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To: hoagy62
The last really long conclave was in 1830-31 (Dec. 14 to Feb. 2), a total of 50 days. In that case the cardinal regarded as most suitable for election was vetoed by the King of Spain, Ferdinand VII, and there was a long stalemate between two other cardinals before a different cardinal was chosen, who became Gregory XVI (1831-1846). It used to be that the kings of Spain and France and the Holy Roman Emperor (later the Austrian Emperor) had a veto power but that was abolished after the 1903 election.

The interval between the election of a new pope and his installation has varied between 3 and 11 days in the years since 1800:

Pius VII--7 days
Leo XII--7 days
Pius VIII--5 days
Gregory XVI--4 days
Pius IX--5 days
Leo XIII--11 days
Pius X--5 days
Benedict XV--3 days
Pius XI--6 days
Pius XII--10 days
John XXIII--7 days
Paul VI--9 days
John Paul I--8 days
John Paul II--7 days
Benedict XVI--5 days

15 posted on 03/09/2013 9:24:38 AM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus

I meant to add that the more recent conclaves (since 1831) have been short, usually 2 or 3 days. So there would seem to be a good chance that the next pope will be announced in time for his installation to take place before March 24 (Palm Sunday, the beginning of Holy Week).


17 posted on 03/09/2013 9:30:04 AM PST by Verginius Rufus
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