teaching for our own Lenten journey. We are to focus not on our sins, nor on our weaknesses, nor on the roughness of the path beneath our feet, but on the Face of Christ. The Introit wonderfully anticipates the words of Saint Matthew in the gospel: “And they lifting up their eyes saw no one but only Jesus” (Mt 17:8).

Psalm 26

The psalm that accompanies the Introit describes the fear of one threatened by attackers on all sides. Psalm 26 is the prayer of one thrust into the fray of spiritual combat. And yet, it teaches us to say, even in the midst of the battle: “The Lord is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear? The Lord is the protector of my life: of whom shall I be afraid” (Ps 26:1). Again, note the link between the introit and the gospel. “And Jesus came and touched them: and said to them, 'Arise and fear not’” (Mt 17:7). Looking into the eyes of her Saviour, the Church says in the words of the psalmist, “Of whom shall I be afraid?” (Ps 26:1).

Ad Gloriam

This Sunday of the Transfiguration follows the Sunday of the Temptation. This too is full of meaning and of practical teaching for us. Saint Paul addresses Timothy with a stern realism: “Bear your share of hardship for the gospel with the strength that comes from God” (2 Tim 1:8). The beginning of the way of the cross is beset with hardship, with temptations. Holy Father Benedict knew this well. He speaks of all the things that are hard and repugnant in the way to God” (RB 8:8). The return to God is through “the toil of obedience” (RB Pro: 2), the hard listening that changes life. There is no return to God apart from the way of the cross, and there is no other way to glory. The ultimate tragedy is our refusal to follow Christ ad gloriam, to glory (RB Pro: 7).

Eyes Fixed on the Face of Christ

Dame Aemiliana Löhr says that “the essence of temptation is the desire to make short-cuts in the way, to come of one’s own power to glory, and to despise the appointed hours; to go round the cross.” “Man’s part,” she says, “is only to go his way, to be patient, to suffer, and to wait. The final glory is God’s to give at the hour which He alone knows” (The Mass Through the Year, Volume I, p. 171). Today’s liturgy says, “Go your way, but with your eyes fixed on the Face of Christ. Be patient, suffer, and wait, seeking at every moment and in all things His Face.”

Collect

The Collect reminds us that without the sustenance of God’s word we will suffer spiritual malnutrition, grow weak, and falter. This is why the Church has us pray: O God, who commanded us to listen to your Son, the Beloved, deign to feed us inwardly by your word.” The soul who, engaged in spiritual combat, slacks off in the practice of lectio divina or allows herself to become indifferent to it, will become spiritually anemic. The soul “inwardly fed by the Word of God” will enjoy a growing clarity of vision. Seeing more clearly, she will be able to follow Christ more closely. Strengthened inwardly, she will be able to walk more securely, until, as the Collect says, “with the eyes of the heart made pure,” she rejoices at the sight of the glory of God.

Offertory Antiphon

Today, the Offertory Antiphon is the voice of the Church reflecting on everything spoken to her in the Liturgy of the Word. The command of the Father speaking out of the bright cloud calls for a response. “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased: listen to Him” (Mt 17:5). While the bread and wine are made ready she takes a moment to ponder what has been said to her, and she makes a resolution. What does she resolve to do? “I will meditate on your commands which I love exceedingly; with arms flung wide I will stretch toward your commandments for I love them” (Ps 118:47-48). The antiphon is taken from Psalm 118 wherein every reference to the commandments, the law, the statutes of God become, for the Church, a reference to Christ, the beloved Son. The Church resolves today to “set nothing before the love of Christ” (RB 4:21). She addresses the Father who spoke to her in the Gospel, and moved by the Spirit, makes this bold resolution. The melody itself is full of energy and tenderness. “I will meditate on your Christ whom I love exceedingly; with arms flung wide I will stretch toward Christ for I love Him.” It is this prayer that readies us for the Holy Sacrifice.

Shines Like the Sun

We cannot step into the sacrosanct core of the Mass without encountering the love of Christ, without coming face to face with “the love of God which, being perfect, drives out all fear” (RB Pro: 67). Every fear, every terror “melts like wax before Him” (cf. Ps 67:3) whose “Face shines like the sun” (Mt 17:2). Exposure to the brightness of the Eucharist, -- a brightness veiled beneath the appearances of bread and wine -- is exposure to the love of Christ and to the radiance of His Face.

And Night Shall Be No More

After Holy Communion, made aware of this we will pray to the Father, saying that, “while we are yet on earth He gives us to partake of things of heaven.” What are these things? The book of the Apocalypse tells us what they are: “And they shall see His Face: and His name shall be on their foreheads. And night shall be no more and they shall not need the light of the lamp, nor the light of the sun, because the Lord God shall enlighten them, and shall reign forever and ever” (Ap 22:4-5).

My Light and My Salvation

With the Face of Christ before us and His light surrounding us we can go forward, even into the dark uncharted territories of faith. “The Lord is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear?” (Ps 26:1).


46 posted on 02/24/2013 8:23:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

Seeing Love in the Darkness

 on February 24, 2013 9:11 AM |
 
Cima_da_Conegliano,_Christ_Crowned_with_Thorns.jpg
The 'very beautiful' of the sixth day--expressed by the creator--is always challenged in this world by evil, suffering, and corruption. It almost seems that evil wants to permanently mar creation, to contradict God and to make His truth and His beauty unrecognisable. In a world that is also so marked by evil, the 'Logos', eternal beauty and eternal 'ars', should appear as the caput cruentatum. The incarnate Son, the incarnate 'Logos' is crowned with a crown of thorns and, nevertheless, just that way, in this suffering figure of the Son of God, we begin to see the most profound beauty of our Creator and Redeemer. In the silence of the 'dark night' we can still hear the Word. Believing is nothing other than, in the darkness of the world, touching the hand of God and thus, in silence, listening to the Word, seeing Love.
Pope Benedict XVI, 23 February 2013

47 posted on 02/24/2013 8:26:13 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, February 24, 2013 >> Second Sunday of Lent
 
Genesis 15:5-12, 17-18
Philippians 3:17—4:1

View Readings
Psalm 27:1, 7-9, 13-14
Luke 9:28-36

 

SLEEPING IT OFF

 
"They appeared in glory and spoke of His passage, which He was about to fulfill in Jerusalem. Peter and those with Him had fallen into a deep sleep." —Luke 9:31-32
 

When Jesus talks about the cross, we tend to doze off, if not physically, then at least spiritually. Did you ever notice what the subject was at the times when you fell asleep in church or fell asleep praying? You may find yourself snoring or at least daydreaming when Jesus brings up the cross of self-denial and self-sacrifice. When Jesus was suffering the agony in the garden of Gethsemani, the three apostles He took with Him had fallen asleep (Lk 22:45). At Jesus' Transfiguration, Moses and Elijah were talking to Jesus about His "passage" from earth to heaven. This "passage" included Jesus' sufferings on the cross. Once again, we find Peter, James, and John in "a deep sleep."

Sleep can be used for rest or for escape. We are tempted to use it for escape, especially when it's time each day to take up our cross and follow Jesus (Lk 9:23). We need a wake-up call. Jesus' Transfiguration was an unsuccessful attempt to wake us up to the cross. However, Pentecost was successful. Filled with the Holy Spirit, the early Church carried the cross.

Beginning this Lent, let's quit sleeping through Jesus' command to share in His agony and suffering. Let's have "com-passion"; let's suffer with Him. "Awake, O sleeper, arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light" (Eph 5:14).

 
Prayer: Father, may I suffer with Jesus and be glorified with Him (Rm 8:17).
Promise: "Take as your guide those who follow the example that we set. Unfortunately, many go about in a way which shows them to be enemies of the cross of Christ." —Phil 3:17-18
Praise: Praise You, risen Jesus. Heaven and earth are full of Your glory!

48 posted on 02/24/2013 8:36:49 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

49 posted on 02/24/2013 8:40:22 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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